Chat Forum
It is currently Thu Apr 18, 2019 11:27 pm

All times are UTC [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28324 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392 ... 709  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 5:29 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 04, 2012 11:30 am
Posts: 1887
piquant wrote:
etherman wrote:
BokJock wrote:
Petej wrote:
Did everyone notice Christopher chope has struck again. Blocking a private member's bill on FGM. At least he backed a private member's bills to ban 20mph speed limits outside schools and to allow companies to opt out of paying the minimum wage. What a Tory hero.


It is crazy that someone like this dickhead can get elected - have conservative voters of Bournemouth given him a pro-fgm, pro-upskirt, pro-dead-kids-outside-schools mandate?

Minimum wage thing is not surprising for a Tory.

He's a serial cuunt. Fillibustering under a flag of stopping poorly writen legislation but in reality just blocks anything with a wiff of liberalism / 21st century about it. He's classic "hangin, flogg em gammon. Has a 49% majority so he doesn't give a fiddlers. :

Quote:
Chope is a member of a group of backbench Conservative MPs who regularly object to private members bills which, in their view, have not received sufficient scrutiny. These have included a number which were previously believed to have widespread public and parliamentary support.[28] The BBC's parliamentary correspondent, Mark D'Arcy, said the group claim to "make a practice of ensuring that what they see as well-meaning but flabby legislation is not lazily plopped on to the statute book by a few MPs on a poorly attended Friday sitting."[29] Chope said that he objects on principle to legislation being introduced to the statute books without debate: "[T]his is something I have fought for in most of my time as an MP and it goes to the very heart of the power balance between the government and Parliament. The government is abusing parliamentary time for its own ends and in a democracy this is not acceptable. The government cannot just bring in what it wants on the nod."[30]

However, it has been noted that Chope does not object to all such Bills, particularly those that align with his own political views and those of his compatriots, with Conservative MP Zac Goldsmith commenting "In case anyone is tempted to believe he has a principled objection to private members’ bills, please note that once again he did not object to those put forward by his friends."[31][32]

On 12 March 2010, he blocked a bill to protect poor countries from vulture funds, despite his party's support for the bill.[33]

In December 2013, Chope objected to the second reading of the Alan Turing (Statutory Pardon) Bill in the House of Commons.[34] Because of this, the Government decided to act under the royal prerogative of mercy. On 24 December 2013, Queen Elizabeth II granted Turing a free pardon.[35][36]

In November 2014, Chope blocked a bill that would have banned the use of wild animals in circus performances, on the basis that a bill on EU membership should have been called before the bill.[37] In the same month, Chope, alongside Philip Davies, the Conservative MP for Shipley, filibustered a bill intended to make revenge evictions an offence.[38] Defending his filibuster, Chope claimed that the bill would have weakened landlords' ability to recover possessions, deterring them from letting properties.[39] Chope was reported as having been a private landlord himself, but he denied these claims.[39][40]

In October 2015, Chope, Davies and Conservative MP David Nuttall filibustered a private member's bill that would have placed restrictions on hospital parking charges for carers.[41]

On 15 June 2018, Chope blocked the passage of a private member's bill that would have made upskirting a specific offence. Chope said that his reason for blocking the passage was in objection to parliamentary procedure rather than to the bill itself: he stated that he would "wholeheartedly" support a government bill that outlawed upskirting.[30] Chope's actions drew immediate criticism from fellow MPs, including some in his own party.[42][43] The prime minister, Theresa May, also expressed her disappointment at the objection.[42] Following his objection, the government reaffirmed its commitment to introduce legislation to outlaw upskirting[44] and the bill to ban it in England and Wales – it was already an offence in Scotland – passed subject to Royal Assent in January 2019.[45] In protest at his actions, staff at the House of Commons placed a bunting of women's underwear outside Chope's office entrance. A similar bunting was also placed outside his constituency office.[46] Protestors also confronted Chope at his constituency surgery.[47]

On the same day as the upskirting bill, Chope and Davies forced a delay to the final debate on a bill which would have improved the oversight of the use of force in mental health units. Chope also blocked a bill which would have given extra legal protection to police dogs and horses.[28][48][49]

On 16 July 2018, Chope blocked a motion calling for the House of Commons chamber to be used for a Women MPs of the World Conference on a day in November when MPs were not sitting.[50][51] The conference was due to the mark the centenary of women's suffrage in the United Kingdom;[51][52] the motion had been moved by Conservative MP Mims Davies and was supported by Andrea Leadsom, the Leader of the House of Commons. Defending his actions, Chope stated that the Commons chamber should only be used by elected parliamentarians, with the exception of its annual use by the UK Youth Parliament.[50] Alongside Conservative MP Sir Desmond Swayne, Chope tabled an amendment to the motion which would require the conference to invite only parliamentarians and hold a debate while using the chamber.[50][53] Following Chope's actions, the government resubmitted the motion with the support of several departments.[54]

On 23 November 2018, Chope objected to a bill which would have amended the Children Act 1989 in order to increase the protective power of courts over girls at risk of female genital mutiliation.[55][56][57][58] Defending his actions, Chope said that the bill was an act of virtue signalling. Lord Berkeley of Knighton, who had introduced the bill, called for Chope to be deselected.[58][59] On 8 February 2019, Chope again blocked the bill.[60] The move was condemned by numerous government ministers, with Chope called to a meeting of his local Conservative association in order to explain his actions.[61]



Always worth making clear Chope doesn’t block all private member bills on principle, but he's keen to block some isolated examples and then claim it's about a wider point of principle. Essentially he's a liar and a disgusting human being


Seems to see no issue with a no deal Brexit (to bring it back to topic) - all in all an ubercunt.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 462
Bump from five or six weeks ago.
bimboman wrote:
derriz wrote:
bimboman wrote:
UK GDP growth currently exceeds both France and Germany. And no the adjust meant isn't like that at all, but there's little point in explaining that inflation is measured against more than food prices.


What are you odds are you offering on the UK exceeding the growth rates of France and Germany? Are you offering the same odds for the whole of the EU? How much money will you accept? By "currently" do you mean the current month, quarter or year?



I'll give you evens in Germany 2:1 on France ..... Though no one pays out on PR sadly.

Offering odds with the caveat that you're not going to pay out? Good thinking I suppose as it looks like you're losing both of these bets - which is impressive given they represent an attempt to deflect from your original claim that the UK was outgrowing the EU as a whole - something which hasn't happened since 2015.

From growing above the EU average for years until 2016, the EU growth is now 50% higher than that of the UK. From growing over twice as fast as France to growing more slowly. Fückin Brexiteer hubris.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2015 12:51 pm
Posts: 15061
RodneyRegis wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
Brexit is going to be a bonanza of cheap food now is it?

The Little Englanders are like bullshit whack-a-moles.


It could be, and I've explained why. Either refute it with reasons or get back in your box.

Of course, it very much depends on the tariffs decided on by the government of the day. Every chance they'd miss the open goal as they have done so regularly over the past 2 years, but at least a proper brexit would give us the facility. There is every opportunity to significantly reduce prices of food and clothing, which are probably the most important considerations for the poorest in our society.

But doubtless maninthebar is right and the farmers would stamp and shriek and get their own way, or even more likely we'll take Mays hideous deal or something similar and fudge ourselves forever.

It’s not the price of food and clothing that’s the problem for the poorest in society....JFC. Are you for real? You think that’s what the problem is? You realize if you cut that by 20% they wouldn’t care, I mean it’s about 20 quid a week.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:12 pm 
Online

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 48590
derriz wrote:
Bump from five or six weeks ago.
bimboman wrote:
derriz wrote:
bimboman wrote:
UK GDP growth currently exceeds both France and Germany. And no the adjust meant isn't like that at all, but there's little point in explaining that inflation is measured against more than food prices.


What are you odds are you offering on the UK exceeding the growth rates of France and Germany? Are you offering the same odds for the whole of the EU? How much money will you accept? By "currently" do you mean the current month, quarter or year?



I'll give you evens in Germany 2:1 on France ..... Though no one pays out on PR sadly.

Offering odds with the caveat that you're not going to pay out? Good thinking I suppose as it looks like you're losing both of these bets - which is impressive given they represent an attempt to deflect from your original claim that the UK was outgrowing the EU as a whole - something which hasn't happened since 2015.

From growing above the EU average for years until 2016, the EU growth is now 50% higher than that of the UK. From growing over twice as fast as France to growing more slowly. Fückin Brexiteer hubris.


https://mobile.twitter.com/afneil/statu ... 7650414592


50% higher ?

I'll pay out on 2018. Who had the greater growth, UK , Germany, France. Why don't you actually check this stuff before posting ?


Last edited by bimboman on Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 11, 2015 12:51 pm
Posts: 15061
Lorthern Nights wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
tazman77 wrote:


This is getting remarkably close to "the pound in your pocket" territory.


Quote:
"Analysts predict that in the event of no deal, sterling could fall by over 20%. Is this such a bad thing?

"Our goods will become 20% more competitive on the global market and our EU competitors' goods would be less competitive."


Which given how far it has already I am really looking forward to this Brexit dividend :uhoh:

Food and clothing will be cheaper....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:32 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 17719
Using MRP - staggering poll.

I think May could walk out of number 10, call all British people plum, and walk back in, and still lead in the polls vs Corbyn

Quote:
Times / YouGov EXC Poll and MRP Model

*Tories wd (just) get working majority in an election today winning 321 seats. Lab lose 12 seats*

Tonight we reveal results of 40,119 YouGov poll of GB adults between 2-7 Feb...

... using MRP model to translate into seats

Estimated seats result if there is an election today

(compared to 2017 GE result in brackets)

Tories 321 (up 4 from 317)
Labour 250 (down 12 from 362)
LD 16 (up 4 from 12)
UKIP 0 (0)
SNP 39 (up 4 from 35)
Green 1 (1)
PC 4 (4)
Other 2 (up 1 from 1)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:34 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 17719
Corbyn probably loves it though.

He gets his Brexit and gets to be an activist.

No need to worry about actually doing something in power.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:36 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 17719
Of course, that poll will be a MSM conspiracy and even if it is true, it's because people dislike Chuka Umunna


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33249
The UK now stocking up on bodybags. :shock: :shock:

https://twitter.com/Peston/status/1095017099855097859


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 3853
The Food & hospitality Industry let's Gove know they're pissed off with the omni-shambles, & want to see some policy.

angry people wrote:
If government seeks to press ahead with these consultations it will be seen by some as a sign of bad faith and many organisations may decline to respond


& Boris is trying valiantly to appear relevant; so he lets the EU know that he considers 6 months enough of a Backstop, because unlike those he gave to his wife, these vows he really means to keep ......

a twat wrote:
“I think it must be pretty obvious that if you are going to have a time limit to the backstop - and I think that would be very good - it has got to fall before the next election,”


[Edit]

Oh yeah, & in a surprise to absolutely no-one; Grayling has been shown to have lied to Parliament; when he didn't mention that they'd spent 800k on consultants, to vet Seabourne, & the consulantants, had made it plain, that SF shouldn't have been given a contract.... & yet he still has the support of the cabinet. No public money my arse !!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 2:54 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 18021
SamShark wrote:
Corbyn probably loves it though.

He gets his Brexit and gets to be an activist.

No need to worry about actually doing something in power.


I wish Labour had someone I could support. That idiot ffs


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:38 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 12:40 pm
Posts: 3640
Location: Suffolk ba
fishfoodie wrote:
The Food & hospitality Industry let's Gove know they're pissed off with the omni-shambles, & want to see some policy.

angry people wrote:
If government seeks to press ahead with these consultations it will be seen by some as a sign of bad faith and many organisations may decline to respond


& Boris is trying valiantly to appear relevant; so he lets the EU know that he considers 6 months enough of a Backstop, because unlike those he gave to his wife, these vows he really means to keep ......

a twat wrote:
“I think it must be pretty obvious that if you are going to have a time limit to the backstop - and I think that would be very good - it has got to fall before the next election,”


[Edit]

Oh yeah, & in a surprise to absolutely no-one; Grayling has been shown to have lied to Parliament; when he didn't mention that they'd spent 800k on consultants, to vet Seabourne, & the consulantants, had made it plain, that SF shouldn't have been given a contract.... & yet he still has the support of the cabinet. No public money my arse !!!


Surprisingly, the Chunnel (remember them?) are suing DoT for faulty procurement of the Seaborne contract.

Surprising in the sense that it has taken them this long


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:41 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 06, 2015 8:05 pm
Posts: 11194
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:42 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 10217
Location: Coalfalls
SamShark wrote:
Of course, that poll will be a MSM conspiracy and even if it is true, it's because people dislike Chuka Umunna

Unsurprising. Last time I tried to Chuka Umunna I put my back out. They’re heavier than they look.

OK OK I’m going now


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 462
bimboman wrote:
derriz wrote:
Bump from five or six weeks ago.
bimboman wrote:
derriz wrote:
bimboman wrote:
UK GDP growth currently exceeds both France and Germany. And no the adjust meant isn't like that at all, but there's little point in explaining that inflation is measured against more than food prices.


What are you odds are you offering on the UK exceeding the growth rates of France and Germany? Are you offering the same odds for the whole of the EU? How much money will you accept? By "currently" do you mean the current month, quarter or year?



I'll give you evens in Germany 2:1 on France ..... Though no one pays out on PR sadly.

Offering odds with the caveat that you're not going to pay out? Good thinking I suppose as it looks like you're losing both of these bets - which is impressive given they represent an attempt to deflect from your original claim that the UK was outgrowing the EU as a whole - something which hasn't happened since 2015.

From growing above the EU average for years until 2016, the EU growth is now 50% higher than that of the UK. From growing over twice as fast as France to growing more slowly. Fückin Brexiteer hubris.


https://mobile.twitter.com/afneil/statu ... 7650414592


50% higher ?

I'll pay out on 2018. Who had the greater growth, UK , Germany, France. Why don't you actually check this stuff before posting ?

:lol: - to "check" you mean consult a tweet from a climate-change denier? No wonder your world view is so at odds with reality.

Current estimates have 2018 GDP grown for the EU at 2.1%, the UK at 1.4% - looks like 50% higher to me. Last official release from Germany statistics is 1.5% for 2018 - current French estimates also 1.5%. But best you ignore regular media and stick to tweets and blogs in the brexit reality bubble.

In contrast to pre-referendum performance: UK 2.35%, Germany 1.7%, France 1.1%.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 33249
So Liam Fox was talking out of his hoop.

Quelle surprise.

Worth reading to the end.

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1094 ... 16096.html


Last edited by camroc1 on Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:36 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 22, 2016 9:43 am
Posts: 17901
Aussie WTO expert on today.

Didn't know that under the rules any deal you offer to a country outside of a trade agreement must me extended to every other WTO member.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 14065
camroc1 wrote:
So Liam Fox was talking out of his hoop.

Quell surprise.

Worth reading to the end.

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1094 ... 16096.html


Interesting read.

Quote:
20. As a smaller market, the UK will not only be negotiating all its future trade agreements from a weaker position, but countries with existing deals may want better terms as part of agreeing continuation.

Japan has already indicated they want a better a deal.


Also worth noting that Argentina feel that they have will be able to push for the Falklands after the 29thof next month.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 10:48 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 3731
Location: Monmouthshire
Rinkals wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
So Liam Fox was talking out of his hoop.

Quell surprise.

Worth reading to the end.

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1094 ... 16096.html


Interesting read.

Quote:
20. As a smaller market, the UK will not only be negotiating all its future trade agreements from a weaker position, but countries with existing deals may want better terms as part of agreeing continuation.

Japan has already indicated they want a better a deal.


Also worth noting that Argentina feel that they have will be able to push for the Falklands after the 29thof next month.

Add to that Gibraltar, NI, a pissed off Scotland and I fail to see how brexit in anyway is patriotic and unionist.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:07 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 17719
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:10 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 3559
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-47199037

Proposed immigration rules after Brexit "risk causing significant harm" to NI businesses, the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) has said.

The government is currently consulting on a minimum salary requirement of £30,000 for foreign workers seeking five-year visas.

The CBI said firms could face "severe difficulties" getting staff.

Some sectors in NI are heavily dependant on workers from Europe, such as food and drink manufacturing.

The average private sector wage in Northern Ireland is £22,000 and the CBI said 71% of all workers in the region earn below £30,000.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:10 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 22, 2016 9:43 am
Posts: 17901
The plan is clearly that the believe at the last second the EU will blink and throw Ireland under the bus.

I think it unlikely myself.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:13 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 12:40 pm
Posts: 3640
Location: Suffolk ba
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


All sorts of analysts are going to have fun with this in years to come:
Political studies: why an MP can't vote for an option they will then have to defend to their electorate; why Parties cannot forsake stated positions for fear of their voters
Game theorists: How does the calculation of an individual as to the likely outcomes affect their decision on voting
Historians: WTAF was going through their tiny brains


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 17719
Mullet 2 wrote:
The plan is clearly that the believe at the last second the EU will blink and throw Ireland under the bus.

I think it unlikely myself.


I'm not sure that they do believe that. Only really silly people like David Davis pretend to believe that.

Maybe it's choreographed in some way, to come up with a meaningless concession that allows enough people to climb down. I doubt the ERG will, but it's clear that the strategy of running down the clock (facilitated by Corbyn) means that there really are only two choices.

Whatever fools like Mogg want, I cant see MP's voting for no deal so if the EU write some new letter of assurance everyone will decide that's actually enough. It's a miracle!

As "the will of the people" is to accept a deal that neither Brexiters or remainers like, I wish we could now just do it rather than waste money on fake ferry companies and body bags.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:15 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 3559
Mullet 2 wrote:
The plan is clearly that the believe at the last second the EU will blink and throw Ireland under the bus.

I think it unlikely myself.

:thumbup:
https://extra.ie/2019/02/11/news/brexit/juncker-brexit-night-dublin
Jean-Claude Juncker and his right-hand man, Martin Selmayr, will come to Dublin to mark the night Britain leaves the European Union, it can be revealed.

The European Commission president and his top official plan to spend March 29 here to show solidarity with the Irish people at this crucial time.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:16 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 12:40 pm
Posts: 3640
Location: Suffolk ba
The odds say that the body bags will get used up in the end


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:17 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 3731
Location: Monmouthshire
ManInTheBar wrote:
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


All sorts of analysts are going to have fun with this in years to come:
Political studies: why an MP can't vote for an option they will then have to defend to their electorate; why Parties cannot forsake stated positions for fear of their voters
Game theorists: How does the calculation of an individual as to the likely outcomes affect their decision on voting
Historians: WTAF was going through their tiny brains

Historians are going to be brutal if no deal happens. May and Cameron could easily go down as the worst PM s and Corbin as the worst opposition leader in history. The polling results Sam posted really shows how awful a position we are in with our democracy.


Last edited by Petej on Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:17 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 17719
ManInTheBar wrote:
The odds say that the body bags will get used up in the end


Sooner or rather than later I guess, when the NHS and social care get the "benefit" of the "Brexit dividend"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:20 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 17719
Petej wrote:
ManInTheBar wrote:
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


All sorts of analysts are going to have fun with this in years to come:
Political studies: why an MP can't vote for an option they will then have to defend to their electorate; why Parties cannot forsake stated positions for fear of their voters
Game theorists: How does the calculation of an individual as to the likely outcomes affect their decision on voting
Historians: WTAF was going through their tiny brains

Historians are going to be brutal if no deal happens. May and Cameron could easily go down as the worst PM s and Corbin as opposition leader in history. The polling results Sam posted really shows how awful a position we are in with our democracy.


I hope we can do better than that. As I'm no lawyer this is merely wishful thinking, but any chance of misconduct in public office for a few of these people? A public enquiry is a bare minimum.

I honestly think as soon as we've left the EU - and it's too late to turn back - the floodgates of information will open.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:23 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 3559
ManInTheBar wrote:
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


All sorts of analysts are going to have fun with this in years to come:
Political studies: why an MP can't vote for an option they will then have to defend to their electorate; why Parties cannot forsake stated positions for fear of their voters
Game theorists: How does the calculation of an individual as to the likely outcomes affect their decision on voting
Historians: WTAF was going through their tiny brains

Economists: Who ultimately made money from Brexit.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:24 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 4116
Location: 'ertfordshire
Petej wrote:
ManInTheBar wrote:
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


All sorts of analysts are going to have fun with this in years to come:
Political studies: why an MP can't vote for an option they will then have to defend to their electorate; why Parties cannot forsake stated positions for fear of their voters
Game theorists: How does the calculation of an individual as to the likely outcomes affect their decision on voting
Historians: WTAF was going through their tiny brains

Historians are going to be brutal if no deal happens. May and Cameron could easily go down as the worst PM s and Corbin as the worst opposition leader in history. The polling results Sam posted really shows how awful a position we are in with our democracy.

Could? I can't think of anyone worse than those three. Though Ian Duncan-Smith would be pushing Corbyn hard.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:24 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 12:40 pm
Posts: 3640
Location: Suffolk ba
tazman77 wrote:
ManInTheBar wrote:
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


All sorts of analysts are going to have fun with this in years to come:
Political studies: why an MP can't vote for an option they will then have to defend to their electorate; why Parties cannot forsake stated positions for fear of their voters
Game theorists: How does the calculation of an individual as to the likely outcomes affect their decision on voting
Historians: WTAF was going through their tiny brains

Economists: Who ultimately made money from Brexit.


If you laid all the economists in the world end to end they still would not reach a conclusion (G B Shaw apocryphally)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:25 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2015 9:27 am
Posts: 1631
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.


Really?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2016 12:40 pm
Posts: 3640
Location: Suffolk ba
SaintK wrote:
Petej wrote:
ManInTheBar wrote:
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


All sorts of analysts are going to have fun with this in years to come:
Political studies: why an MP can't vote for an option they will then have to defend to their electorate; why Parties cannot forsake stated positions for fear of their voters
Game theorists: How does the calculation of an individual as to the likely outcomes affect their decision on voting
Historians: WTAF was going through their tiny brains

Historians are going to be brutal if no deal happens. May and Cameron could easily go down as the worst PM s and Corbin as the worst opposition leader in history. The polling results Sam posted really shows how awful a position we are in with our democracy.

Could? I can't think of anyone worse than those three. Though Ian Duncan-Smith would be pushing Corbyn hard.


We're hardly trying. Michael Howerd, Michael Foot,


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:36 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 21, 2015 9:27 am
Posts: 1631
SaintK wrote:
Petej wrote:
ManInTheBar wrote:
SamShark wrote:
I find it quite staggering that MPs are going to kick the can again.

If they are shit-scared of doing something different, rather than just expressing dissatisfaction at the options on the table, why not just admit they have nothing, and vote for May's deal and get it over with.

It's mind-blowingly stupid to just wait a while longer - do more damage to business confidence and spend more money on no deal prep - if they know deep down that all they will do is vote for it at the last minute when it's that versus no deal.

They are a shameful bunch collectively.


All sorts of analysts are going to have fun with this in years to come:
Political studies: why an MP can't vote for an option they will then have to defend to their electorate; why Parties cannot forsake stated positions for fear of their voters
Game theorists: How does the calculation of an individual as to the likely outcomes affect their decision on voting
Historians: WTAF was going through their tiny brains

Historians are going to be brutal if no deal happens. May and Cameron could easily go down as the worst PM s and Corbin as the worst opposition leader in history. The polling results Sam posted really shows how awful a position we are in with our democracy.

Could? I can't think of anyone worse than those three. Though Ian Duncan-Smith would be pushing Corbyn hard.

She makes Chamberlain look like Churchill


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:42 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:39 am
Posts: 2933
SamShark wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
The plan is clearly that the believe at the last second the EU will blink and throw Ireland under the bus.

I think it unlikely myself.


I'm not sure that they do believe that. Only really silly people like David Davis pretend to believe that.

Maybe it's choreographed in some way, to come up with a meaningless concession that allows enough people to climb down. I doubt the ERG will, but it's clear that the strategy of running down the clock (facilitated by Corbyn) means that there really are only two choices.

Whatever fools like Mogg want, I cant see MP's voting for no deal so if the EU write some new letter of assurance everyone will decide that's actually enough. It's a miracle!

As "the will of the people" is to accept a deal that neither Brexiters or remainers like, I wish we could now just do it rather than waste money on fake ferry companies and body bags.

Labour indicated that if their options were not accepted, then No-Deal isn't, so it should go "back to the people".


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:39 am
Posts: 2933
tazman77 wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
The plan is clearly that the believe at the last second the EU will blink and throw Ireland under the bus.

I think it unlikely myself.

:thumbup:
https://extra.ie/2019/02/11/news/brexit/juncker-brexit-night-dublin
Jean-Claude Juncker and his right-hand man, Martin Selmayr, will come to Dublin to mark the night Britain leaves the European Union, it can be revealed.

The European Commission president and his top official plan to spend March 29 here to show solidarity with the Irish people at this crucial time.

:thumbup:

Good, at least the Euros are acting in a proper manner.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:47 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 9039
Location: Sunny London
tazman77 wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
The plan is clearly that the believe at the last second the EU will blink and throw Ireland under the bus.

I think it unlikely myself.

:thumbup:
https://extra.ie/2019/02/11/news/brexit/juncker-brexit-night-dublin
Jean-Claude Juncker and his right-hand man, Martin Selmayr, will come to Dublin to mark the night Britain leaves the European Union, it can be revealed.

The European Commission president and his top official plan to spend March 29 here to show solidarity with the Irish people at this crucial time.


So they are going to be crying together..


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:48 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 3559
Leffe wrote:
SamShark wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
The plan is clearly that the believe at the last second the EU will blink and throw Ireland under the bus.

I think it unlikely myself.


I'm not sure that they do believe that. Only really silly people like David Davis pretend to believe that.

Maybe it's choreographed in some way, to come up with a meaningless concession that allows enough people to climb down. I doubt the ERG will, but it's clear that the strategy of running down the clock (facilitated by Corbyn) means that there really are only two choices.

Whatever fools like Mogg want, I cant see MP's voting for no deal so if the EU write some new letter of assurance everyone will decide that's actually enough. It's a miracle!

As "the will of the people" is to accept a deal that neither Brexiters or remainers like, I wish we could now just do it rather than waste money on fake ferry companies and body bags.

Labour indicated that if their options were not accepted, then No-Deal isn't, so it should go "back to the people".

https://www.theneweuropean.co.uk/top-stories/keir-starmer-unhappy-after-jeremy-corbyn-team-remove-reference-to-peoples-vote-letter-in-letter-to-theresa-may-1-5886937


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 11:50 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Posts: 18021
TranceNRG wrote:
tazman77 wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
The plan is clearly that the believe at the last second the EU will blink and throw Ireland under the bus.

I think it unlikely myself.

:thumbup:
https://extra.ie/2019/02/11/news/brexit/juncker-brexit-night-dublin
Jean-Claude Juncker and his right-hand man, Martin Selmayr, will come to Dublin to mark the night Britain leaves the European Union, it can be revealed.

The European Commission president and his top official plan to spend March 29 here to show solidarity with the Irish people at this crucial time.


So they are going to be laughing together..


Fixed, how is the market


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28324 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392 ... 709  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: bimboman, Bing [Bot], charltom, DOB, Edinburgh01, Google Adsense [Bot], Google [Bot], Hong Kong, Kiwias, Masterji, Mick Mannock, mr bungle, Turbogoat, Uthikoloshe, Zakar and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group