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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:02 pm 
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A5D5E5 wrote:
globus wrote:
Interesting. Good video. Not sure of the "Hubble Sphere" analysis and conclusion.

Having said that, I've tried to teach people about gravity. Lots of head scratching about that, mostly from myself.

If we accept that thing can go faster than the speed of light, it brings a load more of stuff into play.

Plus. The "universe" is a ruddy enormous thing.

I think I shall go out and mow the lawn.


At the risk of getting into a conversation I wished that I hadn't, did you know that a thought experiment about what people would see if a beam of light was shining into a falling lift* was one of the insights that led Einstein to conclude that gravity would bend light (in complete contradiction to Newton's formulation of gravity) and hence to the idea of gravity as the curvature of spacetime?


* Yes I know you did, that is why I mention it

I shall go and pop my head into a bucket of cold water and come out wondering what why I did that.

I love this stuff, to bits.

I've got to teach my grand-daughter about Archimedes' principle. (Not really, but she is a right clever girl.)

I have purchased the rubber ducks.

The next bit is explaining velocity and acceleration.

That leads to a bit of Calculus.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:03 pm 
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This thread's in danger


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:04 pm 
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message #2527204 wrote:
This thread's in danger

I deny responsibility.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:04 pm 
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Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:07 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


Isn't there an idea that a single celled organism "ate" another single celled organism but rather than "digest" it, it combined with it and hey presto multi-cellular life*

*I've probably got the terminology horribly wrong here.


Last edited by A5D5E5 on Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:08 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.

I'm with you on this one!

Similarly are the chances you will have blue or brown eyes. (I am dredging the memory for this.)


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:09 pm 
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The whole Mitochondrial Eve thing blew my mind when I found out about it. Also the whole thing of looking at the stars and thinking the photons hitting your eye were emitted hundreds, thousands, millions of years ago.

Today, it's that Emotional Support Peacocks are a thing.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:17 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


Don't algae have mitochondria?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:25 pm 
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message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


Don't algae have mitochondria?

They may do now, but the theory was that much more primitive ones (and smaller) were ingested into the bigger cell all those years ago, you know, just before Abraham left Ur.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:27 pm 
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A midge lives for less than a week once it reaches adulthood so go easy on the little critters.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:34 pm 
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I read that initially as:

A midget lives for less than a week once it reaches adulthood so go easy on the little critters.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:40 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


Don't algae have mitochondria?

They may do now, but the theory was that much more primitive ones (and smaller) were ingested into the bigger cell all those years ago, you know, just before Abraham left Ur.


ah.. we evolved from the blue greens, and they already had a mitochondrion or two. D'oh. gotcha.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:42 pm 
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message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


Don't algae have mitochondria?

They may do now, but the theory was that much more primitive ones (and smaller) were ingested into the bigger cell all those years ago, you know, just before Abraham left Ur.


ah.. we evolved from the blue greens, and they already had a mitochondrion or two. D'oh. gotcha.

Curses! That'll teach me.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:43 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


Don't algae have mitochondria?

They may do now, but the theory was that much more primitive ones (and smaller) were ingested into the bigger cell all those years ago, you know, just before Abraham left Ur.


ah.. we evolved from the blue greens, and they already had a mitochondrion or two. D'oh. gotcha.

Curses! That'll teach me.

on the contrary; that'll teach me


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:51 pm 
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Don't algae have mitochondria?[/quote]
They may do now, but the theory was that much more primitive ones (and smaller) were ingested into the bigger cell all those years ago, you know, just before Abraham left Ur.[/quote]

ah.. we evolved from the blue greens, and they already had a mitochondrion or two. D'oh. gotcha.[/quote]
Curses! That'll teach me.[/quote]
on the contrary; that'll teach me[/quote]
Looks as I was wrong too though...


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:52 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


Don't algae have mitochondria?

They may do now, but the theory was that much more primitive ones (and smaller) were ingested into the bigger cell all those years ago, you know, just before Abraham left Ur.


Sorry to interrupt.

"Blue-green algae" is a misnomer - though an understandable one - they're in fact cyanobacteria - they, or their ancestor, is responsible for our oxygen based respiration and the mass extinction event that allowed it to occur. They appear on rocks and as a layer above the waterline, usually on coastlines, and have a slimy "algae like" appearance, hence the name.

Anyway, endosymbiotic theory is a pretty amazing synthesis.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:53 pm 
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Andalu wrote:
I read that initially as:

A midget lives for less than a week once it reaches adulthood so go easy on the little critters.


That too. It especially applies to English rugby players and I don’t mean Lee Mears.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 6:55 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
Don't algae have mitochondria?

They may do now, but the theory was that much more primitive ones (and smaller) were ingested into the bigger cell all those years ago, you know, just before Abraham left Ur.[/quote]

ah.. we evolved from the blue greens, and they already had a mitochondrion or two. D'oh. gotcha.[/quote]
Curses! That'll teach me.[/quote]
on the contrary; that'll teach me[/quote]
Looks as I was wrong too though...[/quote]
Just realised the theory was that chloroplasts were blue green algae - forgetting my own post! Am I turning into Globus?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:04 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
Just realised the theory was that chloroplasts were blue green algae - forgetting my own post! Am I turning into Globus?


I have a quick test for that,

How many fingers am I holding up and is it more or less than the number of impromptu brain surgeries you have performed?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:16 pm 
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Morgan14 wrote:
Trees are more numerous on earth than stars in the galaxy.



I believe there's more galaxies as well as stars.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:31 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Morgan14 wrote:
Trees are more numerous on earth than stars in the galaxy.



I believe there's more galaxies as well as stars.


Double checked this one. Double number of trees on the planet then in the Milky Way galaxy.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:33 pm 
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sorCrer wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Morgan14 wrote:
Trees are more numerous on earth than stars in the galaxy.



I believe there's more galaxies as well as stars.


Double checked this one. Double number of trees on the planet then in the Milky Way galaxy.



Absolutely number of star, I think there's more galaxies than trees also.

Nope there's more trees than galaxies :

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-34134366

Still 100-200 billion galaxies is quite extraordinary .

The largest galaxy has 100 trillion stars in it though.
https://futurism.com/ic-1101-the-larges ... ver-found/


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 8:30 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


I read a book once, forget who by, that put it this way: that despite their millions (billions?) of years association, mitochondria still metaphorically have their bags packed in case it doesn’t work out between us.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 10:33 pm 
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Conservative Eddie wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


Don't algae have mitochondria?

They may do now, but the theory was that much more primitive ones (and smaller) were ingested into the bigger cell all those years ago, you know, just before Abraham left Ur.


Sorry to interrupt.

"Blue-green algae" is a misnomer - though an understandable one - they're in fact cyanobacteria - they, or their ancestor, is responsible for our oxygen based respiration and the mass extinction event that allowed it to occur. They appear on rocks and as a layer above the waterline, usually on coastlines, and have a slimy "algae like" appearance, hence the name.

Anyway, endosymbiotic theory is a pretty amazing synthesis.

Thanks for the correction, it's slowly coming back to me. I looked at this for a biochemistry essay during my medical training. There was a fundamentalist Christian girl in the same year and she decided to write the essay with a biblical viewpoint. She got an f.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 11:38 pm 
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At one point during the Triassic period (about 25 million years before the dinosaurs) approximately 95% of all vertebrates were a single species - lystrosaurus (a bit like a pig).


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 1:33 am 
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A5D5E5 wrote:
At one point during the Triassic period (about 25 million years before the dinosaurs) approximately 95% of all vertebrates were a single species - lystrosaurus (a bit like a pig).

I am not sure about the dates, but the fossils unearthed in the Karoo area (SA) shows the links between the pre-dinosaur creatures and mammals. Different fossils show the different stages of development. Quite amazing.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 5:58 am 
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bimboman wrote:
sorCrer wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Morgan14 wrote:
Trees are more numerous on earth than stars in the galaxy.



I believe there's more galaxies as well as stars.


Double checked this one. Double number of trees on the planet then in the Milky Way galaxy.



Absolutely number of star, I think there's more galaxies than trees also.

Nope there's more trees than galaxies :

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-34134366

Still 100-200 billion galaxies is quite extraordinary .

The largest galaxy has 100 trillion stars in it though.
https://futurism.com/ic-1101-the-larges ... ver-found/

Is there no end to the universe's shameless showing off?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 7:02 am 
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A5D5E5 wrote:
At one point during the Triassic period (about 25 million years before the dinosaurs) approximately 95% of all vertebrates were a single species - lystrosaurus (a bit like a pig).



What about in the ocean?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 9:20 am 
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Sonny Blount wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
At one point during the Triassic period (about 25 million years before the dinosaurs) approximately 95% of all vertebrates were a single species - lystrosaurus (a bit like a pig).



What about in the ocean?


Good point! 95% of vertebrates on land.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:11 am 
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A5D5E5 wrote:
At one point during the Triassic period (about 25 million years before the dinosaurs) approximately 95% of all vertebrates were a single species - lystrosaurus (a bit like a pig).

Did they taste like bacon?


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:15 am 
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koroke hangareka wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Not mind blowing, but fascinating - mitochondria, chloroplasts, and the base of flagella have their own dna and divide and reproduce independently of nuclear division. The theory is that larger cells ingested smaller ones (blue green algae in the case of chloroplasts) waaaaaay back. All your mitochondria come from your mother, as they are in the cellular cytoplasm, and basically all your cytoplasm is derived from the egg that your dad's sperm dna united with at conception.


I read a book once, forget who by, that put it this way: that despite their millions (billions?) of years association, mitochondria still metaphorically have their bags packed in case it doesn’t work out between us.


Bill Bryson - A Short History of Nearly Everything. Cracking book btw.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:19 am 
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Sandstorm wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
At one point during the Triassic period (about 25 million years before the dinosaurs) approximately 95% of all vertebrates were a single species - lystrosaurus (a bit like a pig).

Did they taste like bacon?


They prefer it if we say that bacon tastes like cured lystrosaurus rashers.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:21 am 
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A5D5E5 wrote:
Sandstorm wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
At one point during the Triassic period (about 25 million years before the dinosaurs) approximately 95% of all vertebrates were a single species - lystrosaurus (a bit like a pig).

Did they taste like bacon?


They prefer it if we say that bacon tastes like cured lystrosaurus rashers.

Shush ffs. They’ll be selling those in Balham butchers for £20 a slice by Easter. :uhoh:


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:25 am 
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Sandstorm wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
Sandstorm wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
At one point during the Triassic period (about 25 million years before the dinosaurs) approximately 95% of all vertebrates were a single species - lystrosaurus (a bit like a pig).

Did they taste like bacon?


They prefer it if we say that bacon tastes like cured lystrosaurus rashers.

Shush ffs. They’ll be selling those in Balham butchers for £20 a slice by Easter. :uhoh:


They go very well with a lightly poached oviraptor egg.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:26 am 
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:lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:23 am 
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Of the 20 post-war British general elections, only two have been won by a prime minister who didn't go to Oxford University :shock:


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:04 am 
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Fact 10001: Stuff about gazillion trillion thousands of years ago makes for very boring reading.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:36 am 
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YOYO wrote:
A midge lives for less than a week once it reaches adulthood so go easy on the little critters.


Try pre-season training in July in the North of Scotland (our club is next to a river) - fudge those hell beasts right to death!!!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 11:28 am 
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HurricaneWasp wrote:
Of the 20 post-war British general elections, only two have been won by a prime minister who didn't go to Oxford University :shock:


Good. Our brightest should lead.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 11:34 am 
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slick wrote:
HurricaneWasp wrote:
Of the 20 post-war British general elections, only two have been won by a prime minister who didn't go to Oxford University :shock:


Good. Our brightest should lead.

A few assumptions there...?


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