The official cycling thread

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musefreek
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by musefreek »

Jeff the Bear wrote:
musefreek wrote:
Apposite wrote:
musefreek wrote:
Jeff the Bear wrote:According to mapmyride, I averaged 18 km/h this morning. T'was Brutal mind. Only my 3rd ride in of the season, and the first fro about a month. Felt seriously nauseous when I got in. Just under 30 mins to do 9.47 km (5.9miles).
f**king hell that's quick. why do you bother cycling so fast?
Well if you have a long distance you don't want to spend forever on the bike for starters. And if you are having a shower etc why not go at a decent pace? Some days I cycle home in jeans etc. and I just cruise but mostly I enjoy getting a bit of proper exercise.
different strokes for different folks. some people enjoy taking it all in whilst they cycle.
As Apposite says, it's the fitness I'm working for. I ride my bike in for 3 reasons:

1. Save money
2. Get fit
3. Help save the planet

...in that order. I come from the masochistic line of fitness that if it's not hurting, your not doing it right. As such, I spend as much time out of the saddle as is humanly possible, pushing as hard as I can (I am on a mountain bike)...which also has the added bonus that my undercarriage doesn't feel like it's gone 10 rounds with John Holmes the next morning.

My best ever was a sub-24 minute ride...and I believe with a stiff wind sat my back, and catching all traffic and lights accordingly, I could do it in 20 minutes.
my top 3 reasons:

1. save money
2. help save the planet
3. an excuse to stop for tea and scones halfway
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

musefreek wrote: my top 3 reasons:

1. save money
2. help save the planet
3. an excuse to stop for tea and scones halfway
Ha, brilliant. You should just go the whole hog and get a swoopy handlebar job with a basket and bell.

What £ does cycling save you each day in London?
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musefreek
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by musefreek »

Apposite wrote:
musefreek wrote: my top 3 reasons:

1. save money
2. help save the planet
3. an excuse to stop for tea and scones halfway
Ha, brilliant. You should just go the whole hog and get a swoopy handlebar job with a basket and bell.

What £ does cycling save you each day in London?
around £5.50. mental, huh?
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

musefreek wrote:
Apposite wrote:
musefreek wrote: my top 3 reasons:

1. save money
2. help save the planet
3. an excuse to stop for tea and scones halfway
Ha, brilliant. You should just go the whole hog and get a swoopy handlebar job with a basket and bell.

What £ does cycling save you each day in London?
around £5.50. mental, huh?
€4.70 for me but that's just train. If I did train and tram which takes me closer it would be more like €8. Never bother with tram unless pissing rain though.
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Womack
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

For me:

1) A million times more fun than sweaty, shit trains
2) Fitness
3) Save money (bearing in mind the cost of maintaining bike and purchasing occasional gear)
4) Daylight
5) Planet
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henry
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by henry »

f**king hippies all over this thread.

Save the planet my arse.

You pedestrian bothering plum just want to look smug.

Get in your car or on public transport like the rest of us.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

henry wrote:f**king hippies all over this thread.

Save the planet my arse.

You pedestrian bothering plum just want to look smug.

Get in your car or on public transport like the rest of us.
You should ride to work on a penny farthing.
Kofi Annan
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Kofi Annan »

My journey into work this morning was ruined upon finding my trusty steed had been nicked! Two expensive locks in a 'secure' communal bike lock up and all I'm left with is my front wheel. Was a decent mountain bike that cost me £800 8 years back and on which I've covered approximately 20,000 km's over the years. Coppers reckon there's not much chance of seeing it again. Needless to say I'm a bit pissed off, especially seeing as I stuck it out through the bad weather over the last month or so and was enjoying cycling in to work in the blazing sunshine!
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Kofi Annan wrote:My journey into work this morning was ruined upon finding my trusty steed had been nicked! Two expensive locks in a 'secure' communal bike lock up and all I'm left with is my front wheel. Was a decent mountain bike that cost me £800 8 years back and on which I've covered approximately 20,000 km's over the years. Coppers reckon there's not much chance of seeing it again. Needless to say I'm a bit pissed off, especially seeing as I stuck it out through the bad weather over the last month or so and was enjoying cycling in to work in the blazing sunshine!
fudge man, that's awful. What do you mean by secure communal lockup, at an apartment building or something? Were the locks cut? CCTV?
dinsdale
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by dinsdale »

Apposite wrote:Honest question, are ye not all roasted? Coldest day I've left on was about 5 or 6 and warmest about 14. On the coldest days I have a light top which I usually put around waist after a bit. Today was around 11 and just came in in a tshirt. Everyone I see on bikes looks to be wearing about 3 layers, well almost everyone.
Some people feel the cold more than others :)

I did a long ride on Sunday. The temperature started at around 9 and got up to around 14. I wore 4 layers and leggings the whole day. At the warmest I was considering removing a layer but the sun kept going in so I didn't bother.

I don't ride below 7 degrees. I lose feeling in my feet within 30 mins or so.

Pete
Kofi Annan
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Kofi Annan »

Apposite wrote:
Kofi Annan wrote:My journey into work this morning was ruined upon finding my trusty steed had been nicked! Two expensive locks in a 'secure' communal bike lock up and all I'm left with is my front wheel. Was a decent mountain bike that cost me £800 8 years back and on which I've covered approximately 20,000 km's over the years. Coppers reckon there's not much chance of seeing it again. Needless to say I'm a bit pissed off, especially seeing as I stuck it out through the bad weather over the last month or so and was enjoying cycling in to work in the blazing sunshine!
fudge man, that's awful. What do you mean by secure communal lockup, at an apartment building or something? Were the locks cut? CCTV?
Bike rack under the stairs to which only the residents are meant to have access, entry by intercom system for visitors or keys by residents. I would presume they broke the lock securing the frame and rear wheel to the front wheel and bike rack. There is CCTV, although I'm not sure it points directly at our entrance, but I've contacted the CCTV company in any case and am waiting for them to get back to me.
Homer
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Homer »

Kofi Annan wrote:
Apposite wrote:
Kofi Annan wrote:My journey into work this morning was ruined upon finding my trusty steed had been nicked! Two expensive locks in a 'secure' communal bike lock up and all I'm left with is my front wheel. Was a decent mountain bike that cost me £800 8 years back and on which I've covered approximately 20,000 km's over the years. Coppers reckon there's not much chance of seeing it again. Needless to say I'm a bit pissed off, especially seeing as I stuck it out through the bad weather over the last month or so and was enjoying cycling in to work in the blazing sunshine!
fudge man, that's awful. What do you mean by secure communal lockup, at an apartment building or something? Were the locks cut? CCTV?
Bike rack under the stairs to which only the residents are meant to have access, entry by intercom system for visitors or keys by residents. I would presume they broke the lock securing the frame and rear wheel to the front wheel and bike rack. There is CCTV, although I'm not sure it points directly at our entrance, but I've contacted the CCTV company in any case and am waiting for them to get back to me.
Bummer.

A bit late this time, but for locks try the recommendations on this thread:
http://www.lfgss.com/thread17938.html

The chains from these guys are probably the strongest you can get - ideal for locking up at home:
http://www.almax-security-chains.co.uk/index.asp?pg=17
Kofi Annan
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Kofi Annan »

Homer wrote:
Kofi Annan wrote:
Apposite wrote:
Kofi Annan wrote:My journey into work this morning was ruined upon finding my trusty steed had been nicked! Two expensive locks in a 'secure' communal bike lock up and all I'm left with is my front wheel. Was a decent mountain bike that cost me £800 8 years back and on which I've covered approximately 20,000 km's over the years. Coppers reckon there's not much chance of seeing it again. Needless to say I'm a bit pissed off, especially seeing as I stuck it out through the bad weather over the last month or so and was enjoying cycling in to work in the blazing sunshine!
fudge man, that's awful. What do you mean by secure communal lockup, at an apartment building or something? Were the locks cut? CCTV?
Bike rack under the stairs to which only the residents are meant to have access, entry by intercom system for visitors or keys by residents. I would presume they broke the lock securing the frame and rear wheel to the front wheel and bike rack. There is CCTV, although I'm not sure it points directly at our entrance, but I've contacted the CCTV company in any case and am waiting for them to get back to me.
Bummer.

A bit late this time, but for locks try the recommendations on this thread:
http://www.lfgss.com/thread17938.html

The chains from these guys are probably the strongest you can get - ideal for locking up at home:
http://www.almax-security-chains.co.uk/index.asp?pg=17
Had a decent Abus securing the front wheel to the rack, which is probably why I still have my front wheel. The other lock securing the rest of the bike to the front was also an Abus but was less expensive.
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bealonian
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

Was a post on draughting a couple of pages back. Here's how to do 55mph :shock:
http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/82486491/
Kofi Annan
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Kofi Annan »

I've been looking at replacements and quite like the look of Pinnacle, do any of you have any of you have any feedback or past experience of them?

Was thinking along the lines of this.

Image

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/pin ... e-ec035869
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musefreek
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by musefreek »

i highly recommend these bikes. they're bloody stunning. you got to see them in person at the company's shoreditch shop.

http://tokyobike.co.uk/
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Kofi Annan »

musefreek wrote:i highly recommend these bikes. they're bloody stunning. you got to see them in person at the company's shoreditch shop.

http://tokyobike.co.uk/
I may want to go over 10 kph on it though, do you think it can handle the speed? :D :D
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Kofi Annan wrote:
musefreek wrote:i highly recommend these bikes. they're bloody stunning. you got to see them in person at the company's shoreditch shop.

http://tokyobike.co.uk/
I may want to go over 10 kph on it though, do you think it can handle the speed? :D :D
The one Muse quoted looks faster to me.
Homer
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Homer »

Kofi Annan wrote:I've been looking at replacements and quite like the look of Pinnacle, do any of you have any of you have any feedback or past experience of them?

Was thinking along the lines of this.

Image

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/pin ... e-ec035869
If looking for a fast hybrid I'd also think about some of these:
http://www.evanscycles.com/products/fuj ... e-ec024674
http://www.evanscycles.com/products/spe ... e-ec030146
http://www.paulscycles.co.uk/products.p ... 0s156p2535
http://www.paulscycles.co.uk/products.p ... 0s156p3658
http://www.paulscycles.co.uk/products.p ... 0s156p3546
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

The Cannondale is different to the others IMO, much fatter tyres.

Giant Rapids are lovely bikes.

The Trek 7.5 is nice, as are a few of the Boardman hybrids. Felt do some nice ones too.
dinsdale
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by dinsdale »

musefreek wrote:i highly recommend these bikes. they're bloody stunning. you got to see them in person at the company's shoreditch shop.

http://tokyobike.co.uk/
Hmm.. Many of those bikes use Shimano Acera & Tourney components which are cheap junk. Avoid.

Pete
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

blindcider wrote:
Apposite wrote:The fastest I have had the thing up to was a little above 50k and that was a bit scary tbh, would be happier with helmet and smoother road at that speed.

I generally find I can do 20K even on the uphills, 25-30 on flat and 35-40 downhill. The lights fudge things up completely and I did dodge the odd one when no traffic about, was early enough this morning so some of the quieter junctions empty. London traffic prob a lot worse than here. You have cycle lanes for much of route? Are they any use?
20mph average is fairly easy/maintainable on a half-decent road bike if there aren't too many lights/obstacles in the way (or a headwind)

The hardest is when you have to stop on a hill which completely kills any momentum and requires so much more effort to get going again.

I never go too fast on the downhill as I like blasting the uphill so tend to coast but still have got up to about 50mph on a stupidly steep long hill near me on my old racer (Giant OCR3 - since sold and replaced with a Giant Escape which got wrecked, replaced by the car driver and then stolen :x now waiting for the insurance :x ).
I wouldn't say a true 20mph total ride average is easy on your own; you need to be in pretty good shape to achieve 20mph average for moderate distance. I ride with a reasonably committed cycling group, we typically train/ride 4+ days/week and our 60 mile weekend group ride generally gives me an average of around 22mph on my computer. We are typically riding at 21-27mph (excluding sprints) depending on wind and gradient, but with the stops and slowdowns for turns, etc. the average is down at 22mph.

Or I just need to HTFU… :P
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Nieghorn
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

I don't know if they sell overseas, but I burned three quick road cyclists with my commuter today.

Image

I can't remember all the specs, but it's got a lot of road components so it's quite quick. (Shimano Tiagra)

http://www.brodiebikes.com/2012/archive ... ty&year=11
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HKCJ
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by HKCJ »

Spyglass wrote:
blindcider wrote:
Apposite wrote:The fastest I have had the thing up to was a little above 50k and that was a bit scary tbh, would be happier with helmet and smoother road at that speed.

I generally find I can do 20K even on the uphills, 25-30 on flat and 35-40 downhill. The lights fudge things up completely and I did dodge the odd one when no traffic about, was early enough this morning so some of the quieter junctions empty. London traffic prob a lot worse than here. You have cycle lanes for much of route? Are they any use?
20mph average is fairly easy/maintainable on a half-decent road bike if there aren't too many lights/obstacles in the way (or a headwind)

The hardest is when you have to stop on a hill which completely kills any momentum and requires so much more effort to get going again.

I never go too fast on the downhill as I like blasting the uphill so tend to coast but still have got up to about 50mph on a stupidly steep long hill near me on my old racer (Giant OCR3 - since sold and replaced with a Giant Escape which got wrecked, replaced by the car driver and then stolen :x now waiting for the insurance :x ).
I wouldn't say a true 20mph total ride average is easy on your own; you need to be in pretty good shape to achieve 20mph average for moderate distance. I ride with a reasonably committed cycling group, we typically train/ride 4+ days/week and our 60 mile weekend group ride generally gives me an average of around 22mph on my computer. We are typically riding at 21-27mph (excluding sprints) depending on wind and gradient, but with the stops and slowdowns for turns, etc. the average is down at 22mph.

Or I just need to HTFU… :P
Agreed. 20mph avge for anything more than 30 mins on your own (especially on a commuter bike in traffic with lights and everything) is pretty damn fast. I'd say the median cyclist in an olympic triathlon does about 20mph.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

20mph is 32K, there's no way I would be able to average that on my commute. Maybe on a road of equivalent distance with no lights..

That speed would have me in work in 26 mins! Currently takes me 40, could probably knock 5 mins off that with a decent bit of effort, any trimming after that would be very tough. I think traffic and lights would be more of a factor than fitness.
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musefreek
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by musefreek »

dinsdale wrote:
musefreek wrote:i highly recommend these bikes. they're bloody stunning. you got to see them in person at the company's shoreditch shop.

http://tokyobike.co.uk/
Hmm.. Many of those bikes use Shimano Acera & Tourney components which are cheap junk. Avoid.

Pete
why is it cheap junk?

anyway, i think those bikes looks stunning.
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Womack
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

Apposite wrote:20mph is 32K, there's no way I would be able to average that on my commute. Maybe on a road of equivalent distance with no lights..

That speed would have me in work in 26 mins! Currently takes me 40, could probably knock 5 mins off that with a decent bit of effort, any trimming after that would be very tough. I think traffic and lights would be more of a factor than fitness.
TBH, fitness or cycling ability does play a part too. I think my commute's similar to yours in terms of length and general type of roads etc. I've managed it in 32 mins with a very lucky series of lights, a big effort and probably a bit of a tailwind as well (good for an 18mph moving ave according to Strava, and an overall ave of arount 17mph). But as I say, there are lots of cyclists even at local club level who are quicker than me, so it stands to reason that if they gave it beans and had similar luck with lights and traffic, they'd go quicker.

What would be interesting (and possibly just a little bit sad) would be to do it late at night, maybe ignore a few reds, and see how quickly I could go. My guess is it wouldn't be much quicker, because I think I was already at the limit of my abilities doing 32 mins. Although I'm not as strong atm as I was when I set that 'PB'.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Womack wrote:
Apposite wrote:20mph is 32K, there's no way I would be able to average that on my commute. Maybe on a road of equivalent distance with no lights..

That speed would have me in work in 26 mins! Currently takes me 40, could probably knock 5 mins off that with a decent bit of effort, any trimming after that would be very tough. I think traffic and lights would be more of a factor than fitness.
TBH, fitness or cycling ability does play a part too. I think my commute's similar to yours in terms of length and general type of roads etc. I've managed it in 32 mins with a very lucky series of lights, a big effort and probably a bit of a tailwind as well (good for an 18mph moving ave according to Strava, and an overall ave of arount 17mph). But as I say, there are lots of cyclists even at local club level who are quicker than me, so it stands to reason that if they gave it beans and had similar luck with lights and traffic, they'd go quicker.

What would be interesting (and possibly just a little bit sad) would be to do it late at night, maybe ignore a few reds, and see how quickly I could go. My guess is it wouldn't be much quicker, because I think I was already at the limit of my abilities doing 32 mins. Although I'm not as strong atm as I was when I set that 'PB'.
Ah yeah, I'm sure it's more than possible. If you put a bike courier or a reasonably keen hobby road cyclist on my route they could probably do it in under 30 mins. The odd fucker absolutely blows past me and you can tell they would be maintaining a serious average.

Unless I started doing a serious amount of cycling outside of commuting I don't think I'd be able to get there though and for me anyway it would be the stops that would prevent it. I'd say on my best trip and taking a few chances and breaking a few rules I am still looking at stopping 10+ times and being slowed down on many other occasions.
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Apposite wrote:
Womack wrote:
Apposite wrote:20mph is 32K, there's no way I would be able to average that on my commute. Maybe on a road of equivalent distance with no lights..

That speed would have me in work in 26 mins! Currently takes me 40, could probably knock 5 mins off that with a decent bit of effort, any trimming after that would be very tough. I think traffic and lights would be more of a factor than fitness.
TBH, fitness or cycling ability does play a part too. I think my commute's similar to yours in terms of length and general type of roads etc. I've managed it in 32 mins with a very lucky series of lights, a big effort and probably a bit of a tailwind as well (good for an 18mph moving ave according to Strava, and an overall ave of arount 17mph). But as I say, there are lots of cyclists even at local club level who are quicker than me, so it stands to reason that if they gave it beans and had similar luck with lights and traffic, they'd go quicker.

What would be interesting (and possibly just a little bit sad) would be to do it late at night, maybe ignore a few reds, and see how quickly I could go. My guess is it wouldn't be much quicker, because I think I was already at the limit of my abilities doing 32 mins. Although I'm not as strong atm as I was when I set that 'PB'.
Ah yeah, I'm sure it's more than possible. If you put a bike courier or a reasonably keen hobby road cyclist on my route they could probably do it in under 30 mins. The odd fucker absolutely blows past me and you can tell they would be maintaining a serious average.

Unless I started doing a serious amount of cycling outside of commuting I don't think I'd be able to get there though and for me anyway it would be the stops that would prevent it. I'd say on my best trip and taking a few chances and breaking a few rules I am still looking at stopping 10+ times and being slowed down on many other occasions.
The amount of stops is the key thing, I regularly used to do Bristol-Bath along the old railway cycle-path in a touch under 30 minutes and that distance was about 10 miles. It is a nice surface, flat and few obstacles to block the route.

On my commute into work, I don't often get up to that average due to the amount of traffic lights and traffic volume. There are others that most certainly do.

The other key to maintaining a decent speed over a long run is your pedalling cadence - It's far easier to maintain one pedalling speed than to accelerate/deccelerate a lot, however this requires disciplined gear selection.

I'd like to get back into cycling more seriously again as I used to ride reasonable distances but since my son was born (2 years ago) I seem to have lost all my free time.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Kofi Annan »

What would be interesting (and possibly just a little bit sad) would be to do it late at night, maybe ignore a few reds, and see how quickly I could go. My guess is it wouldn't be much quicker, because I think I was already at the limit of my abilities doing 32 mins. Although I'm not as strong atm as I was when I set that 'PB'.
My journey home usually takes me 45 to 50 mins to complete the roughly 18km's. I worked late one night and cycled home at about midnight. I had a favourable tail wind most of the way home, got lucky with most of traffic lights and jumped a few when I realised I was about to do an all time PB and made it home in a shade under 37 minutes. I think that works out at about an average of 19 MPH, so it certainly is possible under the right conditions, as I don't consider myself to be that fast.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

blindcider wrote: The amount of stops is the key thing, I regularly used to do Bristol-Bath along the old railway cycle-path in a touch under 30 minutes and that distance was about 10 miles. It is a nice surface, flat and few obstacles to block the route.

On my commute into work, I don't often get up to that average due to the amount of traffic lights and traffic volume. There are others that most certainly do.

The other key to maintaining a decent speed over a long run is your pedalling cadence - It's far easier to maintain one pedalling speed than to accelerate/deccelerate a lot, however this requires disciplined gear selection.

I'd like to get back into cycling more seriously again as I used to ride reasonable distances but since my son was born (2 years ago) I seem to have lost all my free time.
I am woeful at making sure I am in the right gear. Bike has triple front chainring and I spend nearly all my time in middle on front bottom on back. It's the wrong gear for accelerating away from lights and I think it's wrong for cruising. Have a well dodgy knee and I think I am making it sore by pedalling with too much torque and not enough speed. Faster cadence in general and way more gear changes is the way to go I feel.

On another note anyone get slightly sore hands when they cycle a lot? Hard to define, just a kind of achey non-specific pain at base of index finger/top of palm. (Golden opportunity for you to diss my flat bars Womack). I might need new grips or else just need to change how am holding bars.
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Nieghorn
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

I get hand pain all the time, which I assume comes from gripping tightly while having a significant amount of my upper body weight transferred through them (on my single speed, I'm leaning well forward). Goes away when I alter my hand position, which is the argument for drop bars, I guess as you've got quite a few options.

On my flat bar hybrid (see above), I have the grips which have a bit of a palm rest (see below), bar ends and often ride with hands closer together where the shifters are mounted.

... grips / ends sort of look like this:

Image


Regarding gearing, if you're in the highest gear of the middle chain ring, why not cruise in a 'lower' gear on the big chain ring? When I'm in the city, I'm usually in the middle while on the big, and then shift down to the middle chain ring at lights, flipping back up when I build some speed.

(For urban riding, I'd be better off with just one cog at the back and the three rings up front. I do fine on my single speed, but many downward slopes see me unable to pedal and there are a couple of hills in this city that I can't make up even standing to pedal, and with my weight.)
Last edited by Nieghorn on Thu May 24, 2012 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Womack
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

I'm saying nothing :P

I got loads of odd aches and pains when starting out, they all gradually went away though. I think I did have a similar hand pain. Do you use gloves? That may help.

Re the gears, definitely do try to anticipate stops and change down - you are right, turning too big a gear is not good for dodgy knees. Also, if you always stay in the same cog you'll wear it out!
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Nieghorn wrote:I get hand pain all the time, which I assume comes from gripping tightly while having a significant amount of my upper body weight transferred through them (on my single speed, I'm leaning well forward). Goes away when I alter my hand position, which is the argument for drop bars, I guess as you've got quite a few options.

On my flat bar hybrid (see above), I have the grips which have a bit of a palm rest (see below), bar ends and often ride with hands closer together where the shifters are mounted.

... grips / ends sort of look like this:

Image


Regarding gearing, if you're in the highest gear of the middle chain ring, why not cruise in a 'lower' gear on the big chain ring? When I'm in the city, I'm usually in the middle while on the big, and then shift down to the middle chain ring at lights, flipping back up when I build some speed.

(For urban riding, I'd be better off with just one cog at the back and the three rings up front. I do fine on my single speed, but many downward slopes see me unable to pedal and there are a couple of hills in this city that I can't make up even standing to pedal, and with my weight.)
That's probably a more sensible strategy alright on the gear front. Never know which is high or low on bikes, basically the bigger the front cog and smaller the back the higher gear, yeah? Higher gear more resistance, so 21st is big cog front/little back? Or is that first??
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Apposite »

Womack wrote:I'm saying nothing :P

I got loads of odd aches and pains when starting out, they all gradually went away though. I think I did have a similar hand pain. Do you use gloves? That may help.

Re the gears, definitely do try to anticipate stops and change down - you are right, turning too big a gear is not good for dodgy knees. Also, if you always stay in the same cog you'll wear it out!
The wear never occurred to me, another good reason to change more.

The knee is only not sore when I am actually cycling, which is weird.

Hopefully the hand pain will just go away. Maybe I am gripping a bit tight. I find the bike pretty comfy in general and vary between the bar-ends and bars a fair bit. I'd say I'm just not used to the vibrations.
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Bobless
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Bobless »

Traffic and lights make a huge difference to my time.

My cycle into central London this morning took me 58 minutes to cover 13.5 miles. Actual moving time was 54 minutes for which I averaged 14.8 mph.

In my defence I just worked out that there are at least 37 sets of lights on my journey plus heavy traffic and wobbly cyclists on Boris bikes clogging up my route.

Best I have done was just under 50 minutes (47 minutes actually pedalling)at 17.2 mph early morning during summer holidays.
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Apposite
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Re: The official cycling thread

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Quick question for anyone who uses Strava, do you turn on GPS or is it not needed? Where do you keep phone? I normally have mine in the little toolbag under saddle if I have no backpack.
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Mr. Very Popular
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Re: The official cycling thread

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Apposite wrote:Quick question for anyone who uses Strava, do you turn on GPS or is it not needed? Where do you keep phone? I normally have mine in the little toolbag under saddle if I have no backpack.
Just turn on the strava app,no need to turn on GPS.
Keep mine in my pocket,but I wear baggies for MTB so have a few pockets that dont interfere with pedalling.
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Womack
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

Yeah I used to keep it in a pocket without any issues.

I thought you DID have to have GPS on? Does the App automatically turn GPS on then?
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Nieghorn
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

Apposite wrote:
Nieghorn wrote:
Regarding gearing, if you're in the highest gear of the middle chain ring, why not cruise in a 'lower' gear on the big chain ring? When I'm in the city, I'm usually in the middle while on the big, and then shift down to the middle chain ring at lights, flipping back up when I build some speed.

(For urban riding, I'd be better off with just one cog at the back and the three rings up front. I do fine on my single speed, but many downward slopes see me unable to pedal and there are a couple of hills in this city that I can't make up even standing to pedal, and with my weight.)
That's probably a more sensible strategy alright on the gear front. Never know which is high or low on bikes, basically the bigger the front cog and smaller the back the higher gear, yeah? Higher gear more resistance, so 21st is big cog front/little back? Or is that first??
Yeah, pretty sure that's how it goes. I always think of it like a car. I'm not starting or going up a hill in the gear that makes me go fastest ... so small chain ring at the front and largest cog at the back is "1st" and as you describe above is "21st".

... though when I think about it too much, I imagine there is some cross over as middle / 5th is probably a 'higher' gear than top / 3rd, for example.

I try not to think about such things, though, as I've only just begun to learn about bike mechanics.
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