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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 7:49 am 
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Incredible stuff GS


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 7:59 am 
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Cheers Mat and Zakar...

I'll go back and complete the trek. From feeling daunted by the prospect before going to getting that much distance covered in relatively short time... I'm chuffed. The drawback is the sheer numbers doing the same... and the ignorance of crowds. I really struggle with that. The area is simply stunning, the views jawdropping, the elevations mind bending. Can't wait to go back. Dunno why... struggling for breath and the will to take another step for hours? :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:45 am 
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Good stuff,GS, I did both Annapurna treks about 25 years ago but not Everest Base Camp, can't see me doing it now, even though I'm of a similar age to you - time and money the issue ATM, as much as fitness. Regarding trekking poles, i used to be a hater but now a reluctant user of one thanks to my right knee having bugger all cartilage left after a lifetime of hard wear - I can attest to the fact that they do work. I do still get annoyed though at fit twentysomethings - invariably Yanks - using one in each hand, thereby taking up the entire feckin' path. :x


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:51 am 
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:lol:

Picture yourself coming through a rough uphill section of narrow trail and seeing about 25 SE Asian 'trekkers' all waving the f**king things like antennae at you :x :x

That is what most do with the damn things. I used one at one stage... as I imagine you're meant to, levering myself with it. Not just waving the ... I rant. Pardon me.

We had a really pleasant meeting with a German group, daughter, son in law, brother in law and 77 yr old father. Really cool people, been going to Nepal for 20 yrs in the couple's case... they were adamant, no more Annapurna circuit for them due to roads in the area. It has been opened up to the detriment of the trails, it's quite bad for trekking in some areas... thankfully, the Khumbu isn't touched and probably won't be, it's too hard to get in tot. I appreciate the need for development, my sentiment is purely that of a self centred trekker.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:58 am 
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Great stuff GS!! As a fellow hater of heights maybe this one isn't for me after all.

f**king Israelis spoiling it for everyone even on top of the world :x


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:10 am 
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Great work GS

I love those dark blue skies you get at high altitude


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:22 am 
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Nice one GS. v envious. Funnily enough it hit my FB feed the other day that it was 2 years since I did the EBC trek.

I've just quit my job by mutual consent but wish I had done it a month earlier as I could have squeezed some hiking in Nepal in but a bit late in the season now and I have plenty of shit to sort out here. My initial plan for this year off was to do the PCT but alas now I'm with someone who isn't a mad keen hiker like me our journey will be a little different. Gutted but she's sacrificing her career here so guess its only fair. She's a mad keen runner and loves the outdoors so at a loss to explain why she wouldnt like hiking really but there we go. Thinking of a quick hike up Rinjani on Lombok in the next few weeks to clear my head a bit as I've got Singapore cabin fever not working. We will be hitting Oz early next year and some hiking in Tazzy is definitely on the cards. We haven't finalised our route for our time off as we have a few weddings during the year to go to but there will be a fair few hikes round the world in there I'm sure. The obligatory Machu Picchu but I'd like to throw a few off the wall ones in too.

I see you got a great day for Kala Patthar. :thumbup: :thumbup: Nice sense of achievement sitting up there isn't it.
Don't get your hate for trekking poles. I'd be lost without them but I do run quite a bit of the downs and I can go so much faster using them to jump off. Also I would agree on the Israelis in Nepal. Total twats and had never met a nice one hiking until I was in France earlier this year and met three lovely guys. Glad I was finally proven wrong that they are not ALL twats.. just the 99 %


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:35 am 
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Well done Guy. Very jealous. Been 24 years since I was in Nepal :( . Will definitely be taking my kid there.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:43 am 
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not happy about the abuse my girlfriend and her nation have received in this thread? what is wrong with trekking poles?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:43 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
I see you got a great day for Kala Patthar. :thumbup: :thumbup: Nice sense of achievement sitting up there isn't it.
Don't get your hate for trekking poles. I'd be lost without them but I do run quite a bit of the downs and I can go so much faster using them to jump off. Also I would agree on the Israelis in Nepal. Total twats and had never met a nice one hiking until I was in France earlier this year and met three lovely guys. Glad I was finally proven wrong that they are not ALL twats.. just the 99 %


I knew you'd appreciate the Kala Patthar experience :thumbup:

My issue with poles isn't with them specifically, it's with the way people use, or misuse them. They appear to have become the accessory of choice for the aspiring mountaineer on an 8 day all included guided experience around some f**king foothills. These clowns wave them around everywhere, leave them lying across the path, stack em up and watch em fall every time they invade a teahouse... I've been tripped up with them, narrowly avoided having one in the eye

I have an issue, yes. I bought a pair and used one on one day because I needed the assistance. They're brilliant going down but I don't rush that :lol: although i did get my Sherpa technique sorted... top of rock to top of next rock going up or down and you fly across the ground :shock:

As for Israelis... we met a couple who were brilliant, two of the nicest people I've met anywhere, and they were joking about how Israelis are arseholes :lol: the rest of them? waste of space. Unreal.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 12:07 pm 
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HKCJ wrote:
Don't get your hate for trekking poles. I'd be lost without them but I do run quite a bit of the downs and I can go so much faster using them to jump off.


I used to be fairly anti trekking poles and saw them as the preserve of middle aged German hikers until I did the GR20 where I smashed my knees to bits while carrying about an 18 kg sack. Hastily bought some midway through the trek and they made such a difference to my comfort.

Any more thoughts on your African overlanding trip?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 12:45 pm 
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Five pages on 'long distance hiking'? How old are you guys? Do you all carry thermos flasks and egg cress sandwiches?

These are the sorts of people who do hiking:

Spoiler: show
Image

Spoiler: show
Image

Real men - natural born alpha male dominators - do HIIT, rowing, cycling, boxing, football, whatever. They don't do 'long distance hiking'.

Each to their own, but frankly it brings this bored into disrepute for such a middle-aged pastime to feature so prominently on the front page. Can the mods create a hiking badger sub-forum for these weirdos?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 12:53 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Don't get your hate for trekking poles. I'd be lost without them but I do run quite a bit of the downs and I can go so much faster using them to jump off.


I used to be fairly anti trekking poles and saw them as the preserve of middle aged German hikers until I did the GR20 where I smashed my knees to bits while carrying about an 18 kg sack. Hastily bought some midway through the trek and they made such a difference to my comfort.

Any more thoughts on your African overlanding trip?


I've never really thought about them before but have started to have a bit of grief from my knees on the downhills. Hmm, might look into this!


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:19 pm 
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MrDominator wrote:
Five pages on 'long distance hiking'? How old are you guys? Do you all carry thermos flasks and egg cress sandwiches?

These are the sorts of people who do hiking:

Spoiler: show
Image

Spoiler: show
Image

Real men - natural born alpha male dominators - do HIIT, rowing, cycling, boxing, football, whatever. They don't do 'long distance hiking'.

Each to their own, but frankly it brings this bored into disrepute for such a middle-aged pastime to feature so prominently on the front page. Can the mods create a hiking badger sub-forum for these weirdos?

what if you wanna see nice scenery and shit?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:20 pm 
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Don't bother.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:33 pm 
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guy smiley wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
I may as well blow the trumpet here as well..

I'm planning a return to Nepal later this year, in October. This time we're heading off to do the Three Passes trek in the Khumbu, the area around Everest. If we can manage it all, we'll climb ... oh bugger it, here's a pic of the profile

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If we pull this off I reckon we'll have done one of the tougher walks going and I'll be well chuffed.




So, I made it back home to Fremantle unbroken from this trek and thanks for all the 'concern'...

I didn't complete the Three Passes and I'm philosophical about that. Basically, we kicked off by getting on the piss ridiculously the night before flying out of Perth and I was hungover still on reaching Kathmandu the next night. We had two nights there and flew to Lukla on Wed the 5th Oct... flights were delayed due to weather in the mountains so the airport was a surreal scene full of anxious travellers, gung ho European guides and f**king tour groups... the worst are the Japanese and Chinese but in my mind, any group is bad news. That didn't improve over coming days. After taking off about 3 hrs late we hopped around the ridge lines in heavy cloud, circled for a while and suddenly we were on the runway, no time to shit ourselves about Lukla.
We took off and started walking straight off the plane, nothing to see or hold us there. That first day was a shock to the system as I like to avoid training and go in cold. We got to Phakding and stopped for the night. There was a Japanese guy with a 2yr old son and guide staying there... wearing a Sherlock Holmes style hat and smoking a glorious pipe outside with his tea. Next morning he made filter coffee over breakfast. I was impressed.
We walked to Namche Bazaar on the second day... 800m elevation gain. It's a savage climb into Namche including the double swing bridge, a new one higher than an older one which must be over 100m up in the gorge... that was fun. Getting into Namche was excruciating but we got there, found a decent hotel and took a rest day to acclimatise to altitude. It's a bit rude being only two days in and having to do that... anyway, we walked over to Khumding the next day, looked around... all that.
Third day walking we got to Tengboche... another day of hard climbing but legs coming good and lungs not far behind. That night I felt a little bit of grumble bum... you know, the edge of the fully liquid fart. That's not a good thing to be feeling at 3900m faced with 2 weeks of altitude to come...
4th day of walking we got to Dengboche and I only just made it to the latrines. Hotel full of loud Germans. Not fun.
5th day we got to Chukhung... It took us 3 1/2 hrs, I was that crook. Had to stop trackside and... use some toilet paper. It wasn't a good day, the wind was biting cold, we really should have got there in an hour and half. I was f**ked.
Stayed at Chukhung for 3 nights. Originally planned two.... it's at 4700m and the first of the three passes, Kongma La is after here and it's an 800m climb to get up there so we planned an acclimatisation hike up Chukhung Ri to 5500m from here. I had to spend an extra day though eating plain rice and chicken soup, worrying about my energy levels. I had a go at the side hike and had to give up... on the second day there I made it up to 5500m but gave up on Chukhung Tse at 5800, just wasn't strong enough and the ridgeline up there looked badly exposed... and I'm afraid of heights. I'd also started coughing hard... caught a cold as well as the shits and the cough was worrying.
On the way down from there I decided to try and find a porter to carry my pack to the pass summit... I thought I was too weak to manage it. Got that sorted and on the 9th day we headed out and crossed Kongma La. It was absolutely savage :lol: seriously... holy crapburgers. It starts out reasonably steep and Just. Gets. Steeper. The last 200m or so was mostly near vertical... so steep the path was a hand stretch in front of your eyes. The last 50m was practically a vertical scramble up loose rock :lol: Every time I stopped for breath and looked around for the view I had to spin back and hold onto the mountain for vertigo. It was insane. The top section was beautiful.... there are lakes on the last plateau, the sky was cloudless, there were snow clad peaks all around, the lakes sparkling like crushed diamonds... incredible to be there and in only 7 days walking from Lukla airport.
The descent was worse. Straight out of hell. We could see Lobuche from the summit, just 4-5 km away and 700m below us, we could see helicopters taking off clearly. The climb down was 6-700 straight down loose rock with snow cover at the top obscuring the gaps and holes. I had taken over my pack again and the added weight was a real problem. once down off that there was a walk to the moraine of the Khumbu glacier and a crossing to Lobuche... that was awful. The moraine is 30-50m high, the glacier is underneath all the debris so it took almost 2 hours to pick our way through listening to rockfalls and movement all the way... a long day at about 10 hrs all up, I think.
10th day we walked Lobuche to Gorakshep. My coughing had become serious... really hacking from deep in the chest. It's not good at altitude... by the time we got to Gorak Shep I'd decided i was heading down in the morning and giving up the Three Passes. We were arguing and not getting on... it wasn't a good time. So Lucy took off to catch up with a group we'd been meeting and chatting with to carry on with them. I had a fat lunch of yak pattie and chips :nod: and then walked up Kala Patthar, another 400m up behind GorakShep for the views of Everest. I topped out up there at 5630m.... and enjoyed flawless blue sky over the mountain. Amazing... absolutely amazing experience to be mere kilometres from the mountain, so close I could make out the south summit, the Khumbu Icefall... all of it, right there. I'm very happy to have done that... and coughing my ring out too.
Next morning set the scene for the next three... I was lazy, got going about 0830 and set fire to the trail descending as fast as I could to outrun the f**king Israelis who really are wrong in so many ways... I got to Pheriche that night, saw the doctor there about my chest, Namche next night, Phakding next night because I was too tired to be arsed dealing with the last climb into Lukla so got there about 1030 next morning, presented my ticket and was on a plane in an hour to Kathmandu... plane to myself :lol:
From there I went to Pokhara for a few days, got on the piss with Lucy again, took off and trekked 4 days up around Tadapani, Ghandruk and Chomrong but soon got sick of climbing after a 900m day and scorched back out to Pokhara and a few days R&R before getting out.

Got really fit. Lost about 5-6kg. Proved I can cover a lot of ground in a hurry when i'm fit but I prefer to soak up the vibe when there's no Israeli's around... or people with trekking poles.

I fuggen hate trekking poles.
size: show
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size: show
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I want to read this, but can you stick some paragraphs in here?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:41 pm 
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Trekking is a breathless and exciting affair, as evidenced in the style of reporting the experience :x


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:51 pm 
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MrDominator wrote:
Five pages on 'long distance hiking'? How old are you guys? Do you all carry thermos flasks and egg cress sandwiches?

These are the sorts of people who do hiking:

Spoiler: show
Image

Spoiler: show
Image

Real men - natural born alpha male dominators - do HIIT, rowing, cycling, boxing, football, whatever. They don't do 'long distance hiking'.

Each to their own, but frankly it brings this bored into disrepute for such a middle-aged pastime to feature so prominently on the front page. Can the mods create a hiking badger sub-forum for these weirdos?


Cycling for natural born Alpha Males. I've officialy heard everything.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:52 pm 
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Zakar wrote:
MrDominator wrote:
Five pages on 'long distance hiking'? How old are you guys? Do you all carry thermos flasks and egg cress sandwiches?

These are the sorts of people who do hiking:

Spoiler: show
Image

Spoiler: show
Image

Real men - natural born alpha male dominators - do HIIT, rowing, cycling, boxing, football, whatever. They don't do 'long distance hiking'.

Each to their own, but frankly it brings this bored into disrepute for such a middle-aged pastime to feature so prominently on the front page. Can the mods create a hiking badger sub-forum for these weirdos?


Cycling for natural born Alpha Males. I've officialy heard everything.


Not to mention football. :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 16, 2016 1:35 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Don't get your hate for trekking poles. I'd be lost without them but I do run quite a bit of the downs and I can go so much faster using them to jump off.


I used to be fairly anti trekking poles and saw them as the preserve of middle aged German hikers until I did the GR20 where I smashed my knees to bits while carrying about an 18 kg sack. Hastily bought some midway through the trek and they made such a difference to my comfort.

Any more thoughts on your African overlanding trip?



The rough plan is to do a loop at the bottom.. visit the gfs family at xmas in SA then sa/namibia/botswana/zambia/tanzani/kenya/rwanda/burundi/tanzania/mozambique


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 7:58 am 
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Fk me.. are the ozzies having a laugh.. just looked into doing some hiking in Tasmania next year.. $495 just for the privilege to hike the 3 capes which is a 46km track.. :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 8:00 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
Fk me.. are the ozzies having a laugh.. just looked into doing some hiking in Tasmania next year.. $495 just for the privilege to hike the 3 capes which is a 46km track.. :lol:



I'd heard something about that... a workmate did the Cradle Mountain walk last winter and said something about paying ridiculous money.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 8:23 am 
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guy smiley wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Fk me.. are the ozzies having a laugh.. just looked into doing some hiking in Tasmania next year.. $495 just for the privilege to hike the 3 capes which is a 46km track.. :lol:



I'd heard something about that... a workmate did the Cradle Mountain walk last winter and said something about paying ridiculous money.


The overland track with Cradle Mountain is a little bit better value.. $500 for the 2 of us but then you still have to get transport which'll be an extra $200 and we would want to do the 85k in 3 days not 6 like most of the fogeys. It still doesn't seem great value really when you can hike anywhere in Europe for nothing.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 8:57 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Fk me.. are the ozzies having a laugh.. just looked into doing some hiking in Tasmania next year.. $495 just for the privilege to hike the 3 capes which is a 46km track.. :lol:



I'd heard something about that... a workmate did the Cradle Mountain walk last winter and said something about paying ridiculous money.


The overland track with Cradle Mountain is a little bit better value.. $500 for the 2 of us but then you still have to get transport which'll be an extra $200 and we would want to do the 85k in 3 days not 6 like most of the fogeys. It still doesn't seem great value really when you can hike anywhere in Europe for nothing.


Holy Jebus. Just come over here instead.

For folks who're keen on the multi-day thing, worth checking out the multi-day offroad rides here http://nzcycletrail.com/. Some outstanding stuff. Doing three of them Dec - March.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 8:59 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Fk me.. are the ozzies having a laugh.. just looked into doing some hiking in Tasmania next year.. $495 just for the privilege to hike the 3 capes which is a 46km track.. :lol:



I'd heard something about that... a workmate did the Cradle Mountain walk last winter and said something about paying ridiculous money.


The overland track with Cradle Mountain is a little bit better value.. $500 for the 2 of us but then you still have to get transport which'll be an extra $200 and we would want to do the 85k in 3 days not 6 like most of the fogeys. It still doesn't seem great value really when you can hike anywhere in Europe for nothing.


It's a popular track. Trying to prevent it getting too crowded I suppose.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 9:01 am 
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Red Chopper wrote:
Good stuff,GS, I did both Annapurna treks about 25 years ago but not Everest Base Camp, can't see me doing it now, even though I'm of a similar age to you - time and money the issue ATM, as much as fitness. Regarding trekking poles, i used to be a hater but now a reluctant user of one thanks to my right knee having bugger all cartilage left after a lifetime of hard wear - I can attest to the fact that they do work.

Yeah - I'll be getting a pair of poles* meself before too long. Ditto as regards cartilege-poor right knee (permanent limp), plus a left knee not much better despite two knee clean-up ops.

I can see them being of particular use going downhill, regardless of what's on my back, and of considerable uphill use when carting a fair amount of shit in my pack.




* No, not a brace of large-bosomed barstaff you dirty pricks!


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 9:04 am 
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Zakar wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Fk me.. are the ozzies having a laugh.. just looked into doing some hiking in Tasmania next year.. $495 just for the privilege to hike the 3 capes which is a 46km track.. :lol:



I'd heard something about that... a workmate did the Cradle Mountain walk last winter and said something about paying ridiculous money.


The overland track with Cradle Mountain is a little bit better value.. $500 for the 2 of us but then you still have to get transport which'll be an extra $200 and we would want to do the 85k in 3 days not 6 like most of the fogeys. It still doesn't seem great value really when you can hike anywhere in Europe for nothing.


It's a popular track. Trying to prevent it getting too crowded I suppose.


I guess that's to be applauded but it just seems rather commercialised to charge people THAT much for hiking on public routes. Does sound like the hut facilities they've built are first class for hikers but frankly I'd rather pay a lot less and just use a tent.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 5:01 pm 
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why do you have to pay anything at all?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2016 2:06 pm 
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Nasty little incident here:

http://www.newshub.co.nz/nznews/dead-tr ... 2016112213

These guys were Belarussian and Ukranian yet the Tararuas got them. I did half of this route a few years back but circled back to the campsite. They unwisely kept going. The first 1000 metre climb is a very steep grab yourself up by tree roots type climb. It's pretty tough.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:24 am 
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Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:27 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Overland track or truck?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:32 am 
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I've been looking for a way to raise money for Alzheimers since dad died last year. Didn't want to do anything "normal" like a marathon etc so have decided I'm going to walk from his old rugby club in Glasgow to his last one near London. Planning to start around September 2018.

Anyone done similar?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:34 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Overland track or truck?



Track.. no overland trucks till Africa in December :) This'll be 82km 4 day affair.. all well and good until your moany arse missus insists you should carry pretty much everything.. my pack was 23kg and hers was 5kg for the last two hikes and she was moaning that is cos I am a smoker.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:41 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Overland track or truck?



Track.. no overland trucks till Africa in December :) This'll be 82km 4 day affair.. all well and good until your moany arse missus insists you should carry pretty much everything.. my pack was 23kg and hers was 5kg for the last two hikes and she was moaning that is cos I am a smoker.


That is madness, I did the GR20 with nearly 20kg and that was probably 8kg too heavy, wrecked my knees, in hindsight taking Anthony Beavors 'Stalingrad' and Daniel Yergin's 'The Prize' books with me was probably a mistake.

Currently making plans for a short walk between Naples and Rome next year following the Appian Way Roman road. Always fancied approaching Rome by foot. Will hook up with the bro in law and watch the England game at the end of it.

What overland truck trip did you choose in the end?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:49 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Overland track or truck?



Track.. no overland trucks till Africa in December :) This'll be 82km 4 day affair.. all well and good until your moany arse missus insists you should carry pretty much everything.. my pack was 23kg and hers was 5kg for the last two hikes and she was moaning that is cos I am a smoker.


That is madness, I did the GR20 with nearly 20kg and that was probably 8kg too heavy, wrecked my knees, in hindsight taking Anthony Beavors 'Stalingrad' and Daniel Yergin's 'The Prize' books with me was probably a mistake.

Currently making plans for a short walk between Naples and Rome next year following the Appian Way Roman road. Always fancied approaching Rome by foot. Will hook up with the bro in law and watch the England game at the end of it.

What overland truck trip did you choose in the end?



Yep have never hiked with more than 12-14kg before. Was feckin stupid but the missus wont listen when I tell her that perhaps an ipad isnt an essential and I figured its better looking like Quasmido than facing the wrath of a saffa. I also mentioned to her that me and my (female) mate had been making noises to do the GR20 some time soon. That went down well.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:49 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Abel Tasman is definitely meh/hiking for beginners. Better off kayaking it really. I loved the Kepler but I had great weather and the scenery was stunning.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:52 am 
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I was in Latin America for the last year and a half and done a fair bit of hiking. Done lots of 1 day hikes and a few multi day hike with the highlight being Huayhuash (pronounced why-wash). 8 days in total highest you go to is 5200m, its one of the best things I've ever done the scenery is out of this world, spectacular. And I don't is all roughly for around €150 not exactly sure, but it was under 200, and that includes food, tent, two sleeping bags, Donkeys to carry you bigger bags and Donkeys to carry you if you ain't feeling up to it.

Others that are decent:

Guatemala: Aacatenango 2 days
Peru: Colca Canyon - 2 days, Laguna 69 - 1 day
Lost City trail - Colombia, 4/5days
Cotopaxi Ecuador - several 1 day hikes


Shit load of others. Peru is really the home of serious hiking, ep North Peru around Huaraz. Epic views, short trails, long trails, mountains, jungles, achievable high altitude Mountains, I climbed a mountain over 6000m and it's cheap. Unless altitude is a major problem for you.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:53 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Overland track or truck?



Track.. no overland trucks till Africa in December :) This'll be 82km 4 day affair.. all well and good until your moany arse missus insists you should carry pretty much everything.. my pack was 23kg and hers was 5kg for the last two hikes and she was moaning that is cos I am a smoker.


That is madness, I did the GR20 with nearly 20kg and that was probably 8kg too heavy, wrecked my knees, in hindsight taking Anthony Beavors 'Stalingrad' and Daniel Yergin's 'The Prize' books with me was probably a mistake.

Currently making plans for a short walk between Naples and Rome next year following the Appian Way Roman road. Always fancied approaching Rome by foot. Will hook up with the bro in law and watch the England game at the end of it.

What overland truck trip did you choose in the end?



Yep have never hiked with more than 12-14kg before. Was feckin stupid but the missus wont listen when I tell her that perhaps an ipad isnt an essential and I figured its better looking like Quasmido than facing the wrath of a saffa. I also mentioned to her that me and my (female) mate had been making noises to do the GR20 some time soon. That went down well.


Christ you are a gluten for punishment :lol:

It gets cold at night in those Corsican mountains, did you tell your Mrs you would need to snuggle up with your female 'friend' to stay warm as well.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:54 am 
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booji boy wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Abel Tasman is definitely meh/hiking for beginners. Better off kayaking it really. I loved the Kepler but I had great weather and the scenery was stunning.


Yeah we've had pretty shite weather which definitely affects things. At this point Queen Charlotte track and Routeburn which I did on my last trip rank higher but we had great weather for those. I think I was disappointed with Abel Tasman cos I thought it would be really in the wilderness... there were so many day trippers it was unreal. More Germans per square metre than a U-boat.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:57 am 
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I'm getting back into this.

Not sure where I'm going to start, I'm old now and don't want to take on the TDMB without people 100% sure of my fitness.


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