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 Post subject: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 1:48 am 
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I thought someone might have started a thread on this by now. Story broke yesterday my time.... there's a vulnerability in Intel chips going back a decade and the patch will result in a performance loss of between 5 and 30% speed. Kind of a big deal with a lot of cloud servers running Intel chips.


https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/0 ... sign_flaw/


Quote:
A fundamental design flaw in Intel's processor chips has forced a significant redesign of the Linux and Windows kernels to defang the chip-level security bug.

Programmers are scrambling to overhaul the open-source Linux kernel's virtual memory system. Meanwhile, Microsoft is expected to publicly introduce the necessary changes to its Windows operating system in an upcoming Patch Tuesday: these changes were seeded to beta testers running fast-ring Windows Insider builds in November and December.

Crucially, these updates to both Linux and Windows will incur a performance hit on Intel products. The effects are still being benchmarked, however we're looking at a ballpark figure of five to 30 per cent slow down, depending on the task and the processor model. More recent Intel chips have features – such as PCID – to reduce the performance hit. Your mileage may vary.
Similar operating systems, such as Apple's 64-bit macOS, will also need to be updated – the flaw is in the Intel x86-64 hardware, and it appears a microcode update can't address it. It has to be fixed in software at the OS level, or go buy a new processor without the design blunder.

Details of the vulnerability within Intel's silicon are under wraps: an embargo on the specifics is due to lift early this month, perhaps in time for Microsoft's Patch Tuesday next week. Indeed, patches for the Linux kernel are available for all to see but comments in the source code have been redacted to obfuscate the issue.

However, some details of the flaw have surfaced, and so this is what we know.

Impact
It is understood the bug is present in modern Intel processors produced in the past decade. It allows normal user programs – from database applications to JavaScript in web browsers – to discern to some extent the layout or contents of protected kernel memory areas.

The fix is to separate the kernel's memory completely from user processes using what's called Kernel Page Table Isolation, or KPTI. At one point, Forcefully Unmap Complete Kernel With Interrupt Trampolines, aka FUCKWIT, was mulled by the Linux kernel team, giving you an idea of how annoying this has been for the developers.

Whenever a running program needs to do anything useful – such as write to a file or open a network connection – it has to temporarily hand control of the processor to the kernel to carry out the job. To make the transition from user mode to kernel mode and back to user mode as fast and efficient as possible, the kernel is present in all processes' virtual memory address spaces, although it is invisible to these programs. When the kernel is needed, the program makes a system call, the processor switches to kernel mode and enters the kernel. When it is done, the CPU is told to switch back to user mode, and reenter the process. While in user mode, the kernel's code and data remains out of sight but present in the process's page tables.

Think of the kernel as God sitting on a cloud, looking down on Earth. It's there, and no normal being can see it, yet they can pray to it.

These KPTI patches move the kernel into a completely separate address space, so it's not just invisible to a running process, it's not even there at all. Really, this shouldn't be needed, but clearly there is a flaw in Intel's silicon that allows kernel access protections to be bypassed in some way.

The downside to this separation is that it is relatively expensive, time wise, to keep switching between two separate address spaces for every system call and for every interrupt from the hardware. These context switches do not happen instantly, and they force the processor to dump cached data and reload information from memory. This increases the kernel's overhead, and slows down the computer.

Your Intel-powered machine will run slower as a result.

How can this security hole be abused?
At best, the vulnerability could be leveraged by malware and hackers to more easily exploit other security bugs.

At worst, the hole could be abused by programs and logged-in users to read the contents of the kernel's memory. Suffice to say, this is not great. The kernel's memory space is hidden from user processes and programs because it may contain all sorts of secrets, such as passwords, login keys, files cached from disk, and so on. Imagine a piece of JavaScript running in a browser, or malicious software running on a shared public cloud server, able to sniff sensitive kernel-protected data.

Specifically, in terms of the best-case scenario, it is possible the bug could be abused to defeat KASLR: kernel address space layout randomization. This is a defense mechanism used by various operating systems to place components of the kernel in randomized locations in virtual memory. This mechanism can thwart attempts to abuse other bugs within the kernel: typically, exploit code – particularly return-oriented programming exploits – relies on reusing computer instructions in known locations in memory.

If you randomize the placing of the kernel's code in memory, exploits can't find the internal gadgets they need to fully compromise a system. The processor flaw could be potentially exploited to figure out where in memory the kernel has positioned its data and code, hence the flurry of software patching.

However, it may be that the vulnerability in Intel's chips is worse than the above mitigation bypass. In an email to the Linux kernel mailing list over Christmas, AMD said it is not affected. The wording of that message, though, rather gives the game away as to what the underlying cockup is:

AMD processors are not subject to the types of attacks that the kernel page table isolation feature protects against. The AMD microarchitecture does not allow memory references, including speculative references, that access higher privileged data when running in a lesser privileged mode when that access would result in a page fault.

A key word here is "speculative." Modern processors, like Intel's, perform speculative execution. In order to keep their internal pipelines primed with instructions to obey, the CPU cores try their best to guess what code is going to be run next, fetch it, and execute it.

It appears, from what AMD software engineer Tom Lendacky was suggesting above, that Intel's CPUs speculatively execute code potentially without performing security checks. It seems it may be possible to craft software in such a way that the processor starts executing an instruction that would normally be blocked – such as reading kernel memory from user mode – and completes that instruction before the privilege level check occurs.

That would allow ring-3-level user code to read ring-0-level kernel data. And that is not good.

The specifics of the vulnerability have yet to be confirmed, but consider this: the changes to Linux and Windows are significant and are being pushed out at high speed. That suggests it's more serious than a KASLR bypass.

Also, the updates to separate kernel and user address spaces on Linux are based on a set of fixes dubbed the KAISER patches, which were created by eggheads at Graz University of Technology in Austria. These boffins discovered [PDF] it was possible to defeat KASLR by extracting memory layout information from the kernel in a side-channel attack on the CPU's virtual memory system. The team proposed splitting kernel and user spaces to prevent this information leak, and their research sparked this round of patching.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 1:53 am 
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Big bank and other financial databases could be very vulnerable, as running 30% slower will eventually lead to a lock up, and no money coming out of ATMs. And adding server capacity takes time and money.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:01 am 
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As said in the Nama thread , the share price has dropped 1% it's a nothing story. If this was significant the share price would have taken an absolute hammering

camroc1 wrote:
Big bank and other financial databases could be very vulnerable, as running 30% slower will eventually lead to a lock up, and no money coming out of ATMs. And adding server capacity takes time and money.

No money coming out of ATM, scaremonger much? :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:04 am 
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No idea what the flaw is, but I do not appear to have been affected over the years.
I see no reason now to do an update to make my laptop slower than it already is.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:31 am 
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Does this mean my PC will no longer run Crysis?


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:46 am 
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Perfect timing as Blue-Sky Thinkers push all their Business' Compute into AWS and AZURE stacks that are all running Intel Procs!


MacPhiles should also be concerned! :D


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:11 am 
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https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/amp.busi ... law-2018-1

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Intel was aware of the chip vulnerability when its CEO sold off $24 million in company stock

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich sold off $24 million worth of stock and options in the company in late November.
The stock sale came after Intel was informed by Google of a significant vulnerability in its chips - a flaw that only became public this week.
Intel says the stock sale was unrelated to the vulnerability, but came as part of a planned divestiture program. But Krzanich put that stock sale plan in place in October - several months after Intel was informed of the vulnerability.


Oh dear. Though, no doubt he will get out of this one.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:02 am 
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camroc1 wrote:
as running 30% slower will eventually lead to a lock up

This doesn't seem to be a concern for all the financial institutions that are buying into the blockchain bubble.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:10 am 
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Doesn't seem to effect everything, but apparently servers are most likely to be heavily effected. Basically they decided to skip security checks for 10 years, and got away with it, now they have to take it into account, unsurprisingly things slow down.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:13 am 
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Leinster in London wrote:
No idea what the flaw is, but I do not appear to have been affected over the years.
I see no reason now to do an update to make my laptop slower than it already is.


The vulnerability is that any malicious software on your system can read all of the system's memory. In theory a process is isolated so it can only read the memory it has allocated. This vulnerability means a hacker could get your internet banking password by reading your browser's memory or similar. It's a really huge deal, as it doesn't need to trick you into giving the process any special privileges or anything.

It's not only Intel, either. There is an Intel specific vulnerability (Meltdown) that can be fixed by updating your operating system (though with the performance costs), but they've also announced another called Spectre that essentially affects all modern processors, and I think requires specific fixes per application - can't be fixed at the OS level. Fortunately it's harder to exploit, but it's a huge deal.

Better explanation here:
https://meltdownattack.com/


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:14 am 
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Seems like a pretty big fudge up. The repetitional damage could could them more in the long run than the cost to fix this, which will surely be in the billions.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:17 am 
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Bit unfair that it's Intel copping all the reputational damage when Spectre affects all modern processors.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:21 am 
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Mahoney wrote:
Bit unfair that it's Intel copping all the reputational damage when Spectre affects all modern processors.


Intel's is far more serious though I believe? And from what I can tell, it's basically because they skipped out on security checks that AMD has in place. For 10 years they've profited from having less security in place, I doubt they're too upset considering how well they've gone in that time.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:21 am 
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Mahoney wrote:
Bit unfair that it's Intel copping all the reputational damage when Spectre affects all modern processors.


That will happen when you dominate the market.

Just like Apple cops the flack for worker conditions in Chinese factories when the same factories also make every other phone under the sun. Intel is a big name and will have to take this on the chin.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:25 am 
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The Intel specific one is both easier to exploit and easier to mitigate; whilst the drop in performance is obviously highly undesirable, at least you can update your operating system and job done, you're safe again. No such simple one shot fix for Spectre, unfortunately; all individual programs you run need to be updated to guard against it. Or buy a new processor once they've fixed it in hardware.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:28 am 
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Mahoney wrote:
The Intel specific one is both easier to exploit and easier to mitigate; whilst the drop in performance is obviously highly undesirable, at least you can update your operating system and job done, you're safe again. No such simple one shot fix for Spectre, unfortunately; all individual programs you run need to be updated to guard against it. Or buy a new processor once they've fixed it in hardware.


So to have a go at all chipmakers for Spectre would seem a little unreasonable no? Intel's one is seemingly specifically because they made a choice not to have the same security checks that companies such as AMD put in (and thus have lower performance).

For 10 years Intel has had a great market share due to superior processors, which are now potentially only superior due to not being as secure as other options, and the software fix has the potentially to ridiculously reduce the processing power (some tests in some software show greater than 30% reductions). A worldwide issue, such as Spectre, is far more easily forgiven, than a company specific one.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:14 pm 
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camroc1 wrote:
Big bank and other financial databases could be very vulnerable, as running 30% slower will eventually lead to a lock up, and no money coming out of ATMs. And adding server capacity takes time and money.


Adding server capacity is a tiny issue, if they haven't got scalability built into their models then they are way behind the times. With the amount of data they are warehousing you can be sure they are on top of it.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:28 pm 
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Raggs wrote:
Mahoney wrote:
The Intel specific one is both easier to exploit and easier to mitigate; whilst the drop in performance is obviously highly undesirable, at least you can update your operating system and job done, you're safe again. No such simple one shot fix for Spectre, unfortunately; all individual programs you run need to be updated to guard against it. Or buy a new processor once they've fixed it in hardware.


So to have a go at all chipmakers for Spectre would seem a little unreasonable no? Intel's one is seemingly specifically because they made a choice not to have the same security checks that companies such as AMD put in (and thus have lower performance).

For 10 years Intel has had a great market share due to superior processors, which are now potentially only superior due to not being as secure as other options, and the software fix has the potentially to ridiculously reduce the processing power (some tests in some software show greater than 30% reductions). A worldwide issue, such as Spectre, is far more easily forgiven, than a company specific one.


Yes, exactly this. Intel's market dominance is based on superior performance which is now wiped out by having to account for this flaw.

It's huge.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:43 pm 
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Image


The Volkswagen of computing ...

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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:49 pm 
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Yourmother wrote:
https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/intel-ceo-krzanich-sold-shares-after-company-was-informed-of-chip-flaw-2018-1

Quote:
Intel was aware of the chip vulnerability when its CEO sold off $24 million in company stock

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich sold off $24 million worth of stock and options in the company in late November.
The stock sale came after Intel was informed by Google of a significant vulnerability in its chips - a flaw that only became public this week.
Intel says the stock sale was unrelated to the vulnerability, but came as part of a planned divestiture program. But Krzanich put that stock sale plan in place in October - several months after Intel was informed of the vulnerability.


Oh dear. Though, no doubt he will get out of this one.

The scary thing is how brazen some of these so-called smart people are.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:52 pm 
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Anyone know what the first Intel CPUs which fix Meltdown & Spectre are, or will be? Any word from AMD as to CPUs that don't suffer from Spectre?

I've been planning on getting a new PC, and it would seem sensible now to wait for hardware that does not suffer from either; or are we talking multiple years?


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 2:53 pm 
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Mahoney wrote:
Anyone know what the first Intel CPUs which fix Meltdown & Spectre are, or will be? Any word from AMD as to CPUs that don't suffer from Spectre?

I've been planning on getting a new PC, and it would seem sensible now to wait for hardware that does not suffer from either; or are we talking multiple years?


Meltdown - you'll need an 8-series, as I understand it.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:01 pm 
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Mahoney wrote:
Anyone know what the first Intel CPUs which fix Meltdown & Spectre are, or will be? Any word from AMD as to CPUs that don't suffer from Spectre?

I've been planning on getting a new PC, and it would seem sensible now to wait for hardware that does not suffer from either; or are we talking multiple years?


On the Intel front, I suspect that a genuine design fix is a year or two away at least; it will require an architecture change.

For AMD and Spectre, it's actually not currently clear that they really are at risk yet. They way they implement x86 is different to Intel


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:07 pm 
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Uncle Fester wrote:
Yourmother wrote:
https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/intel-ceo-krzanich-sold-shares-after-company-was-informed-of-chip-flaw-2018-1

Quote:
Intel was aware of the chip vulnerability when its CEO sold off $24 million in company stock

Intel CEO Brian Krzanich sold off $24 million worth of stock and options in the company in late November.
The stock sale came after Intel was informed by Google of a significant vulnerability in its chips - a flaw that only became public this week.
Intel says the stock sale was unrelated to the vulnerability, but came as part of a planned divestiture program. But Krzanich put that stock sale plan in place in October - several months after Intel was informed of the vulnerability.


Oh dear. Though, no doubt he will get out of this one.

The scary thing is how brazen some of these so-called smart people are.


What's scary is you'd let someone stupid enough to hold the stock in full knowledge it was going to tank running the company


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:09 pm 
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JM2K6 wrote:
Mahoney wrote:
Anyone know what the first Intel CPUs which fix Meltdown & Spectre are, or will be? Any word from AMD as to CPUs that don't suffer from Spectre?

I've been planning on getting a new PC, and it would seem sensible now to wait for hardware that does not suffer from either; or are we talking multiple years?


Meltdown - you'll need an 8-series, as I understand it.


Wouldn't think 8-series would be safe either.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:09 pm 
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this thread needs more leinsterman, he worked for Intel for years, and added the bug where if you type 'iloveleinster' your pc's speed increased 10%


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:14 pm 
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Traveller wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
as running 30% slower will eventually lead to a lock up

This doesn't seem to be a concern for all the financial institutions that are buying into the blockchain bubble.

I'm not aware of any crypto-currencies that are mined on CPUs. Almost all are mined on ASICs or NVidia/AMD GPUs. (I'm sure there are some, but none of the major ones use CPU mining).


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:51 pm 
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Raggs wrote:
JM2K6 wrote:
Mahoney wrote:
Anyone know what the first Intel CPUs which fix Meltdown & Spectre are, or will be? Any word from AMD as to CPUs that don't suffer from Spectre?

I've been planning on getting a new PC, and it would seem sensible now to wait for hardware that does not suffer from either; or are we talking multiple years?


Meltdown - you'll need an 8-series, as I understand it.


Wouldn't think 8-series would be safe either.


I read yesterday that the Coffee Lake CPUs weren't affected, but it's entirely possible the bigger scope of the announcement has meant that's simply not true


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:14 pm 
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JM2K6 wrote:
Raggs wrote:
JM2K6 wrote:
Mahoney wrote:
Anyone know what the first Intel CPUs which fix Meltdown & Spectre are, or will be? Any word from AMD as to CPUs that don't suffer from Spectre?

I've been planning on getting a new PC, and it would seem sensible now to wait for hardware that does not suffer from either; or are we talking multiple years?


Meltdown - you'll need an 8-series, as I understand it.


Wouldn't think 8-series would be safe either.


I read yesterday that the Coffee Lake CPUs weren't affected, but it's entirely possible the bigger scope of the announcement has meant that's simply not true


Coffee Lake is definitely impacted by Meltdown. There was some earlier speculation that since Intel knew about Meltdown before they released Coffee Lake, they would have designed it out, but the designs and specs for Coffee Lake were fixed ages ago.


There is a genuine question about how much of an impact the software fix for Meltdown will actually impact you - if all you do is general use (gaming, email, a bit of Word processing etc) then you may not see any performance hit at all.

If you want a Spectre-proof chip though then you are likely to be waiting a long time - it's still not completely understood what the implactions of Spectre are, what manufacturesrs are affected etc. but on the flipside it's far less clear how to use this as an attack vector. A genuine Spectre-proof chip design could be a complete review of CPU architecture across the board


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:17 pm 
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Ah, cheers. Yeah was just reading a shitload of facts and speculation mixed together yesterday.

Our lovely new big data clusters are going to be a bit unhappy with all this :(


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:17 pm 
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Saint wrote:

Coffee Lake is definitely impacted by Meltdown. There was some earlier speculation that since Intel knew about Meltdown before they released Coffee Lake, they would have designed it out, but the designs and specs for Coffee Lake were fixed ages ago.


There is a genuine question about how much of an impact the software fix for Meltdown will actually impact you - if all you do is general use (gaming, email, a bit of Word processing etc) then you may not see any performance hit at all.

If you want a Spectre-proof chip though then you are likely to be waiting a long time - it's still not completely understood what the implactions of Spectre are, what manufacturesrs are affected etc. but on the flipside it's far less clear how to use this as an attack vector. A genuine Spectre-proof chip design could be a complete review of CPU architecture across the board


Yup, some people have taken the sentence could hit some tasks by 30% to mean all tasks will be hit by 30%. A classic over reaction


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:23 pm 
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Fun twitter thread: https://twitter.com/wycats/status/948812652997885952


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:46 pm 
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JM2K6 wrote:


I understood about 15% of what they were talking about. And I've worked in IT for 20 years. :lol: :blush:


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:52 pm 
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sewa wrote:
Saint wrote:

Coffee Lake is definitely impacted by Meltdown. There was some earlier speculation that since Intel knew about Meltdown before they released Coffee Lake, they would have designed it out, but the designs and specs for Coffee Lake were fixed ages ago.


There is a genuine question about how much of an impact the software fix for Meltdown will actually impact you - if all you do is general use (gaming, email, a bit of Word processing etc) then you may not see any performance hit at all.

If you want a Spectre-proof chip though then you are likely to be waiting a long time - it's still not completely understood what the implactions of Spectre are, what manufacturesrs are affected etc. but on the flipside it's far less clear how to use this as an attack vector. A genuine Spectre-proof chip design could be a complete review of CPU architecture across the board


Yup, some people have taken the sentence could hit some tasks by 30% to mean all tasks will be hit by 30%. A classic over reaction


Yeah, Coffeelake is exactly the same CPU core as Kaby Lake, which was exactly the same as Skylake. They were rushed products to fill in for the fact that Cannonlake was going to be very, very late, & everyone loved the tick/tock cadence; so they made some minor architectural changes & tweaked the production process, & then slapped a new name on the result.

I also worked at Intel for a very long time ;)

I'd guess; if this problem was discovered last summer, any fix won't make Cannonlake either, so they'll either have the decision to dump a shit load of processors they've built, or skip it & try & pull in Icelake.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:59 pm 
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Next PC will be using AMD Ryzen so!


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 8:01 pm 
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Sandstorm wrote:
JM2K6 wrote:


I understood about 15% of what they were talking about. And I've worked in IT for 20 years. :lol: :blush:


Probably a bit like saying i’m a car sales man yet I haven’t a clue what those formula 1 engineers are taking about. How would you be expected to know?! Not unless your a Google engineer or similar.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 8:07 pm 
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Web devs will understand it. Basically it's people noticing that the Chrome developers have basically claimed that one of the most fundamental ways in which we use the internet is now dreadfully insecure.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 1:49 am 
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sewa wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
Big bank and other financial databases could be very vulnerable, as running 30% slower will eventually lead to a lock up, and no money coming out of ATMs. And adding server capacity takes time and money.


Adding server capacity is a tiny issue, if they haven't got scalability built into their models then they are way behind the times. With the amount of data they are warehousing you can be sure they are on top of it.


Not in OZ.......


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 3:50 am 
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Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
Perfect timing as Blue-Sky Thinkers push all their Business' Compute into AWS and AZURE stacks that are all running Intel Procs!


MacPhiles should also be concerned! :D


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-appl ... SKBN1EU04F

Quote:
In a statement on its website, Apple said all Mac and iOS devices are affected by both Meltdown and Spectre. But the most recent operating system updates for Mac computers, Apple TVs, iPhones and iPads protect users against the Meltdown attack and do not slow down the devices, it added, and Meltdown does not affect the Apple Watch.

Macs and iOS devices are vulnerable to Spectre attacks through code that can run in web browsers. Apple said it would issue a patch to its Safari web browser for those devices “in the coming days.”

Shortly after the researchers disclosed the chip flaws Wednesday, Google and Microsoft Corp released statements telling users which of their products were affected. Google said its users of Android phones - more than 80 percent of the global market - were protected if they had the latest security updates.

Apple remained silent for more than a day about the fate of the hundreds of millions of users of its iPhones and iPads. Ben Johnson, co-founder and chief strategist for cyber security firm Carbon Black, said the delay in updating customers about whether Apple’s devices are at risk could affect Apple’s drive to get more business customers to adopt its hardware.

“Something this severe gets the attention of all the employees and executives at a company, and when they go asking the IT and security people about it and security doesn’t have an answer for iPhones and iPads, it just doesn’t give a whole lot of confidence,” Johnson said.


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 Post subject: Re: The Intel chip thing
PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 10:39 am 
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Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
sewa wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
Big bank and other financial databases could be very vulnerable, as running 30% slower will eventually lead to a lock up, and no money coming out of ATMs. And adding server capacity takes time and money.


Adding server capacity is a tiny issue, if they haven't got scalability built into their models then they are way behind the times. With the amount of data they are warehousing you can be sure they are on top of it.


Not in OZ.......


Seriously? The world is full of companies that can design / build this stuff for you. If big banks are leaving themselves vulnerable in terms of server capacity then they must be fierce bloody thick.


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