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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:24 am 
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A true story and perhaps some words of encouragement for the farmers.

In 1983/84, SA was also having tremendous droughts. My father was the editor of 2 farming Magazines in the Low-veldt, but also had a close relationship with the farming community, having grown up as the son of a farmer outside Nelspruit.

In 1983/84 my youngest brother, who was 7 months old, was diagnosed with a myocadrdial anomaly a problematic aorta and a left to right shunt, basically ready to die.

So the night before the surgeons were to open my little brother's chest, my father told me, he was lying in bed thinking about the drought the farmers were going through and the serious surgery his baby son was going to have the following day. So he thought he had to say a prayer, asking to relieve the farmers' suffering by bringing rain and if there was some mercy left, to stand by his son during the op. He says he faded in to sleep before he could say Amen.

A bolt of lightning awoke him at 5 in the morning the next day and it was pouring buckets all over the Eastern Transvaal. He says he also immediately knew that his son would be just fine, and he is 30 something today.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:29 am 
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Farmers are experts when it comes to praying.

Even so, a very good, inspiring anecdote, BL.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:34 am 
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Bad Lieutenant wrote:
A true story and perhaps some words of encouragement for the farmers.

In 1983/84, SA was also having tremendous droughts. My father was the editor of 2 farming Magazines in the Low-veldt, but also had a close relationship with the farming community, having grown up as the son of a farmer outside Nelspruit.

In 1983/84 my youngest brother, who was 7 months old, was diagnosed with a myocadrdial anomaly a problematic aorta and a left to right shunt, basically ready to die.

So the night before the surgeons were to open my little brother's chest, my father told me, he was lying in bed thinking about the drought the farmers were going through and the serious surgery his baby son was going to have the following day. So he thought he had to say a prayer, asking to relieve the farmers' suffering by bringing rain and if there was some mercy left, to stand by his son during the op. He says he faded in to sleep before he could say Amen.

A bolt of lightning awoke him at 5 in the morning the next day and it was pouring buckets all over the Eastern Transvaal. He says he also immediately knew that his son would be just fine, and he is 30 something today.


I lived in a small town in western Transvaal in the early 80s and lived through the droughts. Every Sunday the whole town would go to church and pray for rain. Then one day, after only about two years of praying, God answered their prayers and the drought was over. Proof that God exists.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:43 am 
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Mad suppet wrote:
Bad Lieutenant wrote:
A true story and perhaps some words of encouragement for the farmers.

In 1983/84, SA was also having tremendous droughts. My father was the editor of 2 farming Magazines in the Low-veldt, but also had a close relationship with the farming community, having grown up as the son of a farmer outside Nelspruit.

In 1983/84 my youngest brother, who was 7 months old, was diagnosed with a myocadrdial anomaly a problematic aorta and a left to right shunt, basically ready to die.

So the night before the surgeons were to open my little brother's chest, my father told me, he was lying in bed thinking about the drought the farmers were going through and the serious surgery his baby son was going to have the following day. So he thought he had to say a prayer, asking to relieve the farmers' suffering by bringing rain and if there was some mercy left, to stand by his son during the op. He says he faded in to sleep before he could say Amen.

A bolt of lightning awoke him at 5 in the morning the next day and it was pouring buckets all over the Eastern Transvaal. He says he also immediately knew that his son would be just fine, and he is 30 something today.


I lived in a small town in western Transvaal in the early 80s and lived through the droughts. Every Sunday the whole town would go to church and pray for rain. Then one day, after only about two years of praying, God answered their prayers and the drought was over. Proof that God exists.


Well I don't think our examples are any proof, as it certainly wouldn't prove anything to a rational non-believer. But to people who has strong faith and rock steady commitment to a higher power, it serves as some encouragement for sure. Most people nowadays only believe what their senses can detect. Smell proof, touch proof, see proof.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:52 am 
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Bad Lieutenant wrote:
Mad suppet wrote:
Bad Lieutenant wrote:
A true story and perhaps some words of encouragement for the farmers.

In 1983/84, SA was also having tremendous droughts. My father was the editor of 2 farming Magazines in the Low-veldt, but also had a close relationship with the farming community, having grown up as the son of a farmer outside Nelspruit.

In 1983/84 my youngest brother, who was 7 months old, was diagnosed with a myocadrdial anomaly a problematic aorta and a left to right shunt, basically ready to die.

So the night before the surgeons were to open my little brother's chest, my father told me, he was lying in bed thinking about the drought the farmers were going through and the serious surgery his baby son was going to have the following day. So he thought he had to say a prayer, asking to relieve the farmers' suffering by bringing rain and if there was some mercy left, to stand by his son during the op. He says he faded in to sleep before he could say Amen.

A bolt of lightning awoke him at 5 in the morning the next day and it was pouring buckets all over the Eastern Transvaal. He says he also immediately knew that his son would be just fine, and he is 30 something today.


I lived in a small town in western Transvaal in the early 80s and lived through the droughts. Every Sunday the whole town would go to church and pray for rain. Then one day, after only about two years of praying, God answered their prayers and the drought was over. Proof that God exists.


Well I don't think our examples are any proof, as it certainly wouldn't prove anything to a rational non-believer. But to people who has strong faith and rock steady commitment to a higher power, it serves as some encouragement for sure. Most people nowadays only believe what their senses can detect. Smell proof, touch proof, see proof.

Science proof.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:05 am 
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Mad suppet wrote:
Science proof.



Ja. Global warming style.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:05 am 
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Mad suppet wrote:
Bad Lieutenant wrote:
Mad suppet wrote:
Bad Lieutenant wrote:
A true story and perhaps some words of encouragement for the farmers.

In 1983/84, SA was also having tremendous droughts. My father was the editor of 2 farming Magazines in the Low-veldt, but also had a close relationship with the farming community, having grown up as the son of a farmer outside Nelspruit.

In 1983/84 my youngest brother, who was 7 months old, was diagnosed with a myocadrdial anomaly a problematic aorta and a left to right shunt, basically ready to die.

So the night before the surgeons were to open my little brother's chest, my father told me, he was lying in bed thinking about the drought the farmers were going through and the serious surgery his baby son was going to have the following day. So he thought he had to say a prayer, asking to relieve the farmers' suffering by bringing rain and if there was some mercy left, to stand by his son during the op. He says he faded in to sleep before he could say Amen.

A bolt of lightning awoke him at 5 in the morning the next day and it was pouring buckets all over the Eastern Transvaal. He says he also immediately knew that his son would be just fine, and he is 30 something today.


I lived in a small town in western Transvaal in the early 80s and lived through the droughts. Every Sunday the whole town would go to church and pray for rain. Then one day, after only about two years of praying, God answered their prayers and the drought was over. Proof that God exists.


Well I don't think our examples are any proof, as it certainly wouldn't prove anything to a rational non-believer. But to people who has strong faith and rock steady commitment to a higher power, it serves as some encouragement for sure. Most people nowadays only believe what their senses can detect. Smell proof, touch proof, see proof.

Science proof.


Eaxctly. Like science can prove a pretty flower can inspire a book that changes the lives of people and brings about a change in fortunes for one person that becomes a hero in his work on the floral kingdom that the pretty flower was from.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:22 am 
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Bad Lieutenant wrote:
Mad suppet wrote:
Bad Lieutenant wrote:
Mad suppet wrote:
Well I don't think our examples are any proof, as it certainly wouldn't prove anything to a rational non-believer. But to people who has strong faith and rock steady commitment to a higher power, it serves as some encouragement for sure. Most people nowadays only believe what their senses can detect. Smell proof, touch proof, see proof.

Science proof.


Eaxctly. Like science can prove a pretty flower can inspire a book that changes the lives of people and brings about a change in fortunes for one person that becomes a hero in his work on the floral kingdom that the pretty flower was from.


Actually science doesn't prove that. You're thinking about emotions, linked to fiction, also known as religion.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:29 am 
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I wish I could give you Os some of our rain. :(


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:33 am 
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Mad suppet wrote:
Bad Lieutenant wrote:
Mad suppet wrote:
Bad Lieutenant wrote:
Mad suppet wrote:
Well I don't think our examples are any proof, as it certainly wouldn't prove anything to a rational non-believer. But to people who has strong faith and rock steady commitment to a higher power, it serves as some encouragement for sure. Most people nowadays only believe what their senses can detect. Smell proof, touch proof, see proof.

Science proof.


Eaxctly. Like science can prove a pretty flower can inspire a book that changes the lives of people and brings about a change in fortunes for one person that becomes a hero in his work on the floral kingdom that the pretty flower was from.


Actually science doesn't prove that. You're thinking about emotions, linked to fiction, also known as religion.


Indeed, science cannot prove that. Inspiration is not scientific, nor is art or emotions. But religion is a different monkey all together. The fact that it gives people faith yet another subject on it's own. My view is faith can be had without religion, if you have the time and inclination to live a sensual life of observation amongst others. However, these discussions I have come to learn, are not appropriate on a cynical rugby forum.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:38 am 
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Had one motherfucker of a hail storm a few days ago up here in Joburg. Whatever you do, do not pray for one of those!


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:50 am 
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hedogbrother wrote:
Had one motherfucker of a hail storm a few days ago up here in Joburg. Whatever you do, do not pray for one of those!


LOL...Yep it was big. Missus got caught on William Nicol sitting in traffic. And this after we had hail damaged removed from last year, so there goes R2500 excess again. Sent her a text to wait before leaving work...ah well. Notice hail never falls twice in one day in the same area. I have never seen that. So my thoughts were let it hail for 10 minutes then leave with certainty you won't get struck. Headstrong and in that difficult late 20s period young women seem to have.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:20 pm 
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Drought, religion, just throw in some incest and this thread has the template for 99% of all literature ever penned Afrikaans.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:26 pm 
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Mr. White wrote:
Drought, religion, just throw in some incest and this thread has the template for 99% of all literature ever penned Afrikaans.


Try watch a serious Afrikaans movie! fudge me, always some railway children and a retarded kid in it, on a farm suffering from drought and a priest that prays for everyone...fokken Fiela se Kind kak, Nag van die Fokken 19de.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:31 pm 
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I feel your pain guys. Mt Isa and QLD's Northwest region (which covers an area larger than France) is currently experiencing one of its worst droughts in living memory. We've had one wet day all year, and this is the second wet season in a row where we've had no rain. Our city's dam is down to 28% and cattle farmers in surrounding areas have been forced to kill all but their breeding stock months ago. Many graziers have committed suicide.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:38 pm 
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Mr. White wrote:
Drought, religion, just throw in some incest and this thread has the template for 99% of all literature ever penned Afrikaans.

How about some statutory rape at Paarl Gym for OomPB?


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 1:51 pm 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
I feel your pain guys. Mt Isa and QLD's Northwest region (which covers an area larger than France) is currently experiencing one of its worst droughts in living memory. We've had one wet day all year, and this is the second wet season in a row where we've had no rain. Our city's dam is down to 28% and cattle farmers in surrounding areas have been forced to kill all but their breeding stock months ago. Many graziers have committed suicide.


Sad to hear that.
Got to wonder if global warming is playing a role in destabilising weather. If so, I wish we could irrefutably prove it and sway politics. From what I can tell, Australia and SA would both be massive losers in these long term weather projections.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 1:56 pm 
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springtide wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:
I feel your pain guys. Mt Isa and QLD's Northwest region (which covers an area larger than France) is currently experiencing one of its worst droughts in living memory. We've had one wet day all year, and this is the second wet season in a row where we've had no rain. Our city's dam is down to 28% and cattle farmers in surrounding areas have been forced to kill all but their breeding stock months ago. Many graziers have committed suicide.


Sad to hear that.
Got to wonder if global warming is playing a role in destabilising weather. If so, I wish we could irrefutably prove it and sway politics. From what I can tell, Australia and SA would both be massive losers in these long term weather projections.


Things are getting much more extreme now. 3 years ago QLD experienced it's worse floods in living memory. 2 thirds of the state was literally underwater. Since then, large sections of inland QLD have had virtually had no rain.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 1:59 pm 
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springtide wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:
I feel your pain guys. Mt Isa and QLD's Northwest region (which covers an area larger than France) is currently experiencing one of its worst droughts in living memory. We've had one wet day all year, and this is the second wet season in a row where we've had no rain. Our city's dam is down to 28% and cattle farmers in surrounding areas have been forced to kill all but their breeding stock months ago. Many graziers have committed suicide.


Sad to hear that.
Got to wonder if global warming is playing a role in destabilising weather.


It's Climate Change, not GW. And a two year drought in parts of QLD is fuck-all. Calm down everyone.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:02 pm 
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Sandstorm wrote:
springtide wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:
I feel your pain guys. Mt Isa and QLD's Northwest region (which covers an area larger than France) is currently experiencing one of its worst droughts in living memory. We've had one wet day all year, and this is the second wet season in a row where we've had no rain. Our city's dam is down to 28% and cattle farmers in surrounding areas have been forced to kill all but their breeding stock months ago. Many graziers have committed suicide.


Sad to hear that.
Got to wonder if global warming is playing a role in destabilising weather.


It's Climate Change, not GW. And a two year drought in parts of QLD is fuck-all. Calm down everyone.


I stand corrected.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:07 pm 
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We had excruciatingly dry periods in the interior during the 1980s, as well as a couple of floods (1988 springs to mind). El Nino/El Nina weather phenomena were blamed, at the time.
I do not think AGW has much to do with it.

This is "normal" to me, although it is very bad on the livestock and farmers.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 6:02 pm 
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Drought.

As a kid growing up I remember it too well from a farmer's viewpoint. Every morning my father would look to the horizon, normally in the west, to see if there was any sign of clouds. And often during the day, he would stop what he was doing and look there again. Now and again the clouds would build up, then dissipate or pass over. Sometimes you would hear some thunder, but if rain fell it wasn't on our side of the mountains. The boreholes and dams would be running dry and the livestock moved into different areas to try to keep them alive, but then the grass would all be eaten, and what there was left would be so crispy as to have little food value. So he would go into overdraft buying food for them just to keep them going. The alternative would be to sell them to the butcher, but they would be so skinny so you would get a poor price.

But then the expected rains would fall, and everything would turn from brown to a bright green, and life was good, until the heat and dryness came back again shriveling all the new grass.

It is different for the crop farmers though. They might get the first rains and feel that the rainy season has started, so would plough the fields, and fertilize and plant their seeds, one of the farmers biggest expenses. Then no more rain to properly germinate the seeds which would either grow a little, or just rot in the ground. You can see that in places when driving through the Free State where a farmers has mistimed his planting. Of course in a really bad drought year the rains would come too late for any substantial crop.

I remember one drought year for Durban. We went down for the Comrades, and in the hotel toilets there were the signs "If it is brown, flush it down. If it is yellow, let it mellow". All the households had very limited allowances, so everybody used the same very shallow bath water on the days that they bathed. Some fellow had set up some sort of desalination plant and kindly donated bottled water for the runners. God, it was salty! You should have seen all the runners puking from it. I just tried one bottle, and ran the rest of the way only drinking coke. Of course most of us landed up pretty dehydrated.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 6:17 pm 
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Interesting post Fangle. What I never understood though, is why cattle are preferred to sheep which are much more hardy. Better prices for meat? So it would be more of a high risk/ high reward scenario?


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 15, 2013 6:25 pm 
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springtide wrote:
Interesting post Fangle. What I never understood though, is why cattle are preferred to sheep which are much more hardy. Better prices for meat? So it would be more of a high risk/ high reward scenario?


We farmed both cattle and sheep. But it depends on the type of grass you have as to what you can farm. We stopped with the sheep as in recent years thievery has increased, and it is much easier to make off with a sheep. By 'we', I mean my family.


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 17, 2013 8:05 am 
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Yes, in bad times, what little you can grow gets nicked.

We had a small orchard of Litchi trees which provided an income over Christmas with all the tourists coming down to the South Coast, but the locals would scale the farm fences and strip the trees at night.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 10:15 am 
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30mm of rain over the weekend. Hope it continues.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 10:34 am 
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How many rain elsewhere, we had 100+mm on friday/saturday


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 12:42 pm 
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springtide wrote:
Interesting post Fangle. What I never understood though, is why cattle are preferred to sheep which are much more hardy. Better prices for meat? So it would be more of a high risk/ high reward scenario?


Prices for mutton/lamb are high because the demand outweighs the supply. Sheep are scarce because the chances of theft are higher than with cattle therefore farmers rather opt for cattle. If by any chance sheep was not so risky and more farmers started keeping sheep the prices will eventually dwindle and you’ll probably find pork more pricy because no one wants to keep pigs.
I keep sheep but I’ve gone through great pains to ensure that my security is very tight.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:00 pm 
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Cash turnaround time with cattle is slower, too. If a cow breeds in January, she will calve end September. The calve has to grow at least nine months to wean, when it will be sold to a feedlot. That gives on eighteen months, at the least, to get one's money back on a single calve.

Sheep gestate for six months, and are easily sold at six months old - that cuts the turnaround time by fifty per cent.

Also, sheep can graze and grow fat on fields where cattle would die of hunger. Better exploiters of feed, smaller mouths,can live of much shorter grass, etc. Even off Karoo-bossie, which lends it it's distintctive flavour.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:04 pm 
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Chicken prices to rocket in next few months. Chicken runners a plenty nowadays.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:19 pm 
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If decent rain doesn't come soon, farmers will be forced to sell off breeding stock, for slaughter. That will send red meat prices skyward. The same for rain and maize production - any shortage of maize will reflect in higher maize, and thus meat, prices.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:20 pm 
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OomPB wrote:
Chicken prices to rocket in next few months. Chicken runners a plenty nowadays.


:lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:55 pm 
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I am pleased that proper farmers have turned up to stop my guess work.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 18, 2013 2:15 pm 
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Fangle wrote:
I am pleased that proper farmers have turned up to stop my guess work.



You have the farming outlook down perfect. You described a day, a week, a season for the farmer perfectly, in only a few words.

I well remember the anguish.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:56 am 
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Back from RSA, such a beautiful country really missed the beauty since chicken running to OZ and yes indeed Kimberley(Northern Cape) & Bloemfontein (Free State) were dry as a bone and could do with a ton of rain, had some 37c+ days there but still it was worth it just to see the central bit and speak with some of the locals!

Route 62 was amazing as well as the drive along the coast to Cape Town.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:14 am 
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Good to hear you still love the place. There will always be space here, for such people.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 10:14 am 
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odd144 wrote:
Back from RSA, such a beautiful country really missed the beauty since chicken running to OZ and yes indeed Kimberley(Northern Cape) & Bloemfontein (Free State) were dry as a bone and could do with a ton of rain, had some 37c+ days there but still it was worth it just to see the central bit and speak with some of the locals!

Route 62 was amazing as well as the drive along the coast to Cape Town.


:thumbup:

How was your trip to Bloem? ;)


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 11:53 am 
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DraadkarD wrote:
odd144 wrote:
Back from RSA, such a beautiful country really missed the beauty since chicken running to OZ and yes indeed Kimberley(Northern Cape) & Bloemfontein (Free State) were dry as a bone and could do with a ton of rain, had some 37c+ days there but still it was worth it just to see the central bit and speak with some of the locals!

Route 62 was amazing as well as the drive along the coast to Cape Town.


:thumbup:

How was your trip to Bloem? ;)

Bloem surprised me as it was very nice place and had all the modern comfort, your Water Front shoping centre was huge.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 12:16 pm 
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odd144 wrote:
DraadkarD wrote:
odd144 wrote:
Back from RSA, such a beautiful country really missed the beauty since chicken running to OZ and yes indeed Kimberley(Northern Cape) & Bloemfontein (Free State) were dry as a bone and could do with a ton of rain, had some 37c+ days there but still it was worth it just to see the central bit and speak with some of the locals!

Route 62 was amazing as well as the drive along the coast to Cape Town.


:thumbup:

How was your trip to Bloem? ;)

Bloem surprised me as it was very nice place and had all the modern comfort, your Water Front shoping centre was huge.


It seems that the Municipality is really trying to fix up Bloem. A lot of new projects in the pipeline.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 21, 2013 12:23 pm 
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odd144 wrote:
DraadkarD wrote:
odd144 wrote:
Back from RSA, such a beautiful country really missed the beauty since chicken running to OZ and yes indeed Kimberley(Northern Cape) & Bloemfontein (Free State) were dry as a bone and could do with a ton of rain, had some 37c+ days there but still it was worth it just to see the central bit and speak with some of the locals!

Route 62 was amazing as well as the drive along the coast to Cape Town.


:thumbup:

How was your trip to Bloem? ;)

Bloem surprised me as it was very nice place and had all the modern comfort, your Water Front shoping centre was huge.



I rather suspect that this post will have AC adding to his proven liars list.


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