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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 2:51 pm 
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Bullettyme wrote:
Flametop wrote:
Bullettyme wrote:
What's going on in Dundalk?


18 year old Syrian guy with a knife and an iron bar attacking random targets.
Japanese guy is dead.
Couple of locals injured.


:shock:

Saw a Middle Easterner was involved alright. Worrying.

Second Syrian to go postal in recent weeks. Another attacked a bus driver in Monaghan and gave him a very bad beating.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 3:09 pm 
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Corrected now to be an Egyptian, 18 years old.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 3:13 pm 
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Isn't Farage and his Russian sponsors holding a leave the EU thing here soon. They will love this shit.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 3:14 pm 
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Blackrock Bullet wrote:
Must be mental illness. I’ll wait to hear what Michael D’s take on it is before deciding what angle I’ll blame the West for it.


Yeah, these people have seen an awful lot of violence in their lifetime. Bound to have an impact on some of them


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 3:22 pm 
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ticketlessinseattle wrote:
rfurlong wrote:
CM11 wrote:
ticketlessinseattle wrote:
rfurlong wrote:
When Dublin City actually interrogated the housing waiting list and it’s applicants forensically last year, nearly 1 in 4 people decided that they weren’t actually that bothered to remain on the list ..... if it meant answering awkward questions about their income, their previous circumstances etc etc

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social- ... -1.3053165

People who think there is no gaming of the system going on, typically fall into 3 categories:

1/
Shinners like Eoin O’Broin who want to use homelessness as a stick to beat government with
2/
Poverty industry people like Mike Allen (and the 900 other homelessness charity workers) who’s salaries depend on the ongoing ‘crisis’
3/
Gullible fools who believe 1/ or 2/ above


no one, even snowflakes like meself believe there is no gaming the system going on - equally deluded are the smug upper middle classes/wanna-bees that think there aren't any people in sh1t situations as regards housing in this country - even Apple our great overlords have noted getting decent accommodation for staff in Ireland is a major concern.


I'm sure you have a list of smug people who think there isn't a problem?


Of course he doesn’t .... but since when has that stood in the way of propogating the ‘right-on’ narrative?


you, Cammy, mullet, HKL for starters


please point out the post(s) where I state that there isn't a housing crisis


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 3:30 pm 
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To be fair, that's not what he said.
He said you were smug and middle/upper middle class who doesn't think people are in sh1t situations. :D


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 3:51 pm 
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ticketlessinseattle wrote:
rfurlong wrote:
CM11 wrote:
ticketlessinseattle wrote:
rfurlong wrote:
When Dublin City actually interrogated the housing waiting list and it’s applicants forensically last year, nearly 1 in 4 people decided that they weren’t actually that bothered to remain on the list ..... if it meant answering awkward questions about their income, their previous circumstances etc etc

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social- ... -1.3053165

People who think there is no gaming of the system going on, typically fall into 3 categories:

1/
Shinners like Eoin O’Broin who want to use homelessness as a stick to beat government with
2/
Poverty industry people like Mike Allen (and the 900 other homelessness charity workers) who’s salaries depend on the ongoing ‘crisis’
3/
Gullible fools who believe 1/ or 2/ above


no one, even snowflakes like meself believe there is no gaming the system going on - equally deluded are the smug upper middle classes/wanna-bees that think there aren't any people in sh1t situations as regards housing in this country - even Apple our great overlords have noted getting decent accommodation for staff in Ireland is a major concern.


I'm sure you have a list of smug people who think there isn't a problem?


Of course he doesn’t .... but since when has that stood in the way of propogating the ‘right-on’ narrative?


you, Cammy, mullet, HKL for starters

Ah, the old ad-hominem when actual facts show your argument and consequent conclusions to be wrong.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 4:11 pm 
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Bullettyme wrote:
Flametop wrote:
Bullettyme wrote:
What's going on in Dundalk?


18 year old Syrian guy with a knife and an iron bar attacking random targets.
Japanese guy is dead.
Couple of locals injured.


:shock:

Saw a Middle Easterner was involved alright. Worrying.


More worrying than if a white guy did it? Explain


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 4:22 pm 
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Duff Paddy wrote:
Bullettyme wrote:
Flametop wrote:
Bullettyme wrote:
What's going on in Dundalk?


18 year old Syrian guy with a knife and an iron bar attacking random targets.
Japanese guy is dead.
Couple of locals injured.


:shock:

Saw a Middle Easterner was involved alright. Worrying.


More worrying than if a white guy did it? Explain


Well it's worrying either way, but worrying to think that Ireland would start experiencing the sort of lone wolf Islamist attacks we've seen in Europe.

Anyway, worth waiting for the full details.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 5:55 pm 
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December Exchequer returns are in and hence total 2017 figures.

Tax Revenue up 6% (€ 2.872 bn) to € 50.737 bn; of which Income Tax, after lagging for much of the year, came in on target.
Expenditure was €352 m greater than forecast at € 46.291 bn, an increase of € 2.3 bn yoy.

The overall exchequer figures include the € 3.4 bn the state received for the sale of 28% of AIB.

Tax receipts are now 60% higher than their 2010 low point.

https://www.rte.ie/news/business/2018/0 ... as-50-7bn/

These are very good figures indeed, and bode well for a decent Capital Investment Plan, so long as the greedy fingers of the PS unions can be kept away.


Last edited by camroc1 on Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:01 pm 
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So total revenue is down yoy if you strip out the AIB sale?

That's fairly shite...


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:10 pm 
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nardol wrote:
So total revenue is down yoy if you strip out the AIB sale?

That's fairly shite...

No, my misquote. The AIB figure is additional to the tax revenue.
I've edited my post above.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:14 pm 
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:thumbup:


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:21 pm 
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camroc1 wrote:
December Exchequer returns are in and hence total 2017 figures.

Tax Revenue up 6% (€ 2.872 bn) to € 50.737 bn; of which Income Tax, after lagging for much of the year, came in on target.
Expenditure was €352 m greater than forecast at € 46.291 bn, an increase of € 2.3 bn yoy.

The overall exchequer figures include the € 3.4 bn the state received for the sale of 28% of AIB.

Tax receipts are now 60% higher than their 2010 low point.

https://www.rte.ie/news/business/2018/0 ... as-50-7bn/

These are very good figures indeed, and bode well for a decent Capital Investment Plan, so long as the greedy fingers of the PS unions can be kept away.


I don't see the expenditure figure in your link. I don't get the one you've given. Surely if expenditure was 46.21bn and revenue was 50. 7m then that's a surplus of over 4bn? Yet the article you've given says a surplus of 1.9bn. It also mentions the turnaround from defecit to surplus is accounted for by the AIB sale which makes nardol's point accurate.

Is there a better article out there?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:25 pm 
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Quote:
AIB flotation helps State to end 2017 €2bn in the black
Excluding AIB gain, public finances improved by €1.093bn over end-2016
35 minutes ago
Barry O'Halloran
Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure, Paschal Donohoe: in the black at the end of 2017 Photo: RollingNews.ie
Minister for Finance and Public Expenditure, Paschal Donohoe: in the black at the end of 2017 Photo: RollingNews.ie


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The Government ended the year almost €2 billion in the black with the help of proceeds from the sale of 29 per cent of the State’s stake in AIB.

Exchequer returns for 2017 show that the State had a surplus of €1.909 billion at the end of year, compared with a shortfall of €1.018 billion 12 months earlier.

A statement said that the €2.927 billion improvement in the State’s finances was largely due to the sale of 28.8 per cent of its holding in AIB.

The sale of the bank’s shares in June earned a total of €3.4 billion for the Government.

Excluding this gain, the figures show an improvement of €1.093 billion over the end of 2016, driven by an increase in tax revenue and a fall in the cost of repaying the national debt.

Tax revenues
Tax revenues grew by 6 per cent or €2.872 billion to €50.737 billion. The total collected was 0.2 per cent or €116 million ahead of the Government’s prediction of €50.62 billion.

Tax revenues for December finished 2.2 per cent or €76 million below what was expected, but were €269 million ahead of the same month in 2016.

State spending for 2017 was €352 million higher than planned at €46.291 billion and up €2.3 billion on 2016.

After taking account of supplementary and revised estimates, expenditure was €395 million blow the €46.754 billion voted for by the Dáil.

The Minister for Finance, Paschal Donohoe, welcomed the figures, which he described as “a very solid performance”. Pointing to the tax outcome, Mr Donohoe said all tax headings had recorded annual growth, with overall receipts now 60 per cent above their 2010 low point.

“This fiscal outturn provides a good platform to start 2018. However, we remain vigilant to the potential challenges we face, including Brexit,” Mr Donohoe said.


“ We will continue careful management of the public finances, including the focus on reducing our debt burden and continuation with competitiveness-oriented policies.”


https://www.irishtimes.com/business/eco ... -1.3344033


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:29 pm 
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That's just confused me even more!

50.7m revenue plus 3.4bn AIB sale minus 46.2bn expenditure isn't in the region of 2bn.

Also surplus of 1.9bn with AIB but 1bn without??

What am I missing? I'm sure it's me but how?


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:31 pm 
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Probably left out the cost of funding our debt or some such.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:31 pm 
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The actual Dept. of Finance publication suggests there have been various once off adjustments to figures which may make simple additions difficult to reconcile :

Quote:
Summary
 An Exchequer surplus of €1,909 million was recorded for 2017. This compares to
a deficit of €1,018 million in 2016. This year-on-year improvement of €2,927 million
is primarily due to the sale of over 28% of the State’s shareholding in AIB.
 There was also a significant one-off transaction in the comparable period in 2016.
Excluding these, the underlying Exchequer position shows a year-on-year
improvement of €1,093 million, driven by increased tax revenues and reduced debt
servicing expenditure. This is somewhat offset by an increase in voted expenditure.
 Cumulative tax revenues of €50,737 million were collected in 2017, an increase of
6.0% or €2,872 million on 2016. In addition, tax revenues closed the year on target,
just 0.2% or €116 million above expectations of €50,620 million. Tax revenues for
the month of December finished up 2.2% or €76 million below target. However, in
year-on-year terms, December tax receipts were 8.5% or €269 million higher
 Net voted expenditure to end-December 2017, at €46,291 million finished the year
€352 million or 0.8% above profile and up €2,305 million (5.2%) in year-on-year
terms. After taking account of the Supplementary Estimates and Further Revised
Estimates net voted expenditure, excluding Departmental balances, was €395
million below the aggregate amount of €46,754 million voted by the Dáil for 2017.
 Combined receipts from non-tax revenue and capital receipts of €7,640 million
were up 6.2% (€447 million) year-on-year, primarily due to the sale of over 28% of
the State’s shareholding in AIB in 2017.
 Non-voted expenditure was down year-on-year by 15.8% or €1,913 million. This is
mainly due to the absence of a requirement in the year for any short-term cash
flow loans to the Social Insurance Fund and reduced debt servicing costs.


http://www.finance.gov.ie/wp-content/up ... r-2017.pdf

EDIT I took the journos figures in good faith - silly me :blush:

Regardless, the figures are very good, and should allow a considerable increase in the CIP.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:53 pm 
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Leinsterman wrote:
To be fair, that's not what he said.
He said you were smug and middle/upper middle class who doesn't think people are in sh1t situations. :D


I think my use of the phrase "housing crisis" would make it clear that I think that yes, some people are indeed in sh!t situations due to us not having built any houses between '09 and '16.

People might also be aware of my posts as far back as '12 and '13 stating that we needed to refloat the resi development sector if we weren't going to end up with a housing supply crunch.

Those posts were met with outrage and incredulity at the suggestion that developers be incentivised to get back to building ...... by the very same lefty types who are now wailing now over my perceived lack of empathy

only in Ireland :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 6:59 pm 
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Fúcking homeless conversation again :thumbdown:


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 8:34 pm 
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HighKingLeinster wrote:
Fúcking homeless conversation again :thumbdown:


+1


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 11:11 pm 
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The updated IT report on the exchequer returns makes a lot more sense.

Quote:
Workers and businesses pay ‘record’ €51bn in tax
Exchequer returns come in at €58,376bn with surplus of €1.9bn
about 6 hours ago Updated: about an hour ago
Barry O'Halloran


Workers and businesses paid a record €51 billion in taxes last year, according to Government figures released on Wednesday.

Exchequer returns show that the State collected €58.376 billion last year, including €3.4 billion from the sale of 29 per cent of AIB, and spent €56.47 billion, leaving it with a €1.9 billion surplus.

Excluding the boost from the AIB sale, the figures show that the State spent €1.525 billion more last year than it earned, an improvement of €1.093 billion on 2016.

The figures show that taxes collected in 2017 rose 6 per cent to €50.737 billion, which John Palmer, Department of Finance principal officer, confirmed was a record.

“It was well above the previous year,” he said. He noted that the €47.2 billion collected in 2016 was the next highest total.

Final tally
The final tally of €50.737 billion was was €117 million or 0.2 per cent ahead of the Government’s prediction of €50.62 billion.

Workers contributed €20.01 billion of the total through income tax. This was 1.2 per cent less than the Government expected but €840 million more than in 2016.

However, department officials pointed out that PAYE, which accounted for €13 billion of the total, was 9 per cent ahead of 2016 and was exactly on target. They claimed that this indicated a buoyant jobs market.


Mr Palmer acknowledged that returns from PAYE and the universal social charge (USC) had been lower than expected earlier in the year, but had improved since the third quarter.

Companies paid a total of €8.2 billion in corporation tax on their profits, an increase of €850 million or 11.6 per cent on 2016. The figure was €486 million more than the Government had predicted.

VAT rose 7 per cent to €13.3 billion, broadly in line with Government targets. Property tax, Stamp duty, excise and capital gains accounted for the balance of the revenue collected.

Total State spending in 2017 of €56.47 billion included €46.3 billion approved by the Dáil for Government departments.

The Oireachtas decision to axe water charges and refund cash to those who had paid left the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government with an extra €293 million bill at the end of the year.

John Kinnane, Department of Finance principal officer pointed out that the Dáil approved this last month.

The Department of Health overspent by €195 million, but this was in line with a supplementary estimate also approved by TDs.

The cost of servicing the national debt fell €621 million to €6.224 billion, while the Republic’s contribution to EU budgets was down slightly.

On track
Mr Palmer noted that the Government was on track to meet Budget 2018’s pledge that its deficit would be no more than 0.3 per cent of gross domestic product, a measure of the wealth produced by the Republic.

The Minister for Finance, Paschal Donohoe, welcomed the figures, which he described as “a very solid performance”. Pointing to the tax take, Mr Donohoe said all tax headings had recorded annual growth, with overall receipts now 60 per cent above their 2010 low point.

“This fiscal outturn provides a good platform to start 2018. However, we remain vigilant to the potential challenges we face, including Brexit,” Mr Donohoe said.

“We will continue careful management of the public finances, including the focus on reducing our debt burden and continuation with competitiveness-oriented policies.”

David McNamara, economist with Dublin stockbroking firm Davy, said that the Government was within touching distance of a budget surplus.

“One concern is the increased reliance on corporation tax, now accounting for 16 per cent of tax revenues and driving much of the tax outperformance,” he warned.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 11:27 pm 
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Is Intel fúcked ?

https://www.irishtimes.com/business/tec ... -1.3344242

Whatever about a security patch, imagine what a 30%+ slow down in speed will do for, for example, the big bank databases.

Quote:
But implementing the fix is expected to significantly affect the performance of the computer, making some actions up to around 30 per cent slower.

While normal computer users could see performance problems, the security flaw also affects cloud servers, with Amazon, Microsoft and Google all expected to have to fix the bug with similar performance-reducing patches.


They will just grind to a halt and fall over !

And what about mobiles ? How many have Intel chips ?

Make sure you apply any security patches issued in the next few days, chaps.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:02 am 
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https://www.fool.com/investing/2017/12/ ... stock.aspx

Anything to this? Dated well before this bug become public.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:08 am 
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Most decent mobiles use Qualcomm or Samsung chips.
Intel don't have that big a market share I think for phones. Anyway, phones only last a couple of years nowadays so it isn't a huge issue there.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:16 am 
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The share price is down 1 % so it's obviously nothing, it would have been all over news night if it was anything worth talking about


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:21 am 
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Location: Best country in the world.
goose81 wrote:
The share price is down 1 % so it's obviously nothing, it would have been all over news night if it was anything worth talking about


Intel’s stock had been down as much as 6% in early Wednesday trading, but closed down 3.4% at $45.26, the worst one-day percentage loss since April 28, 2017, when shares also dropped 3.4%.That represents about 1 billion dollars wiped from their market Cap. Shares declined an additional 1.1% in after-hours trading, as Intel went into more detail in media interviews.

hardly a nothing story if you happen to be long.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:23 am 
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I just took a brief look on google share and it looked like 1% at a glance, fair enough. Still if chips were going to be running 30% slower across the board like is being indicated you would expect them to be smashed alot worse than that.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:19 pm 
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So that stabbing had no link to terrorism, or at least no established link.

The comments on some articles :uhoh: never read them.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:20 pm 
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Bullettyme wrote:
So that stabbing had no link to terrorism, or at least no established link.

The comments on some articles :uhoh: never read them.


Source?


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:38 pm 
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Duff Paddy wrote:
Bullettyme wrote:
So that stabbing had no link to terrorism, or at least no established link.

The comments on some articles :uhoh: never read them.


Source?


Irrespective of what may be proved in the future, I felt after listening to radio reports last night that Dundalk is a strange place to attempt suicide by police. This of course then questions how much he is willing to give to a cause.
Ultimately it will not be a surprise if any apparent links to ISIS are tenuous. They may find he viewed an pro isis article or two, and be signed up to a muslim brotherhood site, so not much different to reading the copy of An Phoblacht that was hanging up on the wall in UCD during the 1980s.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:44 pm 
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camroc1 wrote:
Is Intel fúcked ?

https://www.irishtimes.com/business/tec ... -1.3344242

Whatever about a security patch, imagine what a 30%+ slow down in speed will do for, for example, the big bank databases.

Quote:
But implementing the fix is expected to significantly affect the performance of the computer, making some actions up to around 30 per cent slower.

While normal computer users could see performance problems, the security flaw also affects cloud servers, with Amazon, Microsoft and Google all expected to have to fix the bug with similar performance-reducing patches.


They will just grind to a halt and fall over !

And what about mobiles ? How many have Intel chips ?

Make sure you apply any security patches issued in the next few days, chaps.


Grind to a halt and fall over me bollix :lol: The average user will see fupp all difference.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:50 pm 
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Leinster in London wrote:
Duff Paddy wrote:
Bullettyme wrote:
So that stabbing had no link to terrorism, or at least no established link.

The comments on some articles :uhoh: never read them.


Source?


Irrespective of what may be proved in the future, I felt after listening to radio reports last night that Dundalk is a strange place to attempt suicide by police. This of course then questions how much he is willing to give to a cause.
Ultimately it will not be a surprise if any apparent links to ISIS are tenuous. They may find he viewed an pro isis article or two, and be signed up to a muslim brotherhood site, so not much different to reading the copy of An Phoblacht that was hanging up on the wall in UCD during the 1980s.



I was only thinking, if it was actually linked even tenuously to extremism I genuinely dont know if I would trust the Gardai or Media to even report it, effectively operating a blackout. Its been proven many times recently in this country that only certain views or facts are allowed, I reckon this would be shoved under the carpet so as not to cause a panic if it had/ or is subsequently proven to be linked to terrorism.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:05 pm 
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Cammy it seems Metro North could be starting as early as next year. My Brother in law's brother in law is an architect working close with some capital projects. It seems work on College Green and Metro North could be going ahead at the end of this year start of next year. Have you heard likewise?


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:22 pm 
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iarmhiman wrote:
Cammy it seems Metro North could be starting as early as next year. My Brother in law's brother in law is an architect working close with some capital projects. It seems work on College Green and Metro North could be going ahead at the end of this year start of next year. Have you heard likewise?

College Green is held up in ABP. Only today they postponed the Oral Hearing supposed to be starting next week, for another 2-3 months.

Metro North is definitely getting the go ahead, given all the sounds ministers are makking.

DART Underground is the biggie though.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:31 pm 
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Just the start of planning/design for metro north I assume.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 5:43 pm 
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Duff Paddy wrote:
Bullettyme wrote:
So that stabbing had no link to terrorism, or at least no established link.

The comments on some articles :uhoh: never read them.


Source?


https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/n ... 58999.html


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:02 pm 
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Gavin Duffy wrote:
Just the start of planning/design for metro north I assume.

Initial design and planning already strted.

https://www.nationaltransport.ie/projec ... tro-north/

Also, the tunnelling part of the project could (and probably will) be undertaken as seperate contracts to the surface works.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:08 pm 
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I'll be so happy being able to go to town from the airport without taking the f**king bus.

I just hope I'm still alive.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 6:18 pm 
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I see Barrington J has shuffled off his mortal coil to the great Bench in the sky. :((

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/irish-news/ex-judge-and-barrister-to-underdog-donal-barrington-dies-1.3344138

Quote:
Former Supreme Court justice Donal Barrington, one of his generation’s foremost experts in constitutional law, has died at the age of 89.

He attended St Patrick’s primary school, Drumcondra, and was a graduate of Belvedere College and University College Dublin. The Dubliner also studied at King’s Inns and was called to the Bar in 1951. He became a senior counsel in 1967.

After a career as a highly respected barrister, Barrington was appointed to the High Court in 1979 and the European Court of First Instance in Luxembourg in 1989 before becoming a judge of the Supreme Court in 1996. He retired four years later.

During a distinguished career that spanned six decades, he was the first president of the Irish Commission on Human Rights and served as chairman of the General Council of the Bar of Ireland from 1977 to 1979.

He was also chairman of the Barristers Professional Disciplinary Appeal Board and one of the founder members of the Irish Council of Civil Liberties.

Despite being one of the best-known judges of the past half-century, it was Barrington’s work as a pioneering barrister fighting for the underdog that carved out his reputation in the Irish courts.

Barrington represented May McGee, a mother of four from Swords in north Dublin, before the Supreme Court in a 1973 case that found the legal ban on importing contraceptives infringed the constitutional right of a married couple to privacy. The victory was considered a major breakthrough in family planning in Ireland.

In one of the most groundbreaking cases taken during his time in law, Barrington won a case for Co Wicklow nurse Kathleen Byrne, successfully arguing that an Irish citizen could sue the State.

The 1972 Byrne v Ireland ruling abolished the State’s immunity, a carry-over from the British regime when the Crown was considered sovereign and therefore subject to no wrongdoing.

“It changed the whole attitude,” Barrington later said. “Once the State became a corporation subject to the law, it changed the whole nature of society.”

Adoption challenge

Barrington was unsuccessful in a 1965 challenge taken by a London café owner Leon Nicolaou who wanted the Adoption Act 1952 deemed unconstitutional because it allowed the State authorities to make an order on the adoption of his daughter with a Galway woman without hearing the view of the child’s natural father.

The ruling was regarded as one of the worst by the Supreme Court and is primarily remembered as the case in which the court spelled out that the family under the Constitution was grounded in marriage.
Donal Barrington pictured with former president Mary Robinson after being appointed as a Supreme Court judge. Photograph: Alan Betson Donal Barrington pictured with former president Mary Robinson after being appointed as a Supreme Court judge. Photograph: Alan Betson

He represented priest and professor FX Martin in the battle to save Wood Quay in Dublin in the 1970s in one of the most high-profiles cases taken to protect an archaeological site anywhere in Ireland. His junior barrister in the case was Mary Robinson, the future president of Ireland.

On his receipt of a honorary doctorate from the National University of Ireland in 2009, Barrington was described as having “led a revolution in constitution law” and been “a human rights champion before human rights were generally acknowledged as an issue, still less a field of study or work.”

Barrington was the son of Thomas Barrington, a Department of Agriculture civil servant, and Eileen Bracken, daughter of sculptor JK Bracken. His father died while representing Ireland at an overseas conference when Barrington was still toddler.

The young Barrington won scholarships to both Belvedere College and UCD and through his interest in debating, in both English and Irish, at Belvedere he developed an interest in the law.

During his years as a barrister, he was a founder member and first president of Tuairim, a think tank that explored and opened up debate on social, political and religious issues affecting Ireland of that time.

A speech that Barrington delivered in the late 1950s and subsequent pamphlet on developing better relations in Northern Ireland influenced thinking and helped pave the way for the 1965 meetings between then taoiseach Sean Lemass and Northern Ireland Prime Minister Captain Terence O’Neill.

Barrington later worked as a legal adviser to the John Hume and Austin Currie of the SDLP in the 1970s after the collapse of the Sunningdale Agreement that attempted to establish powersharing in Northern Ireland.

President Michael D Higgins paid tribute describing Barrington as “one of the outstanding minds and voices in Ireland’s legal profession”.

“He leaves a rich legacy in public and constitutional law, having consistently brought attention to the importance of civil and political rights, not just in Ireland but also abroad.”

The former judge is survived by his wife Eileen; his four children Kathleen, Kevin, Eileen and Brian; sons-in-law Niall and Cathal; and his four grandchildren Oisín, Fiona, Oscar and Vanessa.


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