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Whether you can or can't actually vote IRL, In, or Out
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:07 pm 
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Silver wrote:
Hammond is as stupid as May. Surely there are at least one or two in parliament that aren't clueless?

Quote:
Brexit: another phoney Brexit
Wednesday 21 June 2017

Chancellor Philip Hammond made his much-delayed speech yesterday. This is the man who thought that the cladding used on Grenfell Tower had been banned in the UK, provoking a swift denial from a lead firm in the renovation project.

And now he has been giving us the benefit of his wisdom on "what we want to achieve from those Brexit negotiations". The Prime Minister's Lancaster House speech in January, he said, "had set out clearly the arrangements that the UK would like to agree, built around a comprehensive trade agreement in the context of a deep and special partnership that goes much wider than trade".

But, said the Chancellor, "we recognise that this is a negotiation, and our negotiating counterparts, while broadly sharing our desire for a close ongoing relationship, will have their own priorities". As to our own priorities, we must be "clear" about them. When the British people voted last June, they did not vote to become poorer, or less secure, but they did vote to leave the EU. And we will leave the EU.

But, Hammond declared, "it must be done in a way that works for Britain. In a way that prioritises British jobs, and underpins Britain's prosperity". He added: "Anything less will be a failure to deliver on the instructions of the British people". This brought us to the moment we'd all been waiting for: how we were going to achieve what the Chancellor called "Brexit for Britain".

Firstly, he said, we would secure "a comprehensive agreement for trade in goods and services". Secondly, we would negotiate "mutually beneficial transitional arrangements". These would "avoid unnecessary disruption and dangerous cliff edges".

Thirdly, said our miracle worker, we would agree "frictionless customs arrangements to facilitate trade across our borders – and crucially – to keep the land border on the island of Ireland open and free-flowing".

To achieve this last miracle, "in the context of our wider objectives" would, said Hammond, "be challenging". It will almost certainly involve, "the deployment of new technology". Therefore, he added, "we'd certainly need an implementation period, outside the Customs Union itself".

To allow this, current customs border arrangements would remain in place until new long-term arrangements were up and running. And then finally, Mr Hammond had one big bubblefart card. He was going to take a "pragmatic approach" to one of our most important EU export sector – financial services.

This would need "a new process for establishing regulatory requirements for cross-border business between the UK and EU". This would have to be "evidence-based, symmetrical, and transparent" and "reflect international standards".

Cooperation arrangements had to be "reciprocal, reliable, and prioritise financial stability". Crucially these had to enable "timely and coordinated risk management on both sides". Third, these arrangements have to be permanent and reliable for the businesses regulated under these regimes.

As far as migration goes, Mr Hammond would have us seeking to manage it. We would not seek to shut it down. But, beyond that, no detail was offered. This, though, was the tenor of the entire speech. One could not say it was "wishy-washy" – just "wishy". The speech was long on aspiration but entirely lacking in execution.

Yet, despite this, the Chancellor was "confident" that we could do "a Brexit deal that puts jobs and prosperity first". This would be a deal that "reassures employers that they will still be able to access the talent they need", one that "keeps our markets for goods and services and capital open" and one that would achieve "early agreement on transitional arrangements".

And in this lovely, fluffy, cuddly Brexit that Mr Hammond has invented for us, "trade can carry on flowing smoothly, and businesses up and down the country can move on with investment decisions that they want to make, but that have been on hold since the Referendum".


I don't see anything wrong with what he has said. That is all desirable and he needs to keep business optimistic for the future.

What do you think he should have said?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:18 pm 
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Silver wrote:
Hammond is as stupid as May. Surely there are at least one or two in parliament that aren't clueless?

Quote:
Brexit: another phoney Brexit
Wednesday 21 June 2017

Chancellor Philip Hammond made his much-delayed speech yesterday. This is the man who thought that the cladding used on Grenfell Tower had been banned in the UK, provoking a swift denial from a lead firm in the renovation project.

And now he has been giving us the benefit of his wisdom on "what we want to achieve from those Brexit negotiations". The Prime Minister's Lancaster House speech in January, he said, "had set out clearly the arrangements that the UK would like to agree, built around a comprehensive trade agreement in the context of a deep and special partnership that goes much wider than trade".

But, said the Chancellor, "we recognise that this is a negotiation, and our negotiating counterparts, while broadly sharing our desire for a close ongoing relationship, will have their own priorities". As to our own priorities, we must be "clear" about them. When the British people voted last June, they did not vote to become poorer, or less secure, but they did vote to leave the EU. And we will leave the EU.

But, Hammond declared, "it must be done in a way that works for Britain. In a way that prioritises British jobs, and underpins Britain's prosperity". He added: "Anything less will be a failure to deliver on the instructions of the British people". This brought us to the moment we'd all been waiting for: how we were going to achieve what the Chancellor called "Brexit for Britain".

Firstly, he said, we would secure "a comprehensive agreement for trade in goods and services". Secondly, we would negotiate "mutually beneficial transitional arrangements". These would "avoid unnecessary disruption and dangerous cliff edges".

Thirdly, said our miracle worker, we would agree "frictionless customs arrangements to facilitate trade across our borders – and crucially – to keep the land border on the island of Ireland open and free-flowing".

To achieve this last miracle, "in the context of our wider objectives" would, said Hammond, "be challenging". It will almost certainly involve, "the deployment of new technology". Therefore, he added, "we'd certainly need an implementation period, outside the Customs Union itself".

To allow this, current customs border arrangements would remain in place until new long-term arrangements were up and running. And then finally, Mr Hammond had one big bubblefart card. He was going to take a "pragmatic approach" to one of our most important EU export sector – financial services.

This would need "a new process for establishing regulatory requirements for cross-border business between the UK and EU". This would have to be "evidence-based, symmetrical, and transparent" and "reflect international standards".

Cooperation arrangements had to be "reciprocal, reliable, and prioritise financial stability". Crucially these had to enable "timely and coordinated risk management on both sides". Third, these arrangements have to be permanent and reliable for the businesses regulated under these regimes.

As far as migration goes, Mr Hammond would have us seeking to manage it. We would not seek to shut it down. But, beyond that, no detail was offered. This, though, was the tenor of the entire speech. One could not say it was "wishy-washy" – just "wishy". The speech was long on aspiration but entirely lacking in execution.

Yet, despite this, the Chancellor was "confident" that we could do "a Brexit deal that puts jobs and prosperity first". This would be a deal that "reassures employers that they will still be able to access the talent they need", one that "keeps our markets for goods and services and capital open" and one that would achieve "early agreement on transitional arrangements".

And in this lovely, fluffy, cuddly Brexit that Mr Hammond has invented for us, "trade can carry on flowing smoothly, and businesses up and down the country can move on with investment decisions that they want to make, but that have been on hold since the Referendum".


vasal state


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:20 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:
easyray wrote:

Rinkals has never come across to me as a 'Brit hating plum'; Rocketz, yes. And it was no troll, I meant what I posted.



You confuse Brit with English and hate with contempt

So full of bluster.

You guys f*cked up but the English Disease means with your pride cannot get you to move forward.

http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/English_disease


I'm not English, but consider myself British. Unfortunately a lot of my fellow countrymen followed the English blindly in leaping of the chasm, without really understanding where the leap would take them and how precarious the fall and landing would be. As for the English disease, you posted that a few pages ago, and while it might apply to some of the English, it certainly doesn't apply to all.

You do yourself no favours stereotyping all the English the same, you'll just get put in the same nut job category as Silver.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:33 pm 
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theo wrote:
Silver wrote:
Hammond is as stupid as May. Surely there are at least one or two in parliament that aren't clueless?

Quote:
Brexit: another phoney Brexit
Wednesday 21 June 2017

Chancellor Philip Hammond made his much-delayed speech yesterday. This is the man who thought that the cladding used on Grenfell Tower had been banned in the UK, provoking a swift denial from a lead firm in the renovation project.

And now he has been giving us the benefit of his wisdom on "what we want to achieve from those Brexit negotiations". The Prime Minister's Lancaster House speech in January, he said, "had set out clearly the arrangements that the UK would like to agree, built around a comprehensive trade agreement in the context of a deep and special partnership that goes much wider than trade".

But, said the Chancellor, "we recognise that this is a negotiation, and our negotiating counterparts, while broadly sharing our desire for a close ongoing relationship, will have their own priorities". As to our own priorities, we must be "clear" about them. When the British people voted last June, they did not vote to become poorer, or less secure, but they did vote to leave the EU. And we will leave the EU.

But, Hammond declared, "it must be done in a way that works for Britain. In a way that prioritises British jobs, and underpins Britain's prosperity". He added: "Anything less will be a failure to deliver on the instructions of the British people". This brought us to the moment we'd all been waiting for: how we were going to achieve what the Chancellor called "Brexit for Britain".

Firstly, he said, we would secure "a comprehensive agreement for trade in goods and services". Secondly, we would negotiate "mutually beneficial transitional arrangements". These would "avoid unnecessary disruption and dangerous cliff edges".

Thirdly, said our miracle worker, we would agree "frictionless customs arrangements to facilitate trade across our borders – and crucially – to keep the land border on the island of Ireland open and free-flowing".

To achieve this last miracle, "in the context of our wider objectives" would, said Hammond, "be challenging". It will almost certainly involve, "the deployment of new technology". Therefore, he added, "we'd certainly need an implementation period, outside the Customs Union itself".

To allow this, current customs border arrangements would remain in place until new long-term arrangements were up and running. And then finally, Mr Hammond had one big bubblefart card. He was going to take a "pragmatic approach" to one of our most important EU export sector – financial services.

This would need "a new process for establishing regulatory requirements for cross-border business between the UK and EU". This would have to be "evidence-based, symmetrical, and transparent" and "reflect international standards".

Cooperation arrangements had to be "reciprocal, reliable, and prioritise financial stability". Crucially these had to enable "timely and coordinated risk management on both sides". Third, these arrangements have to be permanent and reliable for the businesses regulated under these regimes.

As far as migration goes, Mr Hammond would have us seeking to manage it. We would not seek to shut it down. But, beyond that, no detail was offered. This, though, was the tenor of the entire speech. One could not say it was "wishy-washy" – just "wishy". The speech was long on aspiration but entirely lacking in execution.

Yet, despite this, the Chancellor was "confident" that we could do "a Brexit deal that puts jobs and prosperity first". This would be a deal that "reassures employers that they will still be able to access the talent they need", one that "keeps our markets for goods and services and capital open" and one that would achieve "early agreement on transitional arrangements".

And in this lovely, fluffy, cuddly Brexit that Mr Hammond has invented for us, "trade can carry on flowing smoothly, and businesses up and down the country can move on with investment decisions that they want to make, but that have been on hold since the Referendum".


I don't see anything wrong with what he has said. That is all desirable and he needs to keep business optimistic for the future.

What do you think he should have said?


How he plans to do it?

Because a trade agreement starting from scratch will take possibly 5 years plus minimum. Yet he will only have about a year max (possible much less time) once these other points have been settled. May has said no to the single market Norway option.

The only option is going the EFA / EEA route (Norway option) as an interim measure. we need someone who has a definite plan by now. May hasn't. Nor has Hammond. its cross our fingers and hope it all works out approach.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:41 pm 
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easyray wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
easyray wrote:

Rinkals has never come across to me as a 'Brit hating plum'; Rocketz, yes. And it was no troll, I meant what I posted.



You confuse Brit with English and hate with contempt

So full of bluster.

You guys f*cked up but the English Disease means with your pride cannot get you to move forward.

http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/English_disease


I'm not English, but consider myself British. Unfortunately a lot of my fellow countrymen followed the English blindly in leaping of the chasm, without really understanding where the leap would take them and how precarious the fall and landing would be. As for the English disease, you posted that a few pages ago, and while it might apply to some of the English, it certainly doesn't apply to all.

You do yourself no favours stereotyping all the English the same, you'll just get put in the same nut job category as Silver.


Far too many on PR are brain-dead and brainwashed. they hate the truth and prefer to hold onto the fake-news media lies. I'm proud that I challenge these naive posters.

Lots of Irish don't even realize yet what their future is. it will be awful as they lose any say in their future. Instead a greedy heartless appointed elite will call the shots USSR style. It might work out but unlikely.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:47 pm 
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Silver wrote:
theo wrote:
Silver wrote:
Hammond is as stupid as May. Surely there are at least one or two in parliament that aren't clueless?

Quote:
Brexit: another phoney Brexit
Wednesday 21 June 2017

Chancellor Philip Hammond made his much-delayed speech yesterday. This is the man who thought that the cladding used on Grenfell Tower had been banned in the UK, provoking a swift denial from a lead firm in the renovation project.

And now he has been giving us the benefit of his wisdom on "what we want to achieve from those Brexit negotiations". The Prime Minister's Lancaster House speech in January, he said, "had set out clearly the arrangements that the UK would like to agree, built around a comprehensive trade agreement in the context of a deep and special partnership that goes much wider than trade".

But, said the Chancellor, "we recognise that this is a negotiation, and our negotiating counterparts, while broadly sharing our desire for a close ongoing relationship, will have their own priorities". As to our own priorities, we must be "clear" about them. When the British people voted last June, they did not vote to become poorer, or less secure, but they did vote to leave the EU. And we will leave the EU.

But, Hammond declared, "it must be done in a way that works for Britain. In a way that prioritises British jobs, and underpins Britain's prosperity". He added: "Anything less will be a failure to deliver on the instructions of the British people". This brought us to the moment we'd all been waiting for: how we were going to achieve what the Chancellor called "Brexit for Britain".

Firstly, he said, we would secure "a comprehensive agreement for trade in goods and services". Secondly, we would negotiate "mutually beneficial transitional arrangements". These would "avoid unnecessary disruption and dangerous cliff edges".

Thirdly, said our miracle worker, we would agree "frictionless customs arrangements to facilitate trade across our borders – and crucially – to keep the land border on the island of Ireland open and free-flowing".

To achieve this last miracle, "in the context of our wider objectives" would, said Hammond, "be challenging". It will almost certainly involve, "the deployment of new technology". Therefore, he added, "we'd certainly need an implementation period, outside the Customs Union itself".

To allow this, current customs border arrangements would remain in place until new long-term arrangements were up and running. And then finally, Mr Hammond had one big bubblefart card. He was going to take a "pragmatic approach" to one of our most important EU export sector – financial services.

This would need "a new process for establishing regulatory requirements for cross-border business between the UK and EU". This would have to be "evidence-based, symmetrical, and transparent" and "reflect international standards".

Cooperation arrangements had to be "reciprocal, reliable, and prioritise financial stability". Crucially these had to enable "timely and coordinated risk management on both sides". Third, these arrangements have to be permanent and reliable for the businesses regulated under these regimes.

As far as migration goes, Mr Hammond would have us seeking to manage it. We would not seek to shut it down. But, beyond that, no detail was offered. This, though, was the tenor of the entire speech. One could not say it was "wishy-washy" – just "wishy". The speech was long on aspiration but entirely lacking in execution.

Yet, despite this, the Chancellor was "confident" that we could do "a Brexit deal that puts jobs and prosperity first". This would be a deal that "reassures employers that they will still be able to access the talent they need", one that "keeps our markets for goods and services and capital open" and one that would achieve "early agreement on transitional arrangements".

And in this lovely, fluffy, cuddly Brexit that Mr Hammond has invented for us, "trade can carry on flowing smoothly, and businesses up and down the country can move on with investment decisions that they want to make, but that have been on hold since the Referendum".


I don't see anything wrong with what he has said. That is all desirable and he needs to keep business optimistic for the future.

What do you think he should have said?


How he plans to do it?

Because a trade agreement starting from scratch will take possibly 5 years plus minimum. Yet he will only have about a year max (possible much less time) once these other points have been settled. May has said no to the single market Norway option.

The only option is going the EFA / EEA route (Norway option) as an interim measure. we need someone who has a definite plan by now. May hasn't. Nor has Hammond. its cross our fingers and hope it all works out approach.


That was the case when the whole debacle started on the 24th June. No one had a plan. They are trying to fudge it. Better to call the whole thing off and get on with life.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:55 pm 
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The ridiculousness of the British Government continues.

You guys had an election 2 weeks ago and voted in a government on specific premises. The Queen's Speech basically shreds the winning political party and your government's promises.

Nobody's home.


"The Second Coming":
W. B. Yeats

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world...


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:57 pm 
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Rocketz wrote:
The ridiculousness of the British Government continues.

You guys had an election 2 weeks ago and voted in a government on specific premises. The Queen's Speech basically shreds the winning political party and your government's promises.

Nobody's home.


"The Second Coming":
W. B. Yeats

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world...


I think you are missing the point of a minority Government. This is probably a good thing overall as the worst of the Conservative manifesto has been binned.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 12:58 pm 
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easyray wrote:
Rocketz wrote:
easyray wrote:

Rinkals has never come across to me as a 'Brit hating plum'; Rocketz, yes. And it was no troll, I meant what I posted.



You confuse Brit with English and hate with contempt

So full of bluster.

You guys f*cked up but the English Disease means with your pride cannot get you to move forward.

http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/English_disease


I'm not English, but consider myself British. Unfortunately a lot of my fellow countrymen followed the English blindly in leaping of the chasm, without really understanding where the leap would take them and how precarious the fall and landing would be. As for the English disease, you posted that a few pages ago, and while it might apply to some of the English, it certainly doesn't apply to all.

You do yourself no favours stereotyping all the English the same, you'll just get put in the same nut job category as Silver.


True and forgive me that in my mirth I descend into stereotypes. Of course there are a lot of top english blokes in the world. I just dish out what I receive.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:01 pm 
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theo wrote:

That was the case when the whole debacle started on the 24th June. No one had a plan. They are trying to fudge it. Better to call the whole thing off and get on with life.


The UK should either

-Join this new country (ever closer union = US of Europe) including the euro. And give up democracy and the Uk as a sovereign nation or
-leave and become like Norway or Switzerland

We had the vote. We thankfully voted to leave. End of

I have faith it will eventually turn out as it should as there is only ONE option *

A bad agreement si better than no agreement = immediate disaster for both the UK and EU.

* Unlike super rugby expansion say.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:21 pm 
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The Sun God wrote:
Sorry DD but which of the Irish have been trolling on this thread. As far as I can see almost everything that the smarter Micks have said in the last 1000+ pages has been on the money. It may have made some uncomfortable reading for some of our Brit friends but it wasn't trolling IMO.

.



1: unseenwork
2:

I'm sure I could fill a heathy list if I could be arsed- when you say smarter Micks that still leaves plenty :)


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:43 pm 
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Silver wrote:
Hellraiser wrote:
Mahoney wrote:
It looks like we've already screwed the best deal (the one we already had...); Verhofstadt has said if we want to rescind our Article 50 notification it'll cost our rebate and opt-outs.

And even if you decide to rejoin further down the road those are gone forever.


Once we are out we will never want to rejoin.....


You speak for the UK and for the future and make no comment on the age demographics of the EU remainers and leavers...

My fear is that the EU, having prepared for its own short term downsides from Brexit, may well not welcome the UK back into the EU anytime soon.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:52 pm 
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shereblue wrote:
Silver wrote:
Hellraiser wrote:
Mahoney wrote:
It looks like we've already screwed the best deal (the one we already had...); Verhofstadt has said if we want to rescind our Article 50 notification it'll cost our rebate and opt-outs.

And even if you decide to rejoin further down the road those are gone forever.


Once we are out we will never want to rejoin.....


You speak for the UK and for the future and make no comment on the age demographics of the EU remainers and leavers...

My fear is that the EU, having prepared for its own short term downsides from Brexit, may well not welcome the UK back into the EU anytime soon.

I would have thought that was obvious.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:01 pm 
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Rinkals wrote:
shereblue wrote:
Silver wrote:
Hellraiser wrote:
Mahoney wrote:
It looks like we've already screwed the best deal (the one we already had...); Verhofstadt has said if we want to rescind our Article 50 notification it'll cost our rebate and opt-outs.

And even if you decide to rejoin further down the road those are gone forever.


Once we are out we will never want to rejoin.....


You speak for the UK and for the future and make no comment on the age demographics of the EU remainers and leavers...

My fear is that the EU, having prepared for its own short term downsides from Brexit, may well not welcome the UK back into the EU anytime soon.

I would have thought that was obvious.


I think the EU will never close the door on the UK but the conditions will be all on the EU side


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:03 pm 
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Silver wrote:
theo wrote:

That was the case when the whole debacle started on the 24th June. No one had a plan. They are trying to fudge it. Better to call the whole thing off and get on with life.


The UK should either

-Join this new country (ever closer union = US of Europe) including the euro. And give up democracy and the Uk as a sovereign nation or
-leave and become like Norway or Switzerland

We had the vote. We thankfully voted to leave. End of

I have faith it will eventually turn out as it should as there is only ONE option *

A bad agreement si better than no agreement = immediate disaster for both the UK and EU.

* Unlike super rugby expansion say.


Stupid opinions are like wet farts. You just shit in your own pants


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:09 pm 
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I'm always intrigued by people taking Guy Verhofstad's view as the view of the whole EU. He's the leader of what, the fourth largest grouping in the Parliament?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:12 pm 
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croyals wrote:
I'm always intrigued by people taking Guy Verhofstad's view as the view of the whole EU. He's the leader of what, the fourth largest grouping in the Parliament?

Fair point - for some reason I thought he had some official position on the negotiations.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:19 pm 
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Germany's chancellor says she is prepared to consider a euro budget, as well as a joint eurozone finance minister http://p.dw.com/p/2f3HW


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:26 pm 
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Mahoney wrote:
croyals wrote:
I'm always intrigued by people taking Guy Verhofstad's view as the view of the whole EU. He's the leader of what, the fourth largest grouping in the Parliament?

Fair point - for some reason I thought he had some official position on the negotiations.

OK, hang on, I'm not being that dumb after all - "The European Parliament has elected Guy Verhofstadt, a former Belgian Prime Minister and MEP, to act as its representative during negotiations". One of the three "key players in the negotiations on the EU side". He may not simply be able to dictate, but his opinion isn't exactly unimportant.

https://www.instituteforgovernment.org. ... gotiations


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:26 pm 
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Mahoney wrote:
croyals wrote:
I'm always intrigued by people taking Guy Verhofstad's view as the view of the whole EU. He's the leader of what, the fourth largest grouping in the Parliament?

Fair point - for some reason I thought he had some official position on the negotiations.


He's scum. He's a consultant to the elite that screwed Greece.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:27 pm 
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(Though reading on the European Parliament's role is restricted to accepting or rejecting the final agreement.)


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:29 pm 
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Verhofstadt's the Rapporteur isn't he? His job is to take the deal back to parliament and present it.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:35 pm 
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The parliament's negotiating guidelines are essentially the same as the commission's, so there shouldn't be too much of an issue.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:40 pm 
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Reminds me of the French disease


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:48 pm 
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c69 wrote:
Reminds me of the French disease


knock-ons?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:53 pm 
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1100 jobs axed by tesco in Cardiff.

Justified by stating that the retail sector under extreme pressure.


Wonder if that pressure is sterling dropping resulting in increased product costs ...... inflation.

Did Wales vote Leave?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:55 pm 
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nardol wrote:
1100 jobs axed by tesco in Cardiff.

Justified by stating that the retail sector under extreme pressure.


Wonder if that pressure is sterling dropping resulting in increased product costs ...... inflation.

Did Wales vote Leave?


Wales did, Cardiff didn't


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:58 pm 
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DragsterDriver wrote:
The Sun God wrote:
Sorry DD but which of the Irish have been trolling on this thread. As far as I can see almost everything that the smarter Micks have said in the last 1000+ pages has been on the money. It may have made some uncomfortable reading for some of our Brit friends but it wasn't trolling IMO.

.



1: unseenwork
2:

I'm sure I could fill a heathy list if I could be arsed- when you say smarter Micks that still leaves plenty :)


But he has a very particular and reasonable interest in the status quo. Nowhere else in the UK is as volatile as NI, where a handful of mongs can reap havoc. IMO he is quite right to be pissed off to the fact that NI was an afterthought in all of this.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 3:01 pm 
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[quote="nardol"]1100 jobs axed by tesco in Cardiff.

Justified by stating that the retail sector under extreme pressure.


Wonder if that pressure is sterling dropping resulting in increased product costs ...... inflation.

Did Wales vote Leave?[/quote]

Not all of us, but many did I'm afraid. And the funny thing is, many I know who did are now regretting it. Most of them just voted as a fcuk you to the government and austerity.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 3:03 pm 
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And that there is the reason referenda are utterly ridiculous tools to decide policy.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 3:05 pm 
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easyray wrote:
nardol wrote:
1100 jobs axed by tesco in Cardiff.

Justified by stating that the retail sector under extreme pressure.


Wonder if that pressure is sterling dropping resulting in increased product costs ...... inflation.

Did Wales vote Leave?[/quote]

Not all of us, but many did I'm afraid. And the funny thing is, many I know who did are now regretting it. Most of them just voted as a fcuk you to the government and austerity.


Spoiler: show
Image


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 3:08 pm 
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nardol wrote:
And that there is the reason referenda are utterly ridiculous tools to decide policy.

How do you think the UK joined the EEC in the first place?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 3:15 pm 
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Mahoney wrote:
Mahoney wrote:
croyals wrote:
I'm always intrigued by people taking Guy Verhofstad's view as the view of the whole EU. He's the leader of what, the fourth largest grouping in the Parliament?

Fair point - for some reason I thought he had some official position on the negotiations.

OK, hang on, I'm not being that dumb after all - "The European Parliament has elected Guy Verhofstadt, a former Belgian Prime Minister and MEP, to act as its representative during negotiations". One of the three "key players in the negotiations on the EU side". He may not simply be able to dictate, but his opinion isn't exactly unimportant.

https://www.instituteforgovernment.org. ... gotiations

He's not unimportant but he's a bit part player with a penchant for running his mouth off.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 3:25 pm 
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Gospel wrote:
nardol wrote:
And that there is the reason referenda are utterly ridiculous tools to decide policy.

How do you think the UK joined the EEC in the first place?


Ted Heath?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 3:37 pm 
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Gospel wrote:
nardol wrote:
And that there is the reason referenda are utterly ridiculous tools to decide policy.

How do you think the UK joined the EEC in the first place?

Not by a referendum?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 4:00 pm 
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The Sun God wrote:
DragsterDriver wrote:
The Sun God wrote:
Sorry DD but which of the Irish have been trolling on this thread. As far as I can see almost everything that the smarter Micks have said in the last 1000+ pages has been on the money. It may have made some uncomfortable reading for some of our Brit friends but it wasn't trolling IMO.

.



1: unseenwork
2:

I'm sure I could fill a heathy list if I could be arsed- when you say smarter Micks that still leaves plenty :)


But he has a very particular and reasonable interest in the status quo. Nowhere else in the UK is as volatile as NI, where a handful of mongs can reap havoc. IMO he is quite right to be pissed off to the fact that NI was an afterthought in all of this.


2: Nardol.
3: sewa.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 4:06 pm 
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DD, you remind me of a child holding your hands over your ears and chanting loudly so that you can't listen to what you don't want to hear.

As I have said repeatedly, the exit of the UK from the EU will undoubtedly damage both parties, so the Irish and other Europeans have every right to point out what a silly mistake it is.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 4:21 pm 
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DragsterDriver wrote:
The Sun God wrote:
DragsterDriver wrote:
The Sun God wrote:
Sorry DD but which of the Irish have been trolling on this thread. As far as I can see almost everything that the smarter Micks have said in the last 1000+ pages has been on the money. It may have made some uncomfortable reading for some of our Brit friends but it wasn't trolling IMO.

.



1: unseenwork
2:

I'm sure I could fill a heathy list if I could be arsed- when you say smarter Micks that still leaves plenty :)


But he has a very particular and reasonable interest in the status quo. Nowhere else in the UK is as volatile as NI, where a handful of mongs can reap havoc. IMO he is quite right to be pissed off to the fact that NI was an afterthought in all of this.


2: Nardol.
3: sewa.



I think they have been discussing without trolling.

Not agreeing with you does not mean they are trolling.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 4:25 pm 
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Point me to 1 trolling post on this thread of my making.

Just because you don't understand whats being discussed doesn't make it a troll.


(this one might be a semi-troll)


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 21, 2017 4:27 pm 
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Gavin Duffy wrote:
Gospel wrote:
nardol wrote:
And that there is the reason referenda are utterly ridiculous tools to decide policy.

How do you think the UK joined the EEC in the first place?

Not by a referendum?


There is and was no legal requirement for the UK to have a referendum to join the EU.


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