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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:15 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
The girl I hike with (not my gf which may become an issue) and I are keen for GR20 next year.

Btw I may need to pick your brain at some point. GF and I tentatively looking at a decent African road trip in 2018. Will let you know!


GR20 is a classic trek!

Tap me up when you want to have a chat about overlanding. In the meantime have a look at some of Chris Scott's publications and Google 'Horizons Unlimited' which is a very active overlanding forum full of trip planning advice.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:16 am 
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I did the Milford via the expensive huts. I just turned up in Te Anau and that's all I could get, and I had the money. It was great. I drank a bottle of wine every night, and the older folk from all around the world were very interesting. I got to know the people in the other huts too and used to schlep on to the track in the morning and loudly complain about my hangover. :lol:

We had fantastic weather then just as we reached the end it started to rain. And then oh my God it fcking tipped down. It was biblical. The road closed. So the company had to fly us out in helicopters. I hate the things, so I had my eyes closed sitting next to the pilot. But then i opened them and it was the most astonishing experience ever as we swooped between clouds and mountains and water was pouring off vast slabs of rock and then we would stop for a while and the pilot would see another gap and we would swing into that and then on again up and down swinging into clear space.

The chopper guys down there are amazing.

It was incredible.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:17 am 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Seneca of the Night wrote:
The dusky track is the serious walk in new Zealand. Hardcore tramping with lots of mud. 10 days.



Sen

Are you not worried that by hiking in NZ you might be giving people false hope of a Hobbit sequel?


Yes, well, now there's a joke from a man living in a house of glass. :lol:



With my redoubtable courage and magnificent beard I'm more Gimli than Bilbo.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:23 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
The girl I hike with (not my gf which may become an issue) and I are keen for GR20 next year.

Btw I may need to pick your brain at some point. GF and I tentatively looking at a decent African road trip in 2018. Will let you know!


GR20 is a classic trek!

Tap me up when you want to have a chat about overlanding. In the meantime have a look at some of Chris Scott's publications and Google 'Horizons Unlimited' which is a very active overlanding forum full of trip planning advice.


Grr, you guys are making me angry with these trips. Must do a big one in about three years time. The problem I've got at the moment is the girl I used to do these kind of trips has just had a baby (by herself bizarrely) so I need to find another partner. I agree with HK and GS that it's often good to have a female friend to do these things with as it can get a bit difficult with girlfriends.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:24 am 
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HKCJ wrote:
Seneca of the Night wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
Seneca of the Night wrote:
The dusky track is the serious walk in new Zealand. Hardcore tramping with lots of mud. 10 days.



Sen

Are you not worried that by hiking in NZ you might be giving people false hope of a Hobbit sequel?


Yes, well, now there's a joke from a man living in a house of glass. :lol:



With my redoubtable courage and magnificent beard I'm more Gimli than Bilbo.


I tend to run the tracks too. Just days on end running, with armour.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:28 am 
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Funnily enough, the one part of NZ that is underrated and no overseas people go into at all is the Tararuas, just north of Wellington. It is the founding area of tramping in NZ and it is extremely hardcore. Very steep, vast, bushy, and with very dodgy weather. The tracks are also extreme high level of difficulty. That is, barely tracks at all.

I did a day in there before doing the southern great tracks and saw not a soul in 8 hours of gruelling walking. I saw one bloke right at the end and he was super super fit. He said if you've done this the great walks are a total piece of piss.

It's the kind of place people go in for competitive tramping. Bit weird really. People get lost in there all the time.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:51 am 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
The girl I hike with (not my gf which may become an issue) and I are keen for GR20 next year.

Btw I may need to pick your brain at some point. GF and I tentatively looking at a decent African road trip in 2018. Will let you know!


GR20 is a classic trek!

Tap me up when you want to have a chat about overlanding. In the meantime have a look at some of Chris Scott's publications and Google 'Horizons Unlimited' which is a very active overlanding forum full of trip planning advice.


Grr, you guys are making me angry with these trips. Must do a big one in about three years time. The problem I've got at the moment is the girl I used to do these kind of trips has just had a baby (by herself bizarrely) so I need to find another partner. I agree with HK and GS that it's often good to have a female friend to do these things with as it can get a bit difficult with girlfriends.


I dunno, my girlfriend became my fiancée by the end of my trip! When you have seen your Mrs take a dump in the bush without complaint, bollock drunk armed policeman in Guinea or have been clubbing with her in a Brazzaville nightclub you kind of know she is a keeper!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:57 am 
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So Kiwis "founded" going for a walk, in the bad bush North of Wellington.

Don't ever change, antipodeans.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 10:58 am 
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I've managed a few long-ish treks in past years, and would love to be able to take the time to do another, great way of getting away from modern stresses and losing a stack of kgs while you're at it.

I have a good friend who is about half way through the Appalachian trail (3500km long) right now. He's doing it to work through some personal demons (PTSD) and he says it's the most positive thing he could ever have done for it.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:00 am 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
Funnily enough, the one part of NZ that is underrated and no overseas people go into at all is the Tararuas, just north of Wellington. It is the founding area of tramping in NZ and it is extremely hardcore. Very steep, vast, bushy, and with very dodgy weather. The tracks are also extreme high level of difficulty. That is, barely tracks at all.

I did a day in there before doing the southern great tracks and saw not a soul in 8 hours of gruelling walking. I saw one bloke right at the end and he was super super fit. He said if you've done this the great walks are a total piece of piss.

It's the kind of place people go in for competitive tramping. Bit weird really. People get lost in there all the time.


Have done some SAR there. It's hardcore stuff alright.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:01 am 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
I did the Milford via the expensive huts. I just turned up in Te Anau and that's all I could get, and I had the money. It was great. I drank a bottle of wine every night, and the older folk from all around the world were very interesting. I got to know the people in the other huts too and used to schlep on to the track in the morning and loudly complain about my hangover. :lol:

We had fantastic weather then just as we reached the end it started to rain. And then oh my God it fcking tipped down. It was biblical. The road closed. So the company had to fly us out in helicopters. I hate the things, so I had my eyes closed sitting next to the pilot. But then i opened them and it was the most astonishing experience ever as we swooped between clouds and mountains and water was pouring off vast slabs of rock and then we would stop for a while and the pilot would see another gap and we would swing into that and then on again up and down swinging into clear space.

The chopper guys down there are amazing.

It was incredible.


Imagine how fvcking incredible it would have been if you could have got a beer on Good friday .


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:02 am 
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Anyway, has anyone got any experience of the Mont Blanc Route? Am looking at doing it at the beginning of Sep in 6 days but bit worried I'm biting off more than I can chew.


I did the Tour De Mont Blanc route a few years ago - have you left yet?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:03 am 
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Turbogoat wrote:
I've managed a few long-ish treks in past years, and would love to be able to take the time to do another, great way of getting away from modern stresses and losing a stack of kgs while you're at it.

I have a good friend who is about half way through the Appalachian trail (3500km long) right now. He's doing it to work through some personal demons (PTSD) and he says it's the most positive thing he could ever have done for it.


Fair play to him, that is going to take about five months or so surely?

I found an article on an old pilgrim trail from London to Rome which I always liked the look of, need three months to do it, it piggybacks on a lot of the French GR routes before heading down the Italian coast. Looks awesome and like your buddy a good opportunity for some quite reflection.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:04 am 
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6 days is a good effort if you can do it.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:09 am 
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danny_fitz wrote:
Turbogoat wrote:
I've managed a few long-ish treks in past years, and would love to be able to take the time to do another, great way of getting away from modern stresses and losing a stack of kgs while you're at it.

I have a good friend who is about half way through the Appalachian trail (3500km long) right now. He's doing it to work through some personal demons (PTSD) and he says it's the most positive thing he could ever have done for it.


Fair play to him, that is going to take about five months or so surely?

I found an article on an old pilgrim trail from London to Rome which I always liked the look of, need three months to do it, it piggybacks on a lot of the French GR routes before heading down the Italian coast. Looks awesome and like your buddy a good opportunity for some quite reflection.


Even longer, he's doing side trails, stopping off for a few days from time to time, it's more about the mental than the physical for him.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:09 am 
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Armchair_Superstar wrote:
So Kiwis "founded" going for a walk, in the bad bush North of Wellington.

Don't ever change, antipodeans.


Re read my post again you fcking imbecile. In NZ.

The tararua tramping club was the first one IN NEW ZEALAND.

Fck me what a retarded post. I'm going to be shaking my head all day in disbelief that such a pleasant thread could have been railroaded in such moronic fashion.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:17 am 
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Incidentally as an aside from Armchair_Superstar's dumb post, it is said that the first person who went for a walk solely for the purpose of taking a walk was Petrachus sometime in the 13th century.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:22 am 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
HKCJ wrote:
The girl I hike with (not my gf which may become an issue) and I are keen for GR20 next year.

Btw I may need to pick your brain at some point. GF and I tentatively looking at a decent African road trip in 2018. Will let you know!


GR20 is a classic trek!

Tap me up when you want to have a chat about overlanding. In the meantime have a look at some of Chris Scott's publications and Google 'Horizons Unlimited' which is a very active overlanding forum full of trip planning advice.


Grr, you guys are making me angry with these trips. Must do a big one in about three years time. The problem I've got at the moment is the girl I used to do these kind of trips has just had a baby (by herself bizarrely) so I need to find another partner. I agree with HK and GS that it's often good to have a female friend to do these things with as it can get a bit difficult with girlfriends.


About 9 months after your last trip?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:26 am 
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Just flipping through wiki and I see it was petrach in the late 14th century and it was mont ventoux.

Considered a key moment in the transition to the Renaissance. The invention of walking for pleasure.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:28 am 
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When they are old enough I am going to take my boys on either the Annapurna circuit or EBC. (That is assuming I'll be fit enough.)

And if they whinge at any point they get left behind! :x

In all seriousness that would be a dream trip for me. Would love the wife to come too but she will whinge....and worry about hair straighteners.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:37 am 
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Hello chaps, looking at having a few days off work in October and not much of a lounge around kind of guy. Can anyone recommend a decent hike for about 5-6 days in England, preferably some decent pubs somewhere along the way? I'm in decent shape, shouldn't be any English hikes I can't handle (famous last words...)


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 11:39 am 
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theo wrote:
When they are old enough I am going to take my boys on either the Annapurna circuit or EBC. (That is assuming I'll be fit enough.)

And if they whinge at any point they get left behind! :x

In all seriousness that would be a dream trip for me. Would love the wife to come too but she will whinge....and worry about hair straighteners.


Favourite trek in Nepal is Annapurna base camp. A lot less crowded than EBC, and you end up in the centre of the circle range that the Annapurna circuit goes around, so you're surrounded by these giant mountains.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 12:23 pm 
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croyals wrote:
Hello chaps, looking at having a few days off work in October and not much of a lounge around kind of guy. Can anyone recommend a decent hike for about 5-6 days in England, preferably some decent pubs somewhere along the way? I'm in decent shape, shouldn't be any English hikes I can't handle (famous last words...)


Have you done the Ridgeway in our very own Bucks?

Hadrian's Wall is meant to be good. Or, go to Scotland and do the West Highland Way, not a bad time of year for it.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 12:29 pm 
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Turbogoat wrote:
I've managed a few long-ish treks in past years, and would love to be able to take the time to do another, great way of getting away from modern stresses and losing a stack of kgs while you're at it.

I have a good friend who is about half way through the Appalachian trail (3500km long) right now. He's doing it to work through some personal demons (PTSD) and he says it's the most positive thing he could ever have done for it.


One of my wife's good friends (and mine) is a bit f**ked up and got in to far too many hardcore drugs and ridiculous sex a few months back so we persuaded her to go trekking in Spain. Went really well apart from she was meant to abstain from all drugs and sex but had a couple of flings (with girls) and a few joints, but much better. She then went to Norway and had a similar short trip but wanted to go back to Spain. Started again and all going well but unfortunately met some bloke on the way and is now in some city doing lots of drugs and sex again.

She does know now that getting away on a trek works, but have a feeling she will have to hit the lows again before the next trip, sadly.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 12:34 pm 
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slick wrote:
Turbogoat wrote:
I've managed a few long-ish treks in past years, and would love to be able to take the time to do another, great way of getting away from modern stresses and losing a stack of kgs while you're at it.

I have a good friend who is about half way through the Appalachian trail (3500km long) right now. He's doing it to work through some personal demons (PTSD) and he says it's the most positive thing he could ever have done for it.


One of my wife's good friends (and mine) is a bit f**k up and got in to far too many hardcore drugs and ridiculous sex a few months back so we persuaded her to go trekking in Spain. Went really well apart from she was meant to abstain from all drugs and sex but had a couple of flings (with girls) and a few joints, but much better. She then went to Norway and had a similar short trip but wanted to go back to Spain. Started again and all going well but unfortunately met some bloke on the way and is now in some city doing lots of drugs and sex again.

She does know now that getting away on a trek works, but have a feeling she will have to hit the lows again before the next trip, sadly.

A rule 1 and a phone number would be appropriate here methinks.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 12:39 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
slick wrote:
Turbogoat wrote:
I've managed a few long-ish treks in past years, and would love to be able to take the time to do another, great way of getting away from modern stresses and losing a stack of kgs while you're at it.

I have a good friend who is about half way through the Appalachian trail (3500km long) right now. He's doing it to work through some personal demons (PTSD) and he says it's the most positive thing he could ever have done for it.


One of my wife's good friends (and mine) is a bit f**k up and got in to far too many hardcore drugs and ridiculous sex a few months back so we persuaded her to go trekking in Spain. Went really well apart from she was meant to abstain from all drugs and sex but had a couple of flings (with girls) and a few joints, but much better. She then went to Norway and had a similar short trip but wanted to go back to Spain. Started again and all going well but unfortunately met some bloke on the way and is now in some city doing lots of drugs and sex again.

She does know now that getting away on a trek works, but have a feeling she will have to hit the lows again before the next trip, sadly.

A rule 1 and a phone number would be appropriate here methinks.

Agreed. She sounds ideal.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 12:46 pm 
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How do i do it

Actually, shouldn't threadjack.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 12:50 pm 
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slick wrote:
Awesome walk along the Thames yesterday from around Taplow to Marlow way, then back the other side. Stunning, with a welcome pint in The Bounty in Bourne End to finish - great pub, only open in the summer months, can only get to it over a little bridge or boat

I want to live on a boat now though

Clucking bells. That's my neck of the woods though I'm further along the river now in Hurley. The Bounty brings back fond memories as I used to be good friends with the family that own it. Summers were a lot of fun.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 12:53 pm 
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Gospel wrote:
slick wrote:
Awesome walk along the Thames yesterday from around Taplow to Marlow way, then back the other side. Stunning, with a welcome pint in The Bounty in Bourne End to finish - great pub, only open in the summer months, can only get to it over a little bridge or boat

I want to live on a boat now though

Clucking bells. That's my neck of the woods though I'm further along the river now in Hurley. The Bounty brings back fond memories as I used to be good friends with the family that own it. Summers were a lot of fun.


It's a nice part of the world to live, appreciate it more as i get older!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 1:09 pm 
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Seneca of the Night wrote:
Funnily enough, the one part of NZ that is underrated and no overseas people go into at all is the Tararuas, just north of Wellington. It is the founding area of tramping in NZ and it is extremely hardcore. Very steep, vast, bushy, and with very dodgy weather. The tracks are also extreme high level of difficulty. That is, barely tracks at all.

I did a day in there before doing the southern great tracks and saw not a soul in 8 hours of gruelling walking. I saw one bloke right at the end and he was super super fit. He said if you've done this the great walks are a total piece of piss.

It's the kind of place people go in for competitive tramping. Bit weird really. People get lost in there all the time.

No idea if things are any different now, but I found that the Catlins was an underrated area of NZ. I remember drifting off into the bush in pursuit of a Yellowhead, only to find myself totally lost in a forest of identical tree ferns - I eventually emerged some time later on to Tahakopa Bay, which I'd only reached by heading towards the light and sound of the sea. I've never felt as hopelessly lost, either before or since. Beautiful area - though I'm not sure who drew up the border between Southland and Otago.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 1:54 pm 
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Gospel wrote:
slick wrote:
Awesome walk along the Thames yesterday from around Taplow to Marlow way, then back the other side. Stunning, with a welcome pint in The Bounty in Bourne End to finish - great pub, only open in the summer months, can only get to it over a little bridge or boat

I want to live on a boat now though

Clucking bells. That's my neck of the woods though I'm further along the river now in Hurley. The Bounty brings back fond memories as I used to be good friends with the family that own it. Summers were a lot of fun.


Bloody Hell..I used to live in Dean Place Farm up the road from there, walking distance to the Dew Drop luckily enough..


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 2:15 pm 
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croyals wrote:
Hello chaps, looking at having a few days off work in October and not much of a lounge around kind of guy. Can anyone recommend a decent hike for about 5-6 days in England, preferably some decent pubs somewhere along the way? I'm in decent shape, shouldn't be any English hikes I can't handle (famous last words...)



South Downs Way - Winchester to Eastbourne 110 miles or so?

Hadrians Wall?

Avon and Kennet Canal?

Cotswolds Way?

South West Coasr Path?

Yorkshire Three Peaks?

Pennine Way - might be a stretch given your available time

Pembrokeshire Coast Path?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 2:16 pm 
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No One citing Dolomites "Alte Vie" ?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 2:31 pm 
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slick wrote:
croyals wrote:
Hello chaps, looking at having a few days off work in October and not much of a lounge around kind of guy. Can anyone recommend a decent hike for about 5-6 days in England, preferably some decent pubs somewhere along the way? I'm in decent shape, shouldn't be any English hikes I can't handle (famous last words...)


Have you done the Ridgeway in our very own Bucks?

Hadrian's Wall is meant to be good. Or, go to Scotland and do the West Highland Way, not a bad time of year for it.

I've done parts of the Ridgeway, if I'm not found on a rugby/cricket pitch on a weekend I'll probably be walking in the Chilterns.

Would love to do the West Highland Way, but my bloody mates did it without me last year when I couldn't get the time off work!

Hadrian's Wall is a great shout, did parts of it with Scouts when I was a boy, would love to go back.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 2:46 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
croyals wrote:
Hello chaps, looking at having a few days off work in October and not much of a lounge around kind of guy. Can anyone recommend a decent hike for about 5-6 days in England, preferably some decent pubs somewhere along the way? I'm in decent shape, shouldn't be any English hikes I can't handle (famous last words...)



South Downs Way - Winchester to Eastbourne 110 miles or so?

Hadrians Wall?

Avon and Kennet Canal?

Cotswolds Way?

South West Coasr Path?

Yorkshire Three Peaks?

Pennine Way - might be a stretch given your available time

Pembrokeshire Coast Path?


Yorkshire three peaks is good, but, there is a pointless slog on road in it which is best avoided by getting the train.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 2:46 pm 
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I'm off in 2 1/2 weeks.

Quite excited.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 3:18 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
I may as well blow the trumpet here as well..

If we pull this off I reckon we'll have done one of the tougher walks going and I'll be well chuffed.


You're not going to use a scooter are you?


I rode my motorbike to 4,387m the last weekend... far easier than walking.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 3:22 pm 
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Let's start with Alta Via 1 , the most famous and frequented.


It starts from Lago di Braies/Pragsersee
Image

Image

Pass through places like these
Image

Image

Image

with this elevation profile

Image


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 3:28 pm 
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GiorgioXT wrote:
No One citing Dolomites "Alte Vie" ?


In the words of Ian Rush, "it's all a bit foreign innit"


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2016 3:39 pm 
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frillage wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
croyals wrote:
Hello chaps, looking at having a few days off work in October and not much of a lounge around kind of guy. Can anyone recommend a decent hike for about 5-6 days in England, preferably some decent pubs somewhere along the way? I'm in decent shape, shouldn't be any English hikes I can't handle (famous last words...)



South Downs Way - Winchester to Eastbourne 110 miles or so?

Hadrians Wall?

Avon and Kennet Canal?

Cotswolds Way?

South West Coasr Path?

Yorkshire Three Peaks?

Pennine Way - might be a stretch given your available time

Pembrokeshire Coast Path?


Yorkshire three peaks is good, but, there is a pointless slog on road in it which is best avoided by getting the train.



The Cotswolds way is vastly under rated, great scenery and plenty of pubs, it's a cracker.


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