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Whether you can or can't actually vote IRL, In, or Out
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:42 pm 
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Zico wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Ive a bit to,say tonight because you asked questions. I thought you were honestly asking, that was my mistake.



My original question stands regarding BoE hints of a rate rise. How will Brexit affect that decision and therefore the value of the pound?

I wouldn't survive a minute on this subject with anyone who had a faint clue.



Considering your attempts at misrepresentation it's rather irrelevant.

Rate rises are mainly meant to be an inflation control tool. Take a brexit view on inflation first.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:51 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Take a brexit view on inflation first.


Go on, what are they?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:55 pm 
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Zico wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Take a brexit view on inflation first.


Go on, what are they?



Opinions.....

I have no idea what you think your asking let alone the thrust of what seems to be an argument in your head.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 12:12 am 
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bimboman wrote:
Zico wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Take a brexit view on inflation first.


Go on, what are they?



Opinions.....

I have no idea what you think your asking let alone the thrust of what seems to be an argument in your head.


There's a huge list of things of which affect inflation but Brexit is specifically altering labour supply and tarrifs with immediate effect by intent, that's why I mentioned them earlier.

Is the pound going to be worth more or less for those decisions?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 12:58 am 
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Zico wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Zico wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Take a brexit view on inflation first.


Go on, what are they?



Opinions.....

I have no idea what you think your asking let alone the thrust of what seems to be an argument in your head.


There's a huge list of things of which affect inflation but Brexit is specifically altering labour supply and tarrifs with immediate effect by intent, that's why I mentioned them earlier.

Is the pound going to be worth more or less for those decisions?



Brexit may alter labour supply there's little evidence of any major change right now.

Tarifs may or may not happen.


"These decisions" , haven't been made yet how on earth can someone answer the question regarding "more or less" ?

It's unanswerable.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:00 am 
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When you’re done bimbo can you sort me out with tonight’s lottery numbers?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:58 am 
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:lol: it's roundabouts all over again


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 9:21 am 
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These are the ones who are letting on they've some understanding of the economic consequences of Brexit.

Yeah, 'what are the lottery numbers?'


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:24 am 
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Zico wrote:
These are the ones who are letting on they've some understanding of the economic consequences of Brexit.

Yeah, 'what are the lottery numbers?'



"These" ?

No you stared by asking a question about my view on sterling exchange rates and why. You now seem to think your great big "gotcha" moment is that I can't tell you how brexit will end up, what global interest rates will be in 2021, what USD policy will be in 2021, these are the even the most "basic " of questions that would need answering to have a view on rates post brexit.

Do you somehow think I've claimed I know what rates will be post Brexit ? If so point them out ?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:34 am 
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Quote:

I'm a bit curious about what's going to happen next year and what the potential outcomes might be for the currency values. You must know a lot about this stuff if you're laying money on it. The BoE have hinted yet again of an interest rate rise, a bit more strongly this time as the effect of previous hints was wearing off, but if the UK gets a bespoke EU deal which confounds the experts at the BoE will that cause a crash in sterling when the BoE don't raise interest rates


This is where we started.

My first response was " I don't know a lot about FX at all"

"Potential out comes"

"BOE have hinted"

"Bit more "

"But if the UK gets a bespoke"

"Will that"

These are all possibles in your initial question to my self.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 1:31 pm 
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Anonymous. wrote:
shereblue wrote:
Oh and whoever explained that the Germans and French are paying for the lowering of the Polish retirement age, I have to say that sounds like a very generous deal. I like the sound of it. How does it work I wonder and can we in the UK also apply?

It's not just the Germans and the French who are paying for it. Any country that is a net contributor is paying for it and that includes the UK until sometime after we leave.

Spoiler: show
Image


I am unaware of any linkage between specifically Polish pensions and EU net contributions. I do not know but I would expect that to be a matter for the Poles. Quite rightly so. The Brexitists love to make links though and spend and allocate our net contribution many times over (see the stupid NHS funding issue, kept warm not so long ago by the UK foreign secretary, funding the Brussels bureaucracy etc)

From the EU's point of view then certainly the UK is a significant net contributor to the EU budget. The likely loss of that UK contribution is of course a factor helpful to the UK in Brexit negotiations.

However the sense of exploitation foisted by Brexitist campaigners on their frankly exchequer-draining 52% that they are somehow being robbed of their money is unfair. The UK in fact was only the 8th highest net contributor, per capita in 2015.

Thatcher had business in mind when she contributed so vigorously to the creation of the single market - which to be meaningful does involve bringing the economy and infrastructures of new member countries up. That involves investment or net contributions. I doubt that she had in mind upping the state pension and other benefits for the many native UK Leavers reliant on benefits and state pensions who are under the illusion that it is somehow THEIR money subsidising Polish pensions - or whatever the Dail Mail says the UK's net contribution happens to be funding on any given day.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:57 pm 
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Everyone excited about the Valentines Day Boris speech, which it's said will unite Brexiters and remainers on a "liberal" Brexit?

Bits and bobs being trailled seem to suggest it will focus on getting rid of regulations but not sure how many Brexiters or remainers are that arsed about that.

It's kind of a Boris/Redwood/Mogg Brexit rather than a northerner/Welsh working man Brexit, or an older person in Kent brexit or a liberal remainer Brexit.

Looks like there will be some big words thrown in though, consistent with the fact that he's "incredibly intelligent".


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 11:08 pm 
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Will it be a different Brexit than the one set out in Mays party Conference speech in 2016, or her Lancaster House speech of January 2017, or her Florence speech of September 2018 ?

Lots of speechifying, very little actual negotiating.

Touch of the Groundhog days.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 12:47 pm 
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Some European countries and leaders are standing up to the bullies in EU, threatening not to punish UK/offer a narrow deal. Shame the Irish are just toeing the EU line.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5566457/b ... l-barnier/

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5557888/u ... rade-deal/


Last edited by TranceNRG on Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:06 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Quote:

I'm a bit curious about what's going to happen next year and what the potential outcomes might be for the currency values. You must know a lot about this stuff if you're laying money on it. The BoE have hinted yet again of an interest rate rise, a bit more strongly this time as the effect of previous hints was wearing off, but if the UK gets a bespoke EU deal which confounds the experts at the BoE will that cause a crash in sterling when the BoE don't raise interest rates


This is where we started.

My first response was " I don't know a lot about FX at all"

"Potential out comes"

"BOE have hinted"

"Bit more "

"But if the UK gets a bespoke"

"Will that"

These are all possibles in your initial question to my self.


The pills, bozo. Take the pills!


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:43 pm 
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TranceNRG wrote:
Some European countries and leaders are standing up to the bullies in EU, threatening not to punish UK/offer a narrow deal. Shame the Irish are just toeing the EU line.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5566457/b ... l-barnier/

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5557888/u ... rade-deal/

A small number of us may have missed the Sun, so thanks.

Congratulations to the Sun's insightful Paris correspondent.

On 12th Feb, the Sun reports Macron as wanting a hard line on Brexit and then the very next day describes the French as scolding Barnier for being too tough.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:58 pm 
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shereblue wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
Some European countries and leaders are standing up to the bullies in EU, threatening not to punish UK/offer a narrow deal. Shame the Irish are just toeing the EU line.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5566457/b ... l-barnier/

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5557888/u ... rade-deal/

A small number of us may have missed the Sun, so thanks.

Congratulations to the Sun's insightful Paris correspondent.

On 12th Feb, the Sun reports Macron as wanting a hard line on Brexit and then the very next day describes the French as scolding Barnier for being too tough.


Surprised the sun has a Paris correspondent. I look forward to Bojo (appalling bullshitter pillock Johnson- if only his initials were bsj), the disgraced defence minister and Brexit Bulldog selling deregulation of employment, consumer protections and environmental protections in their speeches by pretending they don't intend to do that.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:15 pm 
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The key thing about the trade deal is that every country has a veto. It matters little that a bunch of countries think Barnier is being too harsh. Unless all 27 think the same then the approach will continue to be the current one. The bottom line is Germany and France have lined up with Barnier and so it does not really matter. All it takes is one country to say no compromise and that will be that. The Sun and Express might get excited but the whole point about any future trade deal is that the decision will be the lowest common level agreeable to all 27. Along with the European parliament and other regional bodies.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:30 pm 
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Adetroy wrote:
The key thing about the trade deal is that every country has a veto. It matters little that a bunch of countries think Barnier is being too harsh. Unless all 27 think the same then the approach will continue to be the current one. The bottom line is Germany and France have lined up with Barnier and so it does not really matter. All it takes is one country to say no compromise and that will be that. The Sun and Express might get excited but the whole point about any future trade deal is that the decision will be the lowest common level agreeable to all 27. Along with the European parliament and other regional bodies.

Including the UK.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:33 pm 
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The Sun :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:49 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Ive a bit to,say tonight because you asked questions. I thought you were honestly asking, that was my mistake.


So did I to be honest.......


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:57 pm 
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EverReady wrote:
The Sun :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

That's a serious newspaper for Trance.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:37 pm 
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shereblue wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
shereblue wrote:
Oh and whoever explained that the Germans and French are paying for the lowering of the Polish retirement age, I have to say that sounds like a very generous deal. I like the sound of it. How does it work I wonder and can we in the UK also apply?

It's not just the Germans and the French who are paying for it. Any country that is a net contributor is paying for it and that includes the UK until sometime after we leave.

Spoiler: show
Image


I am unaware of any linkage between specifically Polish pensions and EU net contributions. I do not know but I would expect that to be a matter for the Poles. Quite rightly so. The Brexitists love to make links though and spend and allocate our net contribution many times over (see the stupid NHS funding issue, kept warm not so long ago by the UK foreign secretary, funding the Brussels bureaucracy etc)

From the EU's point of view then certainly the UK is a significant net contributor to the EU budget. The likely loss of that UK contribution is of course a factor helpful to the UK in Brexit negotiations.

However the sense of exploitation foisted by Brexitist campaigners on their frankly exchequer-draining 52% that they are somehow being robbed of their money is unfair. The UK in fact was only the 8th highest net contributor, per capita in 2015.

Thatcher had business in mind when she contributed so vigorously to the creation of the single market - which to be meaningful does involve bringing the economy and infrastructures of new member countries up. That involves investment or net contributions. I doubt that she had in mind upping the state pension and other benefits for the many native UK Leavers reliant on benefits and state pensions who are under the illusion that it is somehow THEIR money subsidising Polish pensions - or whatever the Dail Mail says the UK's net contribution happens to be funding on any given day.

The EU gives Poland money and if they want to give away money on lowering the pension age I suppose you can pretend there is no link


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:15 pm 
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Anonymous. wrote:
shereblue wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
shereblue wrote:
Oh and whoever explained that the Germans and French are paying for the lowering of the Polish retirement age, I have to say that sounds like a very generous deal. I like the sound of it. How does it work I wonder and can we in the UK also apply?

It's not just the Germans and the French who are paying for it. Any country that is a net contributor is paying for it and that includes the UK until sometime after we leave.

Spoiler: show
Image


I am unaware of any linkage between specifically Polish pensions and EU net contributions. I do not know but I would expect that to be a matter for the Poles. Quite rightly so. The Brexitists love to make links though and spend and allocate our net contribution many times over (see the stupid NHS funding issue, kept warm not so long ago by the UK foreign secretary, funding the Brussels bureaucracy etc)

From the EU's point of view then certainly the UK is a significant net contributor to the EU budget. The likely loss of that UK contribution is of course a factor helpful to the UK in Brexit negotiations.

However the sense of exploitation foisted by Brexitist campaigners on their frankly exchequer-draining 52% that they are somehow being robbed of their money is unfair. The UK in fact was only the 8th highest net contributor, per capita in 2015.

Thatcher had business in mind when she contributed so vigorously to the creation of the single market - which to be meaningful does involve bringing the economy and infrastructures of new member countries up. That involves investment or net contributions. I doubt that she had in mind upping the state pension and other benefits for the many native UK Leavers reliant on benefits and state pensions who are under the illusion that it is somehow THEIR money subsidising Polish pensions - or whatever the Dail Mail says the UK's net contribution happens to be funding on any given day.

The EU gives Poland money and if they want to give away money on lowering the pension age I suppose you can pretend there is no link

My point is that the link is so diluted as to be entirely meaningless. If I give you a GBP 10.00 does that mean I contributed to your car, to your home(s), to your wife's diamond engagement ring, to your Carribean holiday, to your Michelin starred meal, to your child allowance or whatever?

The 52% are demographically a drain on the British economy. They should focus on what they can do to stop costing the 48% money rather than see themselves as JP Getty type philanthropists pissed off with benefitting ungrateful foreigners. They don't. They are net takers.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 7:52 pm 
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shereblue wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
shereblue wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
shereblue wrote:
Oh and whoever explained that the Germans and French are paying for the lowering of the Polish retirement age, I have to say that sounds like a very generous deal. I like the sound of it. How does it work I wonder and can we in the UK also apply?

It's not just the Germans and the French who are paying for it. Any country that is a net contributor is paying for it and that includes the UK until sometime after we leave.

Spoiler: show
Image


I am unaware of any linkage between specifically Polish pensions and EU net contributions. I do not know but I would expect that to be a matter for the Poles. Quite rightly so. The Brexitists love to make links though and spend and allocate our net contribution many times over (see the stupid NHS funding issue, kept warm not so long ago by the UK foreign secretary, funding the Brussels bureaucracy etc)

From the EU's point of view then certainly the UK is a significant net contributor to the EU budget. The likely loss of that UK contribution is of course a factor helpful to the UK in Brexit negotiations.

However the sense of exploitation foisted by Brexitist campaigners on their frankly exchequer-draining 52% that they are somehow being robbed of their money is unfair. The UK in fact was only the 8th highest net contributor, per capita in 2015.

Thatcher had business in mind when she contributed so vigorously to the creation of the single market - which to be meaningful does involve bringing the economy and infrastructures of new member countries up. That involves investment or net contributions. I doubt that she had in mind upping the state pension and other benefits for the many native UK Leavers reliant on benefits and state pensions who are under the illusion that it is somehow THEIR money subsidising Polish pensions - or whatever the Dail Mail says the UK's net contribution happens to be funding on any given day.

The EU gives Poland money and if they want to give away money on lowering the pension age I suppose you can pretend there is no link

My point is that the link is so diluted as to be entirely meaningless. If I give you a GBP 10.00 does that mean I contributed to your car, to your home(s), to your wife's diamond engagement ring, to your Carribean holiday, to your Michelin starred meal, to your child allowance or whatever?

The 52% are demographically a drain on the British economy. They should focus on what they can do to stop costing the 48% money rather than see themselves as JP Getty type philanthropists pissed off with benefitting ungrateful foreigners. They don't. They are net takers.
the pole net gain from the EU is 10b€ there government says the cost of lowering the retirement age will be 2.5b€ this year. So you giving me 25% of the cost of a new car would be a nice contribution.

Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:08 pm 
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Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:10 pm 
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Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.



Sorry, you're claiming that all of the UK's contribution to the EU is covered by tax receipts from immigration ?

Wow.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:17 pm 
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Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.


No chance.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:34 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.



Sorry, you're claiming that all of the UK's contribution to the EU is covered by tax receipts from immigration ?

Wow.


3M immigrants Say avg £5k tax/NI, £5k VAT, + ~£2k re addl Corp Tax = £36bn


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:41 pm 
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Leinster in London wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.



Sorry, you're claiming that all of the UK's contribution to the EU is covered by tax receipts from immigration ?



Wow.


3M immigrants Say avg £5k tax/NI, £5k VAT, + ~£2k re addl Corp Tax = £36bn


What now?!


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:50 pm 
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Just saw Trance's source.


The Sun :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:57 pm 
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Leinster in London wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.



Sorry, you're claiming that all of the UK's contribution to the EU is covered by tax receipts from immigration ?

Wow.


3M immigrants Say avg £5k tax/NI, £5k VAT, + ~£2k re addl Corp Tax = £36bn



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/pers ... -back.html

You seem to ignore tax credits and other benefits, cost of health cover, and


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:06 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Leinster in London wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.



Sorry, you're claiming that all of the UK's contribution to the EU is covered by tax receipts from immigration ?

Wow.


3M immigrants Say avg £5k tax/NI, £5k VAT, + ~£2k re addl Corp Tax = £36bn



http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/pers ... -back.html

You seem to ignore tax credits and other benefits, cost of health cover, and


Yes, but your graphs contribute nothing to the argument.

Here is another possible calculation (although I myself am not going to do it)

30m british workers contribute £Xbn to UK pensions
2M polish workers contribute £x/15bn to polish pensions. How is this not fair ?


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:11 pm 
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Jesus Trance. Using that rag to back up your statement. :uhoh:


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:18 pm 
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TranceNRG wrote:
Some European countries and leaders are standing up to the bullies in EU, threatening not to punish UK/offer a narrow deal. Shame the Irish are just toeing the EU line.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5566457/b ... l-barnier/

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5557888/u ... rade-deal/

This explains a lot tbh.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:21 pm 
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Quote:
2M polish workers contribute £x/15bn to polish pensions. How is this not fair ?



They're unlikely to be contributing to a Polish pension if they're not a net contributor to the UK revenue.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:23 pm 
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Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers.

When they pushed for the common market they were really envisioning the fall of the soviet union decades later and loads of cheap labour coming in from Eastern Europe. If you say so. Plus I couldn't give a rats ass what they wanted. It's what is happening now in in the future that concerns me. The only thing keeping Poland afloat is shed loads of non EU labour flooding in from Ukraine


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:02 pm 
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Leinster in London wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.



Sorry, you're claiming that all of the UK's contribution to the EU is covered by tax receipts from immigration ?

Wow.


3M immigrants Say avg £5k tax/NI, £5k VAT, + ~£2k re addl Corp Tax = £36bn


Nonsense. A lot of them don't pay tax. The economic benefit of Eastern European migration is cost neutral at best.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:04 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Quote:
2M polish workers contribute £x/15bn to polish pensions. How is this not fair ?



They're unlikely to be contributing to a Polish pension if they're not a net contributor to the UK revenue.


Exactly what makes you think they are not ? Poles work, brits don't.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:08 pm 
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TranceNRG wrote:
Leinster in London wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Leinster in London wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Young Poles leave in their droves. So much so they have the a average age of a Polish worker is going up faster than anywhere else in Europe. Encouraging those who are left to retire is epic. 1


The UK governments wanted the Single Market to allow the country to bring in cheap workers. They got it and they got the workers, who contribute to the UK tax revenue. A % of these workers contributions are now being paid back to the countries of their origin. If their countries want to pass some of this on to the parents and grandparents of these workers, then I view that as fair.
I doubt if one penny of british workers tax goes to the polish pension pot, but would imagine the poles are covering it twice.



Sorry, you're claiming that all of the UK's contribution to the EU is covered by tax receipts from immigration ?

Wow.


3M immigrants Say avg £5k tax/NI, £5k VAT, + ~£2k re addl Corp Tax = £36bn


Nonsense. A lot of them don't pay tax. The economic benefit of Eastern European migration is cost neutral at best.


Absolute crap.
You are saying that Company regulation in the UK is failing. The same % of UK people will also avoid tax.
How does the country survive ?

You are talking through your hole.


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