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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:00 am 
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DAC2016 wrote:
I'm getting back into this.

Not sure where I'm going to start, I'm old now and don't want to take on the TDMB without people 100% sure of my fitness.


In a pretty similar place. Moving up to Scotland next month and have some grand plans. Have a couple of mates who have done all the Munros and are offering to take me out, but not sure I want to do much with them until up to speed.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:03 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
booji boy wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Abel Tasman is definitely meh/hiking for beginners. Better off kayaking it really. I loved the Kepler but I had great weather and the scenery was stunning.


Yeah we've had pretty shite weather which definitely affects things. At this point Queen Charlotte track and Routeburn which I did on my last trip rank higher but we had great weather for those. I think I was disappointed with Abel Tasman cos I thought it would be really in the wilderness... there were so many day trippers it was unreal. More Germans per square metre than a U-boat.


Totally agree. I actually did it 20 years ago and that is exactly what I thought way back then. Plus the bays are beautiful but you often can't see anything from the track as the scrub/bush on the side of the tracks obscures any view. The only positive was that I ran into my (day tripping) uncle and aunt on the Abel Tasman so went and stayed with them in Kaiteriteri after completing the hike. :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:03 am 
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I've done my fair share of Munros the obvious thing about Scotland is the fecking weather and having to take so much extra kit with you


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:04 am 
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DAC2016 wrote:
I'm getting back into this.

Not sure where I'm going to start, I'm old now and don't want to take on the TDMB without people 100% sure of my fitness.


Start small, say the Rodney Parade to The Dodger pub trek?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:04 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
DAC2016 wrote:
I'm getting back into this.

Not sure where I'm going to start, I'm old now and don't want to take on the TDMB without people 100% sure of my fitness.


Start small, say the Rodney Parade to The Dodger pub trek?


Ha ha. Very good.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:17 am 
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Anyone done much of the south downs way? Eastbourne to Brighton? Doing an organised event in August, 31 miles. Just figuring what I need to prepare us for in terms of hills etc


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:18 am 
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Was disappointed with Abel Tasman, especially after all the hype. Pretty, yeh, but not world class - maybe growing up in Cornwall and living in Wales just made me a bit blase when it comes to good coastal scenery? OTOH, loved Milford, Routeburn, Caples and Kepler, and really wanted to do Dusky but somehow never found the time - enjoyed Stewart Island too. Cradle Mountain was nice, though feckin cold.
Looking to do some more in the High Tatras in the near future - or the Carpathians.BTW. anyone hiked in Slovenia?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:30 am 
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bobbity wrote:
Anyone done much of the south downs way? Eastbourne to Brighton? Doing an organised event in August, 31 miles. Just figuring what I need to prepare us for in terms of hills etc


Pretty easy to be fair, although 30 miles in August heat isn't to be sniffed at.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:30 am 
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bobbity wrote:
Anyone done much of the south downs way? Eastbourne to Brighton? Doing an organised event in August, 31 miles. Just figuring what I need to prepare us for in terms of hills etc


I did Seaforth to Eastbourne a couple of weekends ago. Some moderate hills, enough to alarm the complete novice.

Bloody spectacular though :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:33 am 
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bobbity wrote:
Anyone done much of the south downs way? Eastbourne to Brighton? Doing an organised event in August, 31 miles. Just figuring what I need to prepare us for in terms of hills etc


Wife did 100km in 24 hours along there so you should be right.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:37 am 
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bobbity wrote:
Anyone done much of the south downs way? Eastbourne to Brighton? Doing an organised event in August, 31 miles. Just figuring what I need to prepare us for in terms of hills etc


Only done the first few stages from Winchester to Petersfield. Looking to do the rest this year at some point. Its very well signposted and there are plenty of village pubs/shops enroute to pick up supplies or stop for lunch. Assuming you are staying in B&Bs you don't need to carry too much, you are looking at maybe 5-6 hours walking a day including stops. Keep your clothing light and breathable, avoid jeans, take waterproofs, sun hat, decent broken in footwear and maybe trekking poles. An OS map allows you to take detours to have a look at the loads of historical stuff along the way (bronze age forts, roman villas etc), don't forget a water bottle.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:38 am 
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Should be ok then, it's 50km in a day.

Two others and I did 27miles in the Peak District a while back, including Jacob's Ladder. Just want to get some hills in the legs of the one that didn't do that. Did a lot of training in Malvern, which was invaluable, so will do that again. Slightly concerned to hear that fourth member describe Beachy Head as a really tough long climb, not to underestimate it, but I think it's pretty manageable.

Thanks.


Last edited by bobbity on Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:05 pm 
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booji boy wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
booji boy wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Abel Tasman is definitely meh/hiking for beginners. Better off kayaking it really. I loved the Kepler but I had great weather and the scenery was stunning.


Yeah we've had pretty shite weather which definitely affects things. At this point Queen Charlotte track and Routeburn which I did on my last trip rank higher but we had great weather for those. I think I was disappointed with Abel Tasman cos I thought it would be really in the wilderness... there were so many day trippers it was unreal. More Germans per square metre than a U-boat.


Totally agree. I actually did it 20 years ago and that is exactly what I thought way back then. Plus the bays are beautiful but you often can't see anything from the track as the scrub/bush on the side of the tracks obscures any view. The only positive was that I ran into my (day tripping) uncle and aunt on the Abel Tasman so went and stayed with them in Kaiteriteri after completing the hike. :lol:



yeah kind of wish we had done some kayaking but did it in oz and got bored after 20 mins so didnt bother in Abel Tasman. Big mistake. Not sure whether its a fault as such but the track is so smooth and well maintained it encourages all the day trippers.. be better if they left it a bit wild IMO.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:32 pm 
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bobbity wrote:
Anyone done much of the south downs way? Eastbourne to Brighton? Doing an organised event in August, 31 miles. Just figuring what I need to prepare us for in terms of hills etc


I've cycled the whole thing in a day before, not sure if I've mentioned that?

Eastbourne to Brighton (well, probably Devil's Dyke as the SDW doesn't go to Brighton itself) you're looking at about 35 miles and 4 fairly long climbs - nothing too outrageously steep, just long. The paths are fairly flinty. There are at least two water taps in that section, possibly more. It isn't so much up and down in the segment as long climb - long stretch on the tops - long descent - cross road/railway/river - long climb and so on. You take in the village of Alfriston around a third of the way in which is nice, don't think there's much else for the rest of the segment though.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 1:00 pm 
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Zakar wrote:
bobbity wrote:
Anyone done much of the south downs way? Eastbourne to Brighton? Doing an organised event in August, 31 miles. Just figuring what I need to prepare us for in terms of hills etc


I did Seaforth to Eastbourne a couple of weekends ago. Some moderate hills, enough to alarm the complete novice.

Bloody spectacular though :thumbup:


It's Seaford - I was there this weekend as the MiL lives there. Did you walk across Seaford head and the 7 sisters? If so, that's not strictly speaking the South Downs Way. Nice walk though.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 1:50 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
booji boy wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
booji boy wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Abel Tasman and Keppler done. Meh. May have been the shit weather but wasn't as blown away as I thought I would be. Hiking for beginners really. Did the best hike Ive ever done though in Oz.. Mount Sorrow in Cape Tribulation. A fcuking bitch of a hike.. leeches, giant cobwebs, spiders, impossible to keep on the track.. drank 6 litres of water in the space of 5 hours.. awesome fun. :thumbup: Overland track in Tasmania to look forward to in a few weeks.


Abel Tasman is definitely meh/hiking for beginners. Better off kayaking it really. I loved the Kepler but I had great weather and the scenery was stunning.


Yeah we've had pretty shite weather which definitely affects things. At this point Queen Charlotte track and Routeburn which I did on my last trip rank higher but we had great weather for those. I think I was disappointed with Abel Tasman cos I thought it would be really in the wilderness... there were so many day trippers it was unreal. More Germans per square metre than a U-boat.


Totally agree. I actually did it 20 years ago and that is exactly what I thought way back then. Plus the bays are beautiful but you often can't see anything from the track as the scrub/bush on the side of the tracks obscures any view. The only positive was that I ran into my (day tripping) uncle and aunt on the Abel Tasman so went and stayed with them in Kaiteriteri after completing the hike. :lol:



yeah kind of wish we had done some kayaking but did it in oz and got bored after 20 mins so didnt bother in Abel Tasman. Big mistake. Not sure whether its a fault as such but the track is so smooth and well maintained it encourages all the day trippers.. be better if they left it a bit wild IMO.


It's also the access points. Not sure of the place names now but there's lots of places where you can drive deep into the National Park, park your car and do a 1-2 hour walk in the middle of the park. Most hikes there is only one way in and one way out so you're not going to meet day trippers in the middle of a 3-4 day hike. Really detracts from the experience IMO. :thumbdown:


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 5:12 am 
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I generally run sections of the Abel Tasman coastal track, or kayak along the coast line, the inland track is a bit more rugged and challenging.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 7:18 am 
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Womack wrote:
Zakar wrote:
bobbity wrote:
Anyone done much of the south downs way? Eastbourne to Brighton? Doing an organised event in August, 31 miles. Just figuring what I need to prepare us for in terms of hills etc


I did Seaforth to Eastbourne a couple of weekends ago. Some moderate hills, enough to alarm the complete novice.

Bloody spectacular though :thumbup:


It's Seaford - I was there this weekend as the MiL lives there. Did you walk across Seaford head and the 7 sisters? If so, that's not strictly speaking the South Downs Way. Nice walk though.


Yeah thats it. Didn't really see anything of Seaford as we got the bus there and started walking straight away.

How do you ford a sea?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 8:51 am 
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Yeah, doesn't make much sense now I think about it - don't even think there's a river there to explain the 'ford' suffix, certainly not a significant one. Could be that it was called something else that sounded similar but didn't actually mean 'sea', 'ford' or both, and was gradually corrupted into its present form. Google doesn't seem to have anything to say about it so I'm afraid it must remain a mystery for ever more.

You didn't miss much, bit of a nonentity of a town. Couple of decent pubs, nice enough seafront, fairly civilised, bit of a 'God's waiting room' vibe going on. Its position at one end of one of the best coastal walks in the south-east is probably the best thing going for it. I try and get out for a stroll along the cliffs whenever I'm there, or if I'm really lucky I bring my mountain bike and go for a tool around nearby Friston Forest.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 3:45 pm 
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Heading off on the West Highland Way tomorrow. did it many moons ago but this time I am taking the good lady with me. TBF she has put in far more training than myself so I will probably be dawdling along in her wake. Weather looks fair for the whole week so that will be half the battle


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 7:25 pm 
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I'm going to be hiking the Annapurna circuit in July (yes I know its monsoon season). Its the first long trek I'll have done in 6 years! In that time all I've done is a couple of one day hikes.

Any advice for anyone getting back into hiking?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 30, 2017 8:55 pm 
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BlackMac wrote:
Heading off on the West Highland Way tomorrow. did it many moons ago but this time I am taking the good lady with me. TBF she has put in far more training than myself so I will probably be dawdling along in her wake. Weather looks fair for the whole week so that will be half the battle


A week?! Man up and walk faster princess, just because call you plod doesn't mean you have to walk like that!


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 12:20 am 
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Newby1 wrote:
I'm going to be hiking the Annapurna circuit in July (yes I know its monsoon season). Its the first long trek I'll have done in 6 years! In that time all I've done is a couple of one day hikes.

Any advice for anyone getting back into hiking?


The usual... take your time and plenty of rest breaks. The AC is a steady climb, there's no up and down to it at all, you just keep going up. Once you do summit the pass and head down then, your legs will be screaming in agony within an hour. That's something to look forward to :thumbup:

There's a lot of road development in the area. For the most part you can stick to the trail and stay off the road but if you need a ride at any stage it's there and thumbing a lift should work. You might have to wait a while for a vehicle, hard to say in monsoon season how much traffic there would be.


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 8:01 am 
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Newby1 wrote:
I'm going to be hiking the Annapurna circuit in July (yes I know its monsoon season). Its the first long trek I'll have done in 6 years! In that time all I've done is a couple of one day hikes.

Any advice for anyone getting back into hiking?


Invest in some good boots then get out there and do as many weekend hikes as you can between now and July. That'll get your hiking fitness up as well as break in the boots and confirm they are comfortable and a good fit. I did the AC with my ex girlfriend 20 odd years ago and she found out a few days into the hike that her brand new boots weren't quite right and she suffered agonising blisters on her heels.

A couple of years back I decided to do a day hike in Queenstown that I did 20 years ago no problem. Hadn't done any hiking in years but keep fit through moutain biking so figured I would be fine. WRONG! Totally different type of fitness and I was absolutely f**ked!

Having said all that the AC is long enough that you can build your fitness on the walk itself. Have fun. :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 2:03 pm 
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booji boy wrote:
Newby1 wrote:
I'm going to be hiking the Annapurna circuit in July (yes I know its monsoon season). Its the first long trek I'll have done in 6 years! In that time all I've done is a couple of one day hikes.

Any advice for anyone getting back into hiking?


Invest in some good boots then get out there and do as many weekend hikes as you can between now and July. That'll get your hiking fitness up as well as break in the boots and confirm they are comfortable and a good fit. I did the AC with my ex girlfriend 20 odd years ago and she found out a few days into the hike that her brand new boots weren't quite right and she suffered agonising blisters on her heels.

A couple of years back I decided to do a day hike in Queenstown that I did 20 years ago no problem. Hadn't done any hiking in years but keep fit through moutain biking so figured I would be fine. WRONG! Totally different type of fitness and I was absolutely f**k!

Having said all that the AC is long enough that you can build your fitness on the walk itself. Have fun. :thumbup:


Thanks to you and Guy.

My old boots (Brasher's) are wrecked so I bought a pair of Meidl's which seem comfortable. I've got two 20km walks planned before I head out.

I've planned the walk so there's no more than 20km in a day. Even walking at 3kmph that's not much walking time, so I will definitely go slow. How did you guys find the altitude?


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 3:45 pm 
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I only walked part of the AC. Due to my girlfriend's blisters we had to bail out early so didn't make it high enough for altitude to be a factor.


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 3:46 pm 
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booji boy wrote:
I only walked part of the AC. Due to my girlfriend's blisters we had to bail out early so didn't make it high enough for altitude to be a factor.


Sorry to hear that mate. Its never good to get so close to your goal...


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 3:59 pm 
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Newby1 wrote:

Thanks to you and Guy.

My old boots (Brasher's) are wrecked so I bought a pair of Meidl's which seem comfortable. I've got two 20km walks planned before I head out.

I've planned the walk so there's no more than 20km in a day. Even walking at 3kmph that's not much walking time, so I will definitely go slow. How did you guys find the altitude?


I doubt I got close to 20km in a day on the AC. I did a trek close to Everest last year and might have got up to 12km per day going up, I'm not sure... coming down from that was a different story. I had places to be :lol:

Altitude is ok so long as you don't hurry your ascent. I found the combination of thin air and steep terrain added up to the hardest work I've ever done but a lot of that is mental. The basics are that once you're over 3500m you only gain 3-500m elevation per day. I stuck to that and every now and then you find you have to do more... so long as you haven't hurried it that should be fine. Doing AC, you take a rest day at Manang, at 3500m... side hikes from there for a day can get you up and back down for the night as far as 800m if you go up to the ice lake. Doing so will help on the succeeding days... those day long elevation gains and a return to rest work a treat. From Manang it's relentless and you have some steep gains. We crossed the pass in 3 days from there... almost 2000m gained in a fair old hurry and looking back I think I was feeling the altitude on the last morning when I yakked up a multi vitamin at the door of my room straight after hoisting the pack :lol: I struggled a bit on the last day from Churi Ledhar to Thorung Pedi but took a nap at lunch then zoomed up to High Camp in 80 minutes. That was a big gain day and a lot of people struggle with a night at High Camp but we figured it was worth it to have the extra 400m behind us the next day getting over the pass. Altitude fucks with your sleep anyway and we were ok up there but a couple of others got pretty crook.

Take some Diamox or equivalent with you. If you think the altitude is getting to you, take one in the morning and another at night if you're woozy. Any sign of distress or behaviour change, just go down for a night. 300m down will make a difference.


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 4:20 pm 
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guy smiley wrote:
Newby1 wrote:

Thanks to you and Guy.

My old boots (Brasher's) are wrecked so I bought a pair of Meidl's which seem comfortable. I've got two 20km walks planned before I head out.

I've planned the walk so there's no more than 20km in a day. Even walking at 3kmph that's not much walking time, so I will definitely go slow. How did you guys find the altitude?


I doubt I got close to 20km in a day on the AC. I did a trek close to Everest last year and might have got up to 12km per day going up, I'm not sure... coming down from that was a different story. I had places to be :lol:

Altitude is ok so long as you don't hurry your ascent. I found the combination of thin air and steep terrain added up to the hardest work I've ever done but a lot of that is mental. The basics are that once you're over 3500m you only gain 3-500m elevation per day. I stuck to that and every now and then you find you have to do more... so long as you haven't hurried it that should be fine. Doing AC, you take a rest day at Manang, at 3500m... side hikes from there for a day can get you up and back down for the night as far as 800m if you go up to the ice lake. Doing so will help on the succeeding days... those day long elevation gains and a return to rest work a treat. From Manang it's relentless and you have some steep gains. We crossed the pass in 3 days from there... almost 2000m gained in a fair old hurry and looking back I think I was feeling the altitude on the last morning when I yakked up a multi vitamin at the door of my room straight after hoisting the pack :lol: I struggled a bit on the last day from Churi Ledhar to Thorung Pedi but took a nap at lunch then zoomed up to High Camp in 80 minutes. That was a big gain day and a lot of people struggle with a night at High Camp but we figured it was worth it to have the extra 400m behind us the next day getting over the pass. Altitude f**k with your sleep anyway and we were ok up there but a couple of others got pretty crook.

Take some Diamox or equivalent with you. If you think the altitude is getting to you, take one in the morning and another at night if you're woozy. Any sign of distress or behaviour change, just go down for a night. 300m down will make a difference.


Grand, I've climbed Kilimanjaro a while back and spent most of the last day vomiting so I know I can be susceptible to altitude.

I'm mostly prepared now, just need to get walking fitness back. I'm running every 2 days for general fitness and have a couple of big walks coming up. Should be good fun, despite the monsoon...


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 6:19 pm 
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First training hike for the 31 mile day in August. 14.8 relatively flat, but occasionally tricky, miles. Don't like the current trail runners for this, although they're great for short runs and shorter walks. Back to the Merrell trail gloves.


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PostPosted: Mon May 01, 2017 11:35 pm 
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Newby1 wrote:

Grand, I've climbed Kilimanjaro a while back and spent most of the last day vomiting so I know I can be susceptible to altitude.

I'm mostly prepared now, just need to get walking fitness back. I'm running every 2 days for general fitness and have a couple of big walks coming up. Should be good fun, despite the monsoon...


:thumbup: :thumbup: From what I've heard, Kilimanjaro is a brute. You've done that so you should be right on the AC. Maximum elevation is 5416. It'll be interesting to see how you go in the monsoon.. I expect you'll get a lot of cloud and the humidity in the first week should be...

perfect for weight loss.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 10:54 pm 
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Planning on hiking the Pembrokeshire coastal path in a couple of weeks time. Going to do it all in one go, wild camping near the path every night and am allocating two weeks for the job (188 miles with a lot of up and downing)

I'm generally fit, do the odd short hike, cycle, kayaking, climbing etc. I'm not planning on doing any training, just cracking on with it.

For those experienced at long distance hiking -am I mad, or does that all sound perfectly achievable?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:46 am 
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Well my plan to go to the Lake District and bag a few in September is stymied by the fact my ankle is still not 100%

Still doing Snowdon though - through gritted teeth.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 7:52 am 
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cubby boi wrote:
Planning on hiking the Pembrokeshire coastal path in a couple of weeks time. Going to do it all in one go, wild camping near the path every night and am allocating two weeks for the job (188 miles with a lot of up and downing)

I'm generally fit, do the odd short hike, cycle, kayaking, climbing etc. I'm not planning on doing any training, just cracking on with it.

For those experienced at long distance hiking -am I mad, or does that all sound perfectly achievable?


Sure those 13.5 miles a day will be a real struggle chubby boy.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 8:10 am 
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Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
Well my plan to go to the Lake District and bag a few in September is stymied by the fact my ankle is still not 100%

Still doing Snowdon though - through gritted teeth.


You know there is a train service to the top?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 12:17 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
Well my plan to go to the Lake District and bag a few in September is stymied by the fact my ankle is still not 100%

Still doing Snowdon though - through gritted teeth.


You know there is a train service to the top?


That's for Bloody Tourists!

I used to live the other side of Lake Cwellyn and climbed Snowdon every month...


Last edited by Pat the Ex Mat on Thu Jul 20, 2017 4:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:08 pm 
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frillage wrote:
cubby boi wrote:
Planning on hiking the Pembrokeshire coastal path in a couple of weeks time. Going to do it all in one go, wild camping near the path every night and am allocating two weeks for the job (188 miles with a lot of up and downing)

I'm generally fit, do the odd short hike, cycle, kayaking, climbing etc. I'm not planning on doing any training, just cracking on with it.

For those experienced at long distance hiking -am I mad, or does that all sound perfectly achievable?


Sure those 13.5 miles a day will be a real struggle chubby boy.


I'm unsure if this is a genuine response, or a continuation of the bitter and twisted Scots Lions shenanigans. Can someone confirm?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:11 pm 
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cubby boi wrote:
frillage wrote:
cubby boi wrote:
Planning on hiking the Pembrokeshire coastal path in a couple of weeks time. Going to do it all in one go, wild camping near the path every night and am allocating two weeks for the job (188 miles with a lot of up and downing)

I'm generally fit, do the odd short hike, cycle, kayaking, climbing etc. I'm not planning on doing any training, just cracking on with it.

For those experienced at long distance hiking -am I mad, or does that all sound perfectly achievable?


Sure those 13.5 miles a day will be a real struggle chubby boy.


I'm unsure if this is a genuine response, or a continuation of the bitter and twisted Scots Lions shenanigans. Can someone confirm?

You can do 13.5 miles in a morning.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:16 pm 
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croyals wrote:
cubby boi wrote:
frillage wrote:
cubby boi wrote:
Planning on hiking the Pembrokeshire coastal path in a couple of weeks time. Going to do it all in one go, wild camping near the path every night and am allocating two weeks for the job (188 miles with a lot of up and downing)

I'm generally fit, do the odd short hike, cycle, kayaking, climbing etc. I'm not planning on doing any training, just cracking on with it.

For those experienced at long distance hiking -am I mad, or does that all sound perfectly achievable?


Sure those 13.5 miles a day will be a real struggle chubby boy.


I'm unsure if this is a genuine response, or a continuation of the bitter and twisted Scots Lions shenanigans. Can someone confirm?

You can do 13.5 miles in a morning.


Thanks. The thing I'm worried about though is if I don't do any training, will my legs be knackered the following day, early on? Or will blisters be a problem? I think what I I'm getting at is that I could probably push myself to hike 30 miles on the first day if I wanted, but at what point am I risking the rest of the trip?


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2017 2:17 pm 
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Also bear in mi d that I'll be wild camping and carrying a pack of around 12 KG. ..


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