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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:07 pm 
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sewa wrote:
normilet wrote:
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May: Brexit documents represent a decisive breakthrough, but they're not the final deal. Intense week of negotiations ahead.


Properly confused now, even May is saying there's more negotiations. EU saying no, we're done negotiating. Which is it?


There is apparently two documents. One is the deal itself 565 pages approx, this is not up for negotiation. There is a seperate 7 page doc commiting to the general approach, this may get tweaked not that what is in it matters at all

One is legally binding. The other is political aspirations.

The second is open to tweaking. The first is not.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:34 pm 
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camroc1 wrote:
sewa wrote:
normilet wrote:
Quote:
May: Brexit documents represent a decisive breakthrough, but they're not the final deal. Intense week of negotiations ahead.


Properly confused now, even May is saying there's more negotiations. EU saying no, we're done negotiating. Which is it?


There is apparently two documents. One is the deal itself 565 pages approx, this is not up for negotiation. There is a seperate 7 page doc commiting to the general approach, this may get tweaked not that what is in it matters at all

One is legally binding. The other is political aspirations.

The second is open to tweaking. The first is not.

One is a proposal that ain't happening and the other is pie in the sky


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:49 pm 
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https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/10/ton ... ve-brexit/

This guy knows his onions.

Quote:
A world trade Brexit lets Britain set its own rules. It can say, right now, that it will not impose any tariff or quota on European produce and would recognise all EU product standards. That means no border controls for goods coming from Europe to Britain. You don’t need to negotiate this: just do it. If Europe knows what’s in its own best interests, it would fully reciprocate in order to maintain entirely free trade and full mutual recognition of standards right across Europe.

Next, the UK should declare that Europeans already living here should have the right to remain permanently — and, of course, become British citizens if they wish. This should be a unilateral offer. Again, you don’t need a deal. You don’t need Michel Barnier’s permission. If Europe knows what’s best for itself, it would likewise allow Britons to stay where they are.

Third, there should continue to be free movement of people from Europe into Britain — but with a few conditions. Only for work, not welfare. And with a foreign worker’s tax on the employer, to make sure anyone coming in would not be displacing British workers.

Fourth, no ‘divorce bill’ whatsoever should be paid to Brussels. The UK government would assume the EU’s property and liabilities in Britain, and the EU would assume Britain’s share of these in Europe. If Britain was getting its fair share, these would balance out; and if Britain wasn’t getting its fair share, it’s the EU that should be paying Britain.

Finally, there’s no need on Britain’s part for a hard border with Ireland. Britain wouldn’t be imposing tariffs on European goods, so there’s no money to collect. The UK has exactly the same product standards as the Republic, so let’s not pretend you need to check for problems we all know don’t exist. Some changes may be needed but technology allows for smart borders: there was never any need for a Cold War-style Checkpoint Charlie. Irish citizens, of course, have the right to live and work in the UK in an agreement that long predates EU membership.

Of course, the EU might not like this British leap for independence. It might hit out with tariffs and impose burdens on Britain as it does on the US — but WTO rules put a cap on any retaliatory action. The worst it can get? We’re talking levies of an average 4 or 5 per cent. Which would be more than offset by a post-Brexit devaluation of the pound (which would have the added bonus of making British goods more competitive everywhere).


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:55 pm 
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RodneyRegis wrote:
https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/10/tony-abbott-how-to-save-brexit/

This guy knows his onions.

Quote:
A world trade Brexit lets Britain set its own rules. It can say, right now, that it will not impose any tariff or quota on European produce and would recognise all EU product standards. That means no border controls for goods coming from Europe to Britain. You don’t need to negotiate this: just do it. If Europe knows what’s in its own best interests, it would fully reciprocate in order to maintain entirely free trade and full mutual recognition of standards right across Europe.

Next, the UK should declare that Europeans already living here should have the right to remain permanently — and, of course, become British citizens if they wish. This should be a unilateral offer. Again, you don’t need a deal. You don’t need Michel Barnier’s permission. If Europe knows what’s best for itself, it would likewise allow Britons to stay where they are.

Third, there should continue to be free movement of people from Europe into Britain — but with a few conditions. Only for work, not welfare. And with a foreign worker’s tax on the employer, to make sure anyone coming in would not be displacing British workers.

Fourth, no ‘divorce bill’ whatsoever should be paid to Brussels. The UK government would assume the EU’s property and liabilities in Britain, and the EU would assume Britain’s share of these in Europe. If Britain was getting its fair share, these would balance out; and if Britain wasn’t getting its fair share, it’s the EU that should be paying Britain.

Finally, there’s no need on Britain’s part for a hard border with Ireland. Britain wouldn’t be imposing tariffs on European goods, so there’s no money to collect. The UK has exactly the same product standards as the Republic, so let’s not pretend you need to check for problems we all know don’t exist. Some changes may be needed but technology allows for smart borders: there was never any need for a Cold War-style Checkpoint Charlie. Irish citizens, of course, have the right to live and work in the UK in an agreement that long predates EU membership.

Of course, the EU might not like this British leap for independence. It might hit out with tariffs and impose burdens on Britain as it does on the US — but WTO rules put a cap on any retaliatory action. The worst it can get? We’re talking levies of an average 4 or 5 per cent. Which would be more than offset by a post-Brexit devaluation of the pound (which would have the added bonus of making British goods more competitive everywhere).


That sort of delusional talk is two years out of date


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 1:55 pm 
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Utter bollocks. It is like the last couple of years never happened.....


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 2:00 pm 
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Shamelessly stolen from twitter:

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And then, then, then, Barnier said to May "How many Brexiteers does it take to change a lightbulb? One to promise a brighter future and the rest to screw it up!" ahahahaha!

Image


:lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 2:06 pm 
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RodneyRegis wrote:
https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/10/tony-abbott-how-to-save-brexit/

This guy knows his onions.

Quote:
A world trade Brexit lets Britain set its own rules. It can say, right now, that it will not impose any tariff or quota on European produce and would recognise all EU product standards. That means no border controls for goods coming from Europe to Britain. You don’t need to negotiate this: just do it. If Europe knows what’s in its own best interests, it would fully reciprocate in order to maintain entirely free trade and full mutual recognition of standards right across Europe.

Next, the UK should declare that Europeans already living here should have the right to remain permanently — and, of course, become British citizens if they wish. This should be a unilateral offer. Again, you don’t need a deal. You don’t need Michel Barnier’s permission. If Europe knows what’s best for itself, it would likewise allow Britons to stay where they are.

Third, there should continue to be free movement of people from Europe into Britain — but with a few conditions. Only for work, not welfare. And with a foreign worker’s tax on the employer, to make sure anyone coming in would not be displacing British workers.

Fourth, no ‘divorce bill’ whatsoever should be paid to Brussels. The UK government would assume the EU’s property and liabilities in Britain, and the EU would assume Britain’s share of these in Europe. If Britain was getting its fair share, these would balance out; and if Britain wasn’t getting its fair share, it’s the EU that should be paying Britain.

Finally, there’s no need on Britain’s part for a hard border with Ireland. Britain wouldn’t be imposing tariffs on European goods, so there’s no money to collect. The UK has exactly the same product standards as the Republic, so let’s not pretend you need to check for problems we all know don’t exist. Some changes may be needed but technology allows for smart borders: there was never any need for a Cold War-style Checkpoint Charlie. Irish citizens, of course, have the right to live and work in the UK in an agreement that long predates EU membership.

Of course, the EU might not like this British leap for independence. It might hit out with tariffs and impose burdens on Britain as it does on the US — but WTO rules put a cap on any retaliatory action. The worst it can get? We’re talking levies of an average 4 or 5 per cent. Which would be more than offset by a post-Brexit devaluation of the pound (which would have the added bonus of making British goods more competitive everywhere).


We need 2 brexit threads, one for functioning adults and one for the rest. This is supposed to be a serious discussion but it can't happen with this nonsense stinking up the thread.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 2:13 pm 
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RodneyRegis wrote:
https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/10/tony-abbott-how-to-save-brexit/

This guy knows his onions.

Quote:
A world trade Brexit lets Britain set its own rules. It can say, right now, that it will not impose any tariff or quota on European produce and would recognise all EU product standards. That means no border controls for goods coming from Europe to Britain. You don’t need to negotiate this: just do it. If Europe knows what’s in its own best interests, it would fully reciprocate in order to maintain entirely free trade and full mutual recognition of standards right across Europe.

Next, the UK should declare that Europeans already living here should have the right to remain permanently — and, of course, become British citizens if they wish. This should be a unilateral offer. Again, you don’t need a deal. You don’t need Michel Barnier’s permission. If Europe knows what’s best for itself, it would likewise allow Britons to stay where they are.

Third, there should continue to be free movement of people from Europe into Britain — but with a few conditions. Only for work, not welfare. And with a foreign worker’s tax on the employer, to make sure anyone coming in would not be displacing British workers.

Fourth, no ‘divorce bill’ whatsoever should be paid to Brussels. The UK government would assume the EU’s property and liabilities in Britain, and the EU would assume Britain’s share of these in Europe. If Britain was getting its fair share, these would balance out; and if Britain wasn’t getting its fair share, it’s the EU that should be paying Britain.

Finally, there’s no need on Britain’s part for a hard border with Ireland. Britain wouldn’t be imposing tariffs on European goods, so there’s no money to collect. The UK has exactly the same product standards as the Republic, so let’s not pretend you need to check for problems we all know don’t exist. Some changes may be needed but technology allows for smart borders: there was never any need for a Cold War-style Checkpoint Charlie. Irish citizens, of course, have the right to live and work in the UK in an agreement that long predates EU membership.

Of course, the EU might not like this British leap for independence. It might hit out with tariffs and impose burdens on Britain as it does on the US — but WTO rules put a cap on any retaliatory action. The worst it can get? We’re talking levies of an average 4 or 5 per cent. Which would be more than offset by a post-Brexit devaluation of the pound (which would have the added bonus of making British goods more competitive everywhere).



Yep.

This is what will of course happen if we "crash" out.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 2:31 pm 
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La soule wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:

Those countries have much bigger populations. Take the GDP per capita The Swiss and Norway rank about Germany, UK and France. This is obviously the fact I was referring to.

As for the Brexit predictions, things wrong are the mass exodus of business and banks which are barely moving, more opening a new office in paris or somewhere, wrong about investment, the Uk has had record investment at times post Brexit and article 50, wrong about unemployment, wrong about economic growth, etc. There are precious few other economic measurements that matter here. Most of which are due to the uncertainty. As I said the short term is always going to have some changes business have to wait for.


It was not obvious and hardly makes any sense at all.

It is not post Brexit yet, as it has not yet happened. Jobs are shifting to EU locations whether you like it or not and this trend will dramatically increase in case of hard Brexit.


I referenced that and we have seen every little. The obvious opening of new offices and movement where they have to stay in the EU but not the wholesale movement as predicted. I predict some more, naturally when business see the final details and have to re-sort themselves. We are almost on the cusp of Brexit but we aren't seeing anything drastic, which is what was predicted if the vote went against the EU.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 2:36 pm 
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La soule wrote:
Utter bollocks. It is like the last couple of years never happened.....


I don't entirely agree with it. But you realise this is exactly what Tony Abbott achieved as PM of Australia? He set-up a number of trade deals in record time, scrapped the political connections with them and reaped the benefits.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:06 pm 
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That sort of delusional talk is two years out of date

Utter bollocks. It is like the last couple of years never happened.....

We need 2 brexit threads, one for functioning adults and one for the rest. This is supposed to be a serious discussion but it can't happen with this nonsense stinking up the thread.


Standard remainer/Irish responses. Of course, you lads all know better than Tony Abbott. I bet he's never even negotiated a trade deal, unlike yous experts?

Refute a single one of his points:
Uk could opt not to impose tariffs on EU imports under WTO.
UK could offer Europeans the right to remain after 'hard' Brexit.
UK could bring in a selective immigration policy after 'hard' Brexit.
No need for divorce bill in case of 'hard' Brexit.
No need for UK to impose a hard border.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:17 pm 
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https://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu-nireland-border/wto-rules-clear-on-border-checks-in-no-deal-brexit-uk-northern-ireland-minister-idUSKCN1NO18I?il=0

BELFAST (Reuters) - World Trade Organization (WTO) rules are clear that checks would be required between EU-member Ireland and the British province of Northern Ireland if Britain crashed out of the bloc without an exit deal, the minister for the region said on Monday.

“The fact is that the WTO is very clear that if there are two different customs territories, checks have to be able to be carried out on a contemporaneous basis on consignments passing between the two territories,” Karen Bradley told reporters.

“How this is done would be something we could negotiate. We will do, as the UK government, everything we can do to avoid there being a hard border on the island of Ireland. We do not want to see physical infrastructure but WTO rules are clear.”

Ireland’s prime minister on Friday said for the first time his government would find it very difficult to avoid imposing a hard border on Northern Ireland in a so-called no deal Brexit.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:41 pm 
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I am no expert, but I would imagine that the prospect of goods being introduced into the EU from outside without being subject to the standards required of other EU countries would be unlikely to find favour with the bulk of the 27 remaining EU nations.

I have certainly heard the suggestion that the EU "can go whistle" for any monies owed, but I'm not sure that that would be acceptable either.

Also, the World has moved on since GB held it's place as a Super Power 40 years ago.

Other than that, it's spot on. Easiest deal ever.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:48 pm 
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Of course she said that.

As if WTO would impose hard borders :lol:

They'd need to run point of origin checks. As if these have to be done physically on the f**king border.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:49 pm 
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40years ago, the UK was bankrupt and taking loans from the IMF.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:51 pm 
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RodneyRegis wrote:
Of course she said that.

As if WTO would impose hard borders :lol:

They'd need to run point of origin checks. As if these have to be done physically on the f**king border.


Sorry, I may have given the impression I was taking you seriously and was responding to your post. Please rest assured this wasn't intended.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:59 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
40years ago, the UK was bankrupt and taking loans from the IMF.

Well, there you go then.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 4:00 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
40years ago, the UK was bankrupt and taking loans from the IMF.


Yes it was. Thank fcuk we joined with the rest of Europe to become the worlds 5th, sorry 6th -or is it 7th now - economy.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 5:04 pm 
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easyray wrote:
bimboman wrote:
40years ago, the UK was bankrupt and taking loans from the IMF.


Yes it was. Thank fcuk we joined with the rest of Europe to become the worlds 5th, sorry 6th -or is it 7th now - economy.



No that was monetarism. Since the Euro btw, UK has grown 12% more than France and Germany, we were told that not joining the Euro would be a disaster.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 5:35 pm 
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eldanielfire wrote:
La soule wrote:
Utter bollocks. It is like the last couple of years never happened.....


I don't entirely agree with it. But you realise this is exactly what Tony Abbott achieved as PM of Australia? He set-up a number of trade deals in record time, scrapped the political connections with them and reaped the benefits.

You are right not to agree with it. Not least because Tony Abbott wrote it.

The Japan Trade deal took something like 7 years, longer even than the EU's own trade deal.

China was quicker but certainly had political connections. Trade deals tend to. Under it, thousands of Chinese migrant labourers poured into Aus on construction projects. Unlike our beloved Romanians who undercut our angry but lazy natives, these Chinese migrants don't even have to be employed subject to local labour laws. Not many native Aussies volunteering for that work (even if they were offered it)

The confused, formerly Remain-supporting Tony Abbott converted wholesale post referendum to Brexit. He immediately offered the UK a quickest ever trade deal that year that would be "ready to go" the same day the UK left the EU. He then failed to keep his own job long enough to oversee a lightning fast deal that even thickheads like Liam Fox now know could never have happened.

An opportunist politician doesn't really count as an expert. We have learnt that much by now, shirley?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 5:45 pm 
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The Spanish aren't happy. Will block it apprantly. :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 5:49 pm 
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These ERG Brexiters don't seem very good at maths, first they got the £350m a week all wrong and now they can't even count up to 48. They're hopeless.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 5:57 pm 
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Brexit is the undefined being negotiated by the
unprepared in order to get the unspecified for the uninformed.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 6:25 pm 
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Barnier confirms it was Theresa May who requested a single customs area in perpetuity !


All this while pretending to be fighting for brexit.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 7:55 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Barnier confirms it was Theresa May who requested a single customs area in perpetuity !


All this while pretending to be fighting for brexit.

I think she was arguing from Corbyn's manifesto :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 8:45 pm 
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c69 wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Barnier confirms it was Theresa May who requested a single customs area in perpetuity !


All this while pretending to be fighting for brexit.

I think she was arguing from Corbyn's manifesto :lol:



I used to say Blair in a Dress, but she really is further left than that isn't she.





(Though of course Corbyn needs out of the customs area to make us all state slaves).


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 9:20 pm 
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shereblue wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
La soule wrote:
Utter bollocks. It is like the last couple of years never happened.....


I don't entirely agree with it. But you realise this is exactly what Tony Abbott achieved as PM of Australia? He set-up a number of trade deals in record time, scrapped the political connections with them and reaped the benefits.

You are right not to agree with it. Not least because Tony Abbott wrote it.



Quote:

The Japan Trade deal took something like 7 years, longer even than the EU's own trade deal.


Actually under Abbot it took much shorter. It was going on and on and he got fed-up of prior regimes taking forever to set up deals via civil servants who enjoyed the trips to much. So directed the creation of new trade negotiation teams, directed them with soem specific instructions and started making trade deals within 2 years, many shorter then that.


Quote:

China was quicker but certainly had political connections. Trade deals tend to. Under it, thousands of Chinese migrant labourers poured into Aus on construction projects. Unlike our beloved Romanians who undercut our angry but lazy natives, these Chinese migrants don't even have to be employed subject to local labour laws. Not many native Aussies volunteering for that work (even if they were offered it)

The confused, formerly Remain-supporting Tony Abbott converted wholesale post referendum to Brexit. He immediately offered the UK a quickest ever trade deal that year that would be "ready to go" the same day the UK left the EU. He then failed to keep his own job long enough to oversee a lightning fast deal that even thickheads like Liam Fox now know could never have happened.


I am aware of that. But none of that is his point. He's somebody who ran a country that was in a similar position that the UK is heading to and set-up a number of successes in the trade deals.

Quote:
An opportunist politician doesn't really count as an expert. We have learnt that much by now, shirley?


I'm not sure why you are dismissing his words on the matter. If anything he's exactly got the advice and know-how that is relevant here.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 9:24 pm 
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bimboman wrote:
Barnier confirms it was Theresa May who requested a single customs area in perpetuity !


All this while pretending to be fighting for brexit.


What's the problem? It's the withdrawal deal this is part of, not the future trade deal. As I said staying in Customs until a trade deal is sorted is perfectly sensible. Why rush the dates in this when it's the UKs future for decades that will be controlled by the deal. Getting it right is more important then rushing out. She also still got control of immigration and other areas in the meanwhile which literally no other European nation has in connection with the EU.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 9:26 pm 
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easyray wrote:
bimboman wrote:
40years ago, the UK was bankrupt and taking loans from the IMF.


Yes it was. Thank fcuk we joined with the rest of Europe to become the worlds 5th, sorry 6th -or is it 7th now - economy.


We were bankrupt after we joined the ECC, not before it. It is many of Thatcher's reforms after which helped lead to the UKs future economic strength.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 10:23 pm 
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eldanielfire wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Barnier confirms it was Theresa May who requested a single customs area in perpetuity !


All this while pretending to be fighting for brexit.


What's the problem? It's the withdrawal deal this is part of, not the future trade deal. As I said staying in Customs until a trade deal is sorted is perfectly sensible. Why rush the dates in this when it's the UKs future for decades that will be controlled by the deal. Getting it right is more important then rushing out. She also still got control of immigration and other areas in the meanwhile which literally no other European nation has in connection with the EU.



And the "negotiation" of a trade deal will never ever finish. The EU don't have to concede on anything in that deal because they not us decide on all the rules and if we as the UK have to follow them in perpetuity.

We will never be allowed to leave the customs union. We will never set our own trade policy.

Even our immigration will be bound to the ECJ.

Wake up May is lying about even the tiny benefits.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:11 pm 
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So the DUP voted against the Tory government on a finance bill, That's the Confidence and Supply deal gone as well.
From Stephen Swinford, Deputy Political Editor of The Telegraph.

Quote:
The DUP has tonight voted WITH Labour against the Government on the finance bill.

That feels like more than a warning shot. Confidence and supply agreement over?


https://twitter.com/Steven_Swinford?ref ... ond-Thread)%2Fpage1874

May must be pretty confident she has votes in the HoC elsewhere.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 8:00 am 
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Ah well that's the end of any meaningful legislation being passed this Parliament.
Let the fun and games begin


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:03 am 
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camroc1 wrote:
So the DUP voted against the Tory government on a finance bill, That's the Confidence and Supply deal gone as well.
They did not vote against the governments amendments but they support a Labour one.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:07 am 
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Who would have guessed that stickying a thread would be the best way to kill it


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:12 am 
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eldanielfire wrote:
bimboman wrote:
Barnier confirms it was Theresa May who requested a single customs area in perpetuity !


All this while pretending to be fighting for brexit.


What's the problem? It's the withdrawal deal this is part of, not the future trade deal. As I said staying in Customs until a trade deal is sorted is perfectly sensible. Why rush the dates in this when it's the UKs future for decades that will be controlled by the deal. Getting it right is more important then rushing out. She also still got control of immigration and other areas in the meanwhile which literally no other European nation has in connection with the EU.


You always had control of immigration, you just didn't bother to use it.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:19 am 
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Anonymous. wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
So the DUP voted against the Tory government on a finance bill, That's the Confidence and Supply deal gone as well.
They did not vote against the governments amendments but they support a Labour one.



No they abstained so it was a warning shot for now. Though there's no way they'll vote for Mays deal.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:20 am 
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Will you stop engaging him FFS


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 9:20 am 
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RodneyRegis wrote:
Quote:
That sort of delusional talk is two years out of date

Utter bollocks. It is like the last couple of years never happened.....

We need 2 brexit threads, one for functioning adults and one for the rest. This is supposed to be a serious discussion but it can't happen with this nonsense stinking up the thread.


Standard remainer/Irish responses. Of course, you lads all know better than Tony Abbott. I bet he's never even negotiated a trade deal, unlike yous experts?

Refute a single one of his points:
Uk could opt not to impose tariffs on EU imports under WTO.
UK could offer Europeans the right to remain after 'hard' Brexit.
UK could bring in a selective immigration policy after 'hard' Brexit.
No need for divorce bill in case of 'hard' Brexit.
No need for UK to impose a hard border.



So:

Quote:
it would fully reciprocate in order to maintain entirely free trade and full mutual recognition of standards right across Europe.


That wont work. It has been clear for the best part of two years now.

Quote:
Fourth, no ‘divorce bill’ whatsoever should be paid to Brussels.


That wont work either.

The guy is clueless on the Irish border challenge. Great if people retain freedom of movement but that would piss your average Joe Brexiter off.

It is bollocks.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 10:05 am 
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https://www.rte.ie/news/brexit/2018/1119/1011805-brexit-transition-barnier/

Spain warning it won't approve unless Gibraltar issue is clarified

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-deal-leave-remain-analysis-eu-theresa-may-plan-draft-latest-ministers-a8642161.html

Also the UK Government is being forced to publish the comparison of the Brexit deal to remaining in the EU :twisted:


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 20, 2018 10:10 am 
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Spain's prime minister has said his country will vote against the draft Brexit withdrawal agreement if the text on Gibraltar is not changed.

"As of today, if there are no changes with respect to Gibraltar, Spain will vote no to the agreement on Brexit," Pedro Sanchez says.


Pretty unequivocal I guess.

Quote:
May tells the Belfast Telegraph that the Brexit deal on the table puts Northern Ireland in a "fantastic position".

In an opinion piece published in the newspaper, the PM claims the region's constitutional status within the UK has been guaranteed.

"The challenge of Brexit has always been to continue our deep trading links and security co-operation with the EU in our new relationship, whilst freeing us to take advantage of the opportunities, such as an independent trade policy," she writes.

"This deal strikes that balance, and puts Northern Ireland in a fantastic position for the future."


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