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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 3:09 am 
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German SS guards, exhausted from their forced labour clearing the bodies of the dead at Bergen-Belsen, are allowed a brief rest by British soldiers but are forced to take it by lying face down in one of the empty mass graves, 1945


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 3:34 am 
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 3:59 am 
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Bismarck firing against the Prince of Wales after sinking HMS Hood (i.redd.it)


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 5:03 am 
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Taranaki Snapper wrote:
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Original caption:

"S'il vous plait, monsieurs... hold still and stop ze shooting for sree minutes zo I can get enough expozure time on zis shot!"


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 4:03 am 
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There are some outstanding shots here

http://www.orrazz.com/2012/12/an-album- ... war-2.html

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 6:09 am 
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Paris Kanonen set up by the wehrmacht to terrorise Paris population during WWI. Its range was 120 km :shock: Its shells trajectory culminated at 40 km.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2018 7:36 pm 
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kiap wrote:
^ Sounds like an urban legend ...

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Moustache vs beard. Who wins outta these roosters?

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Turban legend you mean ?!


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 12:21 am 
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 12:25 am 
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 2:52 am 
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^^^ :shock:

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Four female pilots leaving their ship, Pistol Packin' Mama, at the four engine school at Lockbourne AAF. They are members of a group of Women Airforce Service Pilots who have been trained to ferry the B-17 Flying Fortresses. World War II, 1944. (i.redd.it)


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 10:42 am 
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A photograph believed to be of Gerda Taro, one of the world’s first and greatest war photographers, apparently lying on her deathbed in a hospital during the Spanish civil war, has been found 80 years after she was killed.

The photograph was published on Twitter several days ago by John Kiszely, a retired British lieutenant general, whose Hungarian father, Dr Janos Kiszely, was a volunteer doctor with the International Brigades who fought against Gen Francisco Franco during the Spanish civil war.

The photograph shows Dr Kiszely dabbing at blood that has trickled from the nose and mouth of a young woman with short, dark hair and finely plucked eyebrows. She looks remarkably like Taro, who died after she was knocked off the running board of a car by a tank during a fierce, chaotic battle near El Escorial, north-west of Madrid, in July 1937.

An inscription on the back in Spanish and English, which appears to have been added much later, reads: “Brunete Front, June 1937 (in Torrelodones) Mrs Frank Capa = of Ce Soire of Paris, killed at Brunete.”

German-raised Taro, who carried a Polish passport, published her photographs in Ce Soir. She worked with the future Magnum agency co-founder Robert Capa, who was also her partner and first became famous as a war photographer in Spain. She died while photographing a chaotic retreat after the Battle of Brunete, shortly after Franco’s troops had won a major victory.

By the time of her death, both Taro and Capa had become famous and Ce Soir organised a huge funeral for her in Paris.

Taro had ignored warnings from Capa and others to stay away from the frontline at one of the most dangerous moments in the war and, having used up all her film, had hitched a ride on the running boards of a general’s car that was being used to ferry the injured. As they were strafed by German aircraft supporting Franco’s troops near Villanueva de la Cañada, an out-of-control tank from the republican army ran into them and she was mortally wounded in the stomach.

She was still alive and conscious when she arrived at the British hospital in El Escorial, however, where she was operated on by the New Zealand surgeon Dr Douglas Jolly – but she died that night. Witnesses spoke of her face being covered with blood.

The following day, two of her friends, the Spanish poet Rafael Alberti and his wife, María Teresa León, received a call telling them the body was at the hospital.

“She shouldn’t have been there. It was a far too dangerous part of the battle,” said Jane Rogoyska, author of a recent biography of the photographer. “She got too involved, became a star reporter and overidentified with the republican cause. But she got into this conviction that she had to bear witness. The troops loved her and she kept pushing. Capa warned her not to take so many risks.”

Kiszely told the Guardian his father did not talk much about the Spanish civil war, but had said he worked with an English field hospital, doing triage on the injured.

English volunteers encouraged him to go to Britain with them after the war, when the Hungarian embassy in Paris made it clear that, as a supporter of the leftwing republican side during the civil war, he would not be welcome in Hungary. He eventually settled on the Isle of Wight.

Kiszely was handed the photograph after his father’s death by Reg Saxton, a British volunteer who had worked with the international medical services on the republican side.

“I never looked at the back,” he said. “To me this was just a photograph of my father with another patient.” But after he posted it on Twitter two days ago, Spanish civil war enthusiasts began to ask him more – and he then looked at the back.

Spanish media are hailing it as a remarkable find.

“It certainly looks like her,” agreed Richard Baxell, a historian and expert on the Spanish civil war – though he also called for further investigation.

“My very first impression is that it does look very like Gerda Taro,” said Rogoyska, adding that many people in Spain had thought that she was Capa’s wife. “The thing that inclines one to think it is Gerda Taro is the short hair and those very thin eyebrows, and just the fragility of the body.”

Rogoyska said further corroboration was needed about the origins of the mysterious photograph along with more information about Dr Kiszely’s movements before anybody could be sure. “Otherwise it is guesswork,” she said.

The inscription on the back of the photograph gives the wrong month for Taro’s death and talks of Torrelodones, a town 15 miles away from El Escorial – adding further mystery. The fact it names “Frank Capa” suggests that whoever wrote it mixed Robert Capa up with the famous film director Frank Capra.

For many years photographs taken by Taro were attributed to Capa and Rogoyska said that, after her death and during the early Magnum years, their pictures often ended up being “lumped together”.

“There was a covering over of her presence, not maliciously, but because there was no one there to say ‘this is by him’ or ‘that is by her’,” she added.

Capa co-founded the famous Magnum agency in 1947 and died after stepping on a landmine in Vietnam in 1954.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 3:03 am 
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American infantrymen of the U.S. Army’s 92nd Infantry Division (“Buffalo Soldiers Division”) are photographed at rest in Italy. Province of La Spezia, Liguria. April 1945. (i.redd.it)


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 6:35 am 
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PFC Floyd Rogers of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 29 June 1944 (Later killed in action on 12 July 1944). At the time of this photo, Rogers had been credited with sniping 27 German marksmen with his BAR. (i.redd.it)


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 9:47 pm 
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Taranaki Snapper wrote:
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PFC Floyd Rogers of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 29 June 1944 (Later killed in action on 12 July 1944). At the time of this photo, Rogers had been credited with sniping 27 German marksmen with his BAR. (i.redd.it)




Seems odd, is this corroborated somewhere?


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 9:50 pm 
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hornets wrote:
Taranaki Snapper wrote:
Image

Quote:
PFC Floyd Rogers of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 29 June 1944 (Later killed in action on 12 July 1944). At the time of this photo, Rogers had been credited with sniping 27 German marksmen with his BAR. (i.redd.it)




Seems odd, is this corroborated somewhere?

BAR as a Snipper weapon does not really add up


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 11:20 pm 
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Doesn't have to be 'sniped' per se, but he could have emptied a clip into a sniper's nest.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 11:40 pm 
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^This
Laurent wrote:
hornets wrote:
Taranaki Snapper wrote:
Spoiler: show
Image
Quote:
PFC Floyd Rogers of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 29 June 1944 (Later killed in action on 12 July 1944). At the time of this photo, Rogers had been credited with sniping 27 German marksmen with his BAR. (i.redd.it)

Seems odd, is this corroborated somewhere?

BAR as a Snipper weapon does not really add up

By this source here, the man pictured did kill the 27 Germans.

However, I'd say the BAR in WW2 was an "anti-sniper" weapon, not a sniping weapon itself ... more so in the Pacific theatre against the Japanese than against the Germans ... but still, one BAR man was at times more effective against snipers than the rest of his attached rifle platoon combined.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2018 7:16 am 
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An one-armed RAF commanding officer, standing beside his all-black Hawker Hurricane. The Hurricane is sporting his personal emblem showing his amputated arm waving a 'V' sign, West Sussex, England. Circa 1941-1943. Colorized.(i.redd.it)


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2018 9:22 am 
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kiap wrote:
^This
Laurent wrote:
hornets wrote:
Taranaki Snapper wrote:
Spoiler: show
Image
Quote:
PFC Floyd Rogers of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 29 June 1944 (Later killed in action on 12 July 1944). At the time of this photo, Rogers had been credited with sniping 27 German marksmen with his BAR. (i.redd.it)

Seems odd, is this corroborated somewhere?

BAR as a Snipper weapon does not really add up

By this source here, the man pictured did kill the 27 Germans.

However, I'd say the BAR in WW2 was an "anti-sniper" weapon, not a sniping weapon itself ... more so in the Pacific theatre against the Japanese than against the Germans ... but still, one BAR man was at times more effective against snipers than the rest of his attached rifle platoon combined.

Caption is ambiguous ;)

Well Known Aircraft builder in original name

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 2:13 am 
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http://www.oldpolicecellsmuseum.org.uk/ ... _policeman


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 2:42 am 
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"Present...HARMS!"


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 5:23 am 
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Allied (British, American, Soviet) soldiers mock Hitler atop his balcony at the Reich Chancellery, 1945 (i.redd.it)


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:59 am 
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isn’t that the frenchy fighter that actually couldn’t get off the ground on it’s maiden attempt as they initially made the wings too small ?
Or was it deliberate, as pretty hard to fight if you stay on the ground !


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:03 am 
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backrow wrote:
isn’t that the frenchy fighter that actually couldn’t get off the ground on it’s maiden attempt as they initially made the wings too small ?
Or was it deliberate, as pretty hard to fight if you stay on the ground !

Here comes stereotype boy.

here is what they make now under the new name

Spoiler: show
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 11:33 pm 
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Several photos from WWI that were tobacco cards ("My mum smoked herself to DEATH to get the whole set!")

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Spot the Frenchman caught mid-belch

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More: http://www.vintag.es/2018/01/rare-photo ... rough.html


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 04, 2018 9:53 am 
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Belfast, 1980.(i.redd.it)


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:50 pm 
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PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 12:20 am 
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Crews of No 106 Squadron photographed in front of Lancaster ZN-B R5573, at Syerston, Nottinghamshire, on the morning after the raids on Genoa, 22-23 October 1942. "Fourth from the right is Australian Flight Officer David John Shannon, a future 'Dambuster' and leading light of No 617 Squadron."

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This guy: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mom%C4%8D ... 0uji%C4%87


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 4:44 am 
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The Museum was recently contacted to see if we could substantiate whether an RAF airman had survived falling from his aircraft without a parachute by landing in snow. “That sounds unlikely”, I thought, like an urban legend. It couldn’t really have happened, could it? As it transpired, the airman in question had in fact been lucky enough to have the use of his parachute, but my research did lead me to the amazing tale of Flight Sergeant Nicholas Alkemade…

https://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/blog/the-i ... -alkemade/


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:50 am 
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This is easily the best, most fascinating thread on here, thanks to everyone that posts the photos, the stories and the links!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:24 pm 
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They don't make 'em like that anymore

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/obituaries/2018/02/08/derek-kinne-gc-obituary/


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:56 pm 
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Bradwall Boy wrote:


That's some read :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 2:21 pm 
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HMS Loch Doon mine-sweeping trawler. One of a host of trawlers requisitioned by the Royal Navy in the summer of 1939 to be put into service with the Royal Naval Patrol Service mostly crewed by a mixture of RNPS (mostly ex fishermen) and RN men.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Nav ... ol_Service

My great uncle was lost on her on Christmas Day 1939 when she hit a mine laid by U-22 just off Blyth. He was only 19 at the time and didn't want to be doing what he was doing. Came from a fishing family though and felt duty bound to volunteer. Just one of countless kids who were born at the wrong time and never got to live their lives.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:21 am 
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A French boy introduces himself to Indian soldiers in Marseilles ... 1914 (i.redd.it)


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:55 pm 
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Not just the guy with the kid, but the one behind with his hand on his chin is seriously missing people back home right now. :(


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:07 pm 
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Taranaki Snapper wrote:
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The Museum was recently contacted to see if we could substantiate whether an RAF airman had survived falling from his aircraft without a parachute by landing in snow. “That sounds unlikely”, I thought, like an urban legend. It couldn’t really have happened, could it? As it transpired, the airman in question had in fact been lucky enough to have the use of his parachute, but my research did lead me to the amazing tale of Flight Sergeant Nicholas Alkemade…

https://www.rafmuseum.org.uk/blog/the-i ... -alkemade/


I remember reading about this one in Bomber Boys:

Quote:
Joe Herman, of the Royal Australian Air Force, was blown out of his bomber in 1944 without a parachute. He found himself falling through the night sky amid airplane debris and wildly grabbed a piece of it. It turned out to be not debris at all, but rather a fellow flyer, John Vivash, in the process of pulling his ripcord. The parachute inflated slowly, which helped Herman maintain his grasp on Vivash. Joe hung on and, as a courtesy, hit the ground first, breaking the fall of his savior and a mere two ribs of his own.


The author of the book said that the timing would have had to have been perfect - any earlier or later and he wouldn't have been able to hold onto the other bloke's legs as he flew past / as the chute opened.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 11:52 am 
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not sure what's going on here..I'm assuming re-enactors but the lad with the PPSh-41 confused me...

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but then I found this...

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Quote:
A German soldier with the PPSh-41 amid the ruins of Stalingrad, 1942.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:12 pm 
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Guess you take what you can get. If there's a good supply of ammo about, and your other option is a bolt action rifle ... ?

Apparently this famous fella is carrying several pieces of American kit (incl. the knife?).

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I didn't realise there were a bunch of him floating around ...

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US pistol in this one?

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:14 pm 
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That looks like a 1911 alright.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 1:50 pm 
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PPSh-41. Wiki.

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the Winter War against Finland, where the Finnish Army employed the Suomi KP/-31 submachine gun as a highly effective tool for close-quarter fighting in forests and built-up urban areas


Any links to Finland, in those photos ?


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