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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 8:27 pm 
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The Nice Guys is just out on Netflix; Crowe and Gosling work very well together in a ‘70s buddy-cop-type movie piss-take, with some genuine laugh-out-loud moments. Well worth a watch :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 9:11 pm 
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Mother! - loved it, although big DA fan since Pi. I avoided reviews/spoilers, so it's fair to say there as a 'wtf' moment as it segued (f**king hatethat word *administersautouppercut*) into madness, and I wasn't sure whether the shark was actually jumping, or just popping its head out of the water.

Reading the reviews afterwards, my take on its.. thing (been a long day) was quite a bit a different to the critics'. I saw it as much more about the masculinity/femininity dynamic, in all its manifestations, and how it creates, sustains, then destroys... rinse and repeat... relationships/societies/cultures/worlds - eternal recurrence, yin and yang innit. An environmental fable?? Balls - waaaay too simplistic.

Which either means I'm an idiot or DA is a clever bastard and there's summat in there for everyone with an IQ. Or both!

Oh, and finally watched Dunkirk. Outstanding war flick. Just wished I'd seen it at the flicks. When I'm running the show, septic fans of Hacksaw Ridge or (spit) Fury will be forced to watch Dunkirk and Kajaki over and over again in my Cultural Re-calibration Facility, until they recant their predilection for hyperbolic, self-congratulatory, maudlin, jingoistic, implausible, puerile dogwank. While eating marmite and drinking malt whisky, obviously.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 9:41 pm 
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Stripes is the best war film ever made. It's not even close.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 9:46 pm 
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Benthos wrote:

Oh, and finally watched Dunkirk. Outstanding war flick. Just wished I'd seen it at the flicks. When I'm running the show, septic fans of Hacksaw Ridge or (spit) Fury will be forced to watch Dunkirk and Kajaki over and over again in my Cultural Re-calibration Facility, until they recant their predilection for hyperbolic, self-congratulatory, maudlin, jingoistic, implausible, puerile dogwank. While eating marmite and drinking malt whisky, obviously.


:thumbup:

I'd happily run that detention centre and defend the institution wholeheartedly if we ever had to face a 'war crimes' trial at The Hague.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 10:15 pm 
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Joost wrote:
The Nice Guys is just out on Netflix; Crowe and Gosling work very well together in a ‘70s buddy-cop-type movie piss-take, with some genuine laugh-out-loud moments. Well worth a watch :thumbup:


Very underrated film. Some of the more creative script writing in recent years.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:36 am 
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The Native wrote:
Just finished Wind River. 8/10. Surprisingly powerful and resonant with me. Probably as I have a daughter.

When not in comicbook films I find Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen very good. I quite like contemporary Westerns.


/Globus mode.

I was drinking with Jeremy Renner at the premiere of Hansel and Gretel in Germany a few years ago. Genuinely cool guy.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:14 am 
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Benthos wrote:
When I'm running the show, septic fans of Hacksaw Ridge or (spit) Fury will be forced to watch Dunkirk and Kajaki over and over again in my Cultural Re-calibration Facility, until they recant their predilection for hyperbolic, self-congratulatory, maudlin, jingoistic, implausible, puerile dogwank. While eating marmite and drinking malt whisky, obviously.


:thumbup: Couldn't agree more. Kajaki is superb.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:30 am 
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Hacksaw Ridge wasn't that bad. It was a story that deserved to be told. Unfortunately it was an American story - so they had to hyper Americanize it for American audiences.

Would have been a far better story without the guts and glory theme. Thought Garfield was really good in it. Americans don't do subtle war movies.

Fury was pish.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:34 am 
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I quite enjoyed Fury. Brad Pit sticking his bottom lip out and battering Logan Lerman whilst Shia LaBeouf, against all odds, actually acts a bit.

Agree that Kajaki is brilliant, and a lot of servicemen I know think highly of it, though one of the posters here who was out there (OJ?) hated it IIRC.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:53 am 
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Gazzamonster wrote:
Hacksaw Ridge wasn't that bad. It was a story that deserved to be told. Unfortunately it was an American story - so they had to hyper Americanize it for American audiences.

Would have been a far better story without the guts and glory theme. Thought Garfield was really good in it. Americans don't do subtle war movies.

Fury was pish.


Could not get into Hacksaw Ridge, all seemed very formulaic and the battlefield violence seemed almost cartoonish at times. Agree that Garfield was pretty good in it as was Hugo Weaving. Just thought the battle scenes in the Thin Red Line despite not being as violent were more harrowing.

Bizarrely I quite enjoined Fury and agree with Braz that LeBeouf actually passes muster, Pitt is, well, Pitt and the action sequences I thought were well staged and felt. You did not want to be a member of an allied tank crew up against Panzers.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:59 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Hacksaw Ridge wasn't that bad. It was a story that deserved to be told. Unfortunately it was an American story - so they had to hyper Americanize it for American audiences.

Would have been a far better story without the guts and glory theme. Thought Garfield was really good in it. Americans don't do subtle war movies.

Fury was pish.


Could not get into Hacksaw Ridge, all seemed very formulaic and the battlefield violence seemed almost cartoonish at times. Agree that Garfield was pretty good in it as was Hugo Weaving. Just thought the battle scenes in the Thin Red Line despite not being as violent were more harrowing.

Bizarrely I quite enjoined Fury and agree with Braz that LeBeouf actually passes muster, Pitt is, well, Pitt and the action sequences I thought were well staged and felt. You did not want to be a member of an allied tank crew up against Panzers.



Yeah, the hate directed at Hacksaw Ridge and Fury seems a bit odd really. Gritty, not gritty enough, after the overpowering drek of war movies of the last 50 years they're a lot better than most. Yeah, you can pick a lot apart, and yeah, they're fairly pro-American, but hell, so is Saving Private Ryan, and damn near any other Hollywood film ever, they're a lot more undertated than many.

Still can't bring myself to watch the Hurt Locker... after seeing some of the promo shots I just want to throw shit at the screen.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:04 am 
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Just finished Dunkirk.

Very sombre. Nolan does great visuals and the Hans Zimmer soundtrack is perfect in tone. I do like Nolan's use of practical effects were possible. Performances were great, the civilian boat captain was especially good. 9/10.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:16 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Hacksaw Ridge wasn't that bad. It was a story that deserved to be told. Unfortunately it was an American story - so they had to hyper Americanize it for American audiences.

Would have been a far better story without the guts and glory theme. Thought Garfield was really good in it. Americans don't do subtle war movies.

Fury was pish.


Could not get into Hacksaw Ridge, all seemed very formulaic and the battlefield violence seemed almost cartoonish at times. Agree that Garfield was pretty good in it as was Hugo Weaving. Just thought the battle scenes in the Thin Red Line despite not being as violent were more harrowing.

Bizarrely I quite enjoined Fury and agree with Braz that LeBeouf actually passes muster, Pitt is, well, Pitt and the action sequences I thought were well staged and felt. You did not want to be a member of an allied tank crew up against Panzers.


My pish comment was more about the story. It felt like a bit of a non event. Against all odds - bonding - overcoming - we're all in this together - there were some good Germans etc etc etc. It was just missing a stray adopted dog that manages to survive the final conflict while ultimately saving the life of the only survivor.

Nothing wrong with the acting by all - but - every cliche ticked.

I thought some of the actual tank battle scenes were pretty good - especially the sight and sound of a projectile skimming off the Sherman and disappearing into the distance.

The final battle though was thoroughly predictable and a bit of a let down.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:18 am 
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Gazzamonster wrote:
Americans don't do subtle war movies.



I think they do. The Thin Red Line, Jarhead, The Hurt Locker, Letters from Iwo Jima, Born of the 4th July etc etc are all that war films should be.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:22 am 
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MASH is the best American War Film, followed closely by the massively underrated Beach Red.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:01 pm 
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Was going to book the cinema this weekend but selection is terrible. I had preview tickets for 3BOEM in Dublin but nothing else appears worth watching. Molly’s Game at a push I suppose.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:03 pm 
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Turbogoat wrote:
Joost wrote:
The Nice Guys is just out on Netflix; Crowe and Gosling work very well together in a ‘70s buddy-cop-type movie piss-take, with some genuine laugh-out-loud moments. Well worth a watch :thumbup:


Very underrated film. Some of the more creative script writing in recent years.


It's Shane Black. Nuff said


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:30 pm 
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Kid A wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Americans don't do subtle war movies.



I think they do. The Thin Red Line, Jarhead, The Hurt Locker, Letters from Iwo Jima, Born of the 4th July etc etc are all that war films should be.


Hmmmm....Malick is hardly subtle. While I enjoyed parts of TRL - the constant staring at light through leaves and philosophising about what man is was a bit much for me. But I'm not a huge Malick fan.

I feel that Jarhead, Hurt Locker (so disappointing) and 4th of July aren't really war movies. They certainly deal with personal relationships in the time of war - but for me a war movie is where the action is centred around a battle. That is the primary driver of the movie - a battle/battles.

Not sure what you would label those types of movies - maybe I'm wrong. But war movies are a particular type of movie for me.

In my sphere of what a war movie is - Americans struggle with not being a little 'wave the flag'.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:36 pm 
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I suppose it depends on where you're looking for "subtlety". Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Full Metal Jacket are all very brash films but they are also deeply morally ambiguous, which I think is a more significant measure of subtlety when it comes to war films.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:43 pm 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
I suppose it depends on where you're looking for "subtlety". Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Full Metal Jacket are all very brash films but they are also deeply morally ambiguous, which I think is a more significant measure of subtlety when it comes to war films.


Perhaps subtlety is only offered in Anti-War movies. If you are making a movie celebrating/recognising a battle where people are torn to shreds it is impossible to not fall into the category of either 'Look at this tragic but heroic sacrifice - let me wave a flag' or 'War is brutal - here - let me show you'.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:53 pm 
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Gazzamonster wrote:

Hmmmm....Malick is hardly subtle. While I enjoyed parts of TRL - the constant staring at light through leaves and philosophising about what man is was a bit much for me. But I'm not a huge Malick fan.


:shock: ? Mallick, for me, is the definition of subtle in the way he presents his movies.

Quote:
I feel that Jarhead, Hurt Locker (so disappointing) and 4th of July aren't really war movies. They certainly deal with personal relationships in the time of war - but for me a war movie is where the action is centred around a battle. That is the primary driver of the movie - a battle/battles.

.


They are absolutely war movies, the whole concept of them and the themes they deal with are based around war.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 12:57 pm 
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Gazzamonster wrote:
Chuckles1188 wrote:
I suppose it depends on where you're looking for "subtlety". Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Full Metal Jacket are all very brash films but they are also deeply morally ambiguous, which I think is a more significant measure of subtlety when it comes to war films.


Perhaps subtlety is only offered in Anti-War movies. If you are making a movie celebrating/recognising a battle where people are torn to shreds it is impossible to not fall into the category of either 'Look at this tragic but heroic sacrifice - let me wave a flag' or 'War is brutal - here - let me show you'.


I don't agree. Saving Private Ryan is definitely able to have its cake and eat it, for example. Yes it does wave a flag, but it does also show you the unvarnished brutality of modern industrial warfare and the things it does to the participants.

If anything an unabashed anti-war movie is less subtle, devolving as they usually do into "AMERICA IS EVIL!"


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:17 pm 
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Kid A wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Americans don't do subtle war movies.



I think they do. The Thin Red Line, Jarhead, The Hurt Locker, Letters from Iwo Jima, Born of the 4th July etc etc are all that war films should be.


all good movies but hardly subtle though


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:19 pm 
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ukjim wrote:
Kid A wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Americans don't do subtle war movies.



I think they do. The Thin Red Line, Jarhead, The Hurt Locker, Letters from Iwo Jima, Born of the 4th July etc etc are all that war films should be.


all good movies but hardly subtle though


I'm not sure what a subtle war movie is, in that case.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:22 pm 
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saw 2 films on the plane yesterday that I enjoyed, 'American Made' with Tom Cruise (for all his faults he is a very watchable actor imho) and Aliens: Covenant (Fass-B is another very watchable actor)

also saw the Hitman's bodyguard, total shite despite Hayek's bangers


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 3:25 pm 
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Kid A wrote:
ukjim wrote:
Kid A wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Americans don't do subtle war movies.



I think they do. The Thin Red Line, Jarhead, The Hurt Locker, Letters from Iwo Jima, Born of the 4th July etc etc are all that war films should be.



all good movies but hardly subtle though


I'm not sure what a subtle war movie is, in that case.



Battle of Algiers for me would be an example


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:35 pm 
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Dunkirk - excellent stuff

Baby Driver - was rocking out to this one

Cage Dive - interesting Aussie shark movie, apparently produced before 47 Metres Down

The Babysitter - horror comedy, available on Netflix.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 10:55 pm 
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Three Kings is a very good American war movie.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:02 pm 
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Watched Pitch Perfect 3 on Wednesday - Eh.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:32 pm 
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Logan Lucky is pretty dumb fun. Worth a watch.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 5:12 am 
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How to Make a Blockbuster Movie Trailer


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 5:52 am 
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Kid A wrote:
SecretAgentMan wrote:
Yep, Killing of a Sacred Deer and Three Billboards are both brilliant. I've been a huge Frances McDormand fan ever since Blood Simple.


She's amazing. If you can find it, watch the HBO mini-series 'Olive Kitteridge'. Her and Richard Jenkins are on top form and even Bill Murray appears.

Cheers, will check it out.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 1:33 pm 
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Gazzamonster wrote:
Chuckles1188 wrote:
I suppose it depends on where you're looking for "subtlety". Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Full Metal Jacket are all very brash films but they are also deeply morally ambiguous, which I think is a more significant measure of subtlety when it comes to war films.


Perhaps subtlety is only offered in Anti-War movies. If you are making a movie celebrating/recognising a battle where people are torn to shreds it is impossible to not fall into the category of either 'Look at this tragic but heroic sacrifice - let me wave a flag' or 'War is brutal - here - let me show you'.


‘tis often said that the best war movies are actually anti-war movies. I guess a ‘subtle’ war movie, for me, is one which can convey the perspectives and experiences of the combatants whilst not waving a flag or painting one side as righteous or evil.

Something like Letters from Iwo Jimo would certainly qualify.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 2:00 pm 
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Joost wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Chuckles1188 wrote:
I suppose it depends on where you're looking for "subtlety". Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Full Metal Jacket are all very brash films but they are also deeply morally ambiguous, which I think is a more significant measure of subtlety when it comes to war films.


Perhaps subtlety is only offered in Anti-War movies. If you are making a movie celebrating/recognising a battle where people are torn to shreds it is impossible to not fall into the category of either 'Look at this tragic but heroic sacrifice - let me wave a flag' or 'War is brutal - here - let me show you'.


‘tis often said that the best war movies are actually anti-war movies. I guess a ‘subtle’ war movie, for me, is one which can convey the perspectives and experiences of the combatants whilst not waving a flag or painting one side as righteous or evil.

Something like Letters from Iwo Jimo would certainly qualify.


I think my original use of the word 'subtle' was a poor choice.

I guess I was bemoaning Hacksaw Ridges' propensity to fall into cliche'd patriotism and slow motion action while at time ignoring some of the smaller aspects of a remarkable story. Garfield was brilliant - but the movie wasn't.

Although I'm not a fan of the movie - The Thin Red Line managed to capture small moments - as did All Quiet On The Western Front (which I love).


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 4:15 pm 
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Gazzamonster wrote:
Joost wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Chuckles1188 wrote:
I suppose it depends on where you're looking for "subtlety". Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Full Metal Jacket are all very brash films but they are also deeply morally ambiguous, which I think is a more significant measure of subtlety when it comes to war films.


Perhaps subtlety is only offered in Anti-War movies. If you are making a movie celebrating/recognising a battle where people are torn to shreds it is impossible to not fall into the category of either 'Look at this tragic but heroic sacrifice - let me wave a flag' or 'War is brutal - here - let me show you'.


‘tis often said that the best war movies are actually anti-war movies. I guess a ‘subtle’ war movie, for me, is one which can convey the perspectives and experiences of the combatants whilst not waving a flag or painting one side as righteous or evil.

Something like Letters from Iwo Jimo would certainly qualify.


I think my original use of the word 'subtle' was a poor choice.

I guess I was bemoaning Hacksaw Ridges' propensity to fall into cliche'd patriotism and slow motion action while at time ignoring some of the smaller aspects of a remarkable story. Garfield was brilliant - but the movie wasn't.

Although I'm not a fan of the movie - The Thin Red Line managed to capture small moments - as did All Quiet On The Western Front (which I love).


Hacksaw Ridge was Gibson right? He's always been good at brutal violence but not much cop for almost anything else really, and definitely not within a country mile of "subtle". Agree that Garfield did a cracking job with the material given to him.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 6:11 am 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Joost wrote:
Gazzamonster wrote:
Chuckles1188 wrote:
I suppose it depends on where you're looking for "subtlety". Apocalypse Now, Platoon and Full Metal Jacket are all very brash films but they are also deeply morally ambiguous, which I think is a more significant measure of subtlety when it comes to war films.


Perhaps subtlety is only offered in Anti-War movies. If you are making a movie celebrating/recognising a battle where people are torn to shreds it is impossible to not fall into the category of either 'Look at this tragic but heroic sacrifice - let me wave a flag' or 'War is brutal - here - let me show you'.


‘tis often said that the best war movies are actually anti-war movies. I guess a ‘subtle’ war movie, for me, is one which can convey the perspectives and experiences of the combatants whilst not waving a flag or painting one side as righteous or evil.

Something like Letters from Iwo Jimo would certainly qualify.


I think my original use of the word 'subtle' was a poor choice.

I guess I was bemoaning Hacksaw Ridges' propensity to fall into cliche'd patriotism and slow motion action while at time ignoring some of the smaller aspects of a remarkable story. Garfield was brilliant - but the movie wasn't.

Although I'm not a fan of the movie - The Thin Red Line managed to capture small moments - as did All Quiet On The Western Front (which I love).


Hacksaw Ridge was Gibson right? He's always been good at brutal violence but not much cop for almost anything else really, and definitely not within a country mile of "subtle". Agree that Garfield did a cracking job with the material given to him.

I found Garfield quite comical in the movie TBH, but then I've never been a big fan of his, the whole sideways mouth and down home speaking seemed a bit over the top. The movie had some good action scenes though, Crazy Mel can direct pretty good action.

The Thin Red Line was bollocks. It's merely a bunch of scenes clipped together, some with decent action sequences, others pointless monologues, and others annoying actors (Adrien Brody) standing around looking at shit. That was made during Malick's 'legend' period and the critics fawned over it, his subsequent more regular output has put a dent in his reputation and I think he'd be called on if it came out now.

Was looking up Kajaki to see what it was as assumed I hadn't seen it and then realised it's also called Kilo Two Bravo (we obviously got the US naming version down here).

I'm not a huge fan of The Hurt Locker and much prefer Zero Dark Thirty of what's her names films.

I'm not sure I'm getting this 'subtly' bollocks* discussion either. A good war film doesn't have to be subtle (and some of the mentioned subtle films aren't really that subtle). Lot of bollocks from me in this post :).

Benthos wrote:

Oh, and finally watched Dunkirk. Outstanding war flick. Just wished I'd seen it at the flicks. When I'm running the show, septic fans of Hacksaw Ridge or (spit) Fury will be forced to watch Dunkirk and Kajaki over and over again in my Cultural Re-calibration Facility, until they recant their predilection for hyperbolic, self-congratulatory, maudlin, jingoistic, implausible, puerile dogwank. While eating marmite and drinking malt whisky, obviously.

What if you liked Fury and Dunkirk and Kajaki?

Benthos wrote:
Mother! - loved it, although big DA fan since Pi. I avoided reviews/spoilers, so it's fair to say there as a 'wtf' moment as it segued (f**king hatethat word *administersautouppercut*) into madness, and I wasn't sure whether the shark was actually jumping, or just popping its head out of the water.

I actually don't know whether I like Mother! or not. One part of me thinks it's brilliant, while the other thinks it's bollocks and ruined what could have been a great film after the segue you mentioned. Although, Bardem's character traits in the first part only make sense with the second part.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 2:55 pm 
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Just seen Molly's Game. Bit disappointed it wasn't four guys playing monopoly while off their faces on ecstasy but enjoyed the film all the same.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2018 5:00 pm 
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Just back from watching Jumanji. A very enjoyable family film. Karen Gillan is very pleasing on the eye :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 07, 2018 9:17 pm 
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backrow wrote:
saw 2 films on the plane yesterday that I enjoyed, 'American Made' with Tom Cruise (for all his faults he is a very watchable actor imho) and Aliens: Covenant (Fass-B is another very watchable actor)

also saw the Hitman's bodyguard, total shite despite Hayek's bangers


Gave Alien: Covenant another go over the weekend, still a mess though Fass-B is outstanding.

Also ...

It highly overrated horror lite stuff, thought it would be a hell of a lot better after the initial appearance of Pennywise, then it went down hill with one hell of a rushed ending.

Cult of Chucky, a movie that simply exists to push the next sequel

Anaconda, it appear on Netflix okay, put together a group of actors and B listers and tell them to go over the top, oh and CGI snakes.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 1:18 am 
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RuggaBugga wrote:
As an aside I'm really looking forward to Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. saw the shorts tonight and looks really good.

Loved In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths.


Caught this on Friday. Bloody good although decidedly darker than the other two. More Drama with a smattering of comedy than vice versa.

Woody Harrelson, Frances McDormand and the dude from Travellers/Will & Grace were all outstanding.


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