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 Post subject: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:08 pm 
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This is meant in the best possible way, and not intend to offend. Honestly.

Is it my imagination or is Maori (whatever the actual name is) pretty much like Afrikaans, in that you cannot really sound romantic speaking it. But it sounds like it, also like Afrikaans, could be a great language to swear in. It doesn't come across as something like French or Spanish, that females would get slippery and wet over?

How would you ask a lady for some sexy time in the language?

*Cue - Do "I'm getting lucky haka".

Whisper sweet nothings in her ear?

*Cue - Do "I'm about to get a BJ haka".

*Cue - Do "Condom is on haka".

Sweet love-making. All the usual sweet-yet-dirty-talk

*Cue - Do "Lost my erection haka".

How does she say "Don't worry, it happens to everybody" in Maori?

*Cue - Do "I'm ready for action again! haka".

More dirty talk in Maori while you're going at it.

*Cue - Do "I just came" haka

Sweet, cute romantic talk in Maori?

*Cue - Do "I'm ready for round two haka".



The above (minus the haka) sounds horrible in Afrikaans.




PS. I must profess I quite love the Maori language from what I've heard of it.


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:11 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:27 pm 
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Oi, it's not the time for Saffas to take the piss out of the haka - that comes in August.

Wait your turm


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:38 pm 
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Not romantic?!! Listen to this, can't!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5trFzfqmc0k


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:44 pm 
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Enzedder wrote:
Oi, it's not the time for Saffas to take the piss out of the haka - that comes in August.

Wait your turm



Is there a "Wait your turn" haka?


I can imagine that would especially be useful in Dunedin where men outnumber women.


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:49 pm 
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Santa wrote:
Not romantic?!! Listen to this, can't!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5trFzfqmc0k




I must admit, listening to that makes me think Maori is exactly as unromantic as Afrikaans.

Honestly, how would you say "Let's make love" in Maori? And even more frightening, what would the literal translation be?


In cannot for the life of me think of a romantic way to say that in Afrikaans. The only couple of terms I know sounds even more rude when translated into English. :lol:

In terms of "sexy" languages, I'm convinced German, Dutch, Afrikaans, and Russian will always be at the bottom of the list.

In contrast, in the "languages to swear in", those are all top of the list. In Afrikaans you can tell a person to go to hell in so many different ways, each of them sounding more aggressive than the previous one. :thumbup:


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 5:51 pm 
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troglodiet wrote:
Santa wrote:
Not romantic?!! Listen to this, can't!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5trFzfqmc0k




I must admit, listening to that makes me think Maori is exactly as unromantic as Afrikaans.

Honestly, how would you say "Let's make love" in Maori? And even more frightening, what would the literal translation be?


In cannot for the life of me think of a romantic way to say that in Afrikaans. The only couple of terms I know sounds even more rude when translated into English. :lol:

In terms of "sexy" languages, I'm convinced German, Dutch, Afrikaans, and Russian will always be at the bottom of the list.

In contrast, in the "languages to swear in", those are all top of the list. In Afrikaans you can tell a person to go to hell in so many different ways, each of them sounding more aggressive than the previous one. :thumbup:


Literal translation? I think you're misunderstanding the point of a language.

Maori is a pretty soft sounding language. It is a language developed for oratory. It might not be familiar to your ear but it's a reasonably unhorrible language. It is nothing like Afrikaans. Nothing.


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:05 pm 
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Santa wrote:
Literal translation? I think you're misunderstanding the point of a language.

Maori is a pretty soft sounding language. It is a language developed for oratory. It might not be familiar to your ear but it's a reasonably unhorrible language. It is nothing like Afrikaans. Nothing.



I get what you're saying, and agree I may just not be used to the language. But to my ear it sounds like a language made for swearing. A language in which even a simple sentence to tell a person to bugger off, can sound intimidating. But I might be completely wrong. Remember, the only times I really hear the language is when the ABs do the haka (talking pre-match haka) which makes the haka sound even more intimidating. I also prefer the Maori version of the Kiwi anthem over the English. Come to think of it, in the anthem it does sound much more pleasant.

The problem really is, as you correctly pointed out, it's "different" to my ear. It's a bit like any of you guys hearing a person speak Zulu; an absolutely beautiful language, but if you're not used to it, it's going to sound like this Impi is about to rip your neck off any time.

On a serious note, and just to be clear, I'm not making fun of the Maori language. I am actually rather intrigued by it, and would like to learn more about the language. Hence this thread. I don't remember if there has ever been a thread about the language (mind you, my memory is currently so bad I have to pick up my phone every morning to remind me of my own name).



* The haka comments were just added as I felt that you can't discuss anything Kiwi-related without a haka.


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:16 pm 
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troglodiet wrote:
Santa wrote:
Literal translation? I think you're misunderstanding the point of a language.

Maori is a pretty soft sounding language. It is a language developed for oratory. It might not be familiar to your ear but it's a reasonably unhorrible language. It is nothing like Afrikaans. Nothing.



I get what you're saying, and agree I may just not be used to the language. But to my ear it sounds like a language made for swearing. A language in which even a simple sentence to tell a person to bugger off, can sound intimidating. But I might be completely wrong. Remember, the only times I really hear the language is when the ABs do the haka (talking pre-match haka) which makes the haka sound even more intimidating. I also prefer the Maori version of the Kiwi anthem over the English. Come to think of it, in the anthem it does sound much more pleasant.

The problem really is, as you correctly pointed out, it's "different" to my ear. It's a bit like any of you guys hearing a person speak Zulu; an absolutely beautiful language, but if you're not used to it, it's going to sound like this Impi is about to rip your neck off any time.

On a serious note, and just to be clear, I'm not making fun of the Maori language. I am actually rather intrigued by it, and would like to learn more about the language. Hence this thread. I don't remember if there has ever been a thread about the language (mind you, my memory is currently so bad I have to pick up my phone every morning to remind me of my own name).



* The haka comments were just added as I felt that you can't discuss anything Kiwi-related without a haka.


It's a pretty simple language. Sod all letters and sounds. Not that many words. Vowel sounds are less like English and more like, well, all other languages. The complexity comes with the use so it's highly metaphorical and therefore contextual and a shared knowledge base of legends, aphorisms, proverbs etc is important, and due the the role of oratory it is full of slightly ridiculous flourishes.

It is probably a lot different than it was because use collapsed for a few decades and was revived through language schools and taught by people taught often in later life through formal schooling (e.g. universities etc). Older people say it sounds different now than it used to.


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 7:34 pm 
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Santa wrote:

It's a pretty simple language. Sod all letters and sounds. Not that many words. Vowel sounds are less like English and more like, well, all other languages. The complexity comes with the use so it's highly metaphorical and therefore contextual and a shared knowledge base of legends, aphorisms, proverbs etc is important, and due the the role of oratory it is full of slightly ridiculous flourishes.

It is probably a lot different than it was because use collapsed for a few decades and was revived through language schools and taught by people taught often in later life through formal schooling (e.g. universities etc). Older people say it sounds different now than it used to.


Ah this is more like it. Thanks for this info :thumbup:

It sounds like it would be impossible for someone like me to learn the language; I'd have to learn the history, legends and everything else about the culture before beginning to learn the language.

What got me starting this thread was after I wished somebody happy birthday on Facebook. An Afrikaner girl who was in my class in primary school, but who married a Kiwi. She's Afrikaans, her husband obviously English, and her children would (I assume) learn Maori at school. Not even sure her children can speak Afrikaans fluently. I know they know some phrases as I've seen them commenting on her FB in Afrikaans, but it was rather basic. So I thought I'd be clever and wish her happy birthday in Afrikaans, English and Maori.

Now the extend of my knowledge of Maori is "Kia kaha". And that's it. "Go strong/well" (In South Africa Kia means sh*t btw).

When I got the online Maori translation for happy birthday (or at least I fecking hope it means happy birthday and not something else like "your mother sucks rhino horn"), I tried to make sense of the sentence structure but just couldn't. Hence this thread. Could be very educational actually.

Although I suck at learning new languages, I'm quite interested in all the different ones found all around the globe. And it's always nice to know at least a couple of phrases in other languages.


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:46 pm 
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No offence but how fcking dumb do you have to be to judge how euphonious the Maori language is by listening to the Haka and only the Haka.

Seriously.


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 6:12 am 
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Murdoch wrote:
No offence but how fcking dumb do you have to be to judge how euphonious the Maori language is by listening to the Haka and only the Haka.

Seriously.



Not as dumb as someone who would take that statement literally.


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 9:49 am 
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I think Scottish has to be up there too. Even when they say good morning it sounds like them Northern English lot are threatening to rip yer head off!


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 10:59 am 
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Tango22 wrote:
I think Scottish has to be up there too. Even when they say good morning it sounds like them Northern English lot are threatening to rip yer head off!




For me personally, it's a yes and no on Scottish.

There's actually quite a similarity between Afrikaans and Lowland Scots, not only with the hard pronunciation of the r-sound and the guttural sound of the letter 'g' (or ch like in Loch in Scots), but we actually share a fair bit of common words (from our shared Germanic roots which somehow evolved almost the same in Afrikaans and Scots).

But then, I love the way the Scots almost sings words containing a 'u' or pronounce the word "You". If I listen to someone like Amy MacDonald (not talking about physical appearance here - although I should!), it sounds sexy as hell. But then to get to your point, a Scotsman in a kilt shouting how they're going to feck up an Englishman does sound rather intimidating. :lol:

So yeah, when it comes to accents, I am rather drawn to females with Scottish, Irish (there, I said it) and some Aussie accents. And I'm going to get flack for this one, but I also love the Geordie accent.
(females only obviously).


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 Post subject: Re: The Maori language
PostPosted: Fri Jun 23, 2017 11:39 am 
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So yeah, when it comes to accents, I am rather drawn to females with Scottish, Irish (there, I said it) and some Aussie accents. And I'm going to get flack for this one, but I also love the Geordie accent.
(females only obviously).


Lowland Scots and North Eastern English share the same root language that has slightly diverged over the centuries. In the 7th Century the Eastern seaboard from the Forth down to the Humber the Angles took over management and their language became the hipster thing to sprankensie.

Obviously due to the limited mobility of the vast majority of the peasantry the accent and dialect began to diverge over the centuries especially after the people who were to become the Scots assumed control again after Nechtansmere, so there is a difference between somebody from Kircaldy and from Middlesbrough, but on the whole, East coast folk can understand themselves better than say for example a scouser and a weegie.

Mind you, gets a bit boggy as you approach the Saaath, different vowels - mebbes a Saxon thing?


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