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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 9:43 pm 
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https://www.cpr.org/news/story/denver-v ... ooms-legal

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First came the weed. Now, maybe it’s the mushrooms.

After a few rousing chants of “free the spores,” a small group of roughly 20 citizens filtered into the Denver city and county building Monday for a meeting with city officials and emerged knowing they may soon have the all-clear to gather signatures on a measure to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms.

The group calls itself Colorado for Psilocybin after the fungi’s scientific name. Their proposed measure would do away with felony charges for people caught with mushrooms, and make them the lowest enforcement priority for Denver police.


A Colorado for Psilocybin campaign pin.

(Ann Marie Awad/CPR News)

Anyone caught with more than two ounces of dried mushrooms, or two pounds of uncured “wet” mushrooms, would be subject to a citation: less than $99 for the first offense, increased by increments of $100 for subsequent offenses, and never more than $999 per citation.
Tyler Williams, one of the leaders of the Psilocybin Decriminalization Initiative, says the marijuana legalization efforts of yesteryear did provide a helpful roadmap when constructing the initiative. Williams is a believer, too. He’s a co-founder of the Denver chapter of the Psychedelic Club at the University of Colorado Boulder.

“I’m a big believer in cognitive liberty, and so whatever people decide to consume I think is up to them,” Williams says. “I think people should be informed about what they are consuming, and they shouldn’t have to be afraid of going to jail for that.”

Williams adds that he feels psilocybin offers mental health, and spiritual and intellectual benefits.

During the group’s meeting with city officials, Williams pointed to examples of changing tides in drug policy elsewhere. A 2005 appeals court decision in New Mexico effectively legalized the cultivation of psilocybin. Last year, Oregon reduced possession charges for many illegal drugs from a felony to a misdemeanor. California voters approved a similar measure in 2014.

Another state may beat Colorado to the ballot: California may vote on a similar measure later this year.

Kevin Matthews, who helps lead the campaign and helped draft the initiative, says now is the right time for Denver to decriminalize, based on recent studies on the possible medicinal applications of psychedelics.

“I’m proud to say that psilocybin has had a pretty massive impact on my life,” Matthews says. “I struggled with depression for years, I was diagnosed with major depression as a teenager."

Matthews says he and other advocates want people to use psilocybin responsibly, so that they can have the best experience with it.

“It’s helped me tremendously with my own mental health and on top of that, with creativity, and really being able to just explore different aspects of myself, and really get some healing from the inside out,” he says.

Matthews points to a study by Johns Hopkins University that found psilocybin users dealing with cancer-related stress reported lasting positive effects one year later. A New York University study produced similar results.

Another study conducted at London’s imperial college last year found that it could help treat stubborn cases of depression.

That’s why Michele Ross joined the campaign to support the initiative. She’s a neuroscientist and the director of Impact Network, a nonprofit focused on medical marijuana and women's health. “We could apply lessons from cannabis legalization and apply them to psilocybin legalization,” she said. “There’s no reason that both shouldn’t be legalized because psilocybin or magic mushrooms are just as safe as cannabis.”

Ross also says she uses psilocybin as well as cannabis to treat her depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

“I use many different natural substances,” she says,” but psilocybin is one thing that helps me overcome depression in a way that cannabis hasn’t.”

Monday’s meeting was a public hearing to hash out the phrasing and other questions about the initiative, such as enforcement. The next step will be to submit petition materials for review with the Denver Elections Division. If and when that body gives final approval, the pro-mushroom advocates can begin gathering signatures to get the initiative on the ballot this fall.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 9:55 pm 
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omg

Right as I’m bout to move to the East Coast :x

Though I much prefer acid if I’m being honest. Shroomies just gave me panic attacks more often than not


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:03 pm 
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Madness


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 10:26 pm 
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Mushrooms could be the one thing on Earth that saves mankind from itself...


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 11:39 pm 
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Speaking of week in CO...any accurate reports on how the state has actually been impacted? I've read stories on both sides...that it's been negative and positive so wondering what's accurate.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2018 11:52 pm 
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saffer13 wrote:
Speaking of week in CO...any accurate reports on how the state has actually been impacted? I've read stories on both sides...that it's been negative and positive so wondering what's accurate.

The main change is a new addiction - the state government is getting heavily addicted to >$200m a year tax revenue.

There's some weed tourism and a bit more smell from the units growing it. Apart from that nothing much has changed. Prices have dropped quite a bit.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 1:08 am 
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saffer13 wrote:
Speaking of week in CO...any accurate reports on how the state has actually been impacted? I've read stories on both sides...that it's been negative and positive so wondering what's accurate.


Basically a big cash windfall for the state, along with some positive economic impact of weed tourism. There have been two main negatives. One is that edibles were not well regulated to begin with and had varying dosages and poor packaging, leading some to take too much and perhaps some kids to mistake it for candy. This is basically a problem that has been fixed that other states can and have learned from. The second is that because it is still illegal federally, a lot of the major financial service companies (credit card companies, banks, etc.) are afraid to take on dispensaries as clients. Credit unions can fill that void, but they still basically have to operate in all cash and then take a Brinks truck to the bank with all of their cash for the day. That led to some fairly sophisticated robberies early on, but they seem to have figured out procedures well at this point and eventually the banking issue will likely go away. In the end, it's been a huge positive for the state.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 1:12 am 
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Over 95 Marijuana dispenseries now operating in Vancouver, British Columbia

Legalization across Canada in the next few month....


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 1:40 am 
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moosehead wrote:
Over 95 Marijuana dispenseries now operating in Vancouver, British Columbia

Legalization across Canada in the next few month....


I noticed that when I was there (stayed at Bowen Island actually). Even my sister in law's uncle who lives there is in to marijuana. He's well in to his 60's and had only started smoking that crap recently. :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:55 am 
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Shrooms should be legal. I don't take them but the idea that you can be arrested for mushrooms is ridiculous.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 1:42 pm 
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I don't think that prohibition of recreational drugs is effective - look at all the work it gave the Mafia - but that doesn't mean that they are all safe for all users - clearly not - education is the key, but even so, visiting your son every day for 7 weeks while he is in a mental hospital for drug induced psychotic depression, as I did last year, is tough to bear and tests your objectivity.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:09 pm 
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goeagles wrote:
saffer13 wrote:
Speaking of week in CO...any accurate reports on how the state has actually been impacted? I've read stories on both sides...that it's been negative and positive so wondering what's accurate.


Basically a big cash windfall for the state, along with some positive economic impact of weed tourism. There have been two main negatives. One is that edibles were not well regulated to begin with and had varying dosages and poor packaging, leading some to take too much and perhaps some kids to mistake it for candy. This is basically a problem that has been fixed that other states can and have learned from. The second is that because it is still illegal federally, a lot of the major financial service companies (credit card companies, banks, etc.) are afraid to take on dispensaries as clients. Credit unions can fill that void, but they still basically have to operate in all cash and then take a Brinks truck to the bank with all of their cash for the day. That led to some fairly sophisticated robberies early on, but they seem to have figured out procedures well at this point and eventually the banking issue will likely go away. In the end, it's been a huge positive for the state.

That's good to hear. I read something a little while back that the initial thoughts were positive like you suggest but things have turned and now crime, driving while intoxicated, etc. has increased. Was just wondering if that was true or not.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:11 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
I don't think that prohibition of recreational drugs is effective - look at all the work it gave the Mafia - but that doesn't mean that they are all safe for all users - clearly not - education is the key, but even so, visiting your son every day for 7 weeks while he is in a mental hospital for drug induced psychotic depression, as I did last year, is tough to bear and tests your objectivity.

Agreed. I had a students who has been diagnosed with PTSD after having a psychotic episode after taking CBD


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:23 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
I don't think that prohibition of recreational drugs is effective - look at all the work it gave the Mafia - but that doesn't mean that they are all safe for all users - clearly not - education is the key, but even so, visiting your son every day for 7 weeks while he is in a mental hospital for drug induced psychotic depression, as I did last year, is tough to bear and tests your objectivity.


Here is the brutal face of what perhaps we could call the substance industry. There are risks associated with ingesting anything that has any sort of psychotropic effect. We can mitigate this through various mechanisms including prohibition, which is generally considered a failure I think despite it's political popularity. That political popularity for prohibition across a variety of human endeavours only encourages the activity but also leads to a sort of conspiracy theory popularity among those keen to try or disenfranchised with either govt or authority.

I understand the enormous emotional effect of watching someone suffer through any sort of drug induced breakdown and I empathise. I feel our best hopes of long term solutions or pathways to dealing with that is liberalisation and education, along with some regulation regarding quality and dose. The money saved through reduced incarceration along with increased revenues from sales can be directed into health programs dealing with use or addiction, along with education on not just drug properties and use but also understanding mental health within society.

I'm sorry to read about your son's troubles Gwenno and I sincerely hope he recovers some equilibrium and happiness, best of luck to you.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:45 pm 
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Gwenno wrote:
I don't think that prohibition of recreational drugs is effective - look at all the work it gave the Mafia - but that doesn't mean that they are all safe for all users - clearly not - education is the key, but even so, visiting your son every day for 7 weeks while he is in a mental hospital for drug induced psychotic depression, as I did last year, is tough to bear and tests your objectivity.


When I was at university, me and my 3 housemates decided we'd start smoking in our final year when a new housemate introduced us.

fast forward 18 months from then, one had suffered 2 severe psychotic breaks, another, to us, had an unbelievable personality change and I was dealing with anxiety and depression to a crippling degree.

And now at 26, a few years later, we all seem pretty okay, but I can safely say, out of the 4 of us, only one didn't suffer a serious long term mental health issue.

At no point on social media or in these films which seems to constantly celebrate the drug was this ever suggested. Education as you say, is key.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 4:23 pm 
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Theflier wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
I don't think that prohibition of recreational drugs is effective - look at all the work it gave the Mafia - but that doesn't mean that they are all safe for all users - clearly not - education is the key, but even so, visiting your son every day for 7 weeks while he is in a mental hospital for drug induced psychotic depression, as I did last year, is tough to bear and tests your objectivity.


When I was at university, me and my 3 housemates decided we'd start smoking in our final year when a new housemate introduced us.

fast forward 18 months from then, one had suffered 2 severe psychotic breaks, another, to us, had an unbelievable personality change and I was dealing with anxiety and depression to a crippling degree.

And now at 26, a few years later, we all seem pretty okay, but I can safely say, out of the 4 of us, only one didn't suffer a serious long term mental health issue.

At no point on social media or in these films which seems to constantly celebrate the drug was this ever suggested. Education as you say, is key.

As I've discovered, how do you educate someone that knows it all already? I'm glad to hear that it was reversible for you, as it seems with my boy too, but it is soooo slow. :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 6:49 am 
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Sorry to hear about your son Gwenno. This was in the UK where it was illegal right? No doubt the same thing could and does happen here in Colorado, so it's not as if legalization is some panacea for that issue.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:16 am 
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guy smiley wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
I don't think that prohibition of recreational drugs is effective - look at all the work it gave the Mafia - but that doesn't mean that they are all safe for all users - clearly not - education is the key, but even so, visiting your son every day for 7 weeks while he is in a mental hospital for drug induced psychotic depression, as I did last year, is tough to bear and tests your objectivity.


Here is the brutal face of what perhaps we could call the substance industry. There are risks associated with ingesting anything that has any sort of psychotropic effect. We can mitigate this through various mechanisms including prohibition, which is generally considered a failure I think despite it's political popularity. That political popularity for prohibition across a variety of human endeavours only encourages the activity but also leads to a sort of conspiracy theory popularity among those keen to try or disenfranchised with either govt or authority.

I understand the enormous emotional effect of watching someone suffer through any sort of drug induced breakdown and I empathise. I feel our best hopes of long term solutions or pathways to dealing with that is liberalisation and education, along with some regulation regarding quality and dose. The money saved through reduced incarceration along with increased revenues from sales can be directed into health programs dealing with use or addiction, along with education on not just drug properties and use but also understanding mental health within society.

I'm sorry to read about your son's troubles Gwenno and I sincerely hope he recovers some equilibrium and happiness, best of luck to you.

I was going to post but pretty much what I was going to say is above.

The only thing I'd add is that it's intrinsic to human nature that we want to alter our mental state. We will, will, will, take drugs in all sorts of contexts and doses.

Small boy to Robbie Coltraine's Cracker - why do you drink? - Robbie - because I like it!


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:37 am 
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I used to smoke regularly but quit after the paranoia started to become all-consuming.

Another mate of mine swore off the stuff after having a mental breakdown while camping on his own. He'd smoke a fair bit and had a psychotic episode on his own. He was found by a farmer up a tree.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:08 am 
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TheDocForgotHisLogon wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
I don't think that prohibition of recreational drugs is effective - look at all the work it gave the Mafia - but that doesn't mean that they are all safe for all users - clearly not - education is the key, but even so, visiting your son every day for 7 weeks while he is in a mental hospital for drug induced psychotic depression, as I did last year, is tough to bear and tests your objectivity.


Here is the brutal face of what perhaps we could call the substance industry. There are risks associated with ingesting anything that has any sort of psychotropic effect. We can mitigate this through various mechanisms including prohibition, which is generally considered a failure I think despite it's political popularity. That political popularity for prohibition across a variety of human endeavours only encourages the activity but also leads to a sort of conspiracy theory popularity among those keen to try or disenfranchised with either govt or authority.

I understand the enormous emotional effect of watching someone suffer through any sort of drug induced breakdown and I empathise. I feel our best hopes of long term solutions or pathways to dealing with that is liberalisation and education, along with some regulation regarding quality and dose. The money saved through reduced incarceration along with increased revenues from sales can be directed into health programs dealing with use or addiction, along with education on not just drug properties and use but also understanding mental health within society.

I'm sorry to read about your son's troubles Gwenno and I sincerely hope he recovers some equilibrium and happiness, best of luck to you.

I was going to post but pretty much what I was going to say is above.

The only thing I'd add is that it's intrinsic to human nature that we want to alter our mental state. We will, will, will, take drugs in all sorts of contexts and doses.

Small boy to Robbie Coltraine's Cracker - why do you drink? - Robbie - because I like it!

Many years ago Horizon did a documentary on drug (including alcohol) addiction and 2 things I rembeber well:
1 there are a lot out there maybe 10%
2 dress it up how you may, the human race wants oblivion ( i.e. your point above)
When you realise that it takes some of the 'why us?' out of the agonising about the whole thing, The outlook is generally good, and I try to look at it as the dangers of high risk behaviour among young adults, particularly men. There are probably posters here who have lost sons to RTAs. Nevertheless , comments appreciated. :thumbup:


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:17 am 
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Thomas wrote:
I used to smoke regularly but quit after the paranoia started to become all-consuming.

Another mate of mine swore off the stuff after having a mental breakdown while camping on his own. He'd smoke a fair bit and had a psychotic episode on his own. He was found by a farmer up a tree.


Horrible stuff. I once double dropped Fat Freddy's Cats and washed it down with a large cup of shroom tea. In Port Elizabeth. I have no words...


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:45 am 
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I lived in Camden in the early 2000s when all the head shops sold mushrooms and growing kits. An enjoyable period.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 10:17 am 
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Gwenno wrote:
Many years ago Horizon did a documentary on drug (including alcohol) addiction and 2 things I rembeber well:
1 there are a lot out there maybe 10%
2 dress it up how you may, the human race wants oblivion ( i.e. your point above)
When you realise that it takes some of the 'why us?' out of the agonising about the whole thing, The outlook is generally good, and I try to look at it as the dangers of high risk behaviour among young adults, particularly men. There are probably posters here who have lost sons to RTAs. Nevertheless , comments appreciated. :thumbup:


Yes... there's an argument that humans have been avid chasers of whatever toxic thrill we can get our hands on from the dawn of time. We're a race of wastrels, really.

I used to smoke a lot of pot, for many years. I started relatively late for my generation and the current crop of adolescents are often hoofing into weed around 14. It's way too young... so perhaps my late start protected me a little from the worst of it although I know there's a lingering effect and it robbed me of motivation, self esteem and confidence fairly thoroughly. One thing with pot nowadays... it's too strong. What Australians call 'hydro' is grown rapidly in hydroponic type set ups and there are strains around now bred for strength. Smoking it you can tell the difference... the 'manufactured' strains are a more intense hit that passes faster. The stuff we used to have would have you stoned for hours but with the shorter, sharper hit kids are smoking more and more often to maintain the rush. The cumulative effect is a worry.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 10:25 am 
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Theflier wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
I don't think that prohibition of recreational drugs is effective - look at all the work it gave the Mafia - but that doesn't mean that they are all safe for all users - clearly not - education is the key, but even so, visiting your son every day for 7 weeks while he is in a mental hospital for drug induced psychotic depression, as I did last year, is tough to bear and tests your objectivity.


When I was at university, me and my 3 housemates decided we'd start smoking in our final year when a new housemate introduced us.

fast forward 18 months from then, one had suffered 2 severe psychotic breaks, another, to us, had an unbelievable personality change and I was dealing with anxiety and depression to a crippling degree.

And now at 26, a few years later, we all seem pretty okay, but I can safely say, out of the 4 of us, only one didn't suffer a serious long term mental health issue.

At no point on social media or in these films which seems to constantly celebrate the drug was this ever suggested. Education as you say, is key.


My wifes cousin has had long lasting psychosis due to the weed. Went from a happy go lucky young girl enjoying life to someone who now lives in a sheltered home, can't look after herself, won't go out, has no interest in anything in about 6 months. I know a couple of other guys in a similar situation.

It's very common but you just never hear much about that side of it.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 10:28 am 
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guy smiley wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Many years ago Horizon did a documentary on drug (including alcohol) addiction and 2 things I rembeber well:
1 there are a lot out there maybe 10%
2 dress it up how you may, the human race wants oblivion ( i.e. your point above)
When you realise that it takes some of the 'why us?' out of the agonising about the whole thing, The outlook is generally good, and I try to look at it as the dangers of high risk behaviour among young adults, particularly men. There are probably posters here who have lost sons to RTAs. Nevertheless , comments appreciated. :thumbup:


Yes... there's an argument that humans have been avid chasers of whatever toxic thrill we can get our hands on from the dawn of time. We're a race of wastrels, really.


I don't think hallucinogens like mushrooms, acid, peyote etc necessarily fall into the category of drugs that people would use to "get completely wasted".

They are far more spiritual than say alcohol, cannabis, heroin etc.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 10:37 am 
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clementinfrance wrote:
I don't think hallucinogens like mushrooms, acid, peyote etc necessarily fall into the category of drugs that people would use to "get completely wasted".

They are far more spiritual than say alcohol, cannabis, heroin etc.


Fair point, there's a strong history of the use of plants to induce altered states of consciousness for various reasons including spiritual / religious.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 11:45 am 
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clementinfrance wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Many years ago Horizon did a documentary on drug (including alcohol) addiction and 2 things I rembeber well:
1 there are a lot out there maybe 10%
2 dress it up how you may, the human race wants oblivion ( i.e. your point above)
When you realise that it takes some of the 'why us?' out of the agonising about the whole thing, The outlook is generally good, and I try to look at it as the dangers of high risk behaviour among young adults, particularly men. There are probably posters here who have lost sons to RTAs. Nevertheless , comments appreciated. :thumbup:


Yes... there's an argument that humans have been avid chasers of whatever toxic thrill we can get our hands on from the dawn of time. We're a race of wastrels, really.


I don't think hallucinogens like mushrooms, acid, peyote etc necessarily fall into the category of drugs that people would use to "get completely wasted".

They are far more spiritual than say alcohol, cannabis, heroin etc.


Not sure about peyote - but disagree on acid and shrooms, having been to an outdoor rave or two in my younger days.

it is more 'off your tits' than completely wasted'. It is a different high but a high none the less and done for generally the same reasons i.e. alter your state of mind in order to have a good time.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 12:15 pm 
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BokJock wrote:
clementinfrance wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
Many years ago Horizon did a documentary on drug (including alcohol) addiction and 2 things I rembeber well:
1 there are a lot out there maybe 10%
2 dress it up how you may, the human race wants oblivion ( i.e. your point above)
When you realise that it takes some of the 'why us?' out of the agonising about the whole thing, The outlook is generally good, and I try to look at it as the dangers of high risk behaviour among young adults, particularly men. There are probably posters here who have lost sons to RTAs. Nevertheless , comments appreciated. :thumbup:


Yes... there's an argument that humans have been avid chasers of whatever toxic thrill we can get our hands on from the dawn of time. We're a race of wastrels, really.


I don't think hallucinogens like mushrooms, acid, peyote etc necessarily fall into the category of drugs that people would use to "get completely wasted".

They are far more spiritual than say alcohol, cannabis, heroin etc.


Not sure about peyote - but disagree on acid and shrooms, having been to an outdoor rave or two in my younger days.

it is more 'off your tits' than completely wasted'. It is a different high but a high none the less and done for generally the same reasons i.e. alter your state of mind in order to have a good time.


Semantics I think...

How many people do you know regularly use hallucinogens?

Loads of people drink alcohol every day, smoke dope every day and do heroin every day. Apart form Tim leary I've never heard of anyone doing shrooms or acid every day, far from it in fact.

Hallucinogens are psychoactive obviously but you are in no way guaranteed to "have a good time"... As I said they are far more spiritual drugs.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 3:25 pm 
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Legalization is best, then educate and realize it is not for everyone, like alcohol isn't. The Drug companies, the alcohol companies and the prison industrial complex are all against it. Sorry to those that have had people have breakdowns due to weed.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 3:28 pm 
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saffer13 wrote:
goeagles wrote:
saffer13 wrote:
Speaking of week in CO...any accurate reports on how the state has actually been impacted? I've read stories on both sides...that it's been negative and positive so wondering what's accurate.


Basically a big cash windfall for the state, along with some positive economic impact of weed tourism. There have been two main negatives. One is that edibles were not well regulated to begin with and had varying dosages and poor packaging, leading some to take too much and perhaps some kids to mistake it for candy. This is basically a problem that has been fixed that other states can and have learned from. The second is that because it is still illegal federally, a lot of the major financial service companies (credit card companies, banks, etc.) are afraid to take on dispensaries as clients. Credit unions can fill that void, but they still basically have to operate in all cash and then take a Brinks truck to the bank with all of their cash for the day. That led to some fairly sophisticated robberies early on, but they seem to have figured out procedures well at this point and eventually the banking issue will likely go away. In the end, it's been a huge positive for the state.

That's good to hear. I read something a little while back that the initial thoughts were positive like you suggest but things have turned and now crime, driving while intoxicated, etc. has increased. Was just wondering if that was true or not.
I don't know about CO as a whole, but I'm very close to someone in Denver city admin who is involved in legislation relating to marijuana sales.

They say (and I haven't spoken to them about this in a while, and I'm paraphrasing) that the cash windfall thing is a bit disingenuous: they are very conscious of the fact that it's not a state-level crime but still a federal issue, and they really, really want to avoid pissing off the feds, and work extra hard to ensure compliance with the city's/ state's own laws.

So yeah, the Local LEOs are less tied-up dealing with casual stoners, but the money made from legal retailing etc is offset by the city having to employ more people to write new legislation, ensure it's being adhered to, review licensing applications etc. From what I understand, it's not blanket-legal in Denver either, but on a district-by-district basis (not sure if district is the right word, but whatever) which makes things more tricky and expensive to administrate.

Then you have various... 'colourful' applications which skirt the edge of legality and need extra scrutiny (e.g. by chance I happen to know a guy who wanted to set-up a stoner hotel at which he'd provide 'free' weed for an inflated room price - so is that a dispensary or not?).

They're sure in time this will all settle down a bit as the industry becomes more established, but as to whether the city really benefits is still* to be seen.

Here in MA, although we voted to make weed legal for casual use maybe a year ago, it's still to be enacted; it was supposed to be around now if I remember, but I just heard they kicked the can down the road to October (for now) while they try to get everything in order. And even then that's with the benefit of being able to use states like CO as legislative examples. It's a complex business.

*(as of when I last had this particular conversation with them, maybe 18 months ago)

edit: oh, and yes, as goeagles said, the edibles thing has been/ is a huge concern for them


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 7:48 pm 
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goeagles wrote:
saffer13 wrote:
Speaking of week in CO...any accurate reports on how the state has actually been impacted? I've read stories on both sides...that it's been negative and positive so wondering what's accurate.


Basically a big cash windfall for the state, along with some positive economic impact of weed tourism. There have been two main negatives. One is that edibles were not well regulated to begin with and had varying dosages and poor packaging, leading some to take too much and perhaps some kids to mistake it for candy. This is basically a problem that has been fixed that other states can and have learned from. The second is that because it is still illegal federally, a lot of the major financial service companies (credit card companies, banks, etc.) are afraid to take on dispensaries as clients. Credit unions can fill that void, but they still basically have to operate in all cash and then take a Brinks truck to the bank with all of their cash for the day. That led to some fairly sophisticated robberies early on, but they seem to have figured out procedures well at this point and eventually the banking issue will likely go away. In the end, it's been a huge positive for the state.


There was also a negative of people setting up effectively an industrial operation in the middle of a residential area. Effectively a zoning problem of "you can only grow x amount unless your building is zoned industrial or commercial".


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:15 pm 
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Always had a few rugby teammates at a time do pot. Not sure if it's weed or other stuff, heard it might be pyschadelics, but I have one of them now that a couple members of the club have had to take him to an institution to get help. I can tell his personality has changed.

I just don't understand the point to be honest.

Quote:
Yes... there's an argument that humans have been avid chasers of whatever toxic thrill we can get our hands on from the dawn of time. We're a race of wastrels, really.


Overheard once at a practice:

"This one guy just gave me what was left of his sickle-cell anemia pills. There's about six months there I don't remember anything." :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 6:26 am 
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saffer13 wrote:
[ I had a students who has been diagnosed with PTSD after having a psychotic episode after taking CBD



CBD doesn't get you high.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 6:37 am 
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Am in Colorado right now...I think half the people in hospitality especially are stoned...or at least for their sake I hope they are.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 7:03 am 
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We can do so many things that are harmful to our bodies and minds,and many of those things are encouraged e.g. sports. Look at rugby and NFL and boxing and concussions. Mountain climbing and motor racing and...death. All of these things have crippling effects on many people. But we don't say "You can't go mountain climbing you could die" or "Motor racing can kill so you shouldn't do that". Hell even eating unhealthy foods can have disastrous effects on people and cost economies incredible amounts of money. And of course alcohol and prescription drugs cause an incredible amount of harm. It's about personal choice in all of these activities.
So why are recreational drugs so frowned upon? Are recreational drugs more harmful to society than those things I have mentioned? I doubt it even if legalised. Now I'm not saying lets have advertising billboards up everywhere encouraging people to snort coke or drink mushroom tea but I do think we should scrap prohibition and educate people on the effects of drugs and let them make their own decisions. Some people will have bad experiences, some might go nuts. But do we ban driving because people die in car crashes? Harm is going to happen with so much of what we do, it's about educating people and minimising the harm. Prohibition doesn't work, lets try something different.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 9:35 am 
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Davedj77 wrote:
We can do so many things that are harmful to our bodies and minds,and many of those things are encouraged e.g. sports. Look at rugby and NFL and boxing and concussions. Mountain climbing and motor racing and...death. All of these things have crippling effects on many people. But we don't say "You can't go mountain climbing you could die" or "Motor racing can kill so you shouldn't do that". Hell even eating unhealthy foods can have disastrous effects on people and cost economies incredible amounts of money. And of course alcohol and prescription drugs cause an incredible amount of harm. It's about personal choice in all of these activities.
So why are recreational drugs so frowned upon? Are recreational drugs more harmful to society than those things I have mentioned? I doubt it even if legalised. Now I'm not saying lets have advertising billboards up everywhere encouraging people to snort coke or drink mushroom tea but I do think we should scrap prohibition and educate people on the effects of drugs and let them make their own decisions. Some people will have bad experiences, some might go nuts. But do we ban driving because people die in car crashes? Harm is going to happen with so much of what we do, it's about educating people and minimising the harm. Prohibition doesn't work, lets try something different.

Don't think you'll find anyone on this thread disagreeing with you.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2018 12:23 am 
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Like education is really going to do anything. Come on people, let's be honest. We've had decades of education on alcohol, people are still beating their wives, abusing their children, and killing innocents on roadways.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2018 12:37 am 
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Flyin Ryan wrote:
Like education is really going to do anything. Come on people, let's be honest. We've had decades of education on alcohol, people are still beating their wives, abusing their children, and killing innocents on roadways.


Drinking rates among millennials is far lower than their parents generation.

Have you been to a work party recently? If you have a second beer people think you are Ozzy Osbourne.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2018 12:41 am 
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Flyin Ryan wrote:
Like education is really going to do anything. Come on people, let's be honest. We've had decades of education on alcohol, people are still beating their wives, abusing their children, and killing innocents on roadways.


I've never met anyone who beat their wife or abused kids because they smoked cannabis. Cannabis is a gift from nature.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2018 12:41 am 
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Mushrooms were legal in Ireland for a while. It was great.


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