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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 2:01 pm 
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mikeyboy123 wrote:

In some ways I would love to do something like that, but it's the mental side of things that I think I'd struggle with more than anything else. I like trekking, but I think after the 7th day or so, I think it might wear a bit thin.

Done the Kili climb and the Inca trail plus some trekking in Borneo, Austria and around the UK. The longest continuous one I've done is the Kili climb at 6 days up and down. Not sure I'd want to do much more than that.


If this is anything like my trek around the Annapurnas 18 months back then it's exactly that mental side of things we're after... there's an incredibly profound headspace to be found. Life becomes very simple, the struggle is incredible but the clarity is amazing. 'Stuff' drops away and you enter some sort of simplistic one foot after the other mode. I'm lucky, my companion of choice and I share a lot of similar perspectives and her wit and intelligence leads to fantastic conversations. That and I really, really like being among Nepali people in their country. I read a lot about Hilary as a child, this trip will take me through places I remember from his story. In some ways, I think I was always going to go to Nepal.

A girl from work did Kili over our summer with her brother. Talking to her about it, and realising she'd managed higher altitude sparked this trip after we'd heard about it while in Nepal.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 2:37 pm 
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Well that makes my walking the last bit of the Camino de Santiago for my 60th this year, pale into insignificance.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 3:00 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I live hiking but have done piss all since I've been here. I'd like to do an overnight in August. Any recommendations? Literally anywhere in Europe is fine.


Just in the uk there are loads. Pennine, coast to coast, West Highland way, Pembrokeshire coastal. Depends on your time/level.

The most spectacular I've done was more climbing orientated and included les dents du midi and mont blanc. Unbelievable. There's some decent stuff in the dolomites and the pyrenees outside the alps.

The 'pilgrimage' to santiaga De compostella was notable as much for the food as the hiking


St James' Way is something I would like to do for sure. Been planning to go for 30 years. Better get to it.

Also, sitting right next to the Appalachian Trail, I am going to hit parts of it this summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_Trail

Apparently very serious walkers do this: The Appalachian Trail, the Continental Divide Trail, and the Pacific Crest Trail form what is known as the Triple Crown of long–distance hiking in the US.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 4:01 pm 
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Zakar wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I live hiking but have done piss all since I've been here. I'd like to do an overnight in August. Any recommendations? Literally anywhere in Europe is fine.


Just in the uk there are loads. Pennine, coast to coast, West Highland way, Pembrokeshire coastal. Depends on your time/level.

The most spectacular I've done was more climbing orientated and included les dents du midi and mont blanc. Unbelievable. There's some decent stuff in the dolomites and the pyrenees outside the alps.

The 'pilgrimage' to santiaga De compostella was notable as much for the food as the hiking


Would probably want to limit it to about 25kms a day, assuming moderate terrain.

Did one near Lewes a couple of weeks ago that was ok. Think I'd get bored hiking through paddocks though.


The Pembrokeshire Coast is stunning and not particlar arduous. It's bloody long though, so maybe a part of it.

Closer to home and you can split it up and do a day here and there, have a look at the London loop. Also some gentle day trips in the Chiltern and the bluebells are just stunning this time of year


Cheers HH


I do a lot in the Chilterns and can confirm the Bluebells are out and its stunning


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 4:04 pm 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
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Took the train from Marylebone out to Wendover the other day. Twas glorious


Yep, might go out this weekend (I meant Marylebone too, not Paddington). Go out of that station normally a dozen times over summer.


That's my neck of the woods. If either fancy a chum sometime i'll even buy you a beer at the end.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 4:11 pm 
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LandOTurk wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I live hiking but have done piss all since I've been here. I'd like to do an overnight in August. Any recommendations? Literally anywhere in Europe is fine.


Just in the uk there are loads. Pennine, coast to coast, West Highland way, Pembrokeshire coastal. Depends on your time/level.

The most spectacular I've done was more climbing orientated and included les dents du midi and mont blanc. Unbelievable. There's some decent stuff in the dolomites and the pyrenees outside the alps.

The 'pilgrimage' to santiaga De compostella was notable as much for the food as the hiking


St James' Way is something I would like to do for sure. Been planning to go for 30 years. Better get to it.

Also, sitting right next to the Appalachian Trail, I am going to hit parts of it this summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_Trail

Apparently very serious walkers do this: The Appalachian Trail, the Continental Divide Trail, and the Pacific Crest Trail form what is known as the Triple Crown of long–distance hiking in the US.


There is a 6,800 mile path called the Great Western Loop that only one person has ever completed.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 4:32 pm 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
LandOTurk wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
Zakar wrote:
I live hiking but have done piss all since I've been here. I'd like to do an overnight in August. Any recommendations? Literally anywhere in Europe is fine.


Just in the uk there are loads. Pennine, coast to coast, West Highland way, Pembrokeshire coastal. Depends on your time/level.

The most spectacular I've done was more climbing orientated and included les dents du midi and mont blanc. Unbelievable. There's some decent stuff in the dolomites and the pyrenees outside the alps.

The 'pilgrimage' to santiaga De compostella was notable as much for the food as the hiking


St James' Way is something I would like to do for sure. Been planning to go for 30 years. Better get to it.

Also, sitting right next to the Appalachian Trail, I am going to hit parts of it this summer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_Trail

Apparently very serious walkers do this: The Appalachian Trail, the Continental Divide Trail, and the Pacific Crest Trail form what is known as the Triple Crown of long–distance hiking in the US.


There is a 6,800 mile path called the Great Western Loop that only one person has ever completed.


Hell of an adventure. You are right.

The Great Western Loop is a hiking route that loops around the western United States.

It links together five long-distance hiking trails including the Pacific Crest Trail, Pacific Northwest Trail, Continental Divide Trail, Grand Enchantment Trail and Arizona Trail. It passes through the Mojave Desert, Sonoran Desert, 12 National Parks and 75 wilderness areas.

Andrew Skurka, a professional backpacker, was the first to attempt the entire hike. On April 9, 2007, Skurka began the route from the Grand Canyon. Averaging 33 miles per day, Skurka arrived back at the Grand Canyon on November 7, 2007, 208 days since he began. He remains the only known person to complete the hike.


http://andrewskurka.com/adventures/grea ... /overview/


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 4:39 pm 
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blackblackblack wrote:
I got lost for an hour in the hills around bethells beach. Does that count.

My mate did Abel Tasman. I went on the piss and picked her up at the other end.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 5:00 pm 
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guy smiley wrote:
mikeyboy123 wrote:

In some ways I would love to do something like that, but it's the mental side of things that I think I'd struggle with more than anything else. I like trekking, but I think after the 7th day or so, I think it might wear a bit thin.

Done the Kili climb and the Inca trail plus some trekking in Borneo, Austria and around the UK. The longest continuous one I've done is the Kili climb at 6 days up and down. Not sure I'd want to do much more than that.


If this is anything like my trek around the Annapurnas 18 months back then it's exactly that mental side of things we're after... there's an incredibly profound headspace to be found. Life becomes very simple, the struggle is incredible but the clarity is amazing. 'Stuff' drops away and you enter some sort of simplistic one foot after the other mode. I'm lucky, my companion of choice and I share a lot of similar perspectives and her wit and intelligence leads to fantastic conversations. That and I really, really like being among Nepali people in their country. I read a lot about Hilary as a child, this trip will take me through places I remember from his story. In some ways, I think I was always going to go to Nepal.

A girl from work did Kili over our summer with her brother. Talking to her about it, and realising she'd managed higher altitude sparked this trip after we'd heard about it while in Nepal.


Yeah, I get it, and part of me would really like to do that trip. But it would be too long for me. Good luck with it.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 5:25 pm 
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http://www.westcoasttrailbc.com/trail_guidebook_map.htm

The West Coast Trail is part of the Pacific Rim National Park on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

My nephew works as an engineer for the Coast Guard in Bamfield and they regularly haul people off, either by boat or helicopter; there's no other way out once you've started.

I'm just completing the build of a cabin in Bamfield which is at the end (or beginning) of the trail.

Let me know when you're coming and come have a few beers; you'll need 'em if you've just done it.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 7:00 pm 
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Zakar wrote:
I live hiking but have done piss all since I've been here. I'd like to do an overnight in August. Any recommendations? Literally anywhere in Europe is fine.


Just go to Skye for two days walking.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 8:39 pm 
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globus wrote:
What's wrong with a serviceable car? You are all nuts.


That's my stock answer for clowns training to do silly things like Ironman events where they run and cycle on existing roads. You can't take a car where these guys are planning to hike.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 9:06 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
In other news I did the first leg of the South Downs Way last weekend!


Bah, some of us have done the whole lot in a day on a bike


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 9:07 pm 
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Womack wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
In other news I did the first leg of the South Downs Way last weekend!


Bah, some of us have done the whole lot in a day on a bike


Fair play, did the Winchester to Buriton leg, loads of bikers out and about (and miserable looking DofE kids)


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 9:35 pm 
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I absolutely hate walking, but would be interested in cycling routes like the ones mentioned here.

I have completed the Thames, and around the coast of Kent, Sussex, most of Hampshire, and the start of Dorset.
I have come to the South West Path and realise it is practically inaccessible with a bike. I carried it to Anvil Point Lighthouse, then cycled back along the road. I think that's it for the south coast.

The Camino would be accessible, but wrong country.
Any suggestions for UK.
River / Canal routes would work best.

Edit, Womack, just seen your Sth Downs Way. I shall check the interweb.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 9:57 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
Womack wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
In other news I did the first leg of the South Downs Way last weekend!


Bah, some of us have done the whole lot in a day on a bike


Fair play, did the Winchester to Buriton leg, loads of bikers out and about (and miserable looking DofE kids)


Blimey, that's good going - what's that, about 20 miles? The whole thing is a slight blur but I seem to recall the bit from Queen Elizabeth Country park up to around Chanctonbury Ring as the nicest. From Devil's Dyke onwards the climbs are bigger and you spend more time on top of the downs where it can be a bit bleak. Plus obviously I'd been riding for about 10 hours by then so my enthusiasm may have waned slightly. Amazing views mind.

Edit: LiL, it's a fantastic route for cycling but there is a lot of climbing involved!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2016 10:01 pm 
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HKCJ wrote:
I know we have had a couple of boardies who have done a few .. Guysmiley, DAC, Zappaman, Odval remember saying he did the GR20 and the West Highland Way thread was very useful when I did it again last year and quite a few boardies had done it..

Anyway, has anyone got any experience of the Mont Blanc Route? Am looking at doing it at the beginning of Sep in 6 days but bit worried I'm biting off more than I can chew.



Any fat tourist could manage that.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 12:47 am 
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Armchair_Superstar wrote:
Tour de Mont Blanc? Six days is standard is it not?

Edit - Sorry I forgot you'd injured yourself, are you feeling recovered?



Seems that 11 days is the standard from what I've read. I usually take the guide books with a large pinch of salt and usually complete in about half to 2/3 of the recommended.. WHW took us 4 days, PoonHill/ABC loop 6 days, Everest Base camp 8 days, Routeburn a day, Queen Charlotte track 2 days. All of those recommended much longer. My concern with this one is that the elevations seem WAY more. The route I'm planning seems to have 2300m of climbing over 33km on day 2. That seems a shitload to me. Total of 10,000m of climbing in 6 days. We used to do 5000m of climbing in 24 hours on the Trailwalker in Japan but doing that twice is rather daunting. The weird thing is in the pictures I look at online it all seems to be walking along nice flat valleys so Im guessing the climbs over the cols are brutal?

Going to do the Marathon du Medoc at the end of it too so need a bit of gas in the tank when we finish. Injury is ok thanks.. still niggles when I do long distance but doesn't hurt. I dont think it will ever feel 'normal' again. Weren't you planning to bike round the TDMB?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 12:52 am 
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booji boy wrote:
globus wrote:
What's wrong with a serviceable car? You are all nuts.


That's my stock answer for clowns training to do silly things like Ironman events where they run and cycle on existing roads. You can't take a car where these guys are planning to hike.


I'd have thought a bunch of people on an internet chat forum would have heard of Google Earth, but clearly not


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 1:23 am 
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Leinster in London wrote:
I absolutely hate walking, but would be interested in cycling routes like the ones mentioned here.

I have completed the Thames, and around the coast of Kent, Sussex, most of Hampshire, and the start of Dorset.
I have come to the South West Path and realise it is practically inaccessible with a bike. I carried it to Anvil Point Lighthouse, then cycled back along the road. I think that's it for the south coast.

The Camino would be accessible, but wrong country.
Any suggestions for UK.
River / Canal routes would work best.

Edit, Womack, just seen your Sth Downs Way. I shall check the interweb.


There is a ton of them in Wales, part of the The Wales Coast Path - a long-distance footpath which follows, or runs close to, the majority of the coastline of Wales. An 870-mile walking route from Chepstow in the south to Queensferry in the north.
These are the parts you can cycle.
http://www.walescoastpath.gov.uk/what-c ... g/?lang=en


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 1:41 am 
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guy smiley wrote:
I may as well blow the trumpet here as well..

I'm planning a return to Nepal later this year, in October. This time we're heading off to do the Three Passes trek in the Khumbu, the area around Everest. If we can manage it all, we'll climb ... oh bugger it, here's a pic of the profile

Image

If we pull this off I reckon we'll have done one of the tougher walks going and I'll be well chuffed.



Having done EBC I will definitely be going back at some point to do that one Guy. Met a few people who came the other way round and said how great it was. I think October is the best time to do it as well as you dont have the big mountain expeditions about.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 12:05 pm 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
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Took the train from Marylebone out to Wendover the other day. Twas glorious


Yep, might go out this weekend (I meant Marylebone too, not Paddington). Go out of that station normally a dozen times over summer.


By the way, enjoy it whilst its still there, the HS2 is about to go straight through that nice bit of the Chilterns arouns Great Missenden.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 2:12 pm 
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HKCJ wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
I may as well blow the trumpet here as well..

I'm planning a return to Nepal later this year, in October. This time we're heading off to do the Three Passes trek in the Khumbu, the area around Everest. If we can manage it all, we'll climb ... oh bugger it, here's a pic of the profile

Image

If we pull this off I reckon we'll have done one of the tougher walks going and I'll be well chuffed.



Having done EBC I will definitely be going back at some point to do that one Guy. Met a few people who came the other way round and said how great it was. I think October is the best time to do it as well as you dont have the big mountain expeditions about.


I did this nearly 10 years ago over Christmas and New Year. A touch on the cold side but less than a dozen of us at Everest Base Camp and it was stunning to see the lakes frozen over.

For a walk closer to home then wild camping in Scotland is hard to beat. Take a train to Glenfinnen and then walk into Knoydart ...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/25655041@ ... 3956163029


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 28, 2016 2:19 pm 
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slick wrote:
Seneca of the Night wrote:
Quote:

Took the train from Marylebone out to Wendover the other day. Twas glorious


Yep, might go out this weekend (I meant Marylebone too, not Paddington). Go out of that station normally a dozen times over summer.


By the way, enjoy it whilst its still there, the HS2 is about to go straight through that nice bit of the Chilterns arouns Great Missenden.

Yea, saw the locals were out protesting about that the other week


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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2016 11:36 am 
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Awesome walk along the Thames yesterday from around Taplow to Marlow way, then back the other side. Stunning, with a welcome pint in The Bounty in Bourne End to finish - great pub, only open in the summer months, can only get to it over a little bridge or boat

I want to live on a boat now though


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PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2016 1:03 am 
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slick wrote:
Awesome walk along the Thames yesterday from around Taplow to Marlow way, then back the other side. Stunning, with a welcome pint in The Bounty in Bourne End to finish - great pub, only open in the summer months, can only get to it over a little bridge or boat

I want to live on a boat now though


The Thames is ridiculously nice in Summer.

I was back a few years ago and took my mate down a shortcut from Walton to Weybridge - he didn't know you could go that way!

Great pubs on the river bank


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 7:41 am 
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Tour de Mont Blanc done in 5 days.. epic hike done for the year. Got great weather, scenery is simply stunning as expected. Cheeky little marathon du medoc nr Bordeaux to finish which is also very much recommended.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 7:49 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
Tour de Mont Blanc done in 5 days.. epic hike done for the year. Got great weather, scenery is simply stunning as expected. Cheeky little marathon du medoc nr Bordeaux to finish which is also very much recommended.


:thumbup:

It's stunning isn't it!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 7:57 am 
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My list of climbs after getting Rehab out the way:

Milford Track

Mt Taranaki

Mt Fuji

Hopefully without damaging anything


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 8:09 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Tour de Mont Blanc done in 5 days.. epic hike done for the year. Got great weather, scenery is simply stunning as expected. Cheeky little marathon du medoc nr Bordeaux to finish which is also very much recommended.


:thumbup:

It's stunning isn't it!



Yeah beautiful. We took the teleferique up the Aguil du Midi to watch the wingsuit fliers.. was the same day this happened http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/dozens-people-stuck-10-000-feet-air-overnight-french-alps-n645101



Mat - have u booked Milford? If you plan on staying in huts you need to book miles in advance or else you will pay extortionate amounts to go with a tour company. I ended up missing out and doing Queen Charlotte and Routeburn instead so its still on my to do list.

Personally I wouldn't bother with Fuji unless you do it out of season.. it's a truly horrid descent anyway and with the numbers of people the whole thing is ridiculous. Get yourself some crampons, some good thermals, a warm jacket and a balaclava and just go straight up at the end of May (dont have to ski down and its icy if you do). A much more rewarding and spiritually uplifting experience. Trust me doing it in the tourist season is something I would never ever do again.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 8:26 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Tour de Mont Blanc done in 5 days.. epic hike done for the year. Got great weather, scenery is simply stunning as expected. Cheeky little marathon du medoc nr Bordeaux to finish which is also very much recommended.


:thumbup:

It's stunning isn't it!



Yeah beautiful. We took the teleferique up the Aguil du Midi to watch the wingsuit fliers.. was the same day this happened http://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/dozens-people-stuck-10-000-feet-air-overnight-french-alps-n645101



Mat - have u booked Milford? If you plan on staying in huts you need to book miles in advance or else you will pay extortionate amounts to go with a tour company. I ended up missing out and doing Queen Charlotte and Routeburn instead so its still on my to do list.

Personally I wouldn't bother with Fuji unless you do it out of season.. it's a truly horrid descent anyway and with the numbers of people the whole thing is ridiculous. Get yourself some crampons, some good thermals, a warm jacket and a balaclava and just go straight up at the end of May (dont have to ski down and its icy if you do). A much more rewarding and spiritually uplifting experience. Trust me doing it in the tourist season is something I would never ever do again.


So, Chamonix to Zermatt next year?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 8:32 am 
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The girl I hike with (not my gf which may become an issue) and I are keen for GR20 next year.

Btw I may need to pick your brain at some point. GF and I tentatively looking at a decent African road trip in 2018. Will let you know!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 9:11 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
Mat - have u booked Milford? If you plan on staying in huts you need to book miles in advance or else you will pay extortionate amounts to go with a tour company. I ended up missing out and doing Queen Charlotte and Routeburn instead so its still on my to do list.


Mine too!

The only place I've trekked overseas was Nepal (Anapurna circuit) but I've trekked 7 out of 9 of the Great Walks in NZ. The Milford and the Rakiura Track (Stewart Island) are still on my to to list. I didn't do the Milford for the same reason as you. I was booked in to do the Stewart Island trek a few years back but plans changed due to adverse weather and I did the Whanganui Journey instead (which is actually a river/canoe journey).

Still keen to do both at some point.

http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recrea ... eat-walks/


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 9:28 am 
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The dusky track is the serious walk in new Zealand. Hardcore tramping with lots of mud. 10 days.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 9:49 am 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
The dusky track is the serious walk in new Zealand. Hardcore tramping with lots of mud. 10 days.



Sen

Are you not worried that by hiking in NZ you might be giving people false hope of a Hobbit sequel?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:01 am 
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booji boy wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Mat - have u booked Milford? If you plan on staying in huts you need to book miles in advance or else you will pay extortionate amounts to go with a tour company. I ended up missing out and doing Queen Charlotte and Routeburn instead so its still on my to do list.


Mine too!

The only place I've trekked overseas was Nepal (Anapurna circuit) but I've trekked 7 out of 9 of the Great Walks in NZ. The Milford and the Rakiura Track (Stewart Island) are still on my to to list. I didn't do the Milford for the same reason as you. I was booked in to do the Stewart Island trek a few years back but plans changed due to adverse weather and I did the Whanganui Journey instead (which is actually a river/canoe journey).

Still keen to do both at some point.

http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recrea ... eat-walks/

Did Milford in '89 - was busy back then, had to purchase hut passes and warned they might get full, but i don't remember booking? :? Trekked across Stewart Island to Freshwater Bay, don't know if that's the route you're referring to? I remember a lot of the boardwalks being underwater and having to wade various sections, and trying to dry my socks and boots out overnight, only for them to get soaking wet again within 100 metres. Worth it, though, for the Kiwis in broad daylight at Freshwater Bay. :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:04 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
Seneca of the Night wrote:
The dusky track is the serious walk in new Zealand. Hardcore tramping with lots of mud. 10 days.



Sen

Are you not worried that by hiking in NZ you might be giving people false hope of a Hobbit sequel?

He may be trying to reenact the march on Rome


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:08 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
Seneca of the Night wrote:
The dusky track is the serious walk in new Zealand. Hardcore tramping with lots of mud. 10 days.



Sen

Are you not worried that by hiking in NZ you might be giving people false hope of a Hobbit sequel?


Yes, well, now there's a joke from a man living in a house of glass. :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:09 am 
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I am kayaking in Norway for three days next weekend. Involves a big walk up the side of a fjord one day. I cannot wait.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:10 am 
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Red Chopper wrote:
booji boy wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Mat - have u booked Milford? If you plan on staying in huts you need to book miles in advance or else you will pay extortionate amounts to go with a tour company. I ended up missing out and doing Queen Charlotte and Routeburn instead so its still on my to do list.


Mine too!

The only place I've trekked overseas was Nepal (Anapurna circuit) but I've trekked 7 out of 9 of the Great Walks in NZ. The Milford and the Rakiura Track (Stewart Island) are still on my to to list. I didn't do the Milford for the same reason as you. I was booked in to do the Stewart Island trek a few years back but plans changed due to adverse weather and I did the Whanganui Journey instead (which is actually a river/canoe journey).

Still keen to do both at some point.

http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recrea ... eat-walks/

Did Milford in '89 - was busy back then, had to purchase hut passes and warned they might get full, but i don't remember booking? :? Trekked across Stewart Island to Freshwater Bay, don't know if that's the route you're referring to? I remember a lot of the boardwalks being underwater and having to wade various sections, and trying to dry my socks and boots out overnight, only for them to get soaking wet again within 100 metres. Worth it, though, for the Kiwis in broad daylight at Freshwater Bay. :thumbup:


Jealous jealous jealous


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