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Whether you can or can't actually vote IRL, In, or Out
In 62%  62%  [ 232 ]
Out 38%  38%  [ 141 ]
Total votes : 373
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 3:11 pm 
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I like haggis wrote:
We're negotiating tomorrow with no chief negotiator :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: .

If you didn't laugh you'd cry.


I'm sure Boris can bray "No deal is better than a bad deal" and it will all fall into place.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 3:11 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:
Calculus wrote:
SamShark wrote:
Survation poll for the Mail on Sunday

Quote:
The majority of Britons now want a second referendum on the UK quitting the European Union, according to a new survey.



:thumbup:

Will of the people, make it happen Theresa.


80% of voters voted for parties that are pro brexit. I dont think there is any ambiguity.


With all due respect, you know absolutely fokkol about British Politics.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 3:14 pm 
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SamShark wrote:
I like haggis wrote:
We're negotiating tomorrow with no chief negotiator :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: .

If you didn't laugh you'd cry.


I'm sure Boris can bray "No deal is better than a bad deal" and it will all fall into place.


Unfortunately Hammond already came out on Peston and said no deal would be a disaster so whatever the strategy now is anyone's guess.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 3:17 pm 
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I like haggis wrote:
We're negotiating tomorrow with no chief negotiator :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: .

If you didn't laugh you'd cry.

So who is Crawford Falconer?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 3:22 pm 
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William Keegan in the Observer on spreadsheet Phil, the chancellor who last week some thought was on the way out :

"It was Philip Hammond, Osborne’s successor, who, in challenging Theresa May’s obsession with a hard Brexit, maintained that the people who voted for Brexit did not vote to become poorer. But that is what the 51.9% of those who voted in effect did.

There were those who thought that the fantasy of a 150-seat majority would enable May to see off the hard Brexiters and pursue a more sensible policy. But all the evidence suggests that she meant what she said: that she put reductions in immigration above all else, and was prepared to leave the customs union and the single market in order to realise this dubious aim.

It is this preparedness to leave the single market that puzzles me most about the Brexiters. On the whole, these are people who worship the memory of Margaret Thatcher and thought she could do no wrong. My own view is that she did quite a lot of wrong, but that the single market was a great achievement, working very much in our economy’s interests. Yet these latter-day Thatcherites are prepared to give it all up in their mystical pursuit of “sovereignty” and “control”.

One of the results of the election is that May is now so weakened that she has no alternative but to hang on to a chancellor who knows that Brexit is self-damaging nonsense. Hammond is trying to make the best of a bad job: in remarks on Friday before an EU meeting, he rightly emphasised the need for the UK to concentrate on jobs, growth and the needs of business."


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 3:35 pm 
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Calculus wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
Calculus wrote:
SamShark wrote:
Survation poll for the Mail on Sunday

Quote:
The majority of Britons now want a second referendum on the UK quitting the European Union, according to a new survey.



:thumbup:

Will of the people, make it happen Theresa.


80% of voters voted for parties that are pro brexit. I dont think there is any ambiguity.


With all due respect, you know absolutely fokkol about British Politics.


To be fair, neither does the British.... obviously


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 3:38 pm 
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 4:00 pm 
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I like haggis wrote:
We're negotiating tomorrow with no chief negotiator :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: .

If you didn't laugh you'd cry.

Fecking Tory arse clowns


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 4:01 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:

To be fair, neither does the British.... obviously



Jy’s ‘n fokken poesgesig. Doen ons almal ‘n guns boet en pos ‘n bietjie minner op hierdie draad.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 4:18 pm 
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I like haggis wrote:

Unfortunately Hammond already came out on Peston and said no deal would be a disaster so whatever the strategy now is anyone's guess.


This discussion just shows how unbelievably stupid our MP's are. (and how inept the fake-news media is). Not one seems to have a clue. Yet the solution is so simple and obvious. So they will eventually get there as they catch on slowly but surely one by one

http://eureferendum.com/blogview.aspx?b ... qus_thread

Quote:
Here, we learn that "unity" is everything. And just to prove it, Mr Umunna is able to tell us that: "Our affiliated trades unions are strongly supportive of both, given their importance to jobs and workers’ rights". From John to Keir, he says, "we all agree that single market membership, or at least a deal that gives us the exact same benefits, is the best economic option for Britain".

Attempting to put the Labour spin on it, he says that the argument around full membership of the single market is about "whether it can be squared with delivering the desire of many of our voters to gain greater control over immigration".

But, he says – and here comes the meat: "free movement is not unconditional – you can already be required to leave our country after three months if you don’t have a job, but governments have chosen not to do this". Equally, Chuka Umunna declares, "membership of the single market does not mean totally uncontrolled immigration from the European Union".

At this point, though, his comments get bizarre. "Within the European treaties", he says, "restrictions on free movement are explicitly allowed for reasons of 'public policy, public security or public health'", then adding: "So Liechtenstein, which is outside the EU but in the single market, is allowed to impose quotas on EU migrants".

I did say "bizarre". The quote about "public policy" comes from Directive 2004/38/EC (Article 27), which gives grounds for restricting freedom of movement – with the rider that: "These grounds shall not be invoked to serve economic ends".

The issues here are numerous and various. The exclusions cited are not in the "European treaties" but in a Directive. Furthermore, Liechtenstein is not subject to either the European treaties or the Directive. The exclusions come from the EEA Agreement (Article 112), which allows action on the basis of "serious economic, societal or environmental difficulties".

Chuka Umunna should not be making such errors. This is monumental disinformation which, if it reflects the state of knowledge in the Labour Party, betrays a staggering level of ignorance. This we always suspected, but here is strong evidence of a most disturbing kind.

And it does not stop there. The platform for Mr Umunna's display of ignorance was the Guardian. Wasn't there any one there, in the entire editorial process, who had the knowledge to point out the inconsistencies in the piece. Wasn't there anyone who knew that this was an EEA issue, and not a matter for the "European treaties".

But then, that points to a broader omission. Umunna writes a whole piece about the UK's continued membership of the Single Market and does not once mention the EEA. Instead, we get his reference to Barry Gardiner raising the prospect of "reformed membership of the single market and customs union".

For heaven's sake! What does "reformed membership of the single market and customs union" actually mean? And how long is it going to take before MPs – any MP – begins to understand that the UK cannot leave the EU and stay in its customs union?

Here, though, we have a rare focus on the Labour Party. Necessarily, much of our attention is on the party of government, where we see chaos, misunderstanding and ignorance. But this piece shows that the problems are by no means confined to government. We have the main opposition that is also all at sea, unable to offer a coherent position on Brexit.

And the Guardian, the platform for conveying Labour's disarray, then offers an editorial, blithely informing us that: "Theresa May needs to be deflected by facts rather than delusions to try and make our post-EU future work".

It seems to me that this loss-leading newspaper could benefit by being "deflected" by a few facts. Instead, it asserts that Keir Starmer has something intelligent to offer in declaring that the Prime Minister "had been wrong to take continued membership of the customs union and the single market off the table", thereby perpetuating the confusion over the customs union.

We are badly served by the Conservatives, but it is evident that Labour is no better. It has me wondering whether our representatives in Parliament had ever failed us before, to such an extent over such an important policy issue. This alone is enough to question the entire value of the institution – and the media that supports it.

Over the election, Corbyn's slogan was "for the many not the few" but, taking up his theme, all he is actually delivering is a situation where, never in history (or so I believe) have so many been so badly served by so few.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 4:27 pm 
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jorwar wrote:
William Keegan in the Observer on spreadsheet Phil, the chancellor who last week some thought was on the way out :

"It was Philip Hammond, Osborne’s successor, who, in challenging Theresa May’s obsession with a hard Brexit, maintained that the people who voted for Brexit did not vote to become poorer. But that is what the 51.9% of those who voted in effect did.

There were those who thought that the fantasy of a 150-seat majority would enable May to see off the hard Brexiters and pursue a more sensible policy. But all the evidence suggests that she meant what she said: that she put reductions in immigration above all else, and was prepared to leave the customs union and the single market in order to realise this dubious aim.

It is this preparedness to leave the single market that puzzles me most about the Brexiters. On the whole, these are people who worship the memory of Margaret Thatcher and thought she could do no wrong. My own view is that she did quite a lot of wrong, but that the single market was a great achievement, working very much in our economy’s interests. Yet these latter-day Thatcherites are prepared to give it all up in their mystical pursuit of “sovereignty” and “control”.

One of the results of the election is that May is now so weakened that she has no alternative but to hang on to a chancellor who knows that Brexit is self-damaging nonsense. Hammond is trying to make the best of a bad job: in remarks on Friday before an EU meeting, he rightly emphasised the need for the UK to concentrate on jobs, growth and the needs of business."


This article is typical of the ignorance about this topic. where leaving the EU political union is confused with leaving the single market (the article is complete and utter crap)

It just shows how the total confusion in the fake-news media is reflected by those who rely on it. As many politicians seem to

Greece for example is in the POLITICAL UNION and the SINGLE MARKET
Norway is NOT in the POLITICAL UNION but is in the SINGLE MARKET

The UK VOTED to leave the POLITICAL UNION only.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 6:41 pm 
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Calculus wrote:
Rocketz wrote:

To be fair, neither does the British.... obviously



Jy’s ‘n fokken poesgesig. Doen ons almal ‘n guns boet en pos ‘n bietjie minner op hierdie draad.


Jy klink nou soos n regte hanskakie... die Engelse jou familie se inbors en karakter weggespyker?

o ja... die engelse is dose en enige iemand wat hulle ondersteun is maar bedremmeld


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 6:50 pm 
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https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3824143/david-davis-secures-first-brexit-win-ahead-of-mondays-crunch-talks-with-northern-ireland-over-border-deal/

:lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 6:51 pm 
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:lol: deluded fucks


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 6:58 pm 
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paddyor wrote:


Pretty sure that was a priority for everyone so hardly a victory.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 6:58 pm 
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David Davis has insisted on Custard Creams and Chocolate Digestives in the meetings.

It will be tricky, but possible.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:00 pm 
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Petej wrote:


The notoriously (or so the Sun wants them to be) Brexit readers haven't seen it as much of a win if the comments below are anything to go by.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:20 pm 
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SamShark wrote:
David Davis has insisted on Custard Creams and Chocolate Digestives in the meetings.

It will be tricky, but possible.

Hopefully they'll be able to negotiate this most difficult of issues.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:23 pm 
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paddyor wrote:



If ever one wanted a dictionary definition example of post-factual news. :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:27 pm 
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Fortunately for us, the opinions of sun-reading vermin are meaningless now.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:28 pm 
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Silver wrote:
jorwar wrote:
William Keegan in the Observer on spreadsheet Phil, the chancellor who last week some thought was on the way out :

"It was Philip Hammond, Osborne’s successor, who, in challenging Theresa May’s obsession with a hard Brexit, maintained that the people who voted for Brexit did not vote to become poorer. But that is what the 51.9% of those who voted in effect did.

There were those who thought that the fantasy of a 150-seat majority would enable May to see off the hard Brexiters and pursue a more sensible policy. But all the evidence suggests that she meant what she said: that she put reductions in immigration above all else, and was prepared to leave the customs union and the single market in order to realise this dubious aim.

It is this preparedness to leave the single market that puzzles me most about the Brexiters. On the whole, these are people who worship the memory of Margaret Thatcher and thought she could do no wrong. My own view is that she did quite a lot of wrong, but that the single market was a great achievement, working very much in our economy’s interests. Yet these latter-day Thatcherites are prepared to give it all up in their mystical pursuit of “sovereignty” and “control”.

One of the results of the election is that May is now so weakened that she has no alternative but to hang on to a chancellor who knows that Brexit is self-damaging nonsense. Hammond is trying to make the best of a bad job: in remarks on Friday before an EU meeting, he rightly emphasised the need for the UK to concentrate on jobs, growth and the needs of business."


This article is typical of the ignorance about this topic. where leaving the EU political union is confused with leaving the single market (the article is complete and utter crap)

It just shows how the total confusion in the fake-news media is reflected by those who rely on it. As many politicians seem to

Greece for example is in the POLITICAL UNION and the SINGLE MARKET
Norway is NOT in the POLITICAL UNION but is in the SINGLE MARKET

The UK VOTED to leave the POLITICAL UNION only.


Here is the research what people voted for

http://ukandeu.ac.uk/research-papers/un ... th-the-eu/

Quote:
The research, which canvassed opinion from hundreds of people across the East of England by Professor Catherine Barnard and Dr Amy Ludlow, from Cambridge’s Faculty of Law, found many participants wanted full single market access with no free movement or payment to the EU – a position the EU rejects.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:42 pm 
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Not waiting for the results of Brexit, Goldman Sachs announces it is quitting London by redistributing its operations across Europe

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/finanzen/f-a ... 65071.html


Last edited by Rocketz on Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:45 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:
Not waiting for the results of Brexit, Goldman Sachs announces it is quitting London.

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/finanzen/f-a ... 65071.html


That;s old news. Been reported in British press in various different interviews since the start of the year.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:47 pm 
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sewa wrote:
Verhofstad trolls the UK like a boss :lol: :thumbup:

''A day after France and Germany both said Britain could reverse Brexit if it wanted, Verhofstadt said Britain’s budget rebates and opt outs from EU rules would disappear if it did so''

So long, Hoofstate. Goodluck with your project.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:47 pm 
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Saint wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
Not waiting for the results of Brexit, Goldman Sachs announces it is quitting London.

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/finanzen/f-a ... 65071.html


That;s old news. Been reported in British press in various different interviews since the start of the year.


Aha I just read that today in FAS the article was posted today


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:49 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
bimboman wrote:
For perspective Goldman Sachs employ 6,100 plus staff in London.


For perspective on your perspective

1. 6 months ago losing access to the single the market was denied as impossible by everyone in the UK.

2. The banks said there want any clear reason to move people until the terms of Brexit was known (it still isn't and they are moving people allready)

3.since when has anybody believed a banker or a politician. 0 have become 100s in 6 months....



Sorry, you've made all of that above up, everyone was saying we'd leave the single market , we will still have access to it.

It was a clear risk we would lose jobs in finance, they'll be a decent amount going. I know people already working on the duel compliance aspects of this.

It could be lots or little, but a penny to a pound of shit it won't prevent London being the premier financial centre in Europe.


So much.....

Image



Your memory isn't great is it.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 7:53 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
bimboman wrote:
For perspective Goldman Sachs employ 6,100 plus staff in London.


For perspective on your perspective

1. 6 months ago losing access to the single the market was denied as impossible by everyone in the UK.

2. The banks said there want any clear reason to move people until the terms of Brexit was known (it still isn't and they are moving people allready)

3.since when has anybody believed a banker or a politician. 0 have become 100s in 6 months....



Sorry, you've made all of that above up, everyone was saying we'd leave the single market , we will still have access to it.

It was a clear risk we would lose jobs in finance, they'll be a decent amount going. I know people already working on the duel compliance aspects of this.

It could be lots or little, but a penny to a pound of shit it won't prevent London being the premier financial centre in Europe.


So much.....

Image



Your memory isn't great is it.


yep and an article was posted today?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:38 pm 
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SamShark wrote:
David Davis has insisted on Custard Creams and Chocolate Digestives in the meetings.

It will be tricky, but possible.


Let's hope none of the RFU are on the EU negotiating team.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:03 pm 
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Phillip Hammond basically said to the EU to give the UK the deal they want of they are toast.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:08 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:
Saint wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
Not waiting for the results of Brexit, Goldman Sachs announces it is quitting London.

http://www.faz.net/aktuell/finanzen/f-a ... 65071.html


That;s old news. Been reported in British press in various different interviews since the start of the year.


Aha I just read that today in FAS the article was posted today


There have been loads of interviews with Goldman Sachs, saying that they will move up to half of their staff to Europe regardless of how Brexit works out.

The only thing concrete in that article is increasing Frankfurt from 200 to 400 employees


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:08 pm 
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"as France carries out structural economic reforms to boost its credibility"

:lol:

WTF does this mean. I can guarantee it will not be good for the majority in France

and this article shows again why the fake-news media is failing. they just make bullshit up

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... kel-macron
Quote:
At stake is no less than Europe’s role in defending liberal democratic values and a rules-based international order at a time when – as one former Obama administration official put it to me recently – bubblefart’s America is “missing in action and the UK is disappearing into oblivion”. The words may be harsh, but they underscore that Britain’s central weakness lies not only in its internal political confusion – but also with a dangerous ignorance of what its European neighbours are setting their sights on.
Macron and Merkel signal new move to strengthen eurozone
Read more

The Franco-German engine is not focusing on Brexit but rather on consolidating the 60-year-old European project through further integration and cooperation. At the heart of this stands an emerging Macron-Merkel deal, intended to act as Europe’s new powerhouse. On 15 May, the French and German leaders met and spoke of a new “roadmap” for the EU. The thinking goes like this: in the next two to three years, as France carries out structural economic reforms to boost its credibility, Germany will step up much-needed European financial solidarity and investment mechanisms, and embrace a new role on foreign policy, security and defence.

Quote:
I heard the following comment: “A golden decade may be dawning for Europe.” A new narrative is in the air.

There are many caveats, no doubt. Anxieties are rife about Italian banks, for example. Resistance in Germany’s finance ministry about anything that may weigh on German taxpayers has by no means gone away. Germany’s role in security and defence still stirs gruelling domestic debates – even as the country deploys troops in Lithuania as part of Nato’s deterrence of Russia. Much will depend on the outcome of German elections in September. The populist wave in Europe may have ebbed, but it hasn’t disappeared, nor all the factors that fuelled it. Brexit will be time consuming and will take up huge amounts of energy.
Guardian Today: the headlines, the analysis, the debate - sent direct to you
Read more

Still, the scenario of a European reawakening shouldn’t be discarded – especially not in Britain, as it heads for a wrenching exit


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:12 pm 
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paneer wrote:
Phillip Hammond basically said to the EU to give the UK the deal they want of they are toast.


Like a lot of politicians Hammond has no idea how the real world actually organises itself and works.

His view as expressed on Marr and Peston about how customs' free borders should work was naive in the extreme, for all the guff the Tories (and Corbyn tbh) spout about how good for the economy they are, he appears to have no real idea about supply chains in the EU are governed or work.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:13 pm 
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paneer wrote:
Phillip Hammond basically said to the EU to give the UK the deal they want of they are toast.

We're soooooo scared :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:14 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:
Silver wrote:
jorwar wrote:
William Keegan in the Observer on spreadsheet Phil, the chancellor who last week some thought was on the way out :

"It was Philip Hammond, Osborne’s successor, who, in challenging Theresa May’s obsession with a hard Brexit, maintained that the people who voted for Brexit did not vote to become poorer. But that is what the 51.9% of those who voted in effect did.

There were those who thought that the fantasy of a 150-seat majority would enable May to see off the hard Brexiters and pursue a more sensible policy. But all the evidence suggests that she meant what she said: that she put reductions in immigration above all else, and was prepared to leave the customs union and the single market in order to realise this dubious aim.

It is this preparedness to leave the single market that puzzles me most about the Brexiters. On the whole, these are people who worship the memory of Margaret Thatcher and thought she could do no wrong. My own view is that she did quite a lot of wrong, but that the single market was a great achievement, working very much in our economy’s interests. Yet these latter-day Thatcherites are prepared to give it all up in their mystical pursuit of “sovereignty” and “control”.

One of the results of the election is that May is now so weakened that she has no alternative but to hang on to a chancellor who knows that Brexit is self-damaging nonsense. Hammond is trying to make the best of a bad job: in remarks on Friday before an EU meeting, he rightly emphasised the need for the UK to concentrate on jobs, growth and the needs of business."


This article is typical of the ignorance about this topic. where leaving the EU political union is confused with leaving the single market (the article is complete and utter crap)

It just shows how the total confusion in the fake-news media is reflected by those who rely on it. As many politicians seem to

Greece for example is in the POLITICAL UNION and the SINGLE MARKET
Norway is NOT in the POLITICAL UNION but is in the SINGLE MARKET

The UK VOTED to leave the POLITICAL UNION only.


Here is the research what people voted for

http://ukandeu.ac.uk/research-papers/un ... th-the-eu/

Quote:
The research, which canvassed opinion from hundreds of people across the East of England by Professor Catherine Barnard and Dr Amy Ludlow, from Cambridge’s Faculty of Law, found many participants wanted full single market access with no free movement or payment to the EU – a position the EU rejects.


why is this causing so much confusion. It doesn't mention the single market. If we follwo the norewya option then we have left the EU

Image


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:17 pm 
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Gavin Duffy wrote:
paneer wrote:
Phillip Hammond basically said to the EU to give the UK the deal they want of they are toast.

We're soooooo scared :lol:

we've tw0 years. The cries of the Irish and the bullcrap predictions from the likes of Camroc. We will see it all unfold. UK will be fine and they'll come out of this deal grand. Know your place little peoples of the world.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:18 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:

Here is the research what people voted for

http://ukandeu.ac.uk/research-papers/un ... th-the-eu/

Quote:
The research, which canvassed opinion from hundreds of people across the East of England by Professor Catherine Barnard and Dr Amy Ludlow, from Cambridge’s Faculty of Law, found many participants wanted full single market access with no free movement or payment to the EU – a position the EU rejects.


The EU is a racket. where people who want to trade within the single market are forced to hand money over. So as a short term option the Uk will likely have no choice. The Eu are run by crocks. Just a fact of life that the Uk will have to accept

Free movement is another issue that has been discussed before


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:21 pm 
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Will the board political buffons be quiet after the next two years prove every theory they've every had is complete and utter boIlocxs


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:38 pm 
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Silver wrote:
Rocketz wrote:

Here is the research what people voted for

http://ukandeu.ac.uk/research-papers/un ... th-the-eu/

Quote:
The research, which canvassed opinion from hundreds of people across the East of England by Professor Catherine Barnard and Dr Amy Ludlow, from Cambridge’s Faculty of Law, found many participants wanted full single market access with no free movement or payment to the EU – a position the EU rejects.


The EU is a racket. where people who want to trade within the single market are forced to hand money over. So as a short term option the Uk will likely have no choice. The Eu are run by crocks. Just a fact of life that the Uk will have to accept

Free movement is another issue that has been discussed before


So you are giving up already?


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:40 pm 
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Austerity may be over, but Brexit means it won’t feel like it

http://www.theneweuropean.co.uk/top-sto ... -1-5066832

Quote:
Something else that effects everyone is inflation. This week it hit 2.9%, its highest rate for four years. Higher chocolate prices, computer games, holidays and toy costs were to blame for the leap, according to the ONS, all due to the weakness of the pound since June last year.

Inflation is one thing, but prices happen to be rising rapidly at the same time as real wages are falling. This means that household incomes are being squeezed almost as badly as they were in the aftermath of the financial crisis.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 18, 2017 9:41 pm 
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paneer wrote:
Phillip Hammond basically said to the EU to give the UK the deal they want of they are toast.

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