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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2012 1:26 pm 
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Quote:
have tried this all year

stupid small english slugs fall for this every time

I swear the fat spic slugs drink some before raping and pillaging my tender shoots


(and like a village idiot, I often appear to be apologising to the chap at oddbins while buying a single purple tin of scotlands finest aka tramp juice)


Are the big slugs you refer to like this? http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9 ... y5O5AGpPHt
If so, they're a mixed blessing. The Great Grey slug (also known as Tiger slug or Leopard slug) is fond of devouring those small little fecking slugs that you often find deep in the heart of cabbage or lettuce and seem to resist cursory rinsing efforts. :x Unfortunately, being omnivorous, they're also rather partial to young plants,and, pet food. We've had terrible trouble this year of armies of the bastards sliming in under the garage door to get at the cats and dogs bowls. A careful application of salt soon makes them rethink.
Fruit wise, it's been a mixed year so far with no cherries, very few apples forming, some strawberries and loads of raspberries.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2012 2:56 pm 
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Shrekles wrote:
Chilli Oil is easy. Just wash and halve your chillis lengthways. Stick them in a swingtop sealable bottle (similar to a Grolsch beer bottle) and fill it up with a good quality olive oil. Leave to sit for at least 12 months. All the heat gets drawn out of the chillis and into the oil - it should be a hot red after a year. You can decant the oil into a fresh bottle but I leave the chillis in the bottle as they look awesome.


You might want to be a bit careful making a long-lasting oil without heating... Chillies and other earth-grown goodies have been known to contain botulinium. If you don't heat the oil & the chilli to a high enough temperature for long enough you run the risk of giving the bacteria a nice oxygen-free environment to breed and grow to potentially dangerous levels. The same goes for these faddish herb oils where you leave the freshly picked sprigs of rosemary (or whatever) in the jar of oil for a year.

Best bet is to heat the oil and the chillis to 85 degrees C for 5 or so minutes... shouldn't be too long/hot to really damage the ingredients (although I would never use a sedimented oil, e.g. EV olive, for this).


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 12:16 am 
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I see that Ewinkum is posting.

Do you have any fruit trees or bushes?

It's been the most bizarre year. I have apples, gooseberries, blackcurrants & whitecurrants. The last 3 years have been brilliant - bumper crops. This year however I don't have a single fruit of any description. I had loads of blossoms back in May/June but now I have absolutely nothing. I notice that none of the crab apple trees around me have any fruit either. I'm hoping that it's just the s****y weather - I really don't want to have to dig out the apple trees & start again.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 12:25 am 
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lilyw wrote:
I see that Ewinkum is posting.

Do you have any fruit trees or bushes?

It's been the most bizarre year. I have apples, gooseberries, blackcurrants & whitecurrants. The last 3 years have been brilliant - bumper crops. This year however I don't have a single fruit of any description. I had loads of blossoms back in May/June but now I have absolutely nothing. I notice that none of the crab apple trees around me have any fruit either. I'm hoping that it's just the s****y weather - I really don't want to have to dig out the apple trees & start again.


Its the weather Lily dont do anything drastic. Whole crops of strawberries in Wexford ahve been destroyed to due the amount of rain this year


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 12:36 am 
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I'm not an expert Lilyw. I think it's down to the shite weather.

We've had a bumper crop of Rasberries this year too, but the fruit grow under the leaves and don't need sun to ripen as far as I know. Blackcurrants are crap. White currants are ok (but smothered by rasberry canes).
The Strawberries were poor, despite my planting more than I'd ever done and dosing them with ashes as recommended.
I'm just going to pot the runners now and hope for better next year.

I took a chance and sowed a lot of stuff in March, because the weather was so warm.

I got away with most of it, anything that was still underground when the frost came survived, and the early start kind of mitigated the cold summer, with Carrots onions etc all doing well, but some of the stuff got frost bitten and ended up being replanted too late (tomatoes).

It's all swings and roundabouts really.

I'm enjoying the hell out of it though. We were eating our own peas last week (5 mins from plant to pot), and I made a passable rhubarb tart with homegrown stuff.
Can't beat it.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 1:14 am 
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Just heading into spring here and I am flat out getting the garden dug over and composted before planting some new seedlings.
I recently invested in a mini glass house that has been awesome for getting an early start on seedlings. Roll on the warm weather.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2012 1:01 pm 
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Ewinkum wrote:
I'm not an expert Lilyw. I think it's down to the shite weather.

We've had a bumper crop of Rasberries this year too, but the fruit grow under the leaves and don't need sun to ripen as far as I know. Blackcurrants are crap. White currants are ok (but smothered by rasberry canes).
The Strawberries were poor, despite my planting more than I'd ever done and dosing them with ashes as recommended.
I'm just going to pot the runners now and hope for better next year.

I took a chance and sowed a lot of stuff in March, because the weather was so warm.

I got away with most of it, anything that was still underground when the frost came survived, and the early start kind of mitigated the cold summer, with Carrots onions etc all doing well, but some of the stuff got frost bitten and ended up being replanted too late (tomatoes).

It's all swings and roundabouts really.

I'm enjoying the hell out of it though. We were eating our own peas last week (5 mins from plant to pot), and I made a passable rhubarb tart with homegrown stuff.
Can't beat it.


A weird season, alright. Only thing you can do is plant a wide range and some stuff will do better than others.

Tomatoes, basil and most soft fruit were awful for us but coriander, matteuccia, redcurrant and aronias have done better than other years.


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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2015 9:34 am 
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Had a lovely day in t garden yesterday pressure washed the travertine tiles and read a book,miserable weather today though.
What's happening with you guys.


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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2015 10:15 am 
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lorcanoworms wrote:
Had a lovely day in t garden yesterday pressure washed the travertine tiles and read a book,miserable weather today though.
What's happening with you guys.

Despite lots of recent rain when it is normally unexpected and a fair bit of hard yakka by my goodself and Ms MungoSpouse, a big chunk of our garden looks farken awful.

The rotten pricks are to blame.

Suspect No.1

Ringtail possum.

Normally a nectar eater and very arboreal in habit, the little fucks will also eat greenery from the ground. I've seen them do it.
Image

Brushtail possum.

An utter garbage-guts that will eat anything up to and including dry dogfood. Between these pricks and their ringtail cousins (plus feckin' grasshoppers), our herb garden is copping a hammering.
Image

Suspect No.2


Brush turkey, better known as scrub turkeys locally. Utter utter utter caaaaaaaaaants!! :x :x

They're a mound-builder, so the showoff males garner every friggen bit of mulch-like substance from one's garden - that one has placed there at great expense and effort - to construct a ginormous mound the turd-bird hopes will be irresistible to females.
Image

The antisocial motherfucks are lucky John Howard (spit!!!) rammed though his fascist gun laws...


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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2015 10:32 am 
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pjm1 wrote:
Shrekles wrote:
Chilli Oil is easy. Just wash and halve your chillis lengthways. Stick them in a swingtop sealable bottle (similar to a Grolsch beer bottle) and fill it up with a good quality olive oil. Leave to sit for at least 12 months. All the heat gets drawn out of the chillis and into the oil - it should be a hot red after a year. You can decant the oil into a fresh bottle but I leave the chillis in the bottle as they look awesome.


You might want to be a bit careful making a long-lasting oil without heating... Chillies and other earth-grown goodies have been known to contain botulinium. If you don't heat the oil & the chilli to a high enough temperature for long enough you run the risk of giving the bacteria a nice oxygen-free environment to breed and grow to potentially dangerous levels. The same goes for these faddish herb oils where you leave the freshly picked sprigs of rosemary (or whatever) in the jar of oil for a year.

Best bet is to heat the oil and the chillis to 85 degrees C for 5 or so minutes... shouldn't be too long/hot to really damage the ingredients (although I would never use a sedimented oil, e.g. EV olive, for this).

great tips


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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2015 10:36 am 
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Shrekles wrote:
Just heading into spring here and I am flat out getting the garden dug over and composted before planting some new seedlings.
I recently invested in a mini glass house that has been awesome for getting an early start on seedlings. Roll on the warm weather.

I nurtured some seedlings from seed till just perfect to transplant.....relocated to garden and everything was great for a week until one of my sons left the gate open whilst playing......the next day when I checked the rabbits had cleaned out my entire veg garden bar my chilli plants.......( thank feck )


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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2015 11:57 am 
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lorcanoworms wrote:
Had a lovely day in t garden yesterday pressure washed the travertine tiles and read a book,miserable weather today though.
What's happening with you guys.


Spent the day spreading hay on the chook run as after all the rain we have had the last two weeks they were beginning to re-enact the battle of Paschendale.


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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2015 12:01 pm 
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Got loads of chillies and tomatoes indoors at the moment and the toms will go outside when/if the weather becomes warmer in late May or early June.

Plenty of early new potatoes which are currently being thrashed around by the wind out there.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 10:17 am 
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Me plums have gone and shrivelled up and died again.






Been a great year for strawbs and raspberries redcurrants and so on ,two pears on my new pear tree.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 10:20 am 
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Beetroot and Courgettes are going great guns. The Aubergines, Tomatoes and Padrons are finally catching up after a poor start. Doubtful any of the figs will ripen this year as it's just not been warm enough.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 10:36 am 
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some of the apple cordons are bearing fruit now (2nd year) (cookers Arthur Turner)

summer raspberries (glen ample) yielding quite good, blackberries (waldo) look as if they will yield well too

disappointed in my gooseberries (Hinnonmaki Red and Invicta), but not as much as the joostaberry which has nothing

been using some potash, not sure if it has been positive as i had hoped

had a decent strawberry crop, but now taking off the runners for next year

going to try a hydroponic garden, using 4" drainpipe and a wee pump next year


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 10:45 am 
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Brazil wrote:
Beetroot and Courgettes are going great guns. The Aubergines, Tomatoes and Padrons are finally catching up after a poor start. Doubtful any of the figs will ripen this year as it's just not been warm enough.

Figs a tough crop in the UK. Our neighbour's apricots are incredible and a friend has a healthy crop of both black and green grapes..... and they look like they will be edible.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 11:05 am 
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Have had a great crop of tomatoes so far this summer, plenty of them and really tasty. A little surprising since they are outside and the weather hasn't been especially good, I mean OK/normal for a UK summer but not that good. They seem to be at their peak now.

Carrots and spring onions did well too.

Scotch bonnet and orange habanero chillies all ripened and hoping for a second crop.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 11:29 am 
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tabascoboy wrote:
Have had a great crop of tomatoes so far this summer, plenty of them and really tasty. A little surprising since they are outside and the weather hasn't been especially good, I mean OK/normal for a UK summer but not that good. They seem to be at their peak now.

Carrots and spring onions did well too.

Scotch bonnet and orange habanero chillies all ripened and hoping for a second crop.

Tomatoes look like a large crop but nothing matured yet. Had problems getting them started from seed so maybe later than ideal.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 11:37 am 
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Torquemada 1420 wrote:
tabascoboy wrote:
Have had a great crop of tomatoes so far this summer, plenty of them and really tasty. A little surprising since they are outside and the weather hasn't been especially good, I mean OK/normal for a UK summer but not that good. They seem to be at their peak now.

Carrots and spring onions did well too.

Scotch bonnet and orange habanero chillies all ripened and hoping for a second crop.

Tomatoes look like a large crop but nothing matured yet. Had problems getting them started from seed so maybe later than ideal.

I took a chance and put the young plants out right at the start of June, about 8 weeks after planting the seeds. The spot I grow them is a suntrap so it gets the sun from 9am to 6pm on good days, that helps even in our dodgy climate.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 11:37 am 
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fisgard792 wrote:
some of the apple cordons are bearing fruit now (2nd year) (cookers Arthur Turner)

summer raspberries (glen ample) yielding quite good, blackberries (waldo) look as if they will yield well too

disappointed in my gooseberries (Hinnonmaki Red and Invicta), but not as much as the joostaberry which has nothing

been using some potash, not sure if it has been positive as i had hoped

had a decent strawberry crop, but now taking off the runners for next year

going to try a hydroponic garden, using 4" drainpipe and a wee pump next year

Just now I dug up around the roots of my plum tree and added a fertilizer mix recommended for fruit trees and then replaced the soil .


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 11:44 am 
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My garden is an utter mess.....like a swamp.
Just have to wait for the sun to get hotter during the day to burn off excess water.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:00 pm 
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Got some runner beans on the go too, dozens of pods from 2/3 cm up to 15 cm. Maybe get to pick the first lot this weekend.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:03 pm 
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I have got 4 of these beasts in my garden:

Image

And yesterday, I spent the afternoon cutting big branches which went all the way down to the ground. Bad luck, chain saw didn't start, had to do it all the old way, with a good old fashion saw. Pulling the branches, cutting them into small logs etc... My biceps are as tired as after a big musculation session.

I am also trying to get rid of this:

Image

Beautiful as it may look, this is a liana which chokes all your other plants to death. If anybody has any tip, my garden is completely invaded...


Last edited by TheFrog on Mon Aug 03, 2015 1:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:49 pm 
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TheFrog wrote:
I am also trying to get rid of this:

Image

Beautiful as it may look, this is a liana which choke all your other plants to death. If anybody has any tip, my garden is completely invaded...

Doesn't look like liana to me. Passiflora surely?


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:57 pm 
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Torquemada 1420 wrote:
TheFrog wrote:
I am also trying to get rid of this:

Image

Beautiful as it may look, this is a liana which choke all your other plants to death. If anybody has any tip, my garden is completely invaded...

Doesn't look like liana to me. Passiflora surely?


Yes, Passiflora. It is a creeper, it grows and climbs through the branches, and choke trees to death. Birds eat the fruits and drops seeds everywhere in the garden. The plant is a type of liana, and the foot of a liana can become 1cm diameter thick.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 1:02 pm 
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Yup.

We keep one imprisoned in a pot so it doesn't sucker. Take it TF's might have been left alone for a season or two, never seen them take over a garden before.

EDIT - makes more sense now. Any seedlings in the lawn either side of it would be mown down pretty sharpish.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 1:14 pm 
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lemonhead wrote:
Yup.

We keep one imprisoned in a pot so it doesn't sucker. Take it TF's might have been left alone for a season or two, never seen them take over a garden before.

EDIT - makes more sense now. Any seedlings in the lawn either side of it would be mown down pretty sharpish.


Yep. I was renting my house (and garden), and while the tenants were great at maintaining the house, they were a bit less eager to do the work in the garden. The thing has spread like fire, and now, it is a real battle against time. I manage to keep it under control, but never to really get rid of it in the absolute. It is a constant watch of where it starts spreading again. It must have come from a neighbour's garden, and it will continue thanks to birds' dropping too.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 2:23 pm 
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TheFrog wrote:
Torquemada 1420 wrote:
TheFrog wrote:
I am also trying to get rid of this:

Image

Beautiful as it may look, this is a liana which choke all your other plants to death. If anybody has any tip, my garden is completely invaded...

Doesn't look like liana to me. Passiflora surely?


Yes, Passiflora. It is a creeper, it grows and climbs through the branches, and choke trees to death. Birds eat the fruits and drops seeds everywhere in the garden. The plant is a type of liana, and the foot of a liana can become 1cm diameter thick.

Funny: I guess I always think of lianas as those huge dangling vines that Tarzan swung from or were strangling Angkor Wat! I don't think passiflora gets like that in the UK: or at least the varieties that can grow here outside.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 8:48 pm 
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Placeholder post.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 9:02 pm 
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So now that I have a garden, I have to start looking after it. Got a nice compost bin going and I've enjoyed teasing dad over how it's going much faster than the one he's had for years.

There's some bindweed in the front garden but round up is slowly but surely working it's magic there. If I lose some good stuff to get rid of it, so be it.

What has me stumped though is this bugger.

http://imgur.com/a/d26Rw

It starts like the first pic but quickly turns into a mini conifer. Because it doesn't have leaves, it doesn't really have anywhere to soak up the weedkiller and if I'm extremely accurate with my spraying, i might get some of the branches but the rest keeps growing, like in the third pic.

Any ideas what it is and how to get rid of it?


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 9:06 pm 
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Uncle Fester wrote:

Any ideas what it is and how to get rid of it?

Horsetails - very difficult to get rid of them. Essentially dig a great big hole and set a fire if you can to get rid of the rhizomes or they come back year after year.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=257


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 10:02 pm 
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I just fished it all out of my compost bin. :blush:


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 07, 2016 11:13 pm 
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Blasted ground elder. I'm battling it with a vengeance.

I've bought some hypodermic needles so I can kill the blighter without hurting the surrounding plants which include a very expensive acer.

Thought better of a flame thrower but this stuff is invidious.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2016 1:09 am 
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My frangipani tree is growing at a ridiculous rate. Rest of the garden looking lovely.. plenty of nice big ferns, some creepers, bouganvillia, hibiscus, gardenia and orchids. First time Ive had a garden that Ive put some effort into and have found it quite rewarding. Certainly looks a bit different to a UK garden though.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2016 1:44 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
My frangipani tree is growing at a ridiculous rate. Rest of the garden looking lovely.. plenty of nice big ferns, some creepers, bouganvillia, hibiscus, gardenia and orchids. First time Ive had a garden that Ive put some effort into and have found it quite rewarding. Certainly looks a bit different to a UK garden though.


It is very rewarding - I wish I could grow a frangipani but it is too cold here for them to survive. We are starting to develop a great rose garden though.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2016 2:06 am 
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Its funny here in Singapore.. you go the botanical gardens and see all these amazing orchids, palms etc and then you go to the temperate greenhouse at Gardens by the Bay where they keep the conditions like Europe and all the locals are ooohing and ahhhhing at some roses or geraniums that I wouldnt really look at twice having grown up with them.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2016 8:13 am 
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Uncle Fester wrote:
I just fished it all out of my compost bin. :blush:

Well you need to eradicate it where it actually grows because if you cut it down or try pull it out the rhizomes remain underground and come up the next year, so dig a big hole where they grow and turn it into a firepit to get rid of the buggers.

I speak from experience...

This year my garden has been overrun with these
Image
Broad-leaved willowherb


Not unattractive but very invasive, reckon I must have removed about 300 of them so far, and the battle continues.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2016 8:23 am 
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tabascoboy wrote:
Uncle Fester wrote:
I just fished it all out of my compost bin. :blush:

Well you need to eradicate it where it actually grows because if you cut it down or try pull it out the rhizomes remain underground and come up the next year, so dig a big hole where they grow and turn it into a firepit to get rid of the buggers.

I speak from experience...

This year my garden has been overrun with these
Image
Broad-leaved willowherb


Not unattractive but very invasive, reckon I must have removed about 300 of them so far, and the battle continues.


So that's what that is. I get that, fat hen, and some low-lying little shit that gets everywhere and is annoying as fudge. I've also got bindweed (not the Japanese variety) which is receiving a regular treatment of agent-orange strength glyphosate, as is the resurgent Ivy that's f**king the fence up.

Got white aubergines, San Marzano Tomatoes and basil (for the aphids) under glass, Anaheim Chillies, Padrons, Tomatillos and a courgette out in the open. Fingers crossed that we'll get a decent sunny stretch for the next three months...

Any tips on small shrubs for a semi-shaded border (about 50cm)? We've already got a pieris which has revived from the previous owners' neglect thanks to my superior skills. And being next to the compost bin.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 08, 2016 8:45 am 
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Brazil wrote:



So that's what that is. I get that, fat hen, and some low-lying little shit that gets everywhere and is annoying as f**k. I've also got bindweed (not the Japanese variety) which is receiving a regular treatment of agent-orange strength glyphosate, as is the resurgent Ivy that's f**k the fence up.

Got white aubergines, San Marzano Tomatoes and basil (for the aphids) under glass, Anaheim Chillies, Padrons, Tomatillos and a courgette out in the open. Fingers crossed that we'll get a decent sunny stretch for the next three months...

Any tips on small shrubs for a semi-shaded border (about 50cm)? We've already got a pieris which has revived from the previous owners' neglect thanks to my superior skills. And being next to the compost bin.

I have this in a small space, be careful as there are two varietes, one which grows like a bastard and gets too large for borders

Image
Euonymus fortunei 'Emerald 'n' Gold'

It's quite a slow grower, has no flowers and takes time to spread, but it's a nice evergreen with a bit of colour (poisonous leaves though).


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