The official cycling thread

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duke
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by duke »

Laurent wrote:
Apposite wrote:Cheers for all the info lads.

I reckon I need:
Front mudguard. MTB one for rear will go on seatpost.
A decent pump with gauge.
Tool for removing wheels (got QR replaced with security bolts).
Spare tube.

I need to re-familiarise myself with a calculator and pi and I reckon I can get the speedo semiaccurate.

I have bog standard regular tyres on it, 25mm road ones. Didn't recognise the brand. They are new enough. I think I will wait and see if I get punctures. If they last me the summer great, I'll get something grippier and more bulletproof before August, don't mind if they slow me down a bit. What's a good price for a set of Gatorskins?
MTB is 26"
road is 700mm these are basic settings you should be able to set on the cateye

surprised you guys get so many punctures
I had 1 in over a year and it was from being lazy and not pumping the tyre when I noticed it was a bit soft...

basic tyres on my bike.
Punctures can be luck of the draw - I went for a few months without any then got 4 in a week - wet conditions don't help.
New tyres are pretty expensive at the moment - Gatorskins on Wiggle are £26 but others are nearer the £40 mark.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

duke wrote:
Laurent wrote:
Apposite wrote:Cheers for all the info lads.

I reckon I need:
Front mudguard. MTB one for rear will go on seatpost.
A decent pump with gauge.
Tool for removing wheels (got QR replaced with security bolts).
Spare tube.

I need to re-familiarise myself with a calculator and pi and I reckon I can get the speedo semiaccurate.

I have bog standard regular tyres on it, 25mm road ones. Didn't recognise the brand. They are new enough. I think I will wait and see if I get punctures. If they last me the summer great, I'll get something grippier and more bulletproof before August, don't mind if they slow me down a bit. What's a good price for a set of Gatorskins?
MTB is 26"
road is 700mm these are basic settings you should be able to set on the cateye

surprised you guys get so many punctures
I had 1 in over a year and it was from being lazy and not pumping the tyre when I noticed it was a bit soft...

basic tyres on my bike.
Punctures can be luck of the draw - I went for a few months without any then got 4 in a week - wet conditions don't help.
New tyres are pretty expensive at the moment - Gatorskins on Wiggle are £26 but others are nearer the £40 mark.
IIRC the local shop will do a pair fitted for €70 or €80 so that sounds reasonable.
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duke
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by duke »

Apposite wrote:
IIRC the local shop will do a pair fitted for €70 or €80 so that sounds reasonable.
Sounds reasonable to me too - will they include the inner tubes as well?
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Laurent wrote:
Apposite wrote:Cheers for all the info lads.

I reckon I need:
Front mudguard. MTB one for rear will go on seatpost.
A decent pump with gauge.
Tool for removing wheels (got QR replaced with security bolts).
Spare tube.

I need to re-familiarise myself with a calculator and pi and I reckon I can get the speedo semiaccurate.

I have bog standard regular tyres on it, 25mm road ones. Didn't recognise the brand. They are new enough. I think I will wait and see if I get punctures. If they last me the summer great, I'll get something grippier and more bulletproof before August, don't mind if they slow me down a bit. What's a good price for a set of Gatorskins?
MTB is 26"
road is 700mm these are basic settings you should be able to set on the cateye

surprised you guys get so many punctures
I had 1 in over a year and it was from being lazy and not pumping the tyre when I noticed it was a bit soft...

basic tyres on my bike.
I typically find small devices with a couple of buttons impossible to figure out without a manual. Hope I can find/download.

Or I can just work out the difference and calculate the distance from rim it needs to be to have the same calibration as it currently does on the MTB. Doubt I'll have the cable though because the MTB has a way smaller frame and tires.
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globus
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by globus »

He's coming to fix my three bikes

http://www.oundlebikefix.co.uk/html/contact.html
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

duke wrote:
Apposite wrote:
IIRC the local shop will do a pair fitted for €70 or €80 so that sounds reasonable.
Sounds reasonable to me too - will they include the inner tubes as well?
Dunno, I think they are basically a few quid.

Glad to hear people don't have that many punctures. To be honest getting one while commuting would be such a pain in the balls I'd rather pay a bit of cash to lower the possibility of git happening. Plus I still feel like the whole thing is super spindly and fragile, I'd like to feel like I don't have to be as careful with it.
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duke
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by duke »

Apposite wrote:
duke wrote:
Apposite wrote:
IIRC the local shop will do a pair fitted for €70 or €80 so that sounds reasonable.
Sounds reasonable to me too - will they include the inner tubes as well?
Dunno, I think they are basically a few quid.

Glad to hear people don't have that many punctures. To be honest getting one while commuting would be such a pain in the balls I'd rather pay a bit of cash to lower the possibility of git happening. Plus I still feel like the whole thing is super spindly and fragile, I'd like to feel like I don't have to be as careful with it.
Road bikes are more robust than you think - mine has stood up to some severe punishment and I've not had any problems so far (touch wood).
Used to have issues with breaking spokes on wheels but have managed to sort that out.
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Laurent
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Laurent »

Apposite wrote:
Laurent wrote:
Apposite wrote:Cheers for all the info lads.

I reckon I need:
Front mudguard. MTB one for rear will go on seatpost.
A decent pump with gauge.
Tool for removing wheels (got QR replaced with security bolts).
Spare tube.

I need to re-familiarise myself with a calculator and pi and I reckon I can get the speedo semiaccurate.

I have bog standard regular tyres on it, 25mm road ones. Didn't recognise the brand. They are new enough. I think I will wait and see if I get punctures. If they last me the summer great, I'll get something grippier and more bulletproof before August, don't mind if they slow me down a bit. What's a good price for a set of Gatorskins?
MTB is 26"
road is 700mm these are basic settings you should be able to set on the cateye

surprised you guys get so many punctures
I had 1 in over a year and it was from being lazy and not pumping the tyre when I noticed it was a bit soft...

basic tyres on my bike.
I typically find small devices with a couple of buttons impossible to figure out without a manual. Hope I can find/download.

Or I can just work out the difference and calculate the distance from rim it needs to be to have the same calibration as it currently does on the MTB. Doubt I'll have the cable though because the MTB has a way smaller frame and tires.
you are incorrect the magnet allows to count wheel RPM, the cateye calculates the distance / speed with the provided wheel diameter.
distance from the centre is irrelevant.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

duke wrote:
Apposite wrote:
duke wrote:
Apposite wrote:
IIRC the local shop will do a pair fitted for €70 or €80 so that sounds reasonable.
Sounds reasonable to me too - will they include the inner tubes as well?
Dunno, I think they are basically a few quid.

Glad to hear people don't have that many punctures. To be honest getting one while commuting would be such a pain in the balls I'd rather pay a bit of cash to lower the possibility of git happening. Plus I still feel like the whole thing is super spindly and fragile, I'd like to feel like I don't have to be as careful with it.
Road bikes are more robust than you think - mine has stood up to some severe punishment and I've not had any problems so far (touch wood).
Used to have issues with breaking spokes on wheels but have managed to sort that out.
I am used to MTBs and tourer/hybrid kinda bikes. I'm sure it's a lot stronger than it looks but I think I'll leave bunnyhopping onto foot high kerbs and the like for a while.

I reckon if I hit a proper serious Dublin pothole on it at speed I could do a tyre, tube and probably rim and have a nasty crash. Our city centre roads are bad enough here I have to say, vicious couple of winters did a lot of damage and it hasn't all been repaired.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Laurent wrote:
Apposite wrote:
Laurent wrote:
Apposite wrote:Cheers for all the info lads.

I reckon I need:
Front mudguard. MTB one for rear will go on seatpost.
A decent pump with gauge.
Tool for removing wheels (got QR replaced with security bolts).
Spare tube.

I need to re-familiarise myself with a calculator and pi and I reckon I can get the speedo semiaccurate.

I have bog standard regular tyres on it, 25mm road ones. Didn't recognise the brand. They are new enough. I think I will wait and see if I get punctures. If they last me the summer great, I'll get something grippier and more bulletproof before August, don't mind if they slow me down a bit. What's a good price for a set of Gatorskins?
MTB is 26"
road is 700mm these are basic settings you should be able to set on the cateye

surprised you guys get so many punctures
I had 1 in over a year and it was from being lazy and not pumping the tyre when I noticed it was a bit soft...

basic tyres on my bike.
I typically find small devices with a couple of buttons impossible to figure out without a manual. Hope I can find/download.

Or I can just work out the difference and calculate the distance from rim it needs to be to have the same calibration as it currently does on the MTB. Doubt I'll have the cable though because the MTB has a way smaller frame and tires.
you are incorrect the magnet allows to count wheel RPM, the cateye calculates the distance / speed with the provided wheel diameter.
distance from the centre is irrelevant.
Yeah, I get you. Wouldn't work.

So wading through anti-intuitive menus is the only option :((
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cheese cutter
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by cheese cutter »

apposite - I had a quick look, (cos work is, you know, boring) you'll probably find what you're after here:
http://www.cateye.com/en/support/manual/

Also, get yourself a small bag of tools that attaches to the frame/seat like this. I have one I put in a pack for longer rides with fleece, food etc, or clip it under the seat on shorter rides.
Seez
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Seez »

The usual way to setup computers is using the circumference of the wheel. Different profile tyres will mean that you can't just set it up for 26" or 700C accurately.

So you normally do a roll out measurement. Put the valve of the back wheel at its downmost position and mark where it is on the ground. Then roll the bike forward until the valve points down again, mark it and measure the distance between the two marks.

For more accuracy, do more revolutions and divide the measurement accordingly.
Seez
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Seez »

http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk often do dirt cheap offers for tyres, tubes, gloves, lights, pumps etc. Worth signing up to their weekly mailing list if you need something but not urgently.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Seez wrote:http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk often do dirt cheap offers for tyres, tubes, gloves, lights, pumps etc. Worth signing up to their weekly mailing list if you need something but not urgently.
Cheers, subscribed to that. I also noticed I have a titanium* bar (and possibly bar ends).

*like what SR-71 Blackbirds were made of.
choc
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by choc »

Muse - Evans do maintenance courses. Costs 10 quid but you then get that back as a voucher so essentially free. There was one going on when I was in the Kingston one recently but they do it in all the stores if there is one near you.

http://www.evanscycles.com/servicing/fr ... =Affiliate
Mitty's Boat
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Mitty's Boat »

Seez wrote:The usual way to setup computers is using the circumference of the wheel. Different profile tyres will mean that you can't just set it up for 26" or 700C accurately.

So you normally do a roll out measurement. Put the valve of the back wheel at its downmost position and mark where it is on the ground. Then roll the bike forward until the valve points down again, mark it and measure the distance between the two marks.

For more accuracy, do more revolutions and divide the measurement accordingly.
I did that yesterday after I got some replacements for the Polar cadence and speed sensors that die with depressing frequency. If, as you say, you measure three or so revolutions you get a very accurate assessment. My road bike with 23mm tyres works out at 2100, and from experience most of my setups cluster around that measurement. Clydesdale types might end up with something a bit different, though.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Mitty's Boat wrote:
Seez wrote:The usual way to setup computers is using the circumference of the wheel. Different profile tyres will mean that you can't just set it up for 26" or 700C accurately.

So you normally do a roll out measurement. Put the valve of the back wheel at its downmost position and mark where it is on the ground. Then roll the bike forward until the valve points down again, mark it and measure the distance between the two marks.

For more accuracy, do more revolutions and divide the measurement accordingly.
I did that yesterday after I got some replacements for the Polar cadence and speed sensors that die with depressing frequency. If, as you say, you measure three or so revolutions you get a very accurate assessment. My road bike with 23mm tyres works out at 2100, and from experience most of my setups cluster around that measurement. Clydesdale types might end up with something a bit different, though.
Are they 700cc? What is that anyway, 700mm diameter? That should be more than 2100 in circumference even if it includes the tire.

Ideally I just want to steal someone else's measurements. I think I just have regular road bike sized wheels, whatever they are.
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musefreek
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by musefreek »

choc wrote:Muse - Evans do maintenance courses. Costs 10 quid but you then get that back as a voucher so essentially free. There was one going on when I was in the Kingston one recently but they do it in all the stores if there is one near you.

http://www.evanscycles.com/servicing/fr ... =Affiliate
thank you!
Seez
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Seez »

Apposite wrote:
Mitty's Boat wrote:
Seez wrote:The usual way to setup computers is using the circumference of the wheel. Different profile tyres will mean that you can't just set it up for 26" or 700C accurately.

So you normally do a roll out measurement. Put the valve of the back wheel at its downmost position and mark where it is on the ground. Then roll the bike forward until the valve points down again, mark it and measure the distance between the two marks.

For more accuracy, do more revolutions and divide the measurement accordingly.
I did that yesterday after I got some replacements for the Polar cadence and speed sensors that die with depressing frequency. If, as you say, you measure three or so revolutions you get a very accurate assessment. My road bike with 23mm tyres works out at 2100, and from experience most of my setups cluster around that measurement. Clydesdale types might end up with something a bit different, though.
Are they 700cc? What is that anyway, 700mm diameter? That should be more than 2100 in circumference even if it includes the tire.

Ideally I just want to steal someone else's measurements. I think I just have regular road bike sized wheels, whatever they are.
700C means road wheel size and 2100mm is v close to what I got for my turbo trainer wheel at 100PSI, so that should do you.
Mitty's Boat
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Mitty's Boat »

Apposite wrote:
Mitty's Boat wrote:
Seez wrote:The usual way to setup computers is using the circumference of the wheel. Different profile tyres will mean that you can't just set it up for 26" or 700C accurately.

So you normally do a roll out measurement. Put the valve of the back wheel at its downmost position and mark where it is on the ground. Then roll the bike forward until the valve points down again, mark it and measure the distance between the two marks.

For more accuracy, do more revolutions and divide the measurement accordingly.
I did that yesterday after I got some replacements for the Polar cadence and speed sensors that die with depressing frequency. If, as you say, you measure three or so revolutions you get a very accurate assessment. My road bike with 23mm tyres works out at 2100, and from experience most of my setups cluster around that measurement. Clydesdale types might end up with something a bit different, though.
Are they 700cc? What is that anyway, 700mm diameter? That should be more than 2100 in circumference even if it includes the tire.

Ideally I just want to steal someone else's measurements. I think I just have regular road bike sized wheels, whatever they are.
I've got these figures from the Polar manual and you're going to be pretty accurate if you input the one closest to whatever tyres you've got. 700x20C=2086, 23C=2096, 25C=2105. If you really want to be super accurate a roll out is the way to go, and make sure you sit on the bike while doing it. Even if you are a bit out, though, it will only be by tiny fractions of 1mph, rather than anything significant.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

I reckon if I hit a proper serious Dublin pothole on it at speed I could do a tyre, tube and probably rim and have a nasty crash
You'd be pretty unlucky I reckon. My route is pretty bad for potholes and from time to time I really whack one in a way that makes me think my rear wheel will be utterly mangled, but by and large I've been alright. Admittedly I am on my second rear wheel after a couple of spokes broke on the original one, but so far the new one's holding up OK (I have a vague plan of rebuilding the original one, but in all likelihood that won't be happening anytime soon).

Cycling in summer (ie daylight) helps as you can see what's coming up. I know where the major potholes and other bumps are on my route now and try to manoeuvre well in advance to avoid them. I tend to only whack them these days when I'm doing something stupid like draughting a bus, which serves me right really. As I say, the likelihood of hitting one hard enough to crash is slim, the only thing to be wary of is hitting one when you don't have a firm grip on the bar. That could happen on any kind of bike though, I nearly came a cropper that way on my mtb when I first started commuting.

But anyway, as others have said, road bikes are surprisingly sturdy. Having said that, would be interesting to know how you've managed to minimise broken spokes, Duke, if you're still around...
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Laurent
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Laurent »

Womack wrote:
I reckon if I hit a proper serious Dublin pothole on it at speed I could do a tyre, tube and probably rim and have a nasty crash
You'd be pretty unlucky I reckon. My route is pretty bad for potholes and from time to time I really whack one in a way that makes me think my rear wheel will be utterly mangled, but by and large I've been alright. Admittedly I am on my second rear wheel after a couple of spokes broke on the original one, but so far the new one's holding up OK (I have a vague plan of rebuilding the original one, but in all likelihood that won't be happening anytime soon).

Cycling in summer (ie daylight) helps as you can see what's coming up. I know where the major potholes and other bumps are on my route now and try to manoeuvre well in advance to avoid them. I tend to only whack them these days when I'm doing something stupid like draughting a bus, which serves me right really. As I say, the likelihood of hitting one hard enough to crash is slim, the only thing to be wary of is hitting one when you don't have a firm grip on the bar. That could happen on any kind of bike though, I nearly came a cropper that way on my mtb when I first started commuting.

But anyway, as others have said, road bikes are surprisingly sturdy. Having said that, would be interesting to know how you've managed to minimise broken spokes, Duke, if you're still around...
Had a wheel that kept breaking them
I probably got 1/2 replaced before I told your man to sell me a new one ...
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Bobless
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Bobless »

Mitty's Boat wrote:
Apposite wrote:
Mitty's Boat wrote:
Seez wrote:The usual way to setup computers is using the circumference of the wheel. Different profile tyres will mean that you can't just set it up for 26" or 700C accurately.

So you normally do a roll out measurement. Put the valve of the back wheel at its downmost position and mark where it is on the ground. Then roll the bike forward until the valve points down again, mark it and measure the distance between the two marks.

For more accuracy, do more revolutions and divide the measurement accordingly.
I did that yesterday after I got some replacements for the Polar cadence and speed sensors that die with depressing frequency. If, as you say, you measure three or so revolutions you get a very accurate assessment. My road bike with 23mm tyres works out at 2100, and from experience most of my setups cluster around that measurement. Clydesdale types might end up with something a bit different, though.
Are they 700cc? What is that anyway, 700mm diameter? That should be more than 2100 in circumference even if it includes the tire.

Ideally I just want to steal someone else's measurements. I think I just have regular road bike sized wheels, whatever they are.
I've got these figures from the Polar manual and you're going to be pretty accurate if you input the one closest to whatever tyres you've got. 700x20C=2086, 23C=2096, 25C=2105. If you really want to be super accurate a roll out is the way to go, and make sure you sit on the bike while doing it. Even if you are a bit out, though, it will only be by tiny fractions of 1mph, rather than anything significant.
If you know rim diameter a reasonably accurate quick and dirty way of calculating circumference is as follows:

Rim diameter = 622mm on 700c for e.g.
Circumference of wheel including tyres = (622 + 2 x tyre size) x PI

i.e. 25C tyre = (622 + 50) x PI = 2111 which is within 0.2%

Most useful for setting speedos/comps for wheel sizes other than 27/26" and 700c which often aren't included in manual.
Seez
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Seez »

Womack wrote:
I reckon if I hit a proper serious Dublin pothole on it at speed I could do a tyre, tube and probably rim and have a nasty crash
You'd be pretty unlucky I reckon. My route is pretty bad for potholes and from time to time I really whack one in a way that makes me think my rear wheel will be utterly mangled, but by and large I've been alright. Admittedly I am on my second rear wheel after a couple of spokes broke on the original one, but so far the new one's holding up OK (I have a vague plan of rebuilding the original one, but in all likelihood that won't be happening anytime soon).

Cycling in summer (ie daylight) helps as you can see what's coming up. I know where the major potholes and other bumps are on my route now and try to manoeuvre well in advance to avoid them. I tend to only whack them these days when I'm doing something stupid like draughting a bus, which serves me right really. As I say, the likelihood of hitting one hard enough to crash is slim, the only thing to be wary of is hitting one when you don't have a firm grip on the bar. That could happen on any kind of bike though, I nearly came a cropper that way on my mtb when I first started commuting.

But anyway, as others have said, road bikes are surprisingly sturdy. Having said that, would be interesting to know how you've managed to minimise broken spokes, Duke, if you're still around...
Nice big road bike wheels will roll out of most pot holes OK but same is not true for Brompton wheels, as I and the drinkers outside the Gable on Moorgate can confirm :x (me) :shock: :lol: (them)
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Clanger
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Clanger »

Just to mention, me and a mate did a FANTASTIC mountain bike route out of Conwy, you go up to the top of a mountain called Drum (2500ft), and then do the most amazing 3 1/2 mile descent into Llanfairfechan! Wow! You then follow the North Wales path over to Sycnant Pass then up and down Conwy mountain. About 20 miles. You get to see 2 ancient stone circles on route too!
What could be better?

Best route I've done.
fisgard792
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by fisgard792 »

Clanger wrote:Just to mention, me and a mate did a FANTASTIC mountain bike route out of Conwy, you go up to the top of a mountain called Drum (2500ft), and then do the most amazing 3 1/2 mile descent into Llanfairfechan! Wow! You then follow the North Wales path over to Sycnant Pass then up and down Conwy mountain. About 20 miles. You get to see 2 ancient stone circles on route too!
What could be better?

Best route I've done.
Torridon Loop, google it for mtb write up's, but here's a quick mbr one

http://www.mbr.co.uk/routes/scotland-ro ... -torridon/

thinking of trying the north wales trail centres and lee quarry for an away weekend this summer
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Clanger
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Clanger »

fisgard792 wrote:
Clanger wrote:Just to mention, me and a mate did a FANTASTIC mountain bike route out of Conwy, you go up to the top of a mountain called Drum (2500ft), and then do the most amazing 3 1/2 mile descent into Llanfairfechan! Wow! You then follow the North Wales path over to Sycnant Pass then up and down Conwy mountain. About 20 miles. You get to see 2 ancient stone circles on route too!
What could be better?

Best route I've done.
Torridon Loop, google it for mtb write up's, but here's a quick mbr one

http://www.mbr.co.uk/routes/scotland-ro ... -torridon/

thinking of trying the north wales trail centres and lee quarry for an away weekend this summer
I wasn't laying down the challenge, but yes, that probably is better, and if I can get the bike up there one day......

My meaning of course was, what could be better than to get out on a great MTB route with history all around in stunning scenery.

We had a fantastic curry and a few pints after, I nearly died and went to heaven.
fisgard792
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by fisgard792 »

Clanger wrote:
fisgard792 wrote:
Clanger wrote:Just to mention, me and a mate did a FANTASTIC mountain bike route out of Conwy, you go up to the top of a mountain called Drum (2500ft), and then do the most amazing 3 1/2 mile descent into Llanfairfechan! Wow! You then follow the North Wales path over to Sycnant Pass then up and down Conwy mountain. About 20 miles. You get to see 2 ancient stone circles on route too!
What could be better?

Best route I've done.
Torridon Loop, google it for mtb write up's, but here's a quick mbr one

http://www.mbr.co.uk/routes/scotland-ro ... -torridon/

thinking of trying the north wales trail centres and lee quarry for an away weekend this summer
I wasn't laying down the challenge, but yes, that probably is better, and if I can get the bike up there one day......

My meaning of course was, what could be better than out on a great MTB route with history all around in stunning scenery to boot.

We had a fantastic curry and a few pints after, I nearly died and went to heaven.
nah, apologies if it came across that way, and your dead right, stunning scenery, some adrenalin from some techy descents with some bruises thrown in from the off's, alcohol and curry is now my ideal weekend, french alps in the summer, this game is so fecking addictive :thumbup:
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Clanger
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Clanger »

French Alps, sounds amazing. Enjoy, and post back here how it went.

Peak District for me next week.
fisgard792
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by fisgard792 »

Clanger wrote:French Alps, sounds amazing. Enjoy, and post back here how it went.

Peak District for me next week.
have you been to lee quarry?
sparky101
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Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by sparky101 »

Cycling is a joke sport.
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Laurent
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Laurent »

sparky101 wrote:Cycling is a joke sport.
poor sparky munster got monstered

:lol:
sparky101
Posts: 165
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by sparky101 »

Laurent wrote:
sparky101 wrote:Cycling is a joke sport.
poor sparky munster got monstered

:lol:
Laurent,no one wants you in our country.Why are you here?
Go back to where you belong you garlic-munching monkey.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

sparky101 wrote:
Laurent wrote:
sparky101 wrote:Cycling is a joke sport.
poor sparky munster got monstered

:lol:
Laurent,no one wants you in our country.Why are you here?
Go back to where you belong you garlic-munching monkey.
Devastating stuff.

Don't go Laurent, don't go! :((
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Laurent
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Location: balbriggan
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Laurent »

sparky101 wrote:
Laurent wrote:
sparky101 wrote:Cycling is a joke sport.
poor sparky munster got monstered

:lol:
Laurent,no one wants you in our country.Why are you here?
Go back to where you belong you garlic-munching monkey.
still crying ?

poor thicko
sparky101
Posts: 165
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by sparky101 »

Apposite wrote:
sparky101 wrote:
Laurent wrote:
sparky101 wrote:Cycling is a joke sport.
poor sparky munster got monstered

:lol:
Laurent,no one wants you in our country.Why are you here?
Go back to where you belong you garlic-munching monkey.
Devastating stuff.

Don't go Laurent, don't go! :((
Apposite,you have to admit it is incredibly annoying to see a lazy Frenchman scrounge off our state,giving nothing in return.

He is even holding Clontarf back FFS!
sparky101
Posts: 165
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by sparky101 »

Laurent wrote:
sparky101 wrote:
Laurent wrote:
sparky101 wrote:Cycling is a joke sport.
poor sparky munster got monstered

:lol:
Laurent,no one wants you in our country.Why are you here?
Go back to where you belong you garlic-munching monkey.
still crying ?

poor thicko
Sorry ,I don't speak monkey.
User avatar
Laurent
Posts: 17501
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: balbriggan
Contact:

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Laurent »

sparky101 wrote:
Apposite wrote:
sparky101 wrote:
Laurent wrote:
sparky101 wrote:Cycling is a joke sport.
poor sparky munster got monstered

:lol:
Laurent,no one wants you in our country.Why are you here?
Go back to where you belong you garlic-munching monkey.
Devastating stuff.

Don't go Laurent, don't go! :((
Apposite,you have to admit it is incredibly annoying to see a lazy Frenchman scrounge off our state,giving nothing in return.

He is even holding Clontarf back FFS!
You poor thing you still have the side wheels and the big boys in the yard are throwing stuff at you :lol: .

Sparky and his new bike

Image
sparky101
Posts: 165
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by sparky101 »

Laurent wrote:
sparky101 wrote: Apposite,you have to admit it is incredibly annoying to see a lazy Frenchman scrounge off our state,giving nothing in return.

He is even holding Clontarf back FFS!
You poor thing you still have the side wheels and the big boys in the yard are throwing stuff at you :lol: .

Sparky and his new bike

Image
Lets just say I have heard whispers in Clontarf that the locals are hardly endeared by your recent performances.
Armchair_Superstar
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Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

fisgard792 wrote:
Clanger wrote:French Alps, sounds amazing. Enjoy, and post back here how it went.

Peak District for me next week.
have you been to lee quarry?
I've often wondered about Lee Quarry for a trip, got the XC bike with me this time so its likely to be Dalby Forest and the Dales, I'll do Lee Quarry when I have the full susser with me.

Still only ridden the Day One a couple of miles up the road :x It feels good, might need a smaller cog for the back but I'll reserve judgement on that until I've dome some longer rides.
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