Chat Forum
It is currently Mon Oct 15, 2018 10:25 am

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6116 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64 ... 153  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:13 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
kiap wrote:
Nah, Ika lives by his own "special" creed, GS. As any fule kno.

Yer Man wrote:
Diego wrote:
I'm pretty sure it's the Kiwis who are weird in this one. Everyone else calls it inside and outside centre.

I think we're the only ones that use the term out half.

Traditionally "out-half" was Ireland and Scotland, Wales had a "stand-off" and England had a "fly-half"



I think.

Actually the Welsh originated the flyhalf idea. They were innovators back in the day. In 1878 at Cardiff, they developed a short pass to one of the half backs who would then go charging ahead with the ball. He became known as the "flying half back" which in time was shortened to the "fly half".

The kiwis invented the 5/8ths. And which is now most prominent in Rugby League. ;)


yeah.. and the wings I think. Can't remember the details and it's about if someone wants to google fu it, but originally wing three quarters stood outside the scrum as a veritable loose forward and they got moved right out to cover the sidelines and became wingers.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
guy smiley wrote:
WTF is an 'outside centre'?


Are you taking the piss or do you spend all your down time hidden in a mine with no outside contact?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:29 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 2410
Yer Man wrote:
Diego wrote:
I'm pretty sure it's the Kiwis who are weird in this one. Everyone else calls it inside and outside centre.

I think we're the only ones that use the term out half.

Traditionally "out-half" was Ireland and Scotland, Wales had a "stand-off" and England had a "fly-half"



I think.


I think the Scots used Stand-Off....I think.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 26589
guy smiley wrote:
kiap wrote:
Actually the Welsh originated the flyhalf idea. They were innovators back in the day. In 1878 at Cardiff, they developed a short pass to one of the half backs who would then go charging ahead with the ball. He became known as the "flying half back" which in time was shortened to the "fly half".

The kiwis invented the 5/8ths. And which is now most prominent in Rugby League. ;)


yeah.. and the wings I think. Can't remember the details and it's about if someone wants to google fu it, but originally wing three quarters stood outside the scrum as a veritable loose forward and they got moved right out to cover the sidelines and became wingers.


I think the Poms (possibly those Oxbridge types) formulated the three quarters and wings ... at least it might seem according to this:

    In the 1880’s the game had spread to the Universities, particularly Cambridge and Oxford, whose input lead to far more thought being put into the game and the style of play that was developed. They were instrumental in the development of the games tactics, the introduction of need to practice and the coaching of the players.

    In addition they reorganised the scrum, developed short passes amongst the forwards and long passes amongst the backs. This lead to the need for more players to be placed in the back line between the halves and the full back so they were called quarters and the fact that three of them were put in this position led to them being known as three-quarters. The middle player being called the centre with the two on his outside called wings.

    The introduction of a fourth player into the three-quarters was to a large extent, accidental, with Wales again being allowed to take the honour. Cardiff were due to play a tough match away from home and their first choice centre was not available so they promoted one Frank Hancock from the second side in his place. Hancock was a great success scoring two vital tries. When the Cardiff selectors sat down to pick their team for the next match they were keen to revert to their original team, but they were most reluctant to drop Hancock, so they compromised by introducing a fourth three-quarter. Within two years Wales had introduced it at international level.

    The New Zealanders were quick to see the advantage of having a fourth player in the three-quarters. Their solution was to pull a forward out the pack and put him between the half back and the three-quarters. Their problem was what did they call the new position. Legend has it that consent was reached by deciding that the half back was 4/8ths and the three-quarters 6/8ths, so therefore the new position must be a 5/8ths, a name that has continued to this day in that country. When fly half play developed they introduced the first 5/8th and the second 5/8th.

But NZ claim to have introduced the ref whistle. And Brisbane brought in player numbering.


Last edited by kiap on Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:20 pm
Posts: 5101
Location: Lutra
Nolanator wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:
The Irish scrum seemed to go from "under pressure" to "stuffed" when Furlong came on, so he needs to sort that out.


*sigh*

Go read Towny's thread from the weekend. Furlong was stuffed in one scrum when the entire Aussie pack directed their drive through the Cronin and Furlong, with Furlong not dealing with it.
He was in four other scrums. In one of those he took a single step back, in the other three he didn't budge.
The big scrum penalty was his fourth scrum of the game.


"stuffed" as soon as he came on? :roll:


Stuffed only applies to that one scrum. He looked to be under pressure in the others but held firm. Bottom line is that our scrum should be solid, as it was all game on Saturday against the more favoured Irish 8. If we had TPN then it might get a little more interesting for your scrum.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:31 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
Nolanator wrote:
do you spend all your down time hidden in a mine with no outside contact?


Let's examine the mechanics implicit in this statement...

who are you talking to?

Ok, so now that we've reduced your online credibility to the same standard as your average online Australian rugby fan, I think we can safely ignore whatever point you were trying to make.

I will concede though, I have NEVER heard a commentator refer to the 'outside centre'. Some of you must follow the game from the equivalent of communist Russia. That or Dennis Rodman's arse. Your choice.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:32 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 2410
guy smiley wrote:
kiap wrote:
Nah, Ika lives by his own "special" creed, GS. As any fule kno.

Yer Man wrote:
Diego wrote:
I'm pretty sure it's the Kiwis who are weird in this one. Everyone else calls it inside and outside centre.

I think we're the only ones that use the term out half.

Traditionally "out-half" was Ireland and Scotland, Wales had a "stand-off" and England had a "fly-half"



I think.

Actually the Welsh originated the flyhalf idea. They were innovators back in the day. In 1878 at Cardiff, they developed a short pass to one of the half backs who would then go charging ahead with the ball. He became known as the "flying half back" which in time was shortened to the "fly half".

The kiwis invented the 5/8ths. And which is now most prominent in Rugby League. ;)


yeah.. and the wings I think. Can't remember the details and it's about if someone wants to google fu it, but originally wing three quarters stood outside the scrum as a veritable loose forward and they got moved right out to cover the sidelines and became wingers.


I think that's the Wing Forward you're thinking of, which you guys invented by creating an extra man at scrum time by going with a two man front row. Mad feckers that you are!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:33 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2015 12:51 pm
Posts: 13476
Olo wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:
The Irish scrum seemed to go from "under pressure" to "stuffed" when Furlong came on, so he needs to sort that out.


*sigh*

Go read Towny's thread from the weekend. Furlong was stuffed in one scrum when the entire Aussie pack directed their drive through the Cronin and Furlong, with Furlong not dealing with it.
He was in four other scrums. In one of those he took a single step back, in the other three he didn't budge.
The big scrum penalty was his fourth scrum of the game.


"stuffed" as soon as he came on? :roll:


Stuffed only applies to that one scrum. He looked to be under pressure in the others but held firm. Bottom line is that our scrum should be solid, as it was all game on Saturday against the more favoured Irish 8. If we had TPN then it might get a little more interesting for your scrum.

If we'd Rory Best etc.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
do you spend all your down time hidden in a mine with no outside contact?


Let's examine the mechanics implicit in this statement...

who are you talking to?

Ok, so now that we've reduced your online credibility to the same standard as your average online Australian rugby fan, I think we can safely ignore whatever point you were trying to make.

I will concede though, I have NEVER heard a commentator refer to the 'outside centre'. Some of you must follow the game from the equivalent of communist Russia. That or Dennis Rodman's arse. Your choice.


Usual Guy blustering aside, I'm amazed that you've never heard the term outside centre. It's absolutely ubiquitous up here.
I get that you lot use 2nd 5/8 and centre to refer to 12 and 13, respectively, but what did you think the NH used, knowing that we don't use 2nd 5?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
Olo wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:
The Irish scrum seemed to go from "under pressure" to "stuffed" when Furlong came on, so he needs to sort that out.


*sigh*

Go read Towny's thread from the weekend. Furlong was stuffed in one scrum when the entire Aussie pack directed their drive through the Cronin and Furlong, with Furlong not dealing with it.
He was in four other scrums. In one of those he took a single step back, in the other three he didn't budge.
The big scrum penalty was his fourth scrum of the game.


"stuffed" as soon as he came on? :roll:


Stuffed only applies to that one scrum. He looked to be under pressure in the others but held firm. Bottom line is that our scrum should be solid, as it was all game on Saturday against the more favoured Irish 8. If we had TPN then it might get a little more interesting for your scrum.


The Aus scrum was generally excellent on the weekend. :thumbup:
That one demolition was just poetry in motion to my eyes in terms of a perfectly timed and co-ordinated 8 man shove.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
PornDog wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
kiap wrote:
Nah, Ika lives by his own "special" creed, GS. As any fule kno.

Yer Man wrote:
Diego wrote:
I'm pretty sure it's the Kiwis who are weird in this one. Everyone else calls it inside and outside centre.

I think we're the only ones that use the term out half.

Traditionally "out-half" was Ireland and Scotland, Wales had a "stand-off" and England had a "fly-half"



I think.

Actually the Welsh originated the flyhalf idea. They were innovators back in the day. In 1878 at Cardiff, they developed a short pass to one of the half backs who would then go charging ahead with the ball. He became known as the "flying half back" which in time was shortened to the "fly half".

The kiwis invented the 5/8ths. And which is now most prominent in Rugby League. ;)


yeah.. and the wings I think. Can't remember the details and it's about if someone wants to google fu it, but originally wing three quarters stood outside the scrum as a veritable loose forward and they got moved right out to cover the sidelines and became wingers.


I think that's the Wing Forward you're thinking of, which you guys invented by creating an extra man at scrum time by going with a two man front row. Mad feckers that you are!


Thank you PornDog. A Saint among men.


CAIRO


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:37 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
Nolanator wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
do you spend all your down time hidden in a mine with no outside contact?


Let's examine the mechanics implicit in this statement...

who are you talking to?

Ok, so now that we've reduced your online credibility to the same standard as your average online Australian rugby fan, I think we can safely ignore whatever point you were trying to make.

I will concede though, I have NEVER heard a commentator refer to the 'outside centre'. Some of you must follow the game from the equivalent of communist Russia. That or Dennis Rodman's arse. Your choice.


Usual Guy blustering aside, I'm amazed that you've never heard the term outside centre. It's absolutely ubiquitous up here.
I get that you lot use 2nd 5/8 and centre to refer to 12 and 13, respectively, but what did you think the NH used, knowing that we don't use 2nd 5?


Well, to be honest I never thought of that :lol:

I assumed that where we say 2nd 5/8, others say inside centre and the 13 possie was simply centre.

I mean... who seriously tries to suggest that 'things' have two centres? It's simply preposterous.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:37 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 15906
guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
do you spend all your down time hidden in a mine with no outside contact?


Let's examine the mechanics implicit in this statement...

who are you talking to?

Ok, so now that we've reduced your online credibility to the same standard as your average online Australian rugby fan, I think we can safely ignore whatever point you were trying to make.

I will concede though, I have NEVER heard a commentator refer to the 'outside centre'. Some of you must follow the game from the equivalent of communist Russia. That or Dennis Rodman's arse. Your choice.


The Irish Times disagreeing with you only today.

https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/rugby/ ... 7?mode=amp

“Ireland coach Joe Schmidt will seek to salvage the series and eight changes are expected to the starting XV, one positional, as Bundee Aki makes way for Garry Ringrose and Robbie Henshaw switches from outside to inside centre. Schmidt will name his team on Thursday morning. ”

:lol: :lol: :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:20 pm
Posts: 5101
Location: Lutra
paddyor wrote:
Olo wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:
The Irish scrum seemed to go from "under pressure" to "stuffed" when Furlong came on, so he needs to sort that out.


*sigh*

Go read Towny's thread from the weekend. Furlong was stuffed in one scrum when the entire Aussie pack directed their drive through the Cronin and Furlong, with Furlong not dealing with it.
He was in four other scrums. In one of those he took a single step back, in the other three he didn't budge.
The big scrum penalty was his fourth scrum of the game.


"stuffed" as soon as he came on? :roll:


Stuffed only applies to that one scrum. He looked to be under pressure in the others but held firm. Bottom line is that our scrum should be solid, as it was all game on Saturday against the more favoured Irish 8. If we had TPN then it might get a little more interesting for your scrum.

If we'd Rory Best etc.


Yes.
Mind, I think that is the first time both Wallaby front rows had ever packed down in a game as a unit. They did have 4-5 days to practice though.
One would think that they may get a little better this week.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
Look Flametop, I know this may come as something as a shock but....


I don't read the Irish Times. I'm certainly aware of, and I'm proud to admit, very tolerant towards the cultures of other countries and I'm generally supportive of those cultures less sophisticated than my own.. so thanks for the tip, I'll make more of an effort from now on :thumbup:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 11088
Location: Watson city, MN
guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
do you spend all your down time hidden in a mine with no outside contact?


Let's examine the mechanics implicit in this statement...

who are you talking to?

Ok, so now that we've reduced your online credibility to the same standard as your average online Australian rugby fan, I think we can safely ignore whatever point you were trying to make.

I will concede though, I have NEVER heard a commentator refer to the 'outside centre'. Some of you must follow the game from the equivalent of communist Russia. That or Dennis Rodman's arse. Your choice.


Usual Guy blustering aside, I'm amazed that you've never heard the term outside centre. It's absolutely ubiquitous up here.
I get that you lot use 2nd 5/8 and centre to refer to 12 and 13, respectively, but what did you think the NH used, knowing that we don't use 2nd 5?


Well, to be honest I never thought of that :lol:

I assumed that where we say 2nd 5/8, others say inside centre and the 13 possie was simply centre.

I mean... who seriously tries to suggest that 'things' have two centres? It's simply preposterous.

That's not necessarily the suggestion. If you have four men lining up off the scrum, 10 to 14, the centre would sit between the 12 and 13. The 12 would be inside the centre and the 13 would be outside the centre.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
do you spend all your down time hidden in a mine with no outside contact?


Let's examine the mechanics implicit in this statement...

who are you talking to?

Ok, so now that we've reduced your online credibility to the same standard as your average online Australian rugby fan, I think we can safely ignore whatever point you were trying to make.

I will concede though, I have NEVER heard a commentator refer to the 'outside centre'. Some of you must follow the game from the equivalent of communist Russia. That or Dennis Rodman's arse. Your choice.


Usual Guy blustering aside, I'm amazed that you've never heard the term outside centre. It's absolutely ubiquitous up here.
I get that you lot use 2nd 5/8 and centre to refer to 12 and 13, respectively, but what did you think the NH used, knowing that we don't use 2nd 5?


Well, to be honest I never thought of that :lol:

I assumed that where we say 2nd 5/8, others say inside centre and the 13 possie was simply centre.

I mean... who seriously tries to suggest that 'things' have two centres? It's simply preposterous.


Seems mad that you've never heard it mentioned, but I guess not a huge surprise if you only listen to or read NZ media. Fair enough if you don't make a habit of watching 6N or Heineken Cup games etc.
I'm almost positive that they use inside and outside centre in Australia, though. SA, too.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
I've lived in Australia for 30 years Nolanator... I've only registered the use of 'centre' and 'inside centre'.

Not to say it's not in use at all... just something I've not come across.

I'm f**king deadly serious about everything else though :x


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
alliswell wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
Well, to be honest I never thought of that :lol:

I assumed that where we say 2nd 5/8, others say inside centre and the 13 possie was simply centre.

I mean... who seriously tries to suggest that 'things' have two centres? It's simply preposterous.

That's not necessarily the suggestion. If you have four men lining up off the scrum, 10 to 14, the centre would sit between the 12 and 13. The 12 would be inside the centre and the 13 would be outside the centre.


Why the fullback hate, man? What have they ever done to you?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 3:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
guy smiley wrote:
I've lived in Australia for 30 years Nolanator... I've only registered the use of 'centre' and 'inside centre'.

Not to say it's not in use at all... just something I've not come across.

I'm f**king deadly serious about everything else though :x


You probably just filtered it as "outside the centre" or something else that fit for you.

I only ever first came across the whole 1st 5, 2nd 5 as alternatives to OH and IC when I'd been watching rugby for quite a while, but hadn't had much exposure to live S12 or whatever, so there's no reason I'd have heard it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:00 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 26589
Nolanator wrote:
I'm almost positive that they use inside and outside centre in Australia, though. SA, too.

Correct


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:03 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
kiap wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
I'm almost positive that they use inside and outside centre in Australia, though. SA, too.

Correct

I began to doubt myself after Guy being adamant that he'd never heard the term before and he's lived in WA for years.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
Nolanator wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
I've lived in Australia for 30 years Nolanator... I've only registered the use of 'centre' and 'inside centre'.

Not to say it's not in use at all... just something I've not come across.

I'm f**king deadly serious about everything else though :x


You probably just filtered it as "outside the centre" or something else that fit for you.

I only ever first came across the whole 1st 5, 2nd 5 as alternatives to OH and IC when I'd been watching rugby for quite a while, but hadn't had much exposure to live S12 or whatever, so there's no reason I'd have heard it.


To be honest it's posting in here that opened my eyes to the various sort of terms and names and the rest of it around the world... before that I'd only had to deal with the minor difference between Aus and NZ.

Shouldn't be a surprise at all that there are regional variations of course... but still, that feeling when someone else tries to pick up the thing you grew up with. It's like reading Shadrach all over again.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:04 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2013 11:33 am
Posts: 7592
Location: Stockholm
What the fůck is this shit show?

The positions are called inside center and outside center. It's not "some Australian thing". It's just the names of the f'n positions, no matter what you choose to call them with your three mates in your little village.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugby_union_positions

No matter what local vernacular you choose to use, how can any even casual couch potato fan not know the proper names for the positions?

A "lock" is the proper name for "second rower" btw, or "tall-front-row-one-back" or whatever dumbass name you give it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
Nolanator wrote:
kiap wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
I'm almost positive that they use inside and outside centre in Australia, though. SA, too.

Correct

I began to doubt myself after Guy being adamant that he'd never heard the term before and he's lived in WA for years.


Do you listen to Australian commentators?

They all sound like Mog.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2015 12:51 pm
Posts: 13476
Mog The Almighty wrote:
What the fůck is this shit show?

The positions are called inside center and outside center. It's not "some Australian thing". It's just the names of the f'n positions, no matter what you choose to call them with your three mates in your little village.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugby_union_positions

No matter what local vernacular you choose to use, how can any even casual couch potato fan not know the proper names for the positions?

A "lock" is the proper name for "second rower" btw, or "tall-front-row-one-back" or whatever dumbass name you give it.

Didn't the 8 used to be called a lock back when locks were just called 2nd rows?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2013 11:33 am
Posts: 7592
Location: Stockholm
paddyor wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:
What the fůck is this shit show?

The positions are called inside center and outside center. It's not "some Australian thing". It's just the names of the f'n positions, no matter what you choose to call them with your three mates in your little village.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugby_union_positions

No matter what local vernacular you choose to use, how can any even casual couch potato fan not know the proper names for the positions?

A "lock" is the proper name for "second rower" btw, or "tall-front-row-one-back" or whatever dumbass name you give it.

Didn't the 8 used to be called a lock back when locks were just called 2nd rows?


Yeah, I remember when they changed it. It was an "old school" badge of honour to keep calling the eight a lock for a bit. Then it was just old. They still call it a lock in Loig.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 15906
guy smiley wrote:
Look Flametop, I know this may come as something as a shock but....


I don't read the Irish Times. I'm certainly aware of, and I'm proud to admit, very tolerant towards the cultures of other countries and I'm generally supportive of those cultures less sophisticated than my own.. so thanks for the tip, I'll make more of an effort from now on :thumbup:


:lol: you're just embarassing yourself.
Morto for you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 52878
Ah guy must be on a windup at this stage.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
I've lived in Australia for 30 years Nolanator... I've only registered the use of 'centre' and 'inside centre'.

Not to say it's not in use at all... just something I've not come across.

I'm f**king deadly serious about everything else though :x


You probably just filtered it as "outside the centre" or something else that fit for you.

I only ever first came across the whole 1st 5, 2nd 5 as alternatives to OH and IC when I'd been watching rugby for quite a while, but hadn't had much exposure to live S12 or whatever, so there's no reason I'd have heard it.


To be honest it's posting in here that opened my eyes to the various sort of terms and names and the rest of it around the world... before that I'd only had to deal with the minor difference between Aus and NZ.

Shouldn't be a surprise at all that there are regional variations of course... but still, that feeling when someone else tries to pick up the thing you grew up with. It's like reading Shadrach all over again.


Yeah, probably the same for me, now that I think about it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 15906
CM11 wrote:
Ah guy must be on a windup at this stage.


Yep. Good bants though.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 39397
Location: in transit
CM11 wrote:
Ah guy must be on a windup at this stage.


I had them in the palm of my hand... :x :x


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2013 11:33 am
Posts: 7592
Location: Stockholm
FWIW I've also heard the distinction between a fleet-footed-fairy-link-man style inside center and a hard-running-crashball style inside center be differentiated along those lines. e.g. "he's an inside center but his style is more of a second five-eighth with his distribution and kicking skills".


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:18 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 2410
paddyor wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:
What the fůck is this shit show?

The positions are called inside center and outside center. It's not "some Australian thing". It's just the names of the f'n positions, no matter what you choose to call them with your three mates in your little village.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugby_union_positions

No matter what local vernacular you choose to use, how can any even casual couch potato fan not know the proper names for the positions?

A "lock" is the proper name for "second rower" btw, or "tall-front-row-one-back" or whatever dumbass name you give it.

Didn't the 8 used to be called a lock back when locks were just called 2nd rows?


That's certainly how they were named when I was in school - which is both far too long ago and also not that long ago at the same time :|


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:33 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 14555
Location: XPAT CUNT
Interestingly, the French and Spanish appear to call them both centres with no distinction, and the Germans call them inside and outside centres. That's as far as I'm willing to look though, as I probably should do some actual work.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
Mog The Almighty wrote:
FWIW I've also heard the distinction between a fleet-footed-fairy-link-man style inside center and a hard-running-crashball style inside center be differentiated along those lines. e.g. "he's an inside center but his style is more of a second five-eighth with his distribution and kicking skills".

Ditto, but I think I first came upon the term on here. Using 2nd 5/8 description as a ball-playing 12 is much more common amongst pundits up here these days, particularly when making the distinction you mention.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 14555
Location: XPAT CUNT
What's interesting about that is that recently the kiwis have generally not tended to put a '2nd 5/8th' type of player at 12 much of late.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:43 pm 
Online
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 18, 2013 10:14 am
Posts: 18368
Nolanator wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:
FWIW I've also heard the distinction between a fleet-footed-fairy-link-man style inside center and a hard-running-crashball style inside center be differentiated along those lines. e.g. "he's an inside center but his style is more of a second five-eighth with his distribution and kicking skills".

Ditto, but I think I first came upon the term on here. Using 2nd 5/8 description as a ball-playing 12 is much more common amongst pundits up here these days, particularly when making the distinction you mention.

It's generally used by fúckwit pundits like Cummiskey or Dave McIntyre who use it to sound like they have massive rugby knowledge, when in fact your average stalk of asparagus has more insight than they do.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 7:20 pm
Posts: 5101
Location: Lutra
Zakar wrote:
What's interesting about that is that recently the kiwis have generally not tended to put a '2nd 5/8th' type of player at 12 much of late.


Fust five, suckund five?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 4:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33552
Location: Pigdogistan
Diego wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:
FWIW I've also heard the distinction between a fleet-footed-fairy-link-man style inside center and a hard-running-crashball style inside center be differentiated along those lines. e.g. "he's an inside center but his style is more of a second five-eighth with his distribution and kicking skills".

Ditto, but I think I first came upon the term on here. Using 2nd 5/8 description as a ball-playing 12 is much more common amongst pundits up here these days, particularly when making the distinction you mention.

It's generally used by fúckwit pundits like Cummiskey or Dave McIntyre who use it to sound like they have massive rugby knowledge, when in fact your average stalk of asparagus has more insight than they do.

:lol:
That's probably accurate.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6116 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64 ... 153  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: assfly, backrow, bessantj, bimboman, Bing [Bot], Bloutoria, Bobless, Bokkom, Brazil, dam0, danny_fitz, Dark, Diego, etherman, FairWeather_Aussie, Google Adsense [Bot], Google [Bot], I like haggis, JB1981, Jim Lahey, Laurent, Liathroidigloine, Liquid_Len, lorcanoworms, Mullet 2, paulc179, penguin, pigaaaa, piquant, PornDog, Rinkals, Sandstorm, Scrumhead, sewa, sockwithaticket, Taranaki Snapper, Tim13, Toulon's Not Toulouse, TQoET, TrailApe, Ulsters Red Hand, youngsidd and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group