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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 10:21 pm 
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Chilli wrote:
Great Fred. :thumbup: 8)

:thumbup: Why start a new match thread when we can just dig one up from two years ago?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:06 pm 
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saffer13 wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Great Fred. :thumbup: 8)

:thumbup: Why start a new match thread when we can just dig one up from two years ago?

Thread Stomped x(


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:07 pm 
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Listen chef, in your line of work you must have seen a few cool braai ideas...make yourself useful and post a few. :x


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:38 am 
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The braai is not the issue. It can be anything. It's the attention to detail. The cut of meat. The correct thickness for the type of meat. The preperation. The distance from the heat source. The heat itself. Managing the piece of meat.

I am trying to find an article on steak and the various cuts and the recommended thickness and what you should look for in the meat. Something that has always stuck with me is the Rump. Used to be my favourite cut but my supplier closed down and I have not been able to duplicate the taste I used to get in other butchers.
Have you ever bought a rump that looks like there the meat is going in 3 directions. I have and always cooked it as is. This piece is quite special as it is where the various meats join. The best way is to separate the 3 pieces and cook separately.

Anyway I will look for that article as it is very informative.

One thing I have also discovered is that cooking your mushrooms in your mushroom sauce destroys the flavour. It's better to cook your mushrooms first seasoning them so that they taste great. Make your sauce from the same pan using the flavour and seasoning left behind. When you serve pour the sauce over your meat and layer the mushrooms ontop. As you cut into your meat take a mushroom on your fork with the sauce. Makes a huge difference in taste.

Regarding Boerewors. I have been to and hosted many braais where your local experts put the whole thing on and swear by that. How many of you have struggled to manage this. Especially when sharing a braai and you need one of those lockable grids which take up the entire cooking area. I prefer to take the time to twist and cut my boerewors into portions and cook like that. It's easier to manage as you just roll them and serving is easier and you lose a lot less juice .

Pork chops. This is a very tricky piece of meat as it's either overcooked and dry and your crackling is great. Or nicely tender and your crackling is soft and undercooked. Take the time to slice your fat into little pieces without separating from the meat and coat the fat with salt and olive oil. You can experiment with taste here using truffle infused or even chilli infused olive oil. The smaller sections of fat cook a lot quicker especially with the olive oil. So when you have your choppie nice and tender ( and not overcooked) your crackling is ready.

Lamb chops need good seasoning. I don't season. My wife gas a better feel than I do. Don't be ashamed to admit that. It's a personal preference but I prefer medium rare.

Best height coals to meat...15cms.......tried and tested.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:08 am 
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Sards wrote:
The braai is not the issue. It can be anything. It's the attention to detail. The cut of meat. The correct thickness for the type of meat. The preperation. The distance from the heat source. The heat itself. Managing the piece of meat.

I am trying to find an article on steak and the various cuts and the recommended thickness and what you should look for in the meat. Something that has always stuck with me is the Rump. Used to be my favourite cut but my supplier closed down and I have not been able to duplicate the taste I used to get in other butchers.
Have you ever bought a rump that looks like there the meat is going in 3 directions. I have and always cooked it as is. This piece is quite special as it is where the various meats join. The best way is to separate the 3 pieces and cook separately.

Anyway I will look for that article as it is very informative.


This is the correct way to butcher a whole rump.

The top flap is what everyone is wanking over and is now called the Picata or something like this.

By butchering this way you still have fat on the meat [except the eye which is almost fillet like in texture] .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DnJv58Tnwo

Go to The Boer and Butcher in Durbanville, his website is under construction 021 976 8627. It is the best meat in Slaapstad, better than the fvcking Hipster "Celebrity Butchers" like Ryan Boon and his kak expensive cronies.

Buy a whole rump and get him to butcher it as per the video. Then WhatsApp me once you are eating :thumbup:

Lazy improperly trained blockmen merely clean up the rump then slice it into steaks leaving the sinew running through the steak and it gets tougher as you cook it.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:11 am 
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saffer13 wrote:
Right, I am moving house again and as usual, a braai project will be on the horizon. My last one is undoubtedly the reason my house sold in record time and for a record price. :thumbup:

Now I need some suggestions on the next project at the new place. I'd appreciate any saffas that have come across a nice braai setup would post some pictures for ideas please. Cheers and looking forward to seeing them.


Image


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:14 am 
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saffer13 wrote:
Listen chef, in your line of work you must have seen a few cool braai ideas...make yourself useful and post a few. :x

Buy good quality meat and don't mess around with it 8)

It is more about the heat source and the quality of the actual grid. You need a heavy grill to retain the heat to sear the meat, colour is flavour. The actual braai itself is of little importance. I bought one for R190 from Checkers and had the workshop make me a grid. It is excellent.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:15 am 
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rabble wrote:
saffer13 wrote:
Right, I am moving house again and as usual, a braai project will be on the horizon. My last one is undoubtedly the reason my house sold in record time and for a record price. :thumbup:

Now I need some suggestions on the next project at the new place. I'd appreciate any saffas that have come across a nice braai setup would post some pictures for ideas please. Cheers and looking forward to seeing them.


Image

:lol: :lol: :lol: is this the before or after pic?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:20 am 
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Chilli wrote:
rabble wrote:
saffer13 wrote:
Right, I am moving house again and as usual, a braai project will be on the horizon. My last one is undoubtedly the reason my house sold in record time and for a record price. :thumbup:

Now I need some suggestions on the next project at the new place. I'd appreciate any saffas that have come across a nice braai setup would post some pictures for ideas please. Cheers and looking forward to seeing them.


Image

:lol: :lol: :lol: is this the before or after pic?


Should they be different?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:21 am 
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One thing I have also discovered is that cooking your mushrooms in your mushroom sauce destroys the flavour. It's better to cook your mushrooms first seasoning them so that they taste great. Make your sauce from the same pan using the flavour and seasoning left behind. When you serve pour the sauce over your meat and layer the mushrooms ontop. As you cut into your meat take a mushroom on your fork with the sauce. Makes a huge difference in taste.


Sweat finely chopped onion,, season well with salt & pepper and herbs, in oil on a low heat till translucent, add sliced fresh garlic, don't let it discolour as when brown it is sour, add chopped mushrooms and increase the heat. Without burning the onion and garlic cook till the moisture is out and the mushrooms start to stick to the pan slightly, add brandy or scotch to deglaze, add some beef gravy [ or 1/2 a Knorr beef stock pot] stir then add cream, bring to boil, lower heat to reduce, check seasoning then add a 1/2 tablespoon of honey, stir through and serve.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:23 am 
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Regarding Boerewors. I have been to and hosted many braais where your local experts put the whole thing on and swear by that. How many of you have struggled to manage this. Especially when sharing a braai and you need one of those lockable grids which take up the entire cooking area. I prefer to take the time to twist and cut my boerewors into portions and cook like that. It's easier to manage as you just roll them and serving is easier and you lose a lot less juice .


Sounds about right. If you portion without twisting then all the fat cooks out and the boerie is dry.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:24 am 
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Chilli wrote:
Sards wrote:
The braai is not the issue. It can be anything. It's the attention to detail. The cut of meat. The correct thickness for the type of meat. The preperation. The distance from the heat source. The heat itself. Managing the piece of meat.

I am trying to find an article on steak and the various cuts and the recommended thickness and what you should look for in the meat. Something that has always stuck with me is the Rump. Used to be my favourite cut but my supplier closed down and I have not been able to duplicate the taste I used to get in other butchers.
Have you ever bought a rump that looks like there the meat is going in 3 directions. I have and always cooked it as is. This piece is quite special as it is where the various meats join. The best way is to separate the 3 pieces and cook separately.

Anyway I will look for that article as it is very informative.


This is the correct way to butcher a whole rump.

The top flap is what everyone is wanking over and is now called the Picata or something like this.

By butchering this way you still have fat on the meat [except the eye which is almost fillet like in texture] .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DnJv58Tnwo

Go to The Boer and Butcher in Durbanville, his website is under construction 021 976 8627. It is the best meat in Slaapstad, better than the fvcking Hipster "Celebrity Butchers" like Ryan Boon and his kak expensive cronies.

Buy a whole rump and get him to butcher it as per the video. Then WhatsApp me once you are eating :thumbup:

Lazy improperly trained blockmen merely clean up the rump then slice it into steaks leaving the sinew running through the steak and it gets tougher as you cook it.



:thumbup:

Will let you know


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:26 am 
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Chilli wrote:
Quote:
One thing I have also discovered is that cooking your mushrooms in your mushroom sauce destroys the flavour. It's better to cook your mushrooms first seasoning them so that they taste great. Make your sauce from the same pan using the flavour and seasoning left behind. When you serve pour the sauce over your meat and layer the mushrooms ontop. As you cut into your meat take a mushroom on your fork with the sauce. Makes a huge difference in taste.


Sweat finely chopped onion,, season well with salt & pepper and herbs, in oil on a low heat till translucent, add sliced fresh garlic, don't let it discolour as when brown it is sour, add chopped mushrooms and increase the heat. Without burning the onion and garlic cook till the moisture is out and the mushrooms start to stick to the pan slightly, add brandy or scotch to deglaze, add some beef gravy [ or 1/2 a Knorr beef stock pot] stir then add cream, bring to boil, lower heat to reduce, check seasoning then add a 1/2 tablespoon of honey, stir through and serve.



Will try this....What is deglazing......and why is it important?
We have found that cream adds a lot more texture to a sauce... :thumbup:
Why the honey?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:28 am 
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Pork chops. This is a very tricky piece of meat as it's either overcooked and dry and your crackling is great. Or nicely tender and your crackling is soft and undercooked. Take the time to slice your fat into little pieces without separating from the meat and coat the fat with salt and olive oil. You can experiment with taste here using truffle infused or even chilli infused olive oil. The smaller sections of fat cook a lot quicker especially with the olive oil. So when you have your choppie nice and tender ( and not overcooked) your crackling is ready.


Pork chops are either very this and you cook them on high heat for a very short period of time or thick cut and you sear on the high heat then move to a cooler heat, or close the lid of the Weber. Your Diablo should be great for a thick cut pork chop.

I never braai with olive oil as it burns at lower temperature than sunflower oil.

Pork does well with sweet or hot basting / marinades, much like chicken.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:32 am 
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Chilli is cruising his way to best Saffa poster :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:33 am 
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Sards wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Quote:
One thing I have also discovered is that cooking your mushrooms in your mushroom sauce destroys the flavour. It's better to cook your mushrooms first seasoning them so that they taste great. Make your sauce from the same pan using the flavour and seasoning left behind. When you serve pour the sauce over your meat and layer the mushrooms ontop. As you cut into your meat take a mushroom on your fork with the sauce. Makes a huge difference in taste.


Sweat finely chopped onion,, season well with salt & pepper and herbs, in oil on a low heat till translucent, add sliced fresh garlic, don't let it discolour as when brown it is sour, add chopped mushrooms and increase the heat. Without burning the onion and garlic cook till the moisture is out and the mushrooms start to stick to the pan slightly, add brandy or scotch to deglaze, add some beef gravy [ or 1/2 a Knorr beef stock pot] stir then add cream, bring to boil, lower heat to reduce, check seasoning then add a 1/2 tablespoon of honey, stir through and serve.



Will try this....What is deglazing......and why is it important?
We have found that cream adds a lot more texture to a sauce... :thumbup:
Why the honey?

Deglazing? The juices are cooked out of the pan and it is dry, the mushrooms start to stick to the bottom, add liquid and it brings back the moisture.

The honey brings balance to the sauce, I also add it to my pepper sauce.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:34 am 
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Chilli wrote:
I never braai with olive oil as it burns at lower temperature than sunflower oil.
.


That is why I rub it into the fatty rind....I find that your rind never cooks at the same pace as your meat unless it has assistance.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:36 am 
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Chilli wrote:
Sards wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Quote:
One thing I have also discovered is that cooking your mushrooms in your mushroom sauce destroys the flavour. It's better to cook your mushrooms first seasoning them so that they taste great. Make your sauce from the same pan using the flavour and seasoning left behind. When you serve pour the sauce over your meat and layer the mushrooms ontop. As you cut into your meat take a mushroom on your fork with the sauce. Makes a huge difference in taste.


Sweat finely chopped onion,, season well with salt & pepper and herbs, in oil on a low heat till translucent, add sliced fresh garlic, don't let it discolour as when brown it is sour, add chopped mushrooms and increase the heat. Without burning the onion and garlic cook till the moisture is out and the mushrooms start to stick to the pan slightly, add brandy or scotch to deglaze, add some beef gravy [ or 1/2 a Knorr beef stock pot] stir then add cream, bring to boil, lower heat to reduce, check seasoning then add a 1/2 tablespoon of honey, stir through and serve.



Will try this....What is deglazing......and why is it important?
We have found that cream adds a lot more texture to a sauce... :thumbup:
Why the honey?

Deglazing? The juices are cooked out of the pan and it is dry, the mushrooms start to stick to the bottom, add liquid and it brings back the moisture.

The honey brings balance to the sauce, I also add it to my pepper sauce.


:thumbup:

Bit nervous about the honey tbh.......not a fan of sweetness in my meats and curries.....unless its used to help the basting get that great colour.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:41 am 
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Another thing I learnt....had some clients over to my home to test the Diablo Charcoal oven....

Only add basting on towards the end of the process especially with chicken that needs time to cook.

If you add it too soon the basting will burn the skin and you might feel compelled to pull it off the fire and it will not be properly cooked. Only add towards the end.

I fu cked up the two chickens I threw into the oven by basting it from the beginning....

There were 5 chefs watching me and said absolutely nothing.

Actually they threw me and the missus because they were supposed to use the oven and prepare food for us to get a feel.

Bastards decided to drink rather....


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:43 am 
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Lamb chops need good seasoning. I don't season. My wife gas a better feel than I do. Don't be ashamed to admit that. It's a personal preference but I prefer medium rare.


Everything needs good seasoning. If you season before you cook then it adds flavour, if you season aonce cooked then all you taste is salt & pepper.

Use Maldon salt and crush or grind pepper fresh.

For lamb go for lemon and herb basting, make it yourself it is easy and SO much better.

Season lamb, then add fresh lemon juice [ not to much as it will start to cook the meat], chopped olive,fresh garlic, fresh herbs, chopped chilli and olive oil[ please don't quote my previous post :o ]. Mix together and leave for a bit. While braaing, add the left over oil with all the bits to a pan and heat gently to just cook the garlic, pour this over the lamb when on the serving plate.

My favourite is a deboned leg of lamb, well seasoned with herbs and then braaied whole and served with a garlic sauce.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:44 am 
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assfly wrote:
Chilli is cruising his way to best Saffa poster :thumbup:

8)


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:45 am 
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Sards wrote:
Chilli wrote:
I never braai with olive oil as it burns at lower temperature than sunflower oil.
.


That is why I rub it into the fatty rind....I find that your rind never cooks at the same pace as your meat unless it has assistance.

Sunflower Oil.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:46 am 
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Busy with a braai project as well. Massive braai (2 meter opening), with working tops left and right (1.2 meter each).
Floor is paving at the moment, want to get a concrete floor with big, rough edge outside tiles.
Getting a roof as well.

First quote was R 180 000! :x :((


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:46 am 
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Sards wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Sards wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Quote:
One thing I have also discovered is that cooking your mushrooms in your mushroom sauce destroys the flavour. It's better to cook your mushrooms first seasoning them so that they taste great. Make your sauce from the same pan using the flavour and seasoning left behind. When you serve pour the sauce over your meat and layer the mushrooms ontop. As you cut into your meat take a mushroom on your fork with the sauce. Makes a huge difference in taste.


Sweat finely chopped onion,, season well with salt & pepper and herbs, in oil on a low heat till translucent, add sliced fresh garlic, don't let it discolour as when brown it is sour, add chopped mushrooms and increase the heat. Without burning the onion and garlic cook till the moisture is out and the mushrooms start to stick to the pan slightly, add brandy or scotch to deglaze, add some beef gravy [ or 1/2 a Knorr beef stock pot] stir then add cream, bring to boil, lower heat to reduce, check seasoning then add a 1/2 tablespoon of honey, stir through and serve.



Will try this....What is deglazing......and why is it important?
We have found that cream adds a lot more texture to a sauce... :thumbup:
Why the honey?

Deglazing? The juices are cooked out of the pan and it is dry, the mushrooms start to stick to the bottom, add liquid and it brings back the moisture.

The honey brings balance to the sauce, I also add it to my pepper sauce.


:thumbup:

Bit nervous about the honey tbh.......not a fan of sweetness in my meats and curries.....unless its used to help the basting get that great colour.

Add a bit and taste it, you can always add more.
It is there as a balance to the meatiness of the gravy, not really to make it sweet.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:47 am 
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Sards wrote:
Another thing I learnt....had some clients over to my home to test the Diablo Charcoal oven....

Only add basting on towards the end of the process especially with chicken that needs time to cook.

If you add it too soon the basting will burn the skin and you might feel compelled to pull it off the fire and it will not be properly cooked. Only add towards the end.

I fu cked up the two chickens I threw into the oven by basting it from the beginning....

There were 5 chefs watching me and said absolutely nothing.

Actually they threw me and the missus because they were supposed to use the oven and prepare food for us to get a feel.

Quote:
Bastards decided to drink rather
....

Sounds about right :thumbup: :smug: :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:49 am 
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Sards, buy a Cote De Bouef and cook it like I suggested and serve with a blue cheese sauce.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:50 am 
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Let me get some work done.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:52 am 
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Sards wrote:
The braai is not the issue. It can be anything. It's the attention to detail. The cut of meat. The correct thickness for the type of meat. The preperation. The distance from the heat source. The heat itself. Managing the piece of meat.

I am trying to find an article on steak and the various cuts and the recommended thickness and what you should look for in the meat. Something that has always stuck with me is the Rump. Used to be my favourite cut but my supplier closed down and I have not been able to duplicate the taste I used to get in other butchers.
Have you ever bought a rump that looks like there the meat is going in 3 directions. I have and always cooked it as is. This piece is quite special as it is where the various meats join. The best way is to separate the 3 pieces and cook separately.

Anyway I will look for that article as it is very informative.

One thing I have also discovered is that cooking your mushrooms in your mushroom sauce destroys the flavour. It's better to cook your mushrooms first seasoning them so that they taste great. Make your sauce from the same pan using the flavour and seasoning left behind. When you serve pour the sauce over your meat and layer the mushrooms ontop. As you cut into your meat take a mushroom on your fork with the sauce. Makes a huge difference in taste.

Regarding Boerewors. I have been to and hosted many braais where your local experts put the whole thing on and swear by that. How many of you have struggled to manage this. Especially when sharing a braai and you need one of those lockable grids which take up the entire cooking area. I prefer to take the time to twist and cut my boerewors into portions and cook like that. It's easier to manage as you just roll them and serving is easier and you lose a lot less juice .

Pork chops. This is a very tricky piece of meat as it's either overcooked and dry and your crackling is great. Or nicely tender and your crackling is soft and undercooked. Take the time to slice your fat into little pieces without separating from the meat and coat the fat with salt and olive oil. You can experiment with taste here using truffle infused or even chilli infused olive oil. The smaller sections of fat cook a lot quicker especially with the olive oil. So when you have your choppie nice and tender ( and not overcooked) your crackling is ready.

Lamb chops need good seasoning. I don't season. My wife gas a better feel than I do. Don't be ashamed to admit that. It's a personal preference but I prefer medium rare.

Best height coals to meat...15cms.......tried and tested.

Steak should be about 2.5 to 3 cm thick. Massive bed of coals, grid about 10cm from the coals, 7 minutes in total for medium rare, just can't go wrong. Put it on the fat side for a while to start, to get it tasty.

Wors should never be cut before being put on the braai. Never braai too long, should be juicy.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:56 am 
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Chilli wrote:
assfly wrote:
Chilli is cruising his way to best Saffa poster :thumbup:

8)



:thumbup:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 7:57 am 
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Chilli wrote:
Sards, buy a Cote De Bouef and cook it like I suggested and serve with a blue cheese sauce.



ill need that blue cheese recipe


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:17 am 
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Sards wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Sards, buy a Cote De Bouef and cook it like I suggested and serve with a blue cheese sauce.



ill need that blue cheese recipe


Get a good quality RIPE cheese, like a Gorgonzola from Woolies, leave it out the fridge to get to room temperature, crumble into hot cream, stir in, reduce to thicken, add a shot of vodka to help cut the fattiness.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:54 am 
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I braai steak in the flames, not coals.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 11:56 am 
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Bokkom wrote:
I braai steak in the flames, not coals.

It is difficult to get even heat, therefore even cooking with flames. If you can get it then kudos to you ! :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:03 pm 
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Chilli wrote:
Sards wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Sards, buy a Cote De Bouef and cook it like I suggested and serve with a blue cheese sauce.



ill need that blue cheese recipe


Get a good quality RIPE cheese, like a Gorgonzola from Woolies, leave it out the fridge to get to room temperature, crumble into hot cream, stir in, reduce to thicken, add a shot of vodka to help cut the fattiness.

:thumbup:


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:22 pm 
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Chilli. :thumbup:


Enough to get me out of my hibernation. For a short while.


Try coconut oil for flame grilling a steak - had some dramatic effects with it. Lowish combustion temperature. Canola oil is much higher.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:23 pm 
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Another good steak - "picanha". Sirloin with a difference.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kLSy6bPWnk


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:26 pm 
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Wilson's Toffee wrote:
Chilli. :thumbup:


Enough to get me out of my hibernation. For a short while.


Try coconut oil for flame grilling a steak - had some dramatic effects with it. Lowish combustion temperature. Canola oil is much higher.

My donner, hy leef! Wat het van jou geword WT?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:42 pm 
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Location: Innie Kaap
Well done on your return ouboet

XOXOXO


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:55 pm 
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handyman wrote:
Wilson's Toffee wrote:
Chilli. :thumbup:


Enough to get me out of my hibernation. For a short while.


Try coconut oil for flame grilling a steak - had some dramatic effects with it. Lowish combustion temperature. Canola oil is much higher.

My donner, hy leef! Wat het van jou geword WT?



"Hibernate" so bietjie. Mors te veel tyd hier, het eergister begin kyk of jul nog leef na Rassie se eerse twee toetse.

Sal BAIE minder tyd hier moet deurbring - besigheid roep.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 12:56 pm 
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Sards wrote:
Well done on your return ouboet

XOXOXO



:lol:


:thumbup:


I still enjoy that Steelline braaier you sent me. Nice piece of work.


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