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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 12:30 am 
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happyhooker wrote:
Wtf is the Italian wearing on his head?


Haven't you watched Allo Allo?


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 12:52 am 
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Edinburgh01 wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Wtf is the Italian wearing on his head?


He is a Bersaglieri, Italian elite light troops (which is not the oxymoron some would have you believe). As well as being fast movement troops, they were also sharpshooters and the headdresses was used as a form of early camouflage before becoming stylised. Although now mechanised, they still use the feathers and fast pace ceremonially.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNHOLMRoMK4

I liked the next clip shown after that.

https://youtu.be/uVpFkho1HLM


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 1:32 am 
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Edinburgh01 wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Wtf is the Italian wearing on his head?


He is a Bersaglieri, Italian elite light troops (which is not the oxymoron some would have you believe). As well as being fast movement troops, they were also sharpshooters and the headdresses was used as a form of early camouflage before becoming stylised. Although now mechanised, they still use the feathers and fast pace ceremonially.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNHOLMRoMK4


So what’s the thinking behind that camouflage? That as you leopard crawl through the long grass, the enemy will think it’s just a bunch of chickens approaching?
Bit limited.


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 9:10 am 
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Sinkers wrote:
Edinburgh01 wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Wtf is the Italian wearing on his head?

He is a Bersaglieri, Italian elite light troops (which is not the oxymoron some would have you believe). As well as being fast movement troops, they were also sharpshooters and the headdresses was used as a form of early camouflage before becoming stylised. Although now mechanised, they still use the feathers and fast pace ceremonially.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNHOLMRoMK4

So what’s the thinking behind that camouflage? That as you leopard crawl through the long grass, the enemy will think it’s just a bunch of chickens approaching?
Bit limited.

AFAIK originally intended to break up the silhouette of the head when in a prone shooting position. The feathers would be re-arranged to give a broken outline. They are not the only troops to do this, for example here are some Norwegians.

Image

Quite probably some military fashion involved as well though.

I assumed they only wore the feathers ceremonially today. I was wrong. This could only happen in Italy.

Image


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 11:48 am 
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Viscous looking attack chickens.


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 1:31 pm 
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Hey.

Bit more respect called for.

It's not easy being viscous for a chicken in a desert environment.


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PostPosted: Wed May 01, 2019 3:06 pm 
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Cracked article today looked at fake photos in history ... I wonder if people at the time were aware that this was a shopping of the photo? It seems pretty obvious now (esp with chubbier Grant) and weird foreground/background, but if the medium was so new to people?

Image

Sources...

Image

More about it from their source, Library of Congress: http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/cwp/mystery.html


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 4:23 am 
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Polis, rather than Soldaten...

Image

Quote:
A Swedish police officer equipped with an experimental body armour and the Carl Gustav submachine gun, ca. 1970s.


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 8:05 am 
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Edinburgh01 wrote:
Sinkers wrote:
Edinburgh01 wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Wtf is the Italian wearing on his head?

He is a Bersaglieri, Italian elite light troops (which is not the oxymoron some would have you believe). As well as being fast movement troops, they were also sharpshooters and the headdresses was used as a form of early camouflage before becoming stylised. Although now mechanised, they still use the feathers and fast pace ceremonially.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNHOLMRoMK4

So what’s the thinking behind that camouflage? That as you leopard crawl through the long grass, the enemy will think it’s just a bunch of chickens approaching?
Bit limited.

AFAIK originally intended to break up the silhouette of the head when in a prone shooting position. The feathers would be re-arranged to give a broken outline. They are not the only troops to do this, for example here are some Norwegians.

Image

Quite probably some military fashion involved as well though.

I assumed they only wore the feathers ceremonially today. I was wrong. This could only happen in Italy.

Image


:lol: :lol:

Tradition says that they always have to run (even when moving around in their barracks) because one of the first regiment created lost their war flag in battle (Bersaglieri were recluted as regiments - the only regiments having the right to have a proper war flag. This story of the flag is unconfirmed, and it is regarded as a legend)

Want to share with you the story of a famous bersagliere, Enrico Toti - who did not have a leg and joined bersaglieri anyway during wwi, and died throwing his crouch to the enemy
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrico_Toti

Edit: the rationale behind this story is that they have to run toward their flag - until they find it


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 9:09 am 
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Ok, I get that he died throwing his crutch at the enemy but I reckon there would be just something quintessentially Italian about it if he had actually died when throwing his crouch at them.

Italians throwing shapes...


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 9:59 am 
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With that surname it would have been very funny if he threw his crotch at them.


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 10:01 am 
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redderneck wrote:
Ok, I get that he died throwing his crutch at the enemy but I reckon there would be just something quintessentially Italian about it if he had actually died when throwing his crouch at them.

Italians throwing shapes...


:lol:

His life was a legend - lost the leg when he was young; cycled around the world alone, as an early ambassador of disabled people.
Died in the war.
He wanted to serve like everyone else, despite the disability


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 11:18 am 
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How did he get on that bike??


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PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2019 12:00 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
How did he get on that bike??

Surely it's easer without having to swing over the leg.


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PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2019 5:24 am 
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Spoiler: show
Image


massive photo for massive event


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PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2019 9:36 pm 
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Hong Kong wrote:
Spoiler: show
Image


massive photo for massive event


Wow. They must have seen the initial flash; got their camera out & taken the shot.

You can see the compression ring from the blast wave hasn't reached their position yet.


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PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2019 10:35 pm 
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Taranaki Snapper wrote:
Polis, rather than Soldaten...

Image

Quote:
A Swedish police officer equipped with an experimental body armour and the Carl Gustav submachine gun, ca. 1970s.

Think the Moses sandals might be a weak point.


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PostPosted: Sat May 04, 2019 12:16 am 
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WC Scrumbag wrote:
Taranaki Snapper wrote:
Polis, rather than Soldaten...

Image

Quote:
A Swedish police officer equipped with an experimental body armour and the Carl Gustav submachine gun, ca. 1970s.

Think the Moses sandals might be a weak point.


Moreso than the lack of magazine?


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PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2019 1:27 pm 
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Excellently colourised photo of captured Jerries at Bastogne

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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2019 4:39 am 
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Plenty of teenagers there.

I wonder if they were true believers or last ditch concriptions?


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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2019 5:21 am 
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Taranaki Snapper wrote:
Polis, rather than Soldaten...

Image

Quote:
A Swedish police officer equipped with an experimental body armour and the Carl Gustav submachine gun, ca. 1970s.


those shoes do it for me.


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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2019 5:34 am 
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Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
Plenty of teenagers there.

I wonder if they were true believers or last ditch concriptions?



Maybe a little of both, but could also be that the average ranker was often a youngster. I was reminded of this recently by the wonderful Friendly Fire (war movies only) podcast mentioning how the actors in Fury are all at the FURTHEST end of the spectrum for a WW2 soldier. I think the average age in that war would have been mid-20s because 'everyone' was joining up. From Vietnam and maybe even until today, it's younger.

Did Germans have divisional patches liked Allied forces? I've seen the collar braid, but thought that was on a dress uniform or only for specific groups? Those fellas aren't showing many patches as tall. If there is a way to identify, here's the order of battle:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of ... xis_Forces


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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2019 6:44 am 
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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eNdp4pLySVk

I want to post this video here despite the fact the protagonist is an ex soldier from the Repubblica Sociale - he was very young at those times (so it is a little bit related to what you posted before
Nieghorn).
It has English subtitles (and the usual stupid YouTube comments)


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PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2019 9:09 am 
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:thumbup:


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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2019 3:27 pm 
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WWII as a truly global conflict - here's Disney endorsing the Brazilian expeditionary force, the "Smokin' Snakes":

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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2019 1:03 am 
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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2019 1:31 am 
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Nieghorn wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
Plenty of teenagers there.

I wonder if they were true believers or last ditch concriptions?



Maybe a little of both, but could also be that the average ranker was often a youngster. I was reminded of this recently by the wonderful Friendly Fire (war movies only) podcast mentioning how the actors in Fury are all at the FURTHEST end of the spectrum for a WW2 soldier. I think the average age in that war would have been mid-20s because 'everyone' was joining up. From Vietnam and maybe even until today, it's younger.

Did Germans have divisional patches liked Allied forces? I've seen the collar braid, but thought that was on a dress uniform or only for specific groups? Those fellas aren't showing many patches as tall. If there is a way to identify, here's the order of battle:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of ... xis_Forces

Hey Nieghorn, I asked you this on the podcast thread but assume you haven’t seen it:

Quote:
I wondering where I read about this and presumed you'd mentioned it as I downloaded it and listened to the first episode (Saving Private Ryan) and was seriously underwhelmed.

Firstly, their critiquing was terrible, but even worse they didn't really know their history (even the 'expert' on the team).

So, my question is are they still finding their feet in the first episode and do better research going forward? I think I downloaded a later episode, is it worth me listening to that if they've improved?

So, do they get better?


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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2019 4:02 am 
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Ha! I think you will be disappointed if you're looking for historical accuracy in Friendly Fire. They're better on assessing the film-making aspects. I think the appeal is that it's more like me and my mates from my uni town (where I no longer live). Some banter, a few jokes (often bad), a good - but not expert - knowledge of history and with a critical, but appreciative eye on movies.

... you might find that John Roderick knows a thing or two about some topics, and has read up on others, but probably still makes mistakes hobbyist would pick apart, let alone an expert. The other two tend to ask him about history and bring more on their film-making backgrounds.

I tend not to like history deep-dives (some Hardcore History series, but most don't interest me to commit). I recently abandoned Revolutions for being too dry. Will tune in to most History Hit eps, BBC History Extra, and the odd In Our Time if the topic piques interest. Short and sweet coverage works best for me.


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PostPosted: Thu May 09, 2019 5:33 am 
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Nieghorn wrote:
Ha! I think you will be disappointed if you're looking for historical accuracy in Friendly Fire. They're better on assessing the film-making aspects. I think the appeal is that it's more like me and my mates from my uni town (where I no longer live). Some banter, a few jokes (often bad), a good - but not expert - knowledge of history and with a critical, but appreciative eye on movies.

... you might find that John Roderick knows a thing or two about some topics, and has read up on others, but probably still makes mistakes hobbyist would pick apart, let alone an expert. The other two tend to ask him about history and bring more on their film-making backgrounds.

I tend not to like history deep-dives (some Hardcore History series, but most don't interest me to commit). I recently abandoned Revolutions for being too dry. Will tune in to most History Hit eps, BBC History Extra, and the odd In Our Time if the topic piques interest. Short and sweet coverage works best for me.

Cheers - maybe I’ll have a listen of one more and see if it doesn’t do my head in this time. I’ll try focus on the filmmaking rather than the history.

I find that BBC History Extra have moves to a too short model - it used to be a decent chunk of story advertising the new book to now just a small chick of story.

I like Revolutions, I break it into chunks. I’m not a Hardcore Hostory type of guy, can’t handle the voice.


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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2019 3:21 pm 
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Nieghorn wrote:
Ha! I think you will be disappointed if you're looking for historical accuracy in Friendly Fire. They're better on assessing the film-making aspects. I think the appeal is that it's more like me and my mates from my uni town (where I no longer live). Some banter, a few jokes (often bad), a good - but not expert - knowledge of history and with a critical, but appreciative eye on movies.
.

OK, so I've now listened to one and a half and sadly I think it's terrible. They come across as smug idiots or stoner frat boys recording themselves while getting stoned. Most of the time they're laughing at each others lame jokes about how much better these filmmakers could have been (Spielberg and Nolan :shock: ). They actually had some legitimate criticism of Dunkirk and some of the choices Nolan made but as I mentioned above they were so smug and condescending about it that it overshadowed their actual point.

Also, if they're going to comment on the history they really need to have a better knowledge of what they're talking about.

Anyway, not for me but good that you enjoy it. Maybe I just got two of their bad reviews?

On history podcasts I've only just discovered History Unplugged which I think is great.


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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2019 4:54 pm 
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:lol: ... nah, that's pretty fair.

I'll give History Unplugged a listen. Cheers!


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PostPosted: Fri May 10, 2019 5:15 pm 
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Nieghorn wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
Plenty of teenagers there.

I wonder if they were true believers or last ditch concriptions?



Maybe a little of both, but could also be that the average ranker was often a youngster. I was reminded of this recently by the wonderful Friendly Fire (war movies only) podcast mentioning how the actors in Fury are all at the FURTHEST end of the spectrum for a WW2 soldier. I think the average age in that war would have been mid-20s because 'everyone' was joining up. From Vietnam and maybe even until today, it's younger.

Did Germans have divisional patches liked Allied forces? I've seen the collar braid, but thought that was on a dress uniform or only for specific groups? Those fellas aren't showing many patches as tall. If there is a way to identify, here's the order of battle:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of ... xis_Forces



Likely to be from one of the newly formed 'Volksgrenadier' divisions that were in action in the Bulge? To create the manpower for these new formations the Germans were absolutely scraping the barrel so I can well imagine they are mostly teenagers.


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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 11:53 am 
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less chat, more pics:

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Quote:
Boer Guerillas, either 1880-81 or 1898-1902

(according to OP in reddit...)


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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 12:06 pm 
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If you hadn't seen, there's a fella who does pretty good colourizations of photos from the Boer War. (If you follow, I advise staying away from the comments... ) https://www.facebook.com/Boer-War-Colou ... 686709877/


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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2019 7:09 pm 
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PostPosted: Sun May 19, 2019 12:17 pm 
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It's a wonder Guinness didn't play him instead of ... was it Faisal?

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PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2019 1:18 am 
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Not just a story about a man's father being an inspiration for Catch-22, but there's another in the comments below it ...

https://lithub.com/discovering-an-iconi ... andfather/


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PostPosted: Thu May 23, 2019 8:38 pm 
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Nieghorn wrote:
It's a wonder Guinness didn't play him instead of ... was it Faisal?

Image


Image



Looks like Peter O'Toole


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PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2019 3:28 am 
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Well looky here!

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PostPosted: Sat May 25, 2019 2:57 pm 
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