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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:16 pm 
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Brazil wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Has Byrons burgers gone bang? I sort of know the guy who financed them.


Close. They had to close some of the restaurants but, mercifully, I can still get my B-Rex hit when the mood takes me.


You would love this place.

https://www.heartattackgrill.com/

Myself and Mrs Fitz went here after we got married by Elvis


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:19 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
Brazil wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Has Byrons burgers gone bang? I sort of know the guy who financed them.


Close. They had to close some of the restaurants but, mercifully, I can still get my B-Rex hit when the mood takes me.


You would love this place.

https://www.heartattackgrill.com/

Myself and Mrs Fitz went here after we got married by Elvis

Elvis married you and wife? Crikey. "Bless my soul"!


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:24 pm 
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I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:31 pm 
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The only time we've been in one was in the Royal Arcade in Norwich (quelle surprise).

It was good. The best bit was probably the staff.

One of our Oundle residents came in there! I don't know but we seem to have these things happen, all over the world.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:34 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
Brazil wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Has Byrons burgers gone bang? I sort of know the guy who financed them.


Close. They had to close some of the restaurants but, mercifully, I can still get my B-Rex hit when the mood takes me.


You would love this place.

https://www.heartattackgrill.com/

Myself and Mrs Fitz went here after we got married by Elvis

How gauche. We did beers and Philly cheese steaks in Twin Peaks after being married by the Blues Brothers.

Much classier affair.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:40 pm 
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A5D5E5 wrote:
I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.



I seem to recall a lot of bad press stories about how they treat their staff a few years back, tipping policy and the like.

His restaurant near me in Richmond was always mostly empty and did not look that clean when we poked our heads around the door before walking straight back out. Also, the fact that there are hundreds of local independent family run Italian restaurants in London probably did not help much either.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:41 pm 
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ZappaMan wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
Brazil wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Has Byrons burgers gone bang? I sort of know the guy who financed them.


Close. They had to close some of the restaurants but, mercifully, I can still get my B-Rex hit when the mood takes me.


You would love this place.

https://www.heartattackgrill.com/

Myself and Mrs Fitz went here after we got married by Elvis

How gauche. We did beers and Philly cheese steaks in Twin Peaks after being married by the Blues Brothers.

Much classier affair.


The King does not agree.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:42 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
ZappaMan wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
Brazil wrote:
Chilli wrote:
Has Byrons burgers gone bang? I sort of know the guy who financed them.


Close. They had to close some of the restaurants but, mercifully, I can still get my B-Rex hit when the mood takes me.


You would love this place.

https://www.heartattackgrill.com/

Myself and Mrs Fitz went here after we got married by Elvis

How gauche. We did beers and Philly cheese steaks in Twin Peaks after being married by the Blues Brothers.

Much classier affair.


The King does not agree.

But he's left


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:54 pm 
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Location: The centre of The Horrendous Space Kablooie!
His recipe books can be rather annoying.

Great wodges of text, often with vague it no instructions on temperature "heat your oven". To what, Jamie?

Annoying terms substituted for actual measurements, "whack a lug of olive oil in the pan".

Etc.

In the last ten years of cooking for the family, I have buggered up precisely two recipies, both from his books. And I cook everything at the weekends and often of an evening.

I will say this, though, his recipe for roast potatoes and veg works perfectly every time.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:58 pm 
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I am guessing they'll make a song and dance about "saving the jobs", do a CVA, fuck over the creditors, close a few sites and keep it going.

These chains are an absolute stain on the High Street.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 4:59 pm 
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The Man Without Fear wrote:
His recipe books can be rather annoying.

Great wodges of text, often with vague it no instructions on temperature "heat your oven". To what, Jamie?

Annoying terms substituted for actual measurements, "whack a lug of olive oil in the pan".

Etc.

In the last ten years of cooking for the family, I have buggered up precisely two recipies, both from his books. And I cook everything at the weekends and often of an evening.

I will say this, though, his recipe for roast potatoes and veg works perfectly every time.


He embodies precision rusticness.
He fusses endlessly to make it look like he hasn’t fussed at all.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:04 pm 
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The Man Without Fear wrote:
His recipe books can be rather annoying.

Great wodges of text, often with vague it no instructions on temperature "heat your oven". To what, Jamie?

Annoying terms substituted for actual measurements, "whack a lug of olive oil in the pan".

Etc.

In the last ten years of cooking for the family, I have buggered up precisely two recipies, both from his books. And I cook everything at the weekends and often of an evening.

I will say this, though, his recipe for roast potatoes and veg works perfectly every time.


Most cook books these days fall under the coffee table 'aspirational living' category rather then a useful tool to assist with actually preparing a meal. The endless photos of staged show home kitchens littered with the chefs painfully happy middle class family who seem to be straight from a Nazi test tube make them all a bit nauseating.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:12 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.



I seem to recall a lot of bad press stories about how they treat their staff a few years back, tipping policy and the like.

His restaurant near me in Richmond was always mostly empty and did not look that clean when we poked our heads around the door before walking straight back out. Also, the fact that there are hundreds of local independent family run Italian restaurants in London probably did not help much either.


The Richer Sounds lad seems to show there's another way of running a business. He got down on the floor with the staff, paid them well (with them ultimately owning most of the business.) Didn't try to cut corners and made sure none of his staff were forced into high pressure situations, either sales tactics or cost cutting.

For anyone who says that only applies to certain businesses you need to remember Richer Sounds operates in a sector largely pushed off the highstreet towards out-of-town retail parks, and even more towards online only, and he made it work remaining where it always was.

It ties into my own ideas about the high street. That for a business to survive there it needs to move towards honest engagement with customers from valued (by the business) employees who turn that respect into high levels of knowledge for what they're doing, resulting in good service for the customer. The high street needs to be expertise based and engaged with people as the likes of Amazon, for all their algorithm based suggestions, cannot match that.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:17 pm 
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CarrotGawks wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.



I seem to recall a lot of bad press stories about how they treat their staff a few years back, tipping policy and the like.

His restaurant near me in Richmond was always mostly empty and did not look that clean when we poked our heads around the door before walking straight back out. Also, the fact that there are hundreds of local independent family run Italian restaurants in London probably did not help much either.


The Richer Sounds lad seems to show there's another way of running a business. He got down on the floor with the staff, paid them well (with them ultimately owning most of the business.) Didn't try to cut corners and made sure none of his staff were forced into high pressure situations, either sales tactics or cost cutting.

For anyone who says that only applies to certain businesses you need to remember Richer Sounds operates in a sector largely pushed off the highstreet towards out-of-town retail parks, and even more towards online only, and he made it work remaining where it always was.

It ties into my own ideas about the high street. That for a business to survive there it needs to move towards honest engagement with customers from valued (by the business) employees who turn that respect into high levels of knowledge for what they're doing, resulting in good service for the customer. The high street needs to be expertise based and engaged with people as the likes of Amazon, for all their algorithm based suggestions, cannot match that.



Primark have come up with a great way to get people in their high street stores. You can't buy Primark clothes online. It's a simple strategy but they are bucking the trend and posting record numbers. Once in the store, it's much easier for them to manipulate the consumer into buying more than they planned on buying and this is reflected in average transaction data.

I can see other retailers following suit.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:17 pm 
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I'm wedded to Beck, Bertholle and Child. "Mastering the Art of French Cooking", plus a few others.

Rarely let me down but they need a lot of work and timing is key.

Especially if you get guests who want their steak cooked to a shoe leather and the others happy with bleu and all things in between.

I usually get it reasonably right as I check for preference and barbecue some and on the hob for others.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:19 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:
His recipe books can be rather annoying.

Great wodges of text, often with vague it no instructions on temperature "heat your oven". To what, Jamie?

Annoying terms substituted for actual measurements, "whack a lug of olive oil in the pan".

Etc.

In the last ten years of cooking for the family, I have buggered up precisely two recipies, both from his books. And I cook everything at the weekends and often of an evening.

I will say this, though, his recipe for roast potatoes and veg works perfectly every time.


Most cook books these days fall under the coffee table 'aspirational living' category rather then a useful tool to assist with actually preparing a meal. The endless photos of staged show home kitchens littered with the chefs painfully happy middle class family who seem to be straight from a Nazi test tube make them all a bit nauseating.

Most of the prose is to personalise it. If you just type out a list, it's not subject to copyright.

Edit - [globus] Jack monroe was telling me how this can be a real problem just the other day


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:22 pm 
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Michel Roux is a great chef. And a very nice man.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:23 pm 
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ForzaIt wrote:
CarrotGawks wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.



I seem to recall a lot of bad press stories about how they treat their staff a few years back, tipping policy and the like.

His restaurant near me in Richmond was always mostly empty and did not look that clean when we poked our heads around the door before walking straight back out. Also, the fact that there are hundreds of local independent family run Italian restaurants in London probably did not help much either.


The Richer Sounds lad seems to show there's another way of running a business. He got down on the floor with the staff, paid them well (with them ultimately owning most of the business.) Didn't try to cut corners and made sure none of his staff were forced into high pressure situations, either sales tactics or cost cutting.

For anyone who says that only applies to certain businesses you need to remember Richer Sounds operates in a sector largely pushed off the highstreet towards out-of-town retail parks, and even more towards online only, and he made it work remaining where it always was.

It ties into my own ideas about the high street. That for a business to survive there it needs to move towards honest engagement with customers from valued (by the business) employees who turn that respect into high levels of knowledge for what they're doing, resulting in good service for the customer. The high street needs to be expertise based and engaged with people as the likes of Amazon, for all their algorithm based suggestions, cannot match that.



Primark have come up with a great way to get people in their high street stores. You can't buy Primark clothes online. It's a simple strategy but they are bucking the trend and posting record numbers. Once in the store, it's much easier for them to manipulate the consumer into buying more than they planned on buying and this is reflected in average transaction data.

I can see other retailers following suit.


Primark have a brand in place for fast-fashion that's satisfying a warped desire. Sure, it's great that affordable clothes are available. But the pressure to always have something new to wear is what's keeping them going, with them filling that need having cornered the market (partially due to not being online.) I'm not sure how many people would buy such cheap fast-fashion online if they could get their hands on it immediately elsewhere. Fast-fashion isn't just cheaply made, designed to be thrown out. It's made to satisfy an instant desire, which high-street only fills. (Something I have issues with, personally.)


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:26 pm 
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Had a decent dinner in one of his restaurants in central London. I was glad I did not have to pay for it though. Very expensive.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:27 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:
His recipe books can be rather annoying.

Great wodges of text, often with vague it no instructions on temperature "heat your oven". To what, Jamie?

Annoying terms substituted for actual measurements, "whack a lug of olive oil in the pan".

Etc.

In the last ten years of cooking for the family, I have buggered up precisely two recipies, both from his books. And I cook everything at the weekends and often of an evening.

I will say this, though, his recipe for roast potatoes and veg works perfectly every time.


Most cook books these days fall under the coffee table 'aspirational living' category rather then a useful tool to assist with actually preparing a meal. The endless photos of staged show home kitchens littered with the chefs painfully happy middle class family who seem to be straight from a Nazi test tube make them all a bit nauseating.

Most of the prose is to personalise it. If you just type out a list, it's not subject to copyright.

Edit - [globus] Jack monroe was telling me how this can be a real problem just the other day


Lists can constitute a database which is copyrightable, but obviously it's more legal work to prove and enforce than plain prose. It's like if you republished the football scores, taking them all from the BBC that'd be a problem. But if you could show that you sourced them independently, or obfuscated getting them from the BBC it'd be hard for the BBC to prove.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:29 pm 
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ForzaIt wrote:
CarrotGawks wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.



I seem to recall a lot of bad press stories about how they treat their staff a few years back, tipping policy and the like.

His restaurant near me in Richmond was always mostly empty and did not look that clean when we poked our heads around the door before walking straight back out. Also, the fact that there are hundreds of local independent family run Italian restaurants in London probably did not help much either.


The Richer Sounds lad seems to show there's another way of running a business. He got down on the floor with the staff, paid them well (with them ultimately owning most of the business.) Didn't try to cut corners and made sure none of his staff were forced into high pressure situations, either sales tactics or cost cutting.

For anyone who says that only applies to certain businesses you need to remember Richer Sounds operates in a sector largely pushed off the highstreet towards out-of-town retail parks, and even more towards online only, and he made it work remaining where it always was.

It ties into my own ideas about the high street. That for a business to survive there it needs to move towards honest engagement with customers from valued (by the business) employees who turn that respect into high levels of knowledge for what they're doing, resulting in good service for the customer. The high street needs to be expertise based and engaged with people as the likes of Amazon, for all their algorithm based suggestions, cannot match that.



Primark have come up with a great way to get people in their high street stores. You can't buy Primark clothes online. It's a simple strategy but they are bucking the trend and posting record numbers. Once in the store, it's much easier for them to manipulate the consumer into buying more than they planned on buying and this is reflected in average transaction data.

I can see other retailers following suit.


Well that and dirt cheap sweatshop products


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:30 pm 
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CarrotGawks wrote:
ForzaIt wrote:
Primark have come up with a great way to get people in their high street stores. You can't buy Primark clothes online. It's a simple strategy but they are bucking the trend and posting record numbers. Once in the store, it's much easier for them to manipulate the consumer into buying more than they planned on buying and this is reflected in average transaction data.

I can see other retailers following suit.


Primark have a brand in place for fast-fashion that's satisfying a warped desire. Sure, it's great that affordable clothes are available. But the pressure to always have something new to wear is what's keeping them going, with them filling that need having cornered the market (partially due to not being online.) I'm not sure how many people would buy such cheap fast-fashion online if they could get their hands on it immediately elsewhere. Fast-fashion isn't just cheaply made, designed to be thrown out. It's made to satisfy an instant desire, which high-street only fills. (Something I have issues with, personally.)



I've never been in a Primark but I know it's a cheap and cheerful retailer. This is important because since the internet has grown, the only other retailers that have eschewed it, largely completely, are at the complete opposite end of the retail spectrum; the expensive luxury branded goods market.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:30 pm 
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Armchair_Superstar wrote:
I am guessing they'll make a song and dance about "saving the jobs", do a CVA, fuck over the creditors, close a few sites and keep it going.

These chains are an absolute stain on the High Street.

The food was crap. It wasn’t the first cousin of Italian cooking


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:31 pm 
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Reckon the current economic climate has hit firms hard.

We can see it here in our small Town. The internet is killing the High Street retailers as they get better and better at the "customer service experience" and decent returns poliy.

Take a photo of your local bank and ATM. They'll be history so grab the chance to show the grand-kiddiwinks while you can.

They won't believe what you used to do.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:32 pm 
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globus wrote:
Reckon the current economic climate has hit firms hard.

We can see it here in our small Town. The internet is killing the High Street retailers as they get better and better at the "customer service experience" and decent returns poliy.

Take a photo of your local bank and ATM. They'll be history so grab the chance to show the grand-kiddiwinks while you can.

They won't believe what you used to do.


People ordering their dinner online you reckon :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:34 pm 
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CarrotGawks wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.



I seem to recall a lot of bad press stories about how they treat their staff a few years back, tipping policy and the like.

His restaurant near me in Richmond was always mostly empty and did not look that clean when we poked our heads around the door before walking straight back out. Also, the fact that there are hundreds of local independent family run Italian restaurants in London probably did not help much either.


The Richer Sounds lad seems to show there's another way of running a business. He got down on the floor with the staff, paid them well (with them ultimately owning most of the business.) Didn't try to cut corners and made sure none of his staff were forced into high pressure situations, either sales tactics or cost cutting.

For anyone who says that only applies to certain businesses you need to remember Richer Sounds operates in a sector largely pushed off the highstreet towards out-of-town retail parks, and even more towards online only, and he made it work remaining where it always was.

It ties into my own ideas about the high street. That for a business to survive there it needs to move towards honest engagement with customers from valued (by the business) employees who turn that respect into high levels of knowledge for what they're doing, resulting in good service for the customer. The high street needs to be expertise based and engaged with people as the likes of Amazon, for all their algorithm based suggestions, cannot match that.


Richer Sounds certainly seems like a great business model and the owner has set a great example. Though they did have the advantage of operating in a market where people will pay 10 times more for the exact same item so long as the manufacturers include some pseudo-scientific bollocks in their marketing.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:48 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:
His recipe books can be rather annoying.

Great wodges of text, often with vague it no instructions on temperature "heat your oven". To what, Jamie?

Annoying terms substituted for actual measurements, "whack a lug of olive oil in the pan".

Etc.

In the last ten years of cooking for the family, I have buggered up precisely two recipies, both from his books. And I cook everything at the weekends and often of an evening.

I will say this, though, his recipe for roast potatoes and veg works perfectly every time.


Most cook books these days fall under the coffee table 'aspirational living' category rather then a useful tool to assist with actually preparing a meal. The endless photos of staged show home kitchens littered with the chefs painfully happy middle class family who seem to be straight from a Nazi test tube make them all a bit nauseating.

Most of the prose is to personalise it. If you just type out a list, it's not subject to copyright.

Edit - [globus] Jack monroe was telling me how this can be a real problem just the other day



Jack Monroe isn’t chef or even a decent cook so I imagine they struggle with anything beyond a list, and their anecdotes of being a bit poor are pretty dull.


Last edited by bimboman on Tue May 21, 2019 5:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 5:51 pm 
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Duff Paddy wrote:
Armchair_Superstar wrote:
I am guessing they'll make a song and dance about "saving the jobs", do a CVA, fuck over the creditors, close a few sites and keep it going.

These chains are an absolute stain on the High Street.

The food was crap. It wasn’t the first cousin of Italian cooking

This.

There's one in Dundrum that I tried once.

It's not a patch on any of the many small Italian restaurants, and expensive for what is essentially a pasta and pizza joint.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 6:06 pm 
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A5D5E5 wrote:
CarrotGawks wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.



I seem to recall a lot of bad press stories about how they treat their staff a few years back, tipping policy and the like.

His restaurant near me in Richmond was always mostly empty and did not look that clean when we poked our heads around the door before walking straight back out. Also, the fact that there are hundreds of local independent family run Italian restaurants in London probably did not help much either.


The Richer Sounds lad seems to show there's another way of running a business. He got down on the floor with the staff, paid them well (with them ultimately owning most of the business.) Didn't try to cut corners and made sure none of his staff were forced into high pressure situations, either sales tactics or cost cutting.

For anyone who says that only applies to certain businesses you need to remember Richer Sounds operates in a sector largely pushed off the highstreet towards out-of-town retail parks, and even more towards online only, and he made it work remaining where it always was.

It ties into my own ideas about the high street. That for a business to survive there it needs to move towards honest engagement with customers from valued (by the business) employees who turn that respect into high levels of knowledge for what they're doing, resulting in good service for the customer. The high street needs to be expertise based and engaged with people as the likes of Amazon, for all their algorithm based suggestions, cannot match that.


Richer Sounds certainly seems like a great business model and the owner has set a great example. Though they did have the advantage of operating in a market where people will pay 10 times more for the exact same item so long as the manufacturers include some pseudo-scientific bollocks in their marketing.


Hang on, are you telling me those gold core speaker cables I bought from them back in 90s do not actually enhance my listening experience?

:x


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 6:11 pm 
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Can't stand the bloke.

Wish he would just fudge off.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 7:21 pm 
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Seems a nice bloke. Wish him all the best


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 7:24 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
CarrotGawks wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
A5D5E5 wrote:
I've been to the Jamie's Italian in Manchester a few times. Several years ago it was pretty decent and always rammed. More recently it seems no better than ok and always empty. I wonder if there is a link?

The curse of badly done private equity driven expansion.

There are far too many of these sorts of restaurants though, so aside from the impact on the staff (and hopefully they will all find new jobs soon enough), this isn't a big deal.



I seem to recall a lot of bad press stories about how they treat their staff a few years back, tipping policy and the like.

His restaurant near me in Richmond was always mostly empty and did not look that clean when we poked our heads around the door before walking straight back out. Also, the fact that there are hundreds of local independent family run Italian restaurants in London probably did not help much either.


The Richer Sounds lad seems to show there's another way of running a business. He got down on the floor with the staff, paid them well (with them ultimately owning most of the business.) Didn't try to cut corners and made sure none of his staff were forced into high pressure situations, either sales tactics or cost cutting.

For anyone who says that only applies to certain businesses you need to remember Richer Sounds operates in a sector largely pushed off the highstreet towards out-of-town retail parks, and even more towards online only, and he made it work remaining where it always was.

It ties into my own ideas about the high street. That for a business to survive there it needs to move towards honest engagement with customers from valued (by the business) employees who turn that respect into high levels of knowledge for what they're doing, resulting in good service for the customer. The high street needs to be expertise based and engaged with people as the likes of Amazon, for all their algorithm based suggestions, cannot match that.


Richer Sounds certainly seems like a great business model and the owner has set a great example. Though they did have the advantage of operating in a market where people will pay 10 times more for the exact same item so long as the manufacturers include some pseudo-scientific bollocks in their marketing.


Hang on, are you telling me those gold core speaker cables I bought from them back in 90s do not actually enhance my listening experience?

:x


You won't be getting the benefit of them if you don't upgrade your power leads.

https://www.russandrews.com/the-superko ... o-rhodium/

(But don't forget to add £150 to pay for the "super burn in plus" service.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 7:33 pm 
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Am glad fat tongues restaurants have gone pop - been twice, both times quite poor really:

Small portions
Very indifferent food (fish under done so had to be sent back by about 4 people in our group)
Fairly indifferent service
Pricey as you’d expect
On plus side Desserts were nice and I discovered Cornish orchard cider there which is yummy


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 7:43 pm 
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Cornish Orchard? The one kept in old rum barrels? I got annihilated on that stuff at the real ale fest one year, what a lovely drop. :nod:

Never been to any Jamie Olive-oiler’s places, a mate said they were rubbish so I never bothered.

I like the guy in general, mind.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 8:50 pm 
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backrow wrote:
Am glad fat tongues restaurants have gone pop - been twice, both times quite poor really:

Small portions
Very indifferent food (fish under done so had to be sent back by about 4 people in our group)
Fairly indifferent service
Pricey as you’d expect
On plus side Desserts were nice and I discovered Cornish orchard cider there which is yummy


Only been once but had the opposite. Comically matey, think he even sat at the table when he took the order.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 8:53 pm 
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Margin_Walker wrote:
backrow wrote:
Am glad fat tongues restaurants have gone pop - been twice, both times quite poor really:

Small portions
Very indifferent food (fish under done so had to be sent back by about 4 people in our group)
Fairly indifferent service
Pricey as you’d expect
On plus side Desserts were nice and I discovered Cornish orchard cider there which is yummy


Only been once but had the opposite. Comically matey, think he even sat at the table when he took the order.


Was mostly down to the half cooked fish that was served tbf
Didn’t seem to beleive us at first or seem that bothered


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 8:59 pm 
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Margin_Walker wrote:
backrow wrote:
Am glad fat tongues restaurants have gone pop - been twice, both times quite poor really:

Small portions
Very indifferent food (fish under done so had to be sent back by about 4 people in our group)
Fairly indifferent service
Pricey as you’d expect
On plus side Desserts were nice and I discovered Cornish orchard cider there which is yummy


Only been once but had the opposite. Comically matey, think he even sat at the table when he took the order.

They do that in Wagamama. You’re alright thanks I just want to order food not make friends for life


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 9:00 pm 
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Brazil wrote:
Frodder wrote:
Was subjected to a night of him joining an ex-company of mine team do. He was there to provide a team building talk aka money making aka spouting shite.

He was a c0ck of the highest order


Did he speak in his normal accent or like Chas and Dave?


Full on Chas and Dave......he spoke at people all night as people rolled their eyes.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 9:58 pm 
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danny_fitz wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:
His recipe books can be rather annoying.

Great wodges of text, often with vague it no instructions on temperature "heat your oven". To what, Jamie?

Annoying terms substituted for actual measurements, "whack a lug of olive oil in the pan".

Etc.

In the last ten years of cooking for the family, I have buggered up precisely two recipies, both from his books. And I cook everything at the weekends and often of an evening.

I will say this, though, his recipe for roast potatoes and veg works perfectly every time.


Most cook books these days fall under the coffee table 'aspirational living' category rather then a useful tool to assist with actually preparing a meal. The endless photos of staged show home kitchens littered with the chefs painfully happy middle class family who seem to be straight from a Nazi test tube make them all a bit nauseating.


My go to is Gino D'Acampo. His recipes always work, the kids always wolf it down and even the most complicated stuff is just doing a bechamel sauce.

Only two downsides:-

1. Halve the portions if you have small kids or you end up with huge amounts going spare; and
2. He thinks that plum Berlusconi is great.

But then he is Italian and they love a strongman.


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PostPosted: Tue May 21, 2019 10:07 pm 
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The Man Without Fear wrote:
danny_fitz wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:
His recipe books can be rather annoying.

Great wodges of text, often with vague it no instructions on temperature "heat your oven". To what, Jamie?

Annoying terms substituted for actual measurements, "whack a lug of olive oil in the pan".

Etc.

In the last ten years of cooking for the family, I have buggered up precisely two recipies, both from his books. And I cook everything at the weekends and often of an evening.

I will say this, though, his recipe for roast potatoes and veg works perfectly every time.


Most cook books these days fall under the coffee table 'aspirational living' category rather then a useful tool to assist with actually preparing a meal. The endless photos of staged show home kitchens littered with the chefs painfully happy middle class family who seem to be straight from a Nazi test tube make them all a bit nauseating.


My go to is Gino D'Acampo. His recipes always work, the kids always wolf it down and even the most complicated stuff is just doing a bechamel sauce.

Only two downsides:-

1. Halve the portions if you have small kids or you end up with huge amounts going spare; and
2. He thinks that plum Berlusconi is great.

But then he is Italian and they love a strongman.

If you want an Italian cookbook that works, Marcella Hazan is your only woman.


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