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 Post subject: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 5:42 am 
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Thoughts British people?

I think he is brilliant.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 6:10 am 
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What position is he? Name doesn't ring a bell.

He's not one of them soccer types, is he?


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 6:31 am 
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Rather smug but you can see why. He's very very clever.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 6:43 am 
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Reminds me of Globby


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 6:43 am 
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He's great, for this alone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-d4otHE-YI


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 6:48 am 
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nardol wrote:
Reminds me of Globby

Man that is just mean!!! 😡

The poor chap has just been binned and isn’t able to defend himself


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 7:00 am 
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The Native wrote:
He's great, for this alone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-d4otHE-YI

Great answer by Fry


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 7:04 am 
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You know he is lurking and the inability to comment is killing him.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 7:14 am 
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jambanja wrote:
The Native wrote:
He's great, for this alone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-d4otHE-YI

Great answer by Fry


He needs to be careful using that sort of tone, god’s coming back very soon and he will deal with Fry and his ilk. To hell with him post haste.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 7:33 am 
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nardol wrote:
You know he is lurking and the inability to comment is killing him.

Globby or Fry?


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 8:04 am 
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The Native wrote:
He's great, for this alone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-d4otHE-YI




Gay Byrne's face! :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 8:20 am 
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TedIV wrote:
The Native wrote:
He's great, for this alone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-d4otHE-YI




Gay Byrne's face! :lol:

:lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 8:27 am 
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Location: Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right...
Stephen Fry is a remarkable wit and raconteur; check out some of the early stuff with Hugh Laurie if that's new to you.

I met him once in The Neal Street Restaurant (Antonio Carluccio's breakthrough place) and found him totally charming.

(Look, somebody has to pick up the baton! :blush: )


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 8:32 am 
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I’d say he’s in the waiting room for National Treasure status, may have even slipped through the door while no-one was looking and is about to start bothering David Attenborough.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 8:57 am 
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His move to the USA set him back in the national treasure stakes.

Also a relationship with someone 30 years your junior (if not more) is always a bit unusual. National treasures by enlarge need to be boring and old.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 9:06 am 
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Like Jimmy Saville :uhoh:


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 9:08 am 
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He was strange the whole way through.

Looking back you guys should have known from the start.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 9:28 am 
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nardol wrote:
His move to the USA set him back in the national treasure stakes.

Also a relationship with someone 30 years your junior (if not more) is always a bit unusual. National treasures by enlarge need to be boring and old.



There's a plethora of rich men who have wives 30 years younger and no one blinks.


Eugenius , dear lord you're stupid.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 9:32 am 
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The Native wrote:
He's great, for this alone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-d4otHE-YI


That is excellent.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 9:46 am 
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It was fashionable to hate him for a while but he's pretty harmless. Rather him on my telly than some twat from Essex who can't even use tenses correctly.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 10:36 am 
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Joost wrote:
I’d say he’s in the waiting room for National Treasure status, may have even slipped through the door while no-one was looking and is about to start bothering David Attenborough.


Nah. He married a boy didn’t he?


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 11:23 am 
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bimboman wrote:
nardol wrote:
His move to the USA set him back in the national treasure stakes.

Also a relationship with someone 30 years your junior (if not more) is always a bit unusual. National treasures by enlarge need to be boring and old.



There's a plethora of rich men who have wives 30 years younger and no one blinks.


Eugenius , dear lord you're stupid.


Nah... I think people definitely blink at that. There are an astonishing amount of them in Thailand I have noticed.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 12:51 pm 
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Pretty cool dude

His tag team with his mate Hitchens debate "Catholic church a force for good?" is a good watch if you have time to kill

The whole nearly 2 hours

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBSH2oWVGEs

A 20 minute of Fry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SJ6AV31MxA


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 12:56 pm 
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TedIV wrote:
The Native wrote:
He's great, for this alone - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-d4otHE-YI




Gay Byrne's face! :lol:


Looks like somebody has stuck a couple of cold digits up his rear passage.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:14 pm 
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Joost wrote:
I’d say he’s in the waiting room for National Treasure status, may have even slipped through the door while no-one was looking and is about to start bothering ...


You meant Brian Blessed. How he was never given his own nature show, we'll never know!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K547iziuQgI


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:38 pm 
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Nieghorn wrote:
Joost wrote:
I’d say he’s in the waiting room for National Treasure status, may have even slipped through the door while no-one was looking and is about to start bothering ...


You meant Brian Blessed. How he was never given his own nature show, we'll never know!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K547iziuQgI


Blessed is the epitome of awesome

You look at him you think big overweight dude

The bloke was a machine

Fit as

Oldest guy to get to 29,000 feet without oxygen from memory

Plus iconic roles in film, and blackadder.

And his voice


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:44 pm 
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Hasn't done anything good since A Bit Of Fry And Laurie.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 1:58 pm 
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He has had some fantastic twitter meltdowns.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 2:55 pm 
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Big fan of Wooster and Jeeves. :thumbup:


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 3:50 pm 
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J Man wrote:
Thoughts British people?

I think he is brilliant.


Superb as General Melchett. His depiction was prolly not far off what they were actually like back then.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 4:48 pm 
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obelixtim wrote:
J Man wrote:
Thoughts British people?

I think he is brilliant.


Superb as General Melchett. His depiction was prolly not far off what they were actually like back then.


I bet is was not. Apart from the uniform and moustache.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 5:27 pm 
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Mick Mannock wrote:
obelixtim wrote:
J Man wrote:
Thoughts British people?

I think he is brilliant.


Superb as General Melchett. His depiction was prolly not far off what they were actually like back then.


I bet is was not. Apart from the uniform and moustache.


Yes, those Generals were obviously very concerned for the well being of the men they allowed to die in the mud of Flanders by the thousands, while they languished miles behind the lines in their chateaux dining on fine food and French wine.

Trying to move their drinks cabinet another mile closer to Berlin summed it up perfectly.

Very intelligent and smart strategists to boot. Just keep in line and walk into the machine guns lads!

Upper class twats, the lot of them, who regarded the men under them as cannon fodder.

Melchett portrayed them perfectly.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 6:52 pm 
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nardol wrote:
You know he is lurking and the inability to comment is killing him.


Globby replies:

Quote:
Just as an aside, there’s a thread about him. I know him well and my stepdaughter worked for him.

He went to Gresham School in Holt in Norfolk before he went to Cambridge.

Very clever man and I gravitate towards them. I went to a wonderful party at Clive James’ house with him and Hugh Laurie.

I have signed copies of books from them.


.................... /´¯/)
..................../¯.. /
.................../..../
............./´¯/'...'/´¯¯`·¸
........../'/.../..../......./¨¯.)
.........\.................'...../
..........'\'...\.......... _.·´
............\..............(
..............\............


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 10:00 pm 
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obelixtim wrote:
Mick Mannock wrote:
obelixtim wrote:
J Man wrote:
Thoughts British people?

I think he is brilliant.


Superb as General Melchett. His depiction was prolly not far off what they were actually like back then.


I bet is was not. Apart from the uniform and moustache.


Yes, those Generals were obviously very concerned for the well being of the men they allowed to die in the mud of Flanders by the thousands, while they languished miles behind the lines in their chateaux dining on fine food and French wine.

Trying to move their drinks cabinet another mile closer to Berlin summed it up perfectly.

Very intelligent and smart strategists to boot. Just keep in line and walk into the machine guns lads!

Upper class twats, the lot of them, who regarded the men under them as cannon fodder.

Melchett portrayed them perfectly.


Utter nonsense.

Quote:
4. 'The upper class got off lightly'
Although the great majority of casualties in WW1 were from the working class, the social and political elite were hit disproportionately hard by WW1. Their sons provided the junior officers whose job it was to lead the way over the top and expose themselves to the greatest danger as an example to their men.

Some 12% of the British army's ordinary soldiers were killed during the war, compared with 17% of its officers. Eton alone lost more than 1,000 former pupils - 20% of those who served. UK wartime Prime Minister Herbert Asquith lost a son, while future Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law lost two. Anthony Eden lost two brothers, another brother of his was terribly wounded, and an uncle was captured.

5. 'Lions led by donkeys'
This saying was supposed to have come from senior German commanders describing brave British soldiers led by incompetent old toffs from their chateaux. In fact the incident was made up by historian Alan Clark.

During the war more than 200 generals were killed, wounded or captured. Most visited the front lines every day. In battle they were considerably closer to the action than generals are today.

Naturally, some generals were not up to the job, but others were brilliant, such as Arthur Currie, a middle-class Canadian failed insurance broker and property developer.

Rarely in history have commanders had to adapt to a more radically different technological environment.

British commanders had been trained to fight small colonial wars; now they were thrust into a massive industrial struggle unlike anything the British army had ever seen.

Despite this, within three years the British had effectively invented a method of warfare still recognisable today. By the summer of 1918 the British army was probably at its best ever and it inflicted crushing defeats on the Germans.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25776836


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 10:19 pm 
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Edinburgh01 wrote:
obelixtim wrote:
Mick Mannock wrote:
obelixtim wrote:
J Man wrote:
Thoughts British people?

I think he is brilliant.


Superb as General Melchett. His depiction was prolly not far off what they were actually like back then.


I bet is was not. Apart from the uniform and moustache.


Yes, those Generals were obviously very concerned for the well being of the men they allowed to die in the mud of Flanders by the thousands, while they languished miles behind the lines in their chateaux dining on fine food and French wine.

Trying to move their drinks cabinet another mile closer to Berlin summed it up perfectly.

Very intelligent and smart strategists to boot. Just keep in line and walk into the machine guns lads!

Upper class twats, the lot of them, who regarded the men under them as cannon fodder.

Melchett portrayed them perfectly.


Utter nonsense.

Quote:
4. 'The upper class got off lightly'
Although the great majority of casualties in WW1 were from the working class, the social and political elite were hit disproportionately hard by WW1. Their sons provided the junior officers whose job it was to lead the way over the top and expose themselves to the greatest danger as an example to their men.

Some 12% of the British army's ordinary soldiers were killed during the war, compared with 17% of its officers. Eton alone lost more than 1,000 former pupils - 20% of those who served. UK wartime Prime Minister Herbert Asquith lost a son, while future Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law lost two. Anthony Eden lost two brothers, another brother of his was terribly wounded, and an uncle was captured.

5. 'Lions led by donkeys'
This saying was supposed to have come from senior German commanders describing brave British soldiers led by incompetent old toffs from their chateaux. In fact the incident was made up by historian Alan Clark.

During the war more than 200 generals were killed, wounded or captured. Most visited the front lines every day. In battle they were considerably closer to the action than generals are today.

Naturally, some generals were not up to the job, but others were brilliant, such as Arthur Currie, a middle-class Canadian failed insurance broker and property developer.

Rarely in history have commanders had to adapt to a more radically different technological environment.

British commanders had been trained to fight small colonial wars; now they were thrust into a massive industrial struggle unlike anything the British army had ever seen.

Despite this, within three years the British had effectively invented a method of warfare still recognisable today. By the summer of 1918 the British army was probably at its best ever and it inflicted crushing defeats on the Germans.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25776836


Yep. Look at the war memorials in any Oxbridge college (from both WW1 & WW2). Hundreds of names on every one. In "The Lion & the Unicorn", even Orwell makes the point that the upper classes always have been willing to die for their country in enormous numbers. Whilst the generals were obviously hugely detached from the men, they do get a very bad rep.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 10:44 pm 
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Stephen Fry is a barmaid's dream of a raconteur.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 10:55 pm 
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Edinburgh01 wrote:
obelixtim wrote:
Mick Mannock wrote:
obelixtim wrote:
J Man wrote:
Thoughts British people?

I think he is brilliant.


Superb as General Melchett. His depiction was prolly not far off what they were actually like back then.


I bet is was not. Apart from the uniform and moustache.


Yes, those Generals were obviously very concerned for the well being of the men they allowed to die in the mud of Flanders by the thousands, while they languished miles behind the lines in their chateaux dining on fine food and French wine.

Trying to move their drinks cabinet another mile closer to Berlin summed it up perfectly.

Very intelligent and smart strategists to boot. Just keep in line and walk into the machine guns lads!

Upper class twats, the lot of them, who regarded the men under them as cannon fodder.

Melchett portrayed them perfectly.


Utter nonsense.

Quote:
4. 'The upper class got off lightly'
Although the great majority of casualties in WW1 were from the working class, the social and political elite were hit disproportionately hard by WW1. Their sons provided the junior officers whose job it was to lead the way over the top and expose themselves to the greatest danger as an example to their men.

Some 12% of the British army's ordinary soldiers were killed during the war, compared with 17% of its officers. Eton alone lost more than 1,000 former pupils - 20% of those who served. UK wartime Prime Minister Herbert Asquith lost a son, while future Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law lost two. Anthony Eden lost two brothers, another brother of his was terribly wounded, and an uncle was captured.

5. 'Lions led by donkeys'
This saying was supposed to have come from senior German commanders describing brave British soldiers led by incompetent old toffs from their chateaux. In fact the incident was made up by historian Alan Clark.

During the war more than 200 generals were killed, wounded or captured. Most visited the front lines every day. In battle they were considerably closer to the action than generals are today.

Naturally, some generals were not up to the job, but others were brilliant, such as Arthur Currie, a middle-class Canadian failed insurance broker and property developer.

Rarely in history have commanders had to adapt to a more radically different technological environment.

British commanders had been trained to fight small colonial wars; now they were thrust into a massive industrial struggle unlike anything the British army had ever seen.

Despite this, within three years the British had effectively invented a method of warfare still recognisable today. By the summer of 1918 the British army was probably at its best ever and it inflicted crushing defeats on the Germans.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25776836


I know that the British lost a whole lot of their junior officers leading from the front. How many Generals lost their lives on day one of the Somme offensive then?

60,000 British soldiers were killed, wounded or missing on that first day. Not many with red collar patches, I bet.

I was referring to the senior staff (generals), as depicted by Fry as Melchett.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sat May 26, 2018 11:02 pm 
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I think Fry is great, when I watched that, the first thing that came to my mind was this
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxo81Ok9Urk :lol: :lol: :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2018 12:22 am 
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obelixtim wrote:
Edinburgh01 wrote:
obelixtim wrote:
Mick Mannock wrote:
obelixtim wrote:
Superb as General Melchett. His depiction was prolly not far off what they were actually like back then.


I bet is was not. Apart from the uniform and moustache.


Yes, those Generals were obviously very concerned for the well being of the men they allowed to die in the mud of Flanders by the thousands, while they languished miles behind the lines in their chateaux dining on fine food and French wine.

Trying to move their drinks cabinet another mile closer to Berlin summed it up perfectly.

Very intelligent and smart strategists to boot. Just keep in line and walk into the machine guns lads!

Upper class twats, the lot of them, who regarded the men under them as cannon fodder.

Melchett portrayed them perfectly.


Utter nonsense.

Quote:
4. 'The upper class got off lightly'
Although the great majority of casualties in WW1 were from the working class, the social and political elite were hit disproportionately hard by WW1. Their sons provided the junior officers whose job it was to lead the way over the top and expose themselves to the greatest danger as an example to their men.

Some 12% of the British army's ordinary soldiers were killed during the war, compared with 17% of its officers. Eton alone lost more than 1,000 former pupils - 20% of those who served. UK wartime Prime Minister Herbert Asquith lost a son, while future Prime Minister Andrew Bonar Law lost two. Anthony Eden lost two brothers, another brother of his was terribly wounded, and an uncle was captured.

5. 'Lions led by donkeys'
This saying was supposed to have come from senior German commanders describing brave British soldiers led by incompetent old toffs from their chateaux. In fact the incident was made up by historian Alan Clark.

During the war more than 200 generals were killed, wounded or captured. Most visited the front lines every day. In battle they were considerably closer to the action than generals are today.

Naturally, some generals were not up to the job, but others were brilliant, such as Arthur Currie, a middle-class Canadian failed insurance broker and property developer.

Rarely in history have commanders had to adapt to a more radically different technological environment.

British commanders had been trained to fight small colonial wars; now they were thrust into a massive industrial struggle unlike anything the British army had ever seen.

Despite this, within three years the British had effectively invented a method of warfare still recognisable today. By the summer of 1918 the British army was probably at its best ever and it inflicted crushing defeats on the Germans.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-25776836


I know that the British lost a whole lot of their junior officers leading from the front. How many Generals lost their lives on day one of the Somme offensive then?

60,000 British soldiers were killed, wounded or missing on that first day. Not many with red collar patches, I bet.

I was referring to the senior staff (generals), as depicted by Fry as Melchett.


Did you bother to read the link at all? General Staff were usually very close to the front in WW1, and far closer than in any war since. As a result large numbers were killed or captured. More British Generals died at Loos alone than in the whole of WWII.

The image of the uncaring General Staff merrily sending young men to the slaughter is a fiction. Sadly, the fiction has become accepted fact. At the start of the war the British General Staff, like all others, had little idea how to deal with industrial war as practised in WW1; in many instances casualties were higher than they could have been because of this. This is not evidence of indifference, just that no-one had fought an industrial war before and sadly, some lessons could only be learned the hard way. It is also true that some monumental cock ups were made. Again, not evidence of indifference of lack or care, just that some very poor decisions were made. Some of the things done then look absurd to us looking back with the hindsight of a century, but we look back with the benefit of knowledge they did not have.

Far from the nonsensical Melchett view of just keep on doing the same things over and over, tactics changed out of all recognition during the WWI. Many things that were unheard of, irrelevant, or not even possible at the start of the war (tanks, air support, creeping barrages as examples) were integrated into tactics by the end.


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 Post subject: Re: Stephen Fry
PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2018 7:44 am 
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The absence of lack of care and indifference does not excuse stupidity and picking the wrong people to make decisions based on what school they went to


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