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 Post subject: The Glorious 25th of May
PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 2:23 pm 
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Truth! Justice! Freedom! Reasonably-Priced Love! A Hard-Boiled Egg!
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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 2:38 pm 
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:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:


Long live The People's Republic of Treacle Mine Road :nod:


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 2:59 pm 
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NW is, for my money, the absolute peak of the Discworld books, and the finest thing Pterry ever wrote. Small Gods a very close second


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:01 pm 
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Happy Africa Day.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:16 pm 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
Truth! Justice! Freedom! Reasonably-Priced Love! A Hard-Boiled Egg!
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Literally finished reading this last night.

See how they rise up , rise up, rise up.......


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:18 pm 
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They rise FEET up, FEET up, FEET up


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:20 pm 
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fudge it I'm going full quote-mine
Quote:
Knock: Bit of a to do, sir. Had a break-in last night.
Vimes: Really? What did they steal?
Knock: Did I say they stole anything, sir?
Vimes: Well, no, you didn't. That was me jumping to what we call a conclusion. Did they steal anything, then, or did they break in to deliver a box of chocolates and a small complimentary basket of fruit?


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:21 pm 
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Quote:
What did I tell you about Mister Safety Catch?' said Vimes weakly.
When Mister Safety Catch Is Not On, Mister Crossbow Is Not Your Friend,' recited Detritus, saluting.


This is right at the end of the book and the missus was asleep beside me when I was trying to keep my sniggers to myself. I'd forgotten that quote, I love it.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:23 pm 
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Completely agree - easily Pratchett's best & I'd argue one of the best novels of the last 20 years.

“He wanted to go home. He wanted it so much that he trembled at the thought. But if the price of that was selling good men to the night, if the price was filling those graves, if the price was not fighting with every trick he knew…then it was too high.”

Sam Vimes has to be one of the great heroes of our time.

In no particular order after - Small Gods, Lords & Ladies, Mort, Jingo, The Fifth Element & I have a soft spot for Hogfather.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:24 pm 
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Wrong book but the best line involving Detritus is from The Fifth Elephant (i.e. the Watch book immediately before NW):

Quote:
Vimes: Detritus, you can't fire that off in here! This is an enclosed building!
Detritus: Only till I pull dis trigger, sir.


Anyway, more NW quotes.
Quote:
His movements could be called cat-like, except that he did not stop to spray urine up against things.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:25 pm 
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Chilky wrote:
Completely agree - easily Pratchett's best & I'd argue one of the best novels of the last 20 years.

“He wanted to go home. He wanted it so much that he trembled at the thought. But if the price of that was selling good men to the night, if the price was filling those graves, if the price was not fighting with every trick he knew…then it was too high.”

Sam Vimes has to be one of the great heroes of our time.

In no particular order after - Small Gods, Lords & Ladies, Mort, Jingo, The Fifth Element & I have a soft spot for Hogfather.


Agreed on all points. I would also add Reaper Man. Hogfather is brilliant as well. Death's mournful little "HO. HO. HO" seems to constantly crop up in the dustier rooms.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:28 pm 
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Chilky wrote:
Completely agree - easily Pratchett's best & I'd argue one of the best novels of the last 20 years.

“He wanted to go home. He wanted it so much that he trembled at the thought. But if the price of that was selling good men to the night, if the price was filling those graves, if the price was not fighting with every trick he knew…then it was too high.”

Sam Vimes has to be one of the great heroes of our time.


I love the depth and complexity of the moral struggles that Vimes deals with.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:29 pm 
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Quote:
That's a nice song,' said young Sam, and Vimes remembered that he was hearing it for the first time.
It's an old soldiers' song,' he said.
Really, sarge? But it's about angels.'
Yes, thought Vimes, and it's amazing what bits those angels cause to rise up as the song progresses. It's a real soldiers' song: sentimental, with dirty bits.
As I recall, they used to sing it after battles,’ he said. 'I've seen old men cry when they sing it,’ he added.
Why? It sounds cheerful.'
They were remembering who they were not singing it with, thought Vimes. You'll learn. I know you will.


Sir Pterry's not signing it the last couple of years. :((


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:30 pm 
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People on the side of The People always ended up disappointed, in any case. They found that The People tended not to be grateful or appreciative or forward-thinking or obedient. The People tended to be small-minded and conservative and not very clever and were even distrustful of cleverness. And so the children of the revolution were faced with the age-old problem: it wasn’t that you had the wrong kind of government, which was obvious, but that you had the wrong kind of people.


It's almost irritating how casually Pterry was able to brilliantly encapsulate this stuff in basically a throwaway line of narration. And I think you would need to be British, or at least from a member of the current or former Commonwealth, to be able to balance that kind of satirical observation with gentle sarcasm so well.

GNU Pterry


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:32 pm 
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My favourite TP:

Quote:
“The Monks of Cool, whose tiny and exclusive monastery is hidden in a really cool and laid-back valley in the lower Ramtops, have a passing-out test for a novice. He is taken into a room full of all types of clothing and asked: Yo, my son, which of these is the most stylish thing to wear? And the correct answer is: Hey, whatever I select.”


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:34 pm 
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On the futility of revolutions, was chatting with a friend about Pterry's observations on popular uprisings in Interesting Times.

Can't find the quote, but where the peasant states that what he'd really like in life is a longer piece of string, while the Red Army are busy having no clue what the peasants want is brilliant.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:35 pm 
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DAC2016 wrote:
My favourite TP:

Quote:
“The Monks of Cool, whose tiny and exclusive monastery is hidden in a really cool and laid-back valley in the lower Ramtops, have a passing-out test for a novice. He is taken into a room full of all types of clothing and asked: Yo*, my son, which of these is the most stylish thing to wear? And the correct answer is: Hey, whatever I select.”

*Cool, but not necessarily up to date


:thumbup:

Mine:
Quote:
It's like the old saying: give a man a fire and he's warm for a day. Set him on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:39 pm 
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Quote:
Raising the flag and singing the anthem are, while somewhat suspicious, not in themselves acts of treason.


I read the exchanges about this as a subtle dig at the likes of the USA, where that kind of demonstrative patriotism is much more normal.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 3:54 pm 
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"YOU THINK SO? THEN TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET—Death waved a hand. AND YET YOU ACT AS IF THERE IS SOME IDEAL ORDER IN THE WORLD, AS IF THERE IS SOME...SOME RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED."

Death is also pretty damn good


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:09 pm 
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Nolanator wrote:
On the futility of revolutions, was chatting with a friend about Pterry's observations on popular uprisings in Interesting Times.

Can't find the quote, but where the peasant states that what he'd really like in life is a longer piece of string, while the Red Army are busy having no clue what the peasants want is brilliant.

But they're quite sure that everything will be better when they're in charge...


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:09 pm 
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Chilky wrote:
"YOU THINK SO? THEN TAKE THE UNIVERSE AND GRIND IT DOWN TO THE FINEST POWDER AND SIEVE IT THROUGH THE FINEST SIEVE AND THEN SHOW ME ONE ATOM OF JUSTICE, ONE MOLECULE OF MERCY. AND YET—Death waved a hand. AND YET YOU ACT AS IF THERE IS SOME IDEAL ORDER IN THE WORLD, AS IF THERE IS SOME...SOME RIGHTNESS IN THE UNIVERSE BY WHICH IT MAY BE JUDGED."

Death is also pretty damn good

HUMANS NEED FANTASY TO BE HUMAN


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:12 pm 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
f**k it I'm going full quote-mine
Quote:
Knock: Bit of a to do, sir. Had a break-in last night.
Vimes: Really? What did they steal?
Knock: Did I say they stole anything, sir?
Vimes: Well, no, you didn't. That was me jumping to what we call a conclusion. Did they steal anything, then, or did they break in to deliver a box of chocolates and a small complimentary basket of fruit?

Later in the same book:

Keel: If this bloackade keeps up then we'll really need your organisational skills Reg
Reg Shoe: What? You mean there might be famine?
Keel: Well if there isn't, I'm sure you could organise one




(They rise knees-up, knees-up knees-up high!)


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:13 pm 
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Reg is a brilliant little subplot to that book, as is Lady Meserole and Dog-botherer


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:18 pm 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
Quote:
People on the side of The People always ended up disappointed, in any case. They found that The People tended not to be grateful or appreciative or forward-thinking or obedient. The People tended to be small-minded and conservative and not very clever and were even distrustful of cleverness. And so the children of the revolution were faced with the age-old problem: it wasn’t that you had the wrong kind of government, which was obvious, but that you had the wrong kind of people.


It's almost irritating how casually Pterry was able to brilliantly encapsulate this stuff in basically a throwaway line of narration. And I think you would need to be British, or at least from a member of the current or former Commonwealth, to be able to balance that kind of satirical observation with gentle sarcasm so well.

GNU Pterry
The Gambia? Zimbabwe?

Sorry for the threadjack - just that I see this a lot, and most times it's not what people think it means


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:18 pm 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
Reg is a brilliant little subplot to that book, as is Lady Meserole and Dog-botherer

Every subplot in that book is brilliant.
It's 400 pages of perfection. :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:20 pm 
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Benthos wrote:
Chuckles1188 wrote:
Quote:
People on the side of The People always ended up disappointed, in any case. They found that The People tended not to be grateful or appreciative or forward-thinking or obedient. The People tended to be small-minded and conservative and not very clever and were even distrustful of cleverness. And so the children of the revolution were faced with the age-old problem: it wasn’t that you had the wrong kind of government, which was obvious, but that you had the wrong kind of people.


It's almost irritating how casually Pterry was able to brilliantly encapsulate this stuff in basically a throwaway line of narration. And I think you would need to be British, or at least from a member of the current or former Commonwealth, to be able to balance that kind of satirical observation with gentle sarcasm so well.

GNU Pterry
The Gambia? Zimbabwe?

Sorry for the threadjack - just that I see this a lot, and most times it's not what people think it means


I mean people who are have potentially been exposed to a large amount of British or heavily-British-derived culture.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:28 pm 
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"A lie can run around the World before the truth can get its boots on"

Grew up with Pterry, and yeah, NW was his masterpiece.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:33 pm 
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Turbogoat wrote:
"A lie can run around the World before the truth can get its boots on"

Grew up with Pterry, and yeah, NW was his masterpiece.


To be fair that line has been around for over a century. But still yes


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:43 pm 
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My adoration for Night Watch will be evident from anyone who has read my previous posts about Pratchett but it is a brilliant book, one of, if not the best British novel this millennium.

I'd love a proper attempt at trying to the guards books in TV or film, preferrably without David Jason being in any way involved, but I know it would just let me down anyway.

I think it's genuinely perfect.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:44 pm 
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Chuckles1188 wrote:
Benthos wrote:
Chuckles1188 wrote:
Quote:
People on the side of The People always ended up disappointed, in any case. They found that The People tended not to be grateful or appreciative or forward-thinking or obedient. The People tended to be small-minded and conservative and not very clever and were even distrustful of cleverness. And so the children of the revolution were faced with the age-old problem: it wasn’t that you had the wrong kind of government, which was obvious, but that you had the wrong kind of people.


It's almost irritating how casually Pterry was able to brilliantly encapsulate this stuff in basically a throwaway line of narration. And I think you would need to be British, or at least from a member of the current or former Commonwealth, to be able to balance that kind of satirical observation with gentle sarcasm so well.

GNU Pterry
The Gambia? Zimbabwe?

Sorry for the threadjack - just that I see this a lot, and most times it's not what people think it means


I mean people who are have potentially been exposed to a large amount of British or heavily-British-derived culture.
Right. So we're clear, that's your definition of 'the former Commonwealth'..? Or did you just mean 'Commonwealth', as the number of countries that are no longer formal members of the Commonwealth, but who used to be pink on the map, is precisely 2. A few more of the formerly pink jobs never actually joined the Commonwealth, e.g. the US, Sudan, Ireland *ducks*.

I don't want my pedantry to derail the TP love-in, but your amended definition works perfectly well in my view - people often say 'former Commonwealth' when what they really mean is the ex-pink countries, and it's one of the very, very few things I know owt about, so having nothing to add on the subject, desperately seeking a distraction from calling my ex wife to argue about money, and lacking the energy to have another one of the real wanks that such situations normally demand, my pedant pants were puckered at your sentence, so I frotted out a quick fact-wank instead.

If it's any consolation, the ensuing self-loathing is much the same as if I'd stained the carpet (again) under my desk. As you were.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:47 pm 
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...Wilko's bday.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 4:50 pm 
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Benthos wrote:
Right. So we're clear, that's your definition of 'the former Commonwealth'..? Or did you just mean 'Commonwealth', as the number of countries that are no longer formal members of the Commonwealth, but who used to be pink on the map, is precisely 2. A few more of the formerly pink jobs never actually joined the Commonwealth, e.g. the US, Sudan, Ireland *ducks*.

I don't want my pedantry to derail the TP love-in, but your amended definition works perfectly well in my view - people often say 'former Commonwealth' when what they really mean is the ex-pink countries, and it's one of the very, very few things I know owt about, so having nothing to add on the subject, desperately seeking a distraction from calling my ex wife to argue about money, and lacking the energy to have another one of the real wanks that such situations normally demand, my pedant pants were puckered at your sentence, so I frotted out a quick fact-wank instead.

If it's any consolation, the ensuing self-loathing is much the same as if I'd stained the carpet (again) under my desk. As you were.


That was a genuinely fascinating insight into the workings of your mind. Thanks for posting it :thumbup:

earl: Yup. FWIW I thought Jason was reasonably well-cast as Albert, but Rincewind? Nightmare decision. I would love to see someone have a stab at a TV show based on the City Watch though.


Last edited by Chuckles1188 on Wed Jun 21, 2017 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 5:05 pm 
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Guards! Guards! as a gritty movie (not full on Christopher Nolan, though) with elements of film noire and cool dragon effects would be very good.

A series based on the City Watch could work very well. Have it following the general evolution of the characters and events of the books, but it would allow for some great character development and would let the writers pace it appropriately so that the best parts are fairly well spaced throughout.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 5:08 pm 
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Nolanator wrote:
Guards! Guards! as a gritty movie (not full on Christopher Nolan, though) with elements of film noire and cool dragon effects would be very good.

A series based on the City Watch could work very well. Have it following the general evolution of the characters and events of the books, but it would allow for some great character development and would let the writers pace it appropriately so that the best parts are fairly well spaced throughout.


This. Treacle Mine Road Blues. It would/could be amazing


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 5:10 pm 
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CSI: Ankh-Morpork would be right at the top of the list of required viewing.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 5:12 pm 
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Who would you get to act the various characters?


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 5:17 pm 
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Before he died did TP ever give the reason as to why he named Ankh-Morpork, Ankh-Morpork?


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 5:18 pm 
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Vetinari - Jeremy Irons
Carrot - Chris Hemsworth
Colon - Stephen Fry
Nobby - Tony Robinson
Vimes - Bronn from GoT / Ripper St.
Lady Sybil - A younger Penelope Keith


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 5:23 pm 
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Chilky wrote:
Vetinari - Jeremy Irons
Carrot - Chris Hemsworth
Colon - Stephen Fry
Nobby - Tony Robinson
Vimes - Bronn from GoT / Ripper St.
Lady Sybil - A younger Penelope Keith


Some mad ideas in there, but Jerome Flynn for Vimes is inspired. I was going to suggest Robert Carlyle but think Flynn would be even better.

Hemsworth for Carrot works. Fry as Colon is mental, I'd go with Timothy Spall. Sir Tony as Nobby fully agree and I like Irons for Vetinari but Charles Dance was brilliant as well.

Saoirse Ronan to play Angua.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2017 5:25 pm 
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Well holy crap, I've only gone and solved the mystery myself. Been decades.

Morpork is a breed of owl from NZ.


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