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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 6:30 pm 
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lorcanoworms wrote:
I am happy to report my plums have not shrivelled up and died this year, unlike last year.


Mine are hanging in there. Apples are either great, or absent though, depending on the variety.


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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 6:32 pm 
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Mick Mannock wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
I am happy to report my plums have not shrivelled up and died this year, unlike last year.


Mine are hanging in there. Apples are either great, or absent though, depending on the variety.

Apples not looking good , pears by the bucket load.


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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 6:36 pm 
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Shrekles wrote:
Ewinkum wrote:
james garner wrote:
Does anyone keep chickens? My partner has signed up to take 4 rescue hens at the weekend, she has found a coop with a ( tiny) built in run, I need to build a fox proof run of decent size at the weekend! Any tips?


The tiny built in run is useful because you can move the coop around, giving the inmates a fresh patch of grass to rip up every day or two.
A bigger run tends to be permanent and the enclosed area will turn to muck pretty quickly.

Best solution I can think of is Waco fencing. The stuff used around construction sites. Panels are 8 ft long and 6 ft high. It's lightweight and easy enough to move around. The run will be built in an hour and you can hit the pub for the rest of the day.
You'll have to block off the bottom six inches (8ft planks), but once the hens are secured at night you shouldnt have any trouble with foxes.

A fox proof fence would need to be buried about 18 inches but a locked coop makes that unnecessary.


Chickens are great - there is nothing better than your own fresh eggs. A movable chicken tractor is a good idea - it will keep the foxes out and you can move it around the garden so that they scratch up bugs and fertilize the garden.

To make a permanent fox proof structure you need to sink the fence wire at least 12" into the ground, it needs to be heavy gauge wire as they can go through lighter gauges, and you need to roof it as well. If you leave any gap the bastards will find a way in and take all your flock in one go.


I read that smaller gauge and smaller square holes is better so that foxes can't get their teeth around it? For a roof I was thinking of corrugated plastic, over the wire. Tbh the whole run will have been adapted and reinforced when I get back from work at the weekend, the Fil has taken a huge interest and is worried about the hens being too cold and safe enough etc, he's a huge animal lover and I think he will have created chicken fort knocks by the time I am next at home!


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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 6:40 pm 
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I have no more grass. Just a few tufts here and there which the dogs are chewing on. Ferns are shrivelling up. I feel guilty giving them water and guilty when I dont


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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 7:43 pm 
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lorcanoworms wrote:
Mick Mannock wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
I am happy to report my plums have not shrivelled up and died this year, unlike last year.


Mine are hanging in there. Apples are either great, or absent though, depending on the variety.

Apples not looking good , pears by the bucket load.

get a still that's the only good thing you can make with them. :twisted:


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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 8:23 pm 
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Location: Dorset
Poor year thus far for growing in Dorset, very cold and very dry.

I run a four crop rotation on raised beds made from roof joists.

Potatoes are doing well, first and second earlies this year instead of maincrops. Yield from maincrops was poor last year and there was a fair amount of slug and wire worm damage.

I have broad beans and runners just started off.

About 180 onion sets growing OK, plus my autumn sown garlic.

Fourth bed has Swiss chard (not attacked by cabbage whites) and spinach (not that cheap to buy).

I have given up on brassicas, you really need a proper cage of some sort to stop the cabbage whites and I am yet to be convinced about the economic of that.


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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 8:26 pm 
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Laurent wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
Mick Mannock wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
I am happy to report my plums have not shrivelled up and died this year, unlike last year.


Mine are hanging in there. Apples are either great, or absent though, depending on the variety.

Apples not looking good , pears by the bucket load.

get a still that's the only good thing you can make with them. :twisted:


I understand you are a shit poster and should be permabanned


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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 10:49 pm 
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james garner wrote:
Shrekles wrote:
Ewinkum wrote:
james garner wrote:
Does anyone keep chickens? My partner has signed up to take 4 rescue hens at the weekend, she has found a coop with a ( tiny) built in run, I need to build a fox proof run of decent size at the weekend! Any tips?


The tiny built in run is useful because you can move the coop around, giving the inmates a fresh patch of grass to rip up every day or two.
A bigger run tends to be permanent and the enclosed area will turn to muck pretty quickly.

Best solution I can think of is Waco fencing. The stuff used around construction sites. Panels are 8 ft long and 6 ft high. It's lightweight and easy enough to move around. The run will be built in an hour and you can hit the pub for the rest of the day.
You'll have to block off the bottom six inches (8ft planks), but once the hens are secured at night you shouldnt have any trouble with foxes.

A fox proof fence would need to be buried about 18 inches but a locked coop makes that unnecessary.


Chickens are great - there is nothing better than your own fresh eggs. A movable chicken tractor is a good idea - it will keep the foxes out and you can move it around the garden so that they scratch up bugs and fertilize the garden.

To make a permanent fox proof structure you need to sink the fence wire at least 12" into the ground, it needs to be heavy gauge wire as they can go through lighter gauges, and you need to roof it as well. If you leave any gap the bastards will find a way in and take all your flock in one go.


I read that smaller gauge and smaller square holes is better so that foxes can't get their teeth around it? For a roof I was thinking of corrugated plastic, over the wire. Tbh the whole run will have been adapted and reinforced when I get back from work at the weekend, the Fil has taken a huge interest and is worried about the hens being too cold and safe enough etc, he's a huge animal lover and I think he will have created chicken fort knocks by the time I am next at home!


When i rebuilt my run i used a heavier gauge bird wire netting with 1cm squares - nothing has made it through that the last three years.


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PostPosted: Tue May 23, 2017 10:50 pm 
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When we bought our house (we got it cheap because it was let go by the tenants albeit a relatively new house) the front and and back yards (or lack thereof) were in a sorry state. Weeds, bare patches, rough terrain and toys left to sit under the overgrowth. Rented a garden tiller, bought a whole heap of top soil and grass seed. Tilled the yards up after pulling all the weeds out and laid down the soil. I built garden planters and planted Japanese Maple. Within 2 weeks I had grass at 15cms in height.
The Ottawa winter is brutal on grass so once all the snow melted the damage was revealed. Lots of grass had died, ground was lumpy weeds had started to grow in the bare patches. Have just seeded and laid down topsoil and seeds so hopefully by the weekend I'll have some new grass babies. Have planted some NZ natives so hopefully they'll seed and then I can add them to the garden planters as they grow. Sadly I think I lost one of the Maples. Now, I'm no gardener but I have a bit of pride and looking across the neighbours seeing the conditions their yards have become is quite depressing.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 10:10 am 
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Laurent wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
Mick Mannock wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
I am happy to report my plums have not shrivelled up and died this year, unlike last year.


Mine are hanging in there. Apples are either great, or absent though, depending on the variety.

Apples not looking good , pears by the bucket load.

get a still that's the only good thing you can make with them. :twisted:

I think they may be cookers the few I got last year were awful.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 10:41 am 
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Ewinkum wrote:
james garner wrote:
Does anyone keep chickens? My partner has signed up to take 4 rescue hens at the weekend, she has found a coop with a ( tiny) built in run, I need to build a fox proof run of decent size at the weekend! Any tips?


The tiny built in run is useful because you can move the coop around, giving the inmates a fresh patch of grass to rip up every day or two.
A bigger run tends to be permanent and the enclosed area will turn to muck pretty quickly.

Best solution I can think of is Waco fencing. The stuff used around construction sites. Panels are 8 ft long and 6 ft high. It's lightweight and easy enough to move around. The run will be built in an hour and you can hit the pub for the rest of the day.
You'll have to block off the bottom six inches (8ft planks), but once the hens are secured at night you shouldnt have any trouble with foxes.

A fox proof fence would need to be buried about 18 inches but a locked coop makes that unnecessary.

Known as 'Heras panels' here, been using them for years,got a run made with about 50 of them - great when you used to be able to pick them up for scrap value. Unfortunately, every back yard poultry keeper has jumped on the bandwagon, and they now fetch stupid money - not far short of new price on certain auction sites. :uhoh: Great as they are, a determined vixen will still scale them, especially this time of year, and brock will dig under if you don't take preventative measures. Depending on how much space you've got, it might be worth constructing a timber/wire covered run - about 8'x3' should be plenty for 4 hens - the same height as your smaller enclosed run.Butt it up to your existing run, then your chooks can have space in the day and the whole shebang is easy to move when that patch gets tired. Just remember to secure them in their hose for the night.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 1:03 pm 
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Saint wrote:
You need to properly bruise it before applying the weedkiller. Stomping all over it for about half an hour or so will do the trick.

But I wasn't kidding about how long you'll need to keep it up

Guess the plants and flowers in the middle of it aren't that important. :((


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 1:40 pm 
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I got some serious glycosphate from the MD at May and Baker in Norwich (no longer there in Sweet Briar Road).

A few gallons, still have some.

It came with a serious note from him to wear marigolds and breathing apparatus then have a shower!

Roundup and Pathclear are not in the same league.

I have used it selectively to kill some aberrant bamboo* that was spreading like wildfire.

It* died almost immediately.

I've replanted it with a less invasive species that won't crawl all over the place.

It will also murder Japanese knotweed. Now that is a ruddy invasive plant.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:16 pm 
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What's ''glycosphate''? :? FYI, 'Roundup' is the trade name for all Monsanto glyphosate based products, and comes in about nine different strengths for differing applications (eg 'Roundup Flex', or 'Roundup pro-vantage'), and differing applicators - ie backpack or tractor mounted - so you're talking bollox (yet again) when you state ''Roundup and Pathclear are not in the same league'' - they're in exactly the same league, in that they're all glyphosate based herbicides - just in differing concentrations.
Anyone messing around with undiluted agricultural chemicals not holding at least a PA1 and PA6 is, IMO, a fecking idiot - as well as breaking the law.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:54 pm 
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Another ruddy "call out". Listen sonny. I got this long before that legislation came out.

Pre 1980s.

Do tell me of your potentially extensive knowledge of what went on during that era.

I come from the time that DDT was used, plus other chemicals/pesticides.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:56 pm 
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Double post.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:59 pm 
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Red Chopper wrote:
What's ''glycosphate''? :? FYI, 'Roundup' is the trade name for all Monsanto glyphosate based products, and comes in about nine different strengths for differing applications (eg 'Roundup Flex', or 'Roundup pro-vantage'), and differing applicators - ie backpack or tractor mounted - so you're talking bollox (yet again) when you state ''Roundup and Pathclear are not in the same league'' - they're in exactly the same league, in that they're all glyphosate based herbicides - just in differing concentrations.
Anyone messing around with undiluted agricultural chemicals not holding at least a PA1 and PA6 is, IMO, a fecking idiot - as well as breaking the law.


Except in the specific case of glyphosate you can use it in pretty much any concentration can't you?


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:09 pm 
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Got no idea of the concentration that came from M&B. All I can tell you is that it was not the sort of stuff you buy now. I use both Roundup and Pathclear and indeed Verdone for the lawns.

I haven't used the nuclear remedy for quite a while. It's all right though; just assume I'm talking bollocks.


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PostPosted: Tue May 30, 2017 8:09 pm 
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Red Chopper wrote:
Ewinkum wrote:
james garner wrote:
Does anyone keep chickens? My partner has signed up to take 4 rescue hens at the weekend, she has found a coop with a ( tiny) built in run, I need to build a fox proof run of decent size at the weekend! Any tips?


The tiny built in run is useful because you can move the coop around, giving the inmates a fresh patch of grass to rip up every day or two.
A bigger run tends to be permanent and the enclosed area will turn to muck pretty quickly.

Best solution I can think of is Waco fencing. The stuff used around construction sites. Panels are 8 ft long and 6 ft high. It's lightweight and easy enough to move around. The run will be built in an hour and you can hit the pub for the rest of the day.
You'll have to block off the bottom six inches (8ft planks), but once the hens are secured at night you shouldnt have any trouble with foxes.

A fox proof fence would need to be buried about 18 inches but a locked coop makes that unnecessary.

Known as 'Heras panels' here, been using them for years,got a run made with about 50 of them - great when you used to be able to pick them up for scrap value. Unfortunately, every back yard poultry keeper has jumped on the bandwagon, and they now fetch stupid money - not far short of new price on certain auction sites. :uhoh: Great as they are, a determined vixen will still scale them, especially this time of year, and brock will dig under if you don't take preventative measures. Depending on how much space you've got, it might be worth constructing a timber/wire covered run - about 8'x3' should be plenty for 4 hens - the same height as your smaller enclosed run.Butt it up to your existing run, then your chooks can have space in the day and the whole shebang is easy to move when that patch gets tired. Just remember to secure them in their hose for the night.


I put a temporary roof over the enclosure for the ladies. I used a section of the old Lino, punched holes in it, cable tied it on! Just been to b and q and found some corrugated plastic for a more permanent roof, it will be a lean to style roof, any ideas on which way I should angle the roof, highest side in to the prevailing wind?

It's amazing how quickly they have taken to being outside and regrowing missing feathers. Got to taste our first eggs at the weekend.

Slightly going overboard but made them a chicken swing..


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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2017 7:25 am 
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Mick Mannock wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
I am happy to report my plums have not shrivelled up and died this year, unlike last year.


Mine are hanging in there. Apples are either great, or absent though, depending on the variety.


Plums should be great this year there is a bumper crop on the EU Referendum and General Election threads.


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PostPosted: Wed May 31, 2017 7:56 am 
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Uncle Fester wrote:
Saint wrote:
You need to properly bruise it before applying the weedkiller. Stomping all over it for about half an hour or so will do the trick.

But I wasn't kidding about how long you'll need to keep it up

Guess the plants and flowers in the middle of it aren't that important. :((


Do you want to be rid of the weeds or not?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 9:30 pm 
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So the chicken enclosure is mostly mud after a wet weekend, will have to get the permanent roof on soon. The ladies are grand though, not sure if they don't understand to go in out of the rain, or if they don't just care, but they are really getting used to us, chatting away and loving all the fresh thinning a from the kale and spinach patch.

Have tried beer traps this year, lots of slugs have met a drunken end, bad home brew has it's uses!


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2017 12:29 am 
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Frogs get rid of my slugs. It's their dish of the day.

In other news my beetroot is looking sensational this year.

Toms are shooting up. The "Ailsa Craig" variety, bought because it was named after wife's son's wife's mother's house, is looking a bit good.

Trusses yet to set but plenty of flowers.

Herbs are all good, apart from the basil, which is getting some tlc.

The mint is just that. Had some on some Jersey Royals yesterday. The sage is blossoming and will be wrapped in a chicken breast covered in bacon in the next day or two.

I'll have my garden designers come and I'll try and put up pics of the new plants that are coming up and they will give me all the Latin names for them.

I've not told you about my allotment yet. Truth to say, it's early days. Needs a lot of soil improvement and I'm not expecting anything too much this year.

Got some runner beans and a few spuds in, plus some marrows. Not going too berserk this year. Hopes are high though.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 6:52 pm 
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Weeding has become a fun pastime, the hens love them and the slugs. Very satisfying. I have beer traps out for the slugs as well, good job I have some crap home brew saved. Weather was crap for a month but this weekend of sun has really helped the peas, spinach and chard. Had some of the early spuds last week as well, very tasty.

I am growing purple kale for the first time, I left the seeds with the father in law and he put them all in to pots, I now have about 40 plants..

Got round to tackling some of the mint bretia, dug out a bed and sieved all the soil to get rid of the corns, annoying work but now have a hugle bed with squash in it


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:09 pm 
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Can't be arsed with veg these days; few flowers, shrubs, trees and fruit.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 8:05 pm 
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Any thoughts/ experience of slug pellets, hesitant to use the usual variety due to concerns the pets might eat them, going to try the iron phosphate variety, any good?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:12 pm 
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james garner wrote:
Any thoughts/ experience of slug pellets, hesitant to use the usual variety due to concerns the pets might eat them, going to try the iron phosphate variety, any good?


Only successful way I've found to get rid of slugs is the beer trap method


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 7:42 am 
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Saint wrote:
james garner wrote:
Any thoughts/ experience of slug pellets, hesitant to use the usual variety due to concerns the pets might eat them, going to try the iron phosphate variety, any good?


Only successful way I've found to get rid of slugs is the beer trap method



I treat the soil every 6 weeks from spring to the end of summer with nematode solution. Totally organic way to stay slug and snail free.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 7:57 am 
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james garner wrote:
Any thoughts/ experience of slug pellets, hesitant to use the usual variety due to concerns the pets might eat them, going to try the iron phosphate variety, any good?


I sprinkle the ferric phosphate pellets in my pots and found them very effective.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:39 am 
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Saint wrote:
james garner wrote:
Any thoughts/ experience of slug pellets, hesitant to use the usual variety due to concerns the pets might eat them, going to try the iron phosphate variety, any good?


Only successful way I've found to get rid of slugs is the beer trap method

The pets are not mine I have no such concerns :lol: :twisted:


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:44 am 
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Planted 4 tomato plants of various varieties in pots a few weeks back not expecting much to happen.

They have gone f**king mental. Is there anything I need to do? I've put some canes into a nice triangle in each pot and they seem to be using these which is nice.

I also worried for some reason that they are all so close together on the little patio, no idea why, should I be?


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 10:21 am 
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slick wrote:
Planted 4 tomato plants of various varieties in pots a few weeks back not expecting much to happen.

They have gone f**king mental. Is there anything I need to do? I've put some canes into a nice triangle in each pot and they seem to be using these which is nice.

I also worried for some reason that they are all so close together on the little patio, no idea why, should I be?


Are they vine or bush tomatoes? If they're vine you need to nip out the side shoots and in a month or so's time trim away the leaves at the bottom to encourage the plant to put all it's energy into the fruit. You also need to nip out the growing tip once you've got five to seven trusses on them. You need to feed them once a week with tomorite once the first truss of is set. If they're bush just leave them be, though you won't need the canes.

The only worry about them being close together is fungal infections, but you can get sprays for that from B&Q. I'm slightly worried that mine have got something like that as a load of the leaves frizzled up, but it doesn't seem to be general across the plants so may just be shock at the heat.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:03 am 
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Brazil wrote:
slick wrote:
Planted 4 tomato plants of various varieties in pots a few weeks back not expecting much to happen.

They have gone f**king mental. Is there anything I need to do? I've put some canes into a nice triangle in each pot and they seem to be using these which is nice.

I also worried for some reason that they are all so close together on the little patio, no idea why, should I be?


Are they vine or bush tomatoes? If they're vine you need to nip out the side shoots and in a month or so's time trim away the leaves at the bottom to encourage the plant to put all it's energy into the fruit. You also need to nip out the growing tip once you've got five to seven trusses on them. You need to feed them once a week with tomorite once the first truss of is set. If they're bush just leave them be, though you won't need the canes.

The only worry about them being close together is fungal infections, but you can get sprays for that from B&Q. I'm slightly worried that mine have got something like that as a load of the leaves frizzled up, but it doesn't seem to be general across the plants so may just be shock at the heat.


Thanks, thats great. They look bushy to me, but pretty sure the bloke said they were vine.

Must admit I was worried about using feed as I thought it defeats the purpose with the chemicals in it etc, but it seems I need too. We don't have a great worry with the heat here...


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:20 am 
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slick wrote:
Brazil wrote:
slick wrote:
Planted 4 tomato plants of various varieties in pots a few weeks back not expecting much to happen.

They have gone f**king mental. Is there anything I need to do? I've put some canes into a nice triangle in each pot and they seem to be using these which is nice.

I also worried for some reason that they are all so close together on the little patio, no idea why, should I be?


Are they vine or bush tomatoes? If they're vine you need to nip out the side shoots and in a month or so's time trim away the leaves at the bottom to encourage the plant to put all it's energy into the fruit. You also need to nip out the growing tip once you've got five to seven trusses on them. You need to feed them once a week with tomorite once the first truss of is set. If they're bush just leave them be, though you won't need the canes.

The only worry about them being close together is fungal infections, but you can get sprays for that from B&Q. I'm slightly worried that mine have got something like that as a load of the leaves frizzled up, but it doesn't seem to be general across the plants so may just be shock at the heat.


Thanks, thats great. They look bushy to me, but pretty sure the bloke said they were vine.

Must admit I was worried about using feed as I thought it defeats the purpose with the chemicals in it etc, but it seems I need too. We don't have a great worry with the heat here...


Well if you don't feed plants they die, even the ones made of chemicals...


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:35 am 
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Brazil wrote:
slick wrote:
Brazil wrote:
slick wrote:
Planted 4 tomato plants of various varieties in pots a few weeks back not expecting much to happen.

They have gone f**king mental. Is there anything I need to do? I've put some canes into a nice triangle in each pot and they seem to be using these which is nice.

I also worried for some reason that they are all so close together on the little patio, no idea why, should I be?


Are they vine or bush tomatoes? If they're vine you need to nip out the side shoots and in a month or so's time trim away the leaves at the bottom to encourage the plant to put all it's energy into the fruit. You also need to nip out the growing tip once you've got five to seven trusses on them. You need to feed them once a week with tomorite once the first truss of is set. If they're bush just leave them be, though you won't need the canes.

The only worry about them being close together is fungal infections, but you can get sprays for that from B&Q. I'm slightly worried that mine have got something like that as a load of the leaves frizzled up, but it doesn't seem to be general across the plants so may just be shock at the heat.


Thanks, thats great. They look bushy to me, but pretty sure the bloke said they were vine.

Must admit I was worried about using feed as I thought it defeats the purpose with the chemicals in it etc, but it seems I need too. We don't have a great worry with the heat here...


Well if you don't feed plants they die, even the ones made of chemicals...


Isn't that what soil and water is for? I'm new here.

My herbs are going great.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:40 am 
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Herbs going great guns. First use of tomorite yesterday. Looking good.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:43 am 
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Depends on the quality of your soil and how often you fertilise it. There's a reason they muck-spread in the country and it's not just to annoy itinerant Daily Mail hacks.

Tomotoes need lots of feed to get decent fruit, other plants - particularly legumes - will be fine on their own provided the soils alright. You can probably get organic tomato feed if you look for it.

One other thing to bear in mind is aphids, which are bastards. Companion planting with marigolds or basil keeps them off, or you can spray them with something horrific or, if you're a smoker, soak your dog-ends in water and spray them with that, though the nicotine can fuck up bees I think.

Be aware that all this advice is coming from someone whose climbing rose currently looks like it's endured a nuclear winter, though.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:46 am 
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Brazil wrote:
Depends on the quality of your soil and how often you fertilise it. There's a reason they muck-spread in the country and it's not just to annoy itinerant Daily Mail hacks.

Tomotoes need lots of feed to get decent fruit, other plants - particularly legumes - will be fine on their own provided the soils alright. You can probably get organic tomato feed if you look for it.

One other thing to bear in mind is aphids, which are bastards. Companion planting with marigolds or basil keeps them off, or you can spray them with something horrific or, if you're a smoker, soak your dog-ends in water and spray them with that, though the nicotine can fuck up bees I think.

Be aware that all this advice is coming from someone whose climbing rose currently looks like it's endured a nuclear winter, though.


OK, i'll f**king feed the plum (tomatoes, not plums)

I do appreciate the advice mate.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:56 am 
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Definitely feed the toms. Brazil's advice is spot on. Watering is tricky though. You can either under or overwater them.

If the leaves (usually at the bottom) turn yellow, you've got it wrong.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 12:03 pm 
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I've been very careful with the watering and quite proud of how they have come on. Then we got a 2 hour torrential downpour last night and they all look a little sad today.


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