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When will the Beetroot end up in the compost?
A week. If he is lucky 10%  10%  [ 3 ]
A few months at best 16%  16%  [ 5 ]
At least a year 23%  23%  [ 7 ]
He will see out his term 3%  3%  [ 1 ]
He will see his new unborn childs 21st birthday from the duchy of New England 19%  19%  [ 6 ]
What, that filthy sheep shagger? 29%  29%  [ 9 ]
Total votes : 31
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:38 am 
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shanky wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
_fatprop wrote:
Slim 293 wrote:
The citizenship saga has finally claimed Feeney...

Labor quite likely to lose Batman to the Greens...

Meanwhile, the Libs are trying to paint Greens candidate Alex Bathal as “anti-Semitic,” simply due to her involvement with the Greens protests of the Israeli treatment of Palestinians... :lol:


The libs are just shit stirring, they unlikely to even run someone. It will a "who is more left" contest between the Greens and Labor


Michael Kroger called the Greens "Extremists"....... :blush: :lol:



I wouldn’t say ‘extremists’. I would say ‘slightly thick idealists’, instead.

Which I think, is a fair and balanced assessment.


You've just described the Young Liberals to a T...... :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 3:49 am 
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I found this article interesting, mainly because I agree with it.


https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/new ... cial_share
Quote:
A playbook for the culture wars

Jobs and growth, as Malcolm Turnbull is wont to remind us, is no longer just a Liberal Party election slogan. It’s an outcome. The economy is humming along. More than 400,000 new jobs were created in the 2017 calendar year.

So why, then, does the government continue to languish in the polls? It’s a question that puzzles many. But not Ian McAllister, professor of political science at the Australian National University, and director since 1987 of the Australian Election Study, the most comprehensive survey of Australians’ evolving political opinions.

It’s not just that the economic gains are shared unequally and that at the household level most people are not seeing their incomes rise, even as their bills get bigger, he says. It goes deeper than that.

Most people just don’t believe that government has much capacity to influence the economy anymore.

“The defeat of the conservative forces on same-sex marriage and euthanasia, along with the tarnishing of organised religion, has put the cultural right very much on the back foot.”

McAllister points to a chart on page 51 of the 2016 election study, which records voters’ responses when they were asked to predict the effect of government actions on the economy.

Just 13 per cent of respondents thought government would make things better in the coming year. Another 20 per cent thought the government would make things worse. And a whopping 67 per cent thought the actions of the government would have no effect on the economy at all.

“It was the lowest figure we’ve ever recorded,” McAllister says. “Even Coalition voters in the 2016 election mostly didn’t think a Coalition government would be able to do much for them.”

The result, he and other political scientists and social researchers suggest, reflects an understanding in the electorate of the huge influence on the economy of global forces, substantially beyond the control of government.

It’s a problem for both sides of politics, and part of the reason for the decline in the vote for major parties. But it is a bigger problem for conservative parties, because the claim to superior management of the economy has traditionally been core to their electoral appeal.

And it’s a bigger problem given evidence, found in the election study and elsewhere, that voters increasingly favour stronger government action to redistribute income. Thus the persistent lead in the polls for Labor, which voices those concerns about economic inequality.

What to do?

The time-honoured response, says Carol Johnson, professor of politics at Adelaide University, is “to use culture war arguments to wedge off a section of Labor’s traditional support base, to split off socially conservative members of the working class”.

She says, “It’s an old technique that John Howard used very successfully.”

In contrast to the effective warrior Howard, says Johnson, Tony Abbott was an enthusiastic but clumsy one. And Malcolm Turnbull wasn’t really one at all during the early part of his leadership. Then he had the near-death experience of the 2016 election.

“And since then,” she says, “we see these culture war issues rising again.”

Last year, particularly in the latter half of the year, they dominated politics. This year is starting out the same way. Before 2018 was a week old, Turnbull got himself tangled in the issue of an Australian republic, suggesting a postal plebiscite, à la the same sex-marriage vote, but only after the current queen expires.

In short order after that, he launched a defence of the Australian flag – ironic, given he once supported changing it, just as he once supported the republic. Then he declared he would not be “bullied” by a “tiny minority” into changing the date of Australia Day, notwithstanding the fact many Indigenous Australians see it as marking the start of their dispossession by white settlers.

And then, in response to the revelation that former immigration minister Scott Morrison had directed ASIO to delay the security clearances of refugees so as to deny their legitimate claims to permanent protection in Australia, Turnbull virtually channelled John Howard: he made “no apologies”, he said, for “securing” Australia’s borders.

If Turnbull’s performance in the political silly season is any guide, we could be in for a combative year in the culture wars. And possibly a turning point in the culture wars, after two decades of dominance by political conservatives.

Before we get to the reasons for that, though, let’s give some consideration to what “culture wars” actually are, for they are far more often alluded to than defined.

On one interpretation, says Ben Oquist, executive director of the progressive The Australia Institute, all political and economic positions are ultimately an expression of cultural considerations.

Another take on culture wars comes from Toby Ralph, self-described hatchet man, marketing bloke and sometime propagandist, who has worked on scores of elections around the world, including all of John Howard’s campaigns.

His view is more cynical: they are a means to keep a party’s base activated by providing “political alternatives to the tedium and predictability of major party policies and narratives”, which are otherwise “as boring as batshit”.

It is characteristic of culture war issues that they generate more heat than light and tend to be steeped in “vitriol” and “sanctimonious outrage”. They serve as a populist proxy for broader political debate, says Ralph, and can have “a significant impact at the polling booths”.

As the eminent public intellectual Robert Manne noted a few years back, cultural warfare tends to be a tool of the political right, adopted from the United States Republican playbook, that plays to conservative values of “a proud national history, the Western canon, the traditional family, Christian virtues, patriotism, a unified national culture”.

In reality, anyone of any political stripe can play at cultural warfare, although it’s easier to make an emotional plea for the status quo than a rational case for change. It is easier to appeal to fear for what might be lost than hope for what might be gained from change.

A bit of political history makes the point. Social researcher Rebecca Huntley, of Essential Media, harks back to the end of the Keating Labor government.

Having engineered big economic changes, Keating had moved on to championing major cultural changes, but failed to bring the electorate with him.

“The social research from the tail end of the Keating era suggested that Australians by then had had a gutful of economic reform and engagement with Asia and republicanism and multiculturalism and Indigenous reconciliation, and there was a kind of fatigue,” Huntley says.

John Howard recognised this fatigue and won big by offering a small vision, limited to sober economic management and cultural stasis.

Aside from “a brief moment under Rudd, who dared talk about big issues like climate change and the apology to the Stolen Generation and engagement with China”, major party politics has barely touched these bigger cultural issues since, she says.

ANU political scientist Dr Jill Sheppard agrees. “The lasting impact of the ’96 election,” she says, “was that everyone retreated into their shells and didn’t want to talk about wholesale social reform.”

The Liberal Party was remade in the image of John Howard, overtaken by social conservatives. In response, Labor has been wary of attack from the conservatives and their right-wing surrogates in the media.

The result, according to the various sources spoken to for this story, from Oquist on the left to Ralph on the right, and the data-informed academics and researchers in between, is that the cultural attitudes of the public have moved way ahead of the politicians.

The evidence is there in the graphs of the Australian Election Study. Ever since Howard was elected in 1996, Australia has been moving consistently leftward on the political spectrum, and the rate of that move has sped up considerably since the current government lucked into office on the back of Labor Party disunity in 2013.

Electors are increasingly dissatisfied with the nature of our democracy, increasingly inclined to see no real choice between the major parties and to believe that powerful vested interests have too much sway.

Once Australia overwhelming preferred tax cuts to increases in government spending. We no longer do. We are far more progressive on a whole range of social issues, from abortion to drug laws to crime and punishment in general. We are far more in favour of government support for Indigenous Australians and land rights, less hostile to asylum seekers, and vastly more inclined to see climate change as a serious threat.

“A lot of things are happening in parallel,” says Sheppard, who works with McAllister on the election study and who also is primary author of the ANU poll of social attitudes and behaviours.

“We are at a weird juncture in which we are increasingly sceptical of governments’ economic impact, where we are increasingly liberal on social issues, but where most of us still are voting for our parties of habit.”

But that will change, and the change will be seismic.

“That elector passivity that parties have relied on for so long is breaking down and the younger generations in Australia are driving social change so much faster than anything we’ve seen for decades,” Sheppard says.

“All signs seem to point towards social issues becoming much more important in political choice.”

Rebecca Huntley detects the same thing in the focus groups she conducts, and sees last year’s same-sex marriage survey as a “massive loss” for the conservative culture warriors, with ramifications far beyond that single issue.

“People have a new appetite for larger issues,” she says, and the postal survey showed them they could effect change from outside the established political process.

“We’ve got a culture war led by activists, through new media channels, which is different. The role of organisations like GetUp! has no precedent.”

The old culture warriors are desperately scared of the campaigning power of these new activists, she says, which explains their recent rush to change electoral laws, to “squash the model that GetUp! represents”.

This mood for change will not be limited by sly donation laws, however. Huntley cites the debate over Australia Day, on which she did significant focus group research.

Far from being a “tiny minority”, as Turnbull said, the mood for change is strong.

“What we found was that roughly one third of people thought Australia Day celebrations on January 26 were shameful. Another, slightly smaller cohort … had little empathy for Indigenous pain or thought it was a token issue which obscured the real issues of Aboriginal disadvantage. Then there was another disengaged but pragmatic third, whose attitude was ‘as long as there’s a day where I can have a holiday and a beer with my mates, I don’t care what day. Change the date if it upsets you.’

“I think the mood is there to have conversations about a range of issues: about reconciliation, Uluru, the republic, other things. There is definitely a greater energy about these questions that relate not to the economy or what we import or export, but who we are as Australians.

“I wouldn’t be at all surprised if some of these issues become quite critical in the next election.”

Ian McAllister, likewise, sees a new mood abroad in the wake of the same-sex marriage debate. “It suggests to me that in the next five years or so there will be a lot more discussion of these moral issues, unless the economy really goes south. I think education, religious education, funding for religious schools, the whole role of religion, perhaps.”

Certainly, Oquist says, the progressive forces are at last ascendant in the culture wars.

“The defeat of the conservative forces on same-sex marriage and euthanasia, along with the tarnishing of organised religion as a moral force as a result of the child abuse royal commission, has put the cultural right very much on the back foot,” he says.

And it’s hard to argue with that. The old issues so deftly exploited by John Howard just don’t seem to cut through the way they did. The biggest of them historically – the alleged threat to national sovereignty posed by asylum seekers – has receded in the public mind, ironically because the government succeeded in stopping the boats. Despite the government’s best efforts to dehumanise the people left bunged up on Manus and Nauru, public attitudes have softened, even among those who would not see a change in policy.

Peter Dutton’s attempts to pick a fight with New Zealand over its offer to take some of the detainees are increasingly perceived as a desperate effort to gin up a fading issue.

So what else have they got? The long campaign to make an issue of the Racial Discrimination Act quietly expired without much change. Safe Schools? It’s hard to see any great mileage left in that one, particularly as the religious right’s efforts to conflate it with same-sex marriage fell so comprehensively flat.

As we noted at the top of the story, Turnbull’s recent forays into the issues of the republic, the flag and Australia Day got little traction. Indeed, they served to underline the contradictions between the old Malcolm Turnbull, of whom voters initially approved, and the new one, who is beholden to the hard right of the Liberal Party.

“At least,” says Carol Johnson, “voters knew where they were with John Howard, knew that he was consistent in his convictions, whereas they don’t see Turnbull as completely sincere on these things.”

There remains, of course, the issue of climate change and energy policy, but the polls indicate the government is losing that one as well.

Meanwhile, on Thursday, Turnbull delivered what was billed as an “agenda setting” speech in Toowoomba, spruiking the creation of those 403,100 new jobs last year. He claimed it was the result of his government’s trickle-down company tax cuts.

In the absence of real wage growth, though, there’s Buckley’s chance he’ll get any real poll bounce out of it. Ian McAllister speaks with the authority of 30 years of electoral surveys: “Jobs haven’t been an issue since the 1990s recession.”

What’s left is culture war. But as much as he tries, Malcolm Turnbull is not much good at it.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2018 7:32 am 
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This is fun:
Quote:
Australian political donations 2016-17: who gave what to which parties

Political parties receive money from donors and investments, and get public funding through the Australian Electoral Commission. We have mapped the entities and donors associated with every significant political party, showing how much is given and the source of each party’s income

(click through to select entities and see interactive graphics...)
https://www.theguardian.com/australia-n ... ntityID=38


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:22 pm 
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Bugger me. If this news about Brainlessly had come out during the New England by-election, he would have lost in a landslide.



Private business, my arse. You live by the sword, you die by it.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:55 pm 
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wamberal99 wrote:
Bugger me. If this news about Brainlessly had come out during the New England by-election, he would have lost in a landslide.



Private business, my arse. You live by the sword, you die by it.


Yup, absolutely. Meanwhile, the political press tries to cover its arse in not reporting it and everyone tries to demonise NewsCorp for doing so...

i) Newscorp really are scum sucking bottom dwellers anyway

ii) everyone knew about this and sat on it, why? If this had involved a female pollie, can you imagine hw it would have been handled?

iii) Joyce is an unmitigated cnut.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:06 am 
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wamberal99 wrote:
Bugger me. If this news about Brainlessly had come out during the New England by-election, he would have lost in a landslide.



Private business, my arse. You live by the sword, you die by it.


I am not sure about losing the election and I don't see how arguing in favour of marriage is negated by yourself failing at it.
Quote:
“Just because my marriage didn’t work out doesn’t mean I disregard what marriage are about. I acknowledge that I failed,” he said.


In the end, it happens and I hope them the best
Quote:
Ms Campion is reportedly due to give birth in April. Friends have told the Telegraph the pair are “madly in love”.


I am just surprised it doesn't happen more often, locked away in Canberra for months must make it bloody difficult to keep any relationship going outside that bubble


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:07 am 
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Note all the Politicians scrambling away from it.

More live by the (pork) sword I reckon...


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:08 am 
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Fatty,


He is a farking hypocrite. End of story. I have no doubt, and neither should you, that he has behaved reprehensibly. Just call to mind some of the rather strange behaviour that we saw from a few people who followed him around and attacked him during the campaign. My guess is that they are relatives or friends of his former wife, who knew a lot more about this than you or I do.


Give them the benefit of the doubt, not this bum.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:19 am 
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He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:28 am 
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Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


Yup... let's just wisely mutter about cognitive dissonance and turn our attention to water theft in the Murray Darling aided and abetted by his complete mismanagement of the Water portfolio amid suggestions of corruption regarding water licenses.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:29 am 
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Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


So does the pregnant woman also deserve the coverage?

Maybe just a good shaming for being complicit in the break up of a marriage of a hypocrite?


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:33 am 
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_fatprop wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


So does the pregnant woman also deserve the coverage?

Maybe just a good shaming for being complicit in the break up of a marriage of a hypocrite?


She deserves to be shamed for her massively poor taste in wanting to root that wanker.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:33 am 
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_fatprop wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


So does the pregnant woman also deserve the coverage?

Maybe just a good shaming for being complicit in the break up of a marriage of a hypocrite?


Yeah, I was talking about the Pregnant woman....who by the way, Redface consistently declined to confirm whether she was still employed by him when their affair started.

Riddle me this, what do you think the outcome would be if a female ALP/Greens MP was caught getting pregnant with a male staffer?

Apoplexy across Talkback radio.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:36 am 
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_fatprop wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


So does the pregnant woman also deserve the coverage?

Maybe just a good shaming for being complicit in the break up of a marriage of a hypocrite?



Yeah, that's the perfect lever to manage the outrage. If it's such a big deal then every politician (and fanboi) will immediately start fighting for the rights of women, the oppressed and the disadvantaged as a matter of consistency.

Let's start with funding for domestic violence and Aboriginal disadvantage, just to get the ball rolling, eh?


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 1:05 am 
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Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
_fatprop wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


So does the pregnant woman also deserve the coverage?

Maybe just a good shaming for being complicit in the break up of a marriage of a hypocrite?


Yeah, I was talking about the Pregnant woman....who by the way, Redface consistently declined to confirm whether she was still employed by him when their affair started.

Riddle me this, what do you think the outcome would be if a female ALP/Greens MP was caught getting pregnant with a male staffer?

Apoplexy across Talkback radio.


I don't disagree with the sheer hypocrisy of the politics in general although I don't agree with this essentially removing someones rights to have an opinion on marriage itself if they have a failed marriage.

Can I comment on marriage being never married? or on women's rights, not being a woman etc etc

It is obviously an office romance but they have to hunt her down, get that photo (is it slut shaming? to highlight the pregnant mistress and the wronged wife? dunno): and we saw it in an other sphere yesterday with Susan Lamb the lack of nuance over citizenship (something that should have been sorted in two minutes in a meeting with the PM).

Quote:
Riddle me this, what do you think the outcome would be if a female ALP/Greens MP was caught getting pregnant with a male staffer?


I think it would be just as f*cked up


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 1:12 am 
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guy smiley wrote:
_fatprop wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


So does the pregnant woman also deserve the coverage?

Maybe just a good shaming for being complicit in the break up of a marriage of a hypocrite?



Yeah, that's the perfect lever to manage the outrage. If it's such a big deal then every politician (and fanboi) will immediately start fighting for the rights of women, the oppressed and the disadvantaged as a matter of consistency.

Let's start with funding for domestic violence and Aboriginal disadvantage, just to get the ball rolling, eh?


Hey, I just have a differing opinion on some of this type of stuff.

I think I can have that while still thinking personally that Barnaby is a dick


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 2:30 am 
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_fatprop wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
_fatprop wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
He absolutely is a hypocrite.

On the 7.30 Report last night, he was pontificating about "leaving people's personal lives out of the public eye".

Wading in about other people's marriage rights - yeah, that's leaving it out..... :roll:


So does the pregnant woman also deserve the coverage?

Maybe just a good shaming for being complicit in the break up of a marriage of a hypocrite?



Yeah, that's the perfect lever to manage the outrage. If it's such a big deal then every politician (and fanboi) will immediately start fighting for the rights of women, the oppressed and the disadvantaged as a matter of consistency.

Let's start with funding for domestic violence and Aboriginal disadvantage, just to get the ball rolling, eh?


Hey, I just have a differing opinion on some of this type of stuff.

I think I can have that while still thinking personally that Barnaby is a dick



Yeah, you canhave any opinion you like, of course.

My opinion is that I question how this can be twisted into being called a 'shaming'.

It happened. They did it.

The AFL accepted two resignations from two married senior executives last year for intra office affairs. If that was newsworthy then this is as well... unless we are somehow supposed to operate a double standard.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:03 am 
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guy smiley wrote:

The AFL accepted two resignations from two married senior executives last year for intra office affairs. If that was newsworthy then this is as well... unless we are somehow supposed to operate a double standard.


It's the Libs, double-standards abound...

TBH, I think Joyce was lucky yesterday - for the last two weeks on Q&A and 7.30, the questions have been a bit soft.

Direction from above maybe?


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:04 am 
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guy smiley wrote:
_fatprop wrote:


Hey, I just have a differing opinion on some of this type of stuff.

I think I can have that while still thinking personally that Barnaby is a dick



Yeah, you canhave any opinion you like, of course.

My opinion is that I question how this can be twisted into being called a 'shaming'.

It happened. They did it.


To him, no,

To her? We have already seen the wife issuing a statement as the devastated/wronged party and the media chasing the new pregnant partner, I think that is the shaming (those old fashioned underlying memes of the "scarlet women")

Quote:
The AFL accepted two resignations from two married senior executives last year for intra office affairs. If that was newsworthy then this is as well... unless we are somehow supposed to operate a double standard.


I don't think it is newsworthy, as long as it is consensual. Office relationships happen, people are probably together in an office longer that they with their spouse

If it isn't consensual, call the police ASAP

It is lazy management practice just to ban these relationships and just sack the parties involved


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:30 am 
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_fatprop wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
_fatprop wrote:


Hey, I just have a differing opinion on some of this type of stuff.

I think I can have that while still thinking personally that Barnaby is a dick



Yeah, you canhave any opinion you like, of course.

My opinion is that I question how this can be twisted into being called a 'shaming'.

It happened. They did it.


To him, no,

To her? We have already seen the wife issuing a statement as the devastated/wronged party and the media chasing the new pregnant partner, I think that is the shaming (those old fashioned underlying memes of the "scarlet women")

Quote:
The AFL accepted two resignations from two married senior executives last year for intra office affairs. If that was newsworthy then this is as well... unless we are somehow supposed to operate a double standard.


I don't think it is newsworthy, as long as it is consensual. Office relationships happen, people are probably together in an office longer that they with their spouse

If it isn't consensual, call the police ASAP

It is lazy management practice just to ban these relationships and just sack the parties involved


I tend to agree that for almost every profession, this is not a story. it wouldnt affect the persons ability to do their job. If the relationship between the two does start affecting the job then there is a point that the people may be stood down. But it doesnt necessarily mean it would. Of course, if an affair caused negative publicity for the employer then they would be completely within their rights to sanction the individuals.

But this is a special case. Politicians are elected to represent the people based on the moral values that they espouse. It is probably the one profession where your moral actions matter to how you do your job. Barnaby was elected based on his morals, one of which was the sanctity of marriage between a man and a woman. It is very newsworthy should he not live those morals. Its newsworthy because he was elected based on a set of morals. He makes policy based on his moral stance and his electorate have every right to know where he stands morally.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:46 am 
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Farva wrote:
But this is a special case. Politicians are elected to represent the people based on the moral values that they espouse. It is probably the one profession where your moral actions matter to how you do your job. Barnaby was elected based on his morals, one of which was the sanctity of marriage between a man and a woman. It is very newsworthy should he not live those morals. Its newsworthy because he was elected based on a set of morals. He makes policy based on his moral stance and his electorate have every right to know where he stands morally.


And he lacks morals...


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 3:55 am 
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The ALP will romp it in unless Shorten manages to do or say something really outrageous.


The tories will lose a significant slice of their female vote.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:14 am 
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Farva wrote:

I tend to agree that for almost every profession, this is not a story. it wouldnt affect the persons ability to do their job. If the relationship between the two does start affecting the job then there is a point that the people may be stood down. But it doesnt necessarily mean it would. Of course, if an affair caused negative publicity for the employer then they would be completely within their rights to sanction the individuals.


It is such a vexed issue and I fear a back lash.

I already know businesses who won't employ good looking young female staff, won't send a female and a male together on business trips; and are following the child protection rules and getting rid of all solid office doors replacing them with clear glass panels

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But this is a special case. Politicians are elected to represent the people based on the moral values that they espouse. It is probably the one profession where your moral actions matter to how you do your job. Barnaby was elected based on his morals, one of which was the sanctity of marriage between a man and a woman. It is very newsworthy should he not live those morals. Its newsworthy because he was elected based on a set of morals. He makes policy based on his moral stance and his electorate have every right to know where he stands morally.


Fair enough, I never considered him a moral person


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:18 am 
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_fatprop wrote:
Farva wrote:

I tend to agree that for almost every profession, this is not a story. it wouldnt affect the persons ability to do their job. If the relationship between the two does start affecting the job then there is a point that the people may be stood down. But it doesnt necessarily mean it would. Of course, if an affair caused negative publicity for the employer then they would be completely within their rights to sanction the individuals.


It is such a vexed issue and I fear a back lash.

I already know businesses who won't employ good looking young female staff, won't send a female and a male together on business trips; and are following the child protection rules and getting rid of all solid office doors replacing them with clear glass panels

Quote:
But this is a special case. Politicians are elected to represent the people based on the moral values that they espouse. It is probably the one profession where your moral actions matter to how you do your job. Barnaby was elected based on his morals, one of which was the sanctity of marriage between a man and a woman. It is very newsworthy should he not live those morals. Its newsworthy because he was elected based on a set of morals. He makes policy based on his moral stance and his electorate have every right to know where he stands morally.


Fair enough, I never considered him a moral person


Yeah, I think what you described above is overkill. Basically, if the affair doesn't affect business then who cares, keep it private and personal. If it does affect their ability to perform then it becomes the employers business. We are talking consenting adults here.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:24 am 
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They were caught in the middle of a messy office break up and have basically taken steps that it won't happen again easily


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 4:30 am 
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_fatprop wrote:
They were caught in the middle of a messy office break up and have basically taken steps that it won't happen again easily


Sorry, I was talking about general employers and employees.
I think politicians, given the very fact that people vote for someone to represent them based on their moral and political standpoint, should be held to a higher level of scrutiny for this sort of stuff. Barnaby Joyce, or any other politician, getting involved in actions that contradict what they state (Joyce is an ardent supporter of marriage) should be of interest to the public. The public need to know what sort of man Joyce is a he is representing them in deciding on the very laws that we live by. Like I said, I think politicians are different to most other professions in that personal life actions matter.

Equally, the messy office breakup may have affected Joyce's ability to do his job and that matters as well, and should be of interest to his employers (us).


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:01 am 
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Where is the happy couple going to live? In Canberra?


It is hard to imagine that they would get a riproaring welcome if they choose to live in Tamworth.



Come to that, Brainlessly will never feel at ease anywhere in his old stamping grounds. His wife hates him, his four daughters hate him, no doubt a lot of other relatives and former friends hate him.


But of course he will have to spend time in his seat. And he will have to expect a lot of hostiility.


The mighty "retail politician" will suffer. Given some of the populist shite he has thrown at the ellectorate over the years, ($200 legs of lamb, anyone?) I for one am pretty glad.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:08 am 
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wamberal99 wrote:
Where is the happy couple going to live? In Canberra?


It is hard to imagine that they would get a riproaring welcome if they choose to live in Tamworth.



Come to that, Brainlessly will never feel at ease anywhere in his old stamping grounds. His wife hates him, his four daughters hate him, no doubt a lot of other relatives and former friends hate him.


But of course he will have to spend time in his seat. And he will have to expect a lot of hostiility.


The mighty "retail politician" will suffer. Given some of the populist shite he has thrown at the ellectorate over the years, ($200 legs of lamb, anyone?) I for one am pretty glad.


He may not have to endure it for too long... there's a general election in the wings.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 10:56 pm 
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guy smiley wrote:
wamberal99 wrote:
Where is the happy couple going to live? In Canberra?


It is hard to imagine that they would get a riproaring welcome if they choose to live in Tamworth.



Come to that, Brainlessly will never feel at ease anywhere in his old stamping grounds. His wife hates him, his four daughters hate him, no doubt a lot of other relatives and former friends hate him.


But of course he will have to spend time in his seat. And he will have to expect a lot of hostiility.


The mighty "retail politician" will suffer. Given some of the populist shite he has thrown at the ellectorate over the years, ($200 legs of lamb, anyone?) I for one am pretty glad.


He may not have to endure it for too long... there's a general election in the wings.

Relevant to the redfaced ratfúck:


Calls For National Sick Day After Nation Forced To Imagine Barnaby Joyce Having Sex

By The Shovel on February 8, 2018

*TRIGGER WARNING – Contains distressing material*

Workers rights groups have called for a nation-wide day off, after millions of Australians were involuntarily subjected to the mental image of the member for New England having intercourse.

Marianne Nolan from Workers Health Australia said Wednesday was a harrowing day for many Australians, and that they needed time to recover. “There’s been a lot of nausea, a lot of small vomits in the mouth. We need to look after each other today”.

She the timing of the imagery only made things worse. “For most of us, it was over a bowl of cereal that the image of the Deputy Prime Minister naked and sexually active entered our minds. It was totally unexpected and quite gruesome.

“It’s bad enough having to see Barnaby fully clothed. But to think of him working up a sweat in the bedroom … I’m sorry, excuse me, sorry, I think I’m going to be sick”.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 12:37 am 
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guy smiley wrote:
wamberal99 wrote:
Where is the happy couple going to live? In Canberra?


It is hard to imagine that they would get a riproaring welcome if they choose to live in Tamworth.



Come to that, Brainlessly will never feel at ease anywhere in his old stamping grounds. His wife hates him, his four daughters hate him, no doubt a lot of other relatives and former friends hate him.


But of course he will have to spend time in his seat. And he will have to expect a lot of hostiility.


The mighty "retail politician" will suffer. Given some of the populist shite he has thrown at the ellectorate over the years, ($200 legs of lamb, anyone?) I for one am pretty glad.


He may not have to endure it for too long... there's a general election in the wings.


I think it will be rather close as usual

http://www.smh.com.au/comment/bill-shor ... 0vrnm.html

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What is especially significant about Turnbull's recovery is that the improvement in the Coalition position is largely being driven by Conservatives returning to the fold, having flirted with fringe right-wing parties. As both the Western Australian and Queensland elections have revealed, voters opt for sanity and predictability in their governments.

The sane centre continues to hold in Australian politics, though growing disparity in income distribution and increasing pressure on family budgets could conceivably revive angry populism. But for the moment, the hectoring "Milo" kids on Sky can continue to rant at transient passengers in airport lounges.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:56 am 
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The 'Turnbull recovery' is a bit of a myth. This week's Newspoll had them still trailing by a significant margin, at 48-52. That's pretty much where they've been for the past 18 months.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 9:07 am 
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Wow. Australian politics is at a very very low ebb right now.

Who could have imagined it could get worse than Abbott? :lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 9:12 am 
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Thai guy wrote:
Wow. Australian politics is at a very very low ebb right now.

Who could have imagined it could get worse than Abbott? :lol: :lol: :lol:

Few, is who.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 3:43 am 
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And the silly buggers created a new position for Brainlessley's girlfriend.


This will sink them, and they richly deserve it. Jobs for the pregnant girlfriends!!!!


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 5:09 am 
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wamberal99 wrote:
And the silly buggers created a new position for Brainlessley's girlfriend.


This will sink them, and they richly deserve it. Jobs for the pregnant girlfriends!!!!


It would be comical if it wasn't really happening. Most people I know just don't want to talk politics aside from squawking 'it's all crooked'.

They have a point.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 1:47 pm 
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Barney could be well and truly sunk on Monday stand by for an explosive revelation. If it happens he will be gone from politics and we could possibly be looking at a general election.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:59 pm 
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Brumbie_Steve wrote:
Barney could be well and truly sunk on Monday stand by for an explosive revelation. If it happens he will be gone from politics and we could possibly be looking at a general election.

Sexual assault?

Possibly pregnancy with another woman?

Incriminating photos of his beetroot face sweating profusely over the hind quarters of a domesticated beast... perhaps a breeding sow?


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 11:08 pm 
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Today's "Rupert" has a front page story the essence of which is that the Bumpkin's career is all but over, with Agrarian Socialist MPs reporting "white hot anger" is widespread amongst conservative constituents.


This is a chap who made a career out of being a good, clean, conservative, traditional family-orientated Catholic.


Well, by definition, that career is over, bar the shouting.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 11:25 pm 
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guy smiley wrote:
Brumbie_Steve wrote:
Barney could be well and truly sunk on Monday stand by for an explosive revelation. If it happens he will be gone from politics and we could possibly be looking at a general election.

Sexual assault?

Possibly pregnancy with another woman?

Incriminating photos of his beetroot face sweating profusely over the hind quarters of a domesticated beast... perhaps a breeding sow?


"Pork-barrelling"...


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:15 am 
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Nationals senator John "Wacka" Williams has backed his scandal-plagued leader, Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce, but suggested any revelations about misuse of public money could spell trouble for Mr Joyce.


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