The official cycling thread

All things Rugby
User avatar
bealonian
Posts: 1646
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

I use the cycle surgery in Spital Sq. as it's over the road to work.
I think it was £15 for a wheel trueing, the last time I had it done which was money well spent IMO.

Don't think they do while you wait, but you could phone them up and ask...they're quite accommodating usually.
Exiled in D4
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Exiled in D4 »

Swift Cycles on Strype St, just off Middlesex St is a really good LBS, they should be able to sort you out. I believe it's run by an Aussie who got fed up with accounting and decided to open a bike shop instead. They claim to have the lowest workshop rates in the city. Went in there looking at road bikes and found them most helpful. They do organised cycles on Saturdays from the shop also.

http://www.swiftcycles.co.uk/
User avatar
Womack
Posts: 5530
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: By the mighty beard of Adam Jones

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

Cheers guys, so it looks like the answer lies somewhere around the Spitalfields type area.
mikerob
Posts: 1684
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by mikerob »

My experience of a couple of Cycle Surgeries (but I haven't used that particular branch...) is you need to book things in advance to get them to do anything.
User avatar
bealonian
Posts: 1646
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

Completed London to Cambridge in 3:43 yesterday at an average of 16 mph. Really quite happy with that.
User avatar
Womack
Posts: 5530
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: By the mighty beard of Adam Jones

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

Excellent stuff Beals - that's a decent average for a ride of that distance. How did it compare to L2B in terms of crowds, atmosphere, and difficulty?

Weird sense of deja vu this morning. Last year I watched Cav win on the Champs Elysee, then the next morning I donned a green jersey and flew into work, destroying all comers on London Bridge (our equivalent of the Champs Elysee) in tribute to the great man.

Did exactly the same this morning, was wearing the same jersey and everything - it wasn't deliberate, must just have been a subconscious impulse at work.

I also stopped off to cheer the Olympic torch on its way, bit of excitement on a Monday morning!
User avatar
bealonian
Posts: 1646
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

L2C is a much less congested ride than the L2B...probably less than 6000 all told. This, in combination with the weather, made it feel like a 'better' event, although significantly less fun and more serious.

We left at 8.15 or thereabouts and, after experience on L2B, decided to get a good 30 miles under the belt before stopping (that's the Strava update from yesterday...had to stop as the iPhone's battery was down to 40%). Quick water refill and banana chomp and carried on.

There's nothing like Ditchling on this ride. The hardest climbs are out of the Lee Valley at Nazeing and at Elmdon, but they were both pretty easy (although didn't feel it at the time). Despite repeated promises of beer stops, we were too early for the pubs, so it was only at Duxford that we stopped for a couple of pints of Timothy Taylors, after which we only had 10 miles left into Cambridge.

Got into Cambridge around 1-ish, met the wife, drank about 5 pints and ate a large bowl of paella while sitting in glorious sunshine. Lovely day all told.

I think Wiggo, Froom and Cav will inspire a huge amount of people to start cycling. I don't follow the Tour, but you can't fail to take pride in something like this, and if I see a green jersey bearing down on me I think I'll just get out of the way!
User avatar
Womack
Posts: 5530
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: By the mighty beard of Adam Jones

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

Nice one, sounds excellent. I enjoyed L2B both times I've done it, but the crowds are a massive ball-ache. May consider L2C next year then - only slight issue would be getting home afterwards I guess, but presumably some kind of transport back to London is available? Where does it start, out of interest?
User avatar
bealonian
Posts: 1646
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

It starts at Pickett's Lock in Enfield (Lee Valley Athletics Centre) http://goo.gl/maps/Vc71
There is a coach service back to the start, or the train station is about a mile away from the finish line. Trains run to either KX or Liv St.
One of my mates from Sidcup did it yesterday, and he did say it was a bit of a nightmare to get to the start. If you like, I can find out how he got there....even as close as I am, I still had a 6 mile cycle to get to the start. Still, better than the 12 miles I had to do pre-L2B.
User avatar
duke
Posts: 345
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Salisbury

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by duke »

There is a variant on the L2B which I did a few weeks ago - runs overnight from Alexandra Palace down to Brighton Racecourse - called Moonriders.

One of the big advantages is that it doesn't have anywhere near so many participants - big disadvantage this year was that there was a massive downpour at about 1am which made life very interesting. Loved riding through the Sussex countryside at 4am after the rain had stopped listening to the dawn chorus, made the slog up Ditchling Beacon worthwhile.
ZappaMan
Posts: 16308
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by ZappaMan »

Went for a lovely cycle to Yvoire yesterday. After a boozy lunch we were forced to get the boat back, sadly.
Spyglass
Posts: 397
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Houston

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

Spyglass wrote:I just signed up for the Katy Flatland Century on July 22nd, which as you can guess is a pretty flat course. The challange comes from the temps (95degF & 95%RH) and winds (typically 15mph). A group of around 10 of us are planning to paceline it, so with only two stops for food/fluids we are aiming for under 5 hours total.
Apologies as this is a bit of a gratuitous look at me post, here's my ride summary.

Weather was very kind to us, mostly overcast and didn't get in to the 90's until the last half an hour. It was supposed to be a century by my Garmin said 99.1 miles, perhaps I should have ridden around the block a couple of times at the end :P Total time including two scheduled stops at 55 miles and 77 miles, plus one unscheduled stop to puke (an impressive 4 times!) at 94 miles was 4hrs 53 mins. Moving time was 4 hrs 28 mins for a ride average of 22.2 mph.

My group broke up a bit after 60 miles as some of us joined crazy fast pacelines for around 15 miles that were cruising at 27 mph and surging to 33 mph - fun whilst it lasted but burnt a few matches keeping up with them.

All in all great ride, happy with my time, but need to get my nutrition on the bike sorted out, that's the second time it's happened at the 80-90 mile point.
User avatar
bealonian
Posts: 1646
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

Well done. I think with a ride like that you're entitled to bignote yourself.
User avatar
HKCJ
Posts: 7765
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Auld Reekie

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by HKCJ »

Spyglass wrote:
Spyglass wrote:I just signed up for the Katy Flatland Century on July 22nd, which as you can guess is a pretty flat course. The challange comes from the temps (95degF & 95%RH) and winds (typically 15mph). A group of around 10 of us are planning to paceline it, so with only two stops for food/fluids we are aiming for under 5 hours total.
Apologies as this is a bit of a gratuitous look at me post, here's my ride summary.

Weather was very kind to us, mostly overcast and didn't get in to the 90's until the last half an hour. It was supposed to be a century by my Garmin said 99.1 miles, perhaps I should have ridden around the block a couple of times at the end :P Total time including two scheduled stops at 55 miles and 77 miles, plus one unscheduled stop to puke (an impressive 4 times!) at 94 miles was 4hrs 53 mins. Moving time was 4 hrs 28 mins for a ride average of 22.2 mph.

My group broke up a bit after 60 miles as some of us joined crazy fast pacelines for around 15 miles that were cruising at 27 mph and surging to 33 mph - fun whilst it lasted but burnt a few matches keeping up with them.

All in all great ride, happy with my time, but need to get my nutrition on the bike sorted out, that's the second time it's happened at the 80-90 mile point.
Thats a very decent time SG. I'll be doing a similar length ride this Saturday my last training ride before Ironman in NY but at a much much slower pace thankfully! Like you I struggle a bit with nutrition.. I just dont get on at all with energy bars or gels.. As wierd as it sounds for me fried chicken, flat coke or dr pepper and plain chocolate seems to work best.
Spyglass
Posts: 397
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Houston

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

HKCJ wrote:
Spyglass wrote:
Spyglass wrote:I just signed up for the Katy Flatland Century on July 22nd, which as you can guess is a pretty flat course. The challange comes from the temps (95degF & 95%RH) and winds (typically 15mph). A group of around 10 of us are planning to paceline it, so with only two stops for food/fluids we are aiming for under 5 hours total.
Apologies as this is a bit of a gratuitous look at me post, here's my ride summary.

Weather was very kind to us, mostly overcast and didn't get in to the 90's until the last half an hour. It was supposed to be a century by my Garmin said 99.1 miles, perhaps I should have ridden around the block a couple of times at the end :P Total time including two scheduled stops at 55 miles and 77 miles, plus one unscheduled stop to puke (an impressive 4 times!) at 94 miles was 4hrs 53 mins. Moving time was 4 hrs 28 mins for a ride average of 22.2 mph.

My group broke up a bit after 60 miles as some of us joined crazy fast pacelines for around 15 miles that were cruising at 27 mph and surging to 33 mph - fun whilst it lasted but burnt a few matches keeping up with them.

All in all great ride, happy with my time, but need to get my nutrition on the bike sorted out, that's the second time it's happened at the 80-90 mile point.
Thats a very decent time SG. I'll be doing a similar length ride this Saturday my last training ride before Ironman in NY but at a much much slower pace thankfully! Like you I struggle a bit with nutrition.. I just dont get on at all with energy bars or gels.. As wierd as it sounds for me fried chicken, flat coke or dr pepper and plain chocolate seems to work best.
Thanks HKCJ. Pretty pleased overall, would have been better if I had: - not pulled for so long during the first third; not got carried away with fast pacelines in the second third; and got my nutrition sorted in the final third. Maybe next time…

Fired chicken goes against sports nutrition theory; limited carbs and too much fat slowing digestion, but hey if it works for you stick with it! I thought I had cracked it by switching to Hammer Heed and Shot Blocks, but obviously not, just have to try some other overpriced products.

What are your plans for the NY Ironman?
User avatar
HKCJ
Posts: 7765
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Auld Reekie

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by HKCJ »

To be perfectly honest my only plan and goal is to finish, no matter what pain I have to go through on the way. I have done zero training which is immensely stupid but am hoping my sheer stubborness gets me round. It will be the furthest I have ever swum, followed by the furthest Ive ever biked followed by a marathon so I know its not going to be easy.. That said I did the Hawaii 70.3 with no training in 6 hours but I reckon I'll be pretty much crawling by the time I start the marathon. Im thinking 1.5hr swim, will be happy enough with a 7 hour bike and 5 hour marathon.. likelihood is it'll be longer though and I'll be finishing with the fatties and the 80 year olds if I finish at all!
Spyglass
Posts: 397
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Houston

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

HKCJ wrote:To be perfectly honest my only plan and goal is to finish, no matter what pain I have to go through on the way. I have done zero training which is immensely stupid but am hoping my sheer stubborness gets me round. It will be the furthest I have ever swum, followed by the furthest Ive ever biked followed by a marathon so I know its not going to be easy.. That said I did the Hawaii 70.3 with no training in 6 hours but I reckon I'll be pretty much crawling by the time I start the marathon. Im thinking 1.5hr swim, will be happy enough with a 7 hour bike and 5 hour marathon.. likelihood is it'll be longer though and I'll be finishing with the fatties and the 80 year olds if I finish at all!
Good luck, I just couldn't imagine stringing those three events together. Are you hanging around NY/US afterwards, I'm in and out of NY at the moment and may be in town around that time.
User avatar
bealonian
Posts: 1646
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

User avatar
bobbity
Posts: 5598
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bobbity »

Digging this up because I'm now giving serious consideration to buying a bike again. I think I'm going to commit to training for a charity sportive next autumn, which will probably take some doing. Looking at the Cat and Fiddle, my brother's then wife is doing it this October, will try and persuade them both to ride it with me next year.

Still struggling with versatility though. Thought I'd found the solution in the Boardman hybrids, they're basically somewhat elongated flat bar cyclocross bikes that come in light enough to be pretty decent allround. The problem I have is that the reviews state that the Team and Pro will take cyclocross tires no issue, but having dropped in to Halfords, the bottom end Comp I was going to get has a very different fork (alloy rather than carbon) that doesn't have anywhere near the clearance of the other models. Otherwise the frames were identical. It's a £200 hike in price to get the Team, so serious reservations.

Pictures will be a bit shit, screenshots off the Halfords website. 28c fitted to both according to Halfords.

Image

That's the Comp, white bike, white background is helpful.

Image

That's the Team. Bikeradar review of the Team

Sat on both the other day, the Team was actually the right size, a medium. The chap serving me was trying to persuade me I'd not want anything smaller than the large - I'm 5'7", and that's the biggest model they make! The proper size felt good, not too stretched out. Thinking I should probably get over it, and get the Comp, I suppose I could always change the fork out one day.
Armchair_Superstar
Posts: 13521
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

It looks like the white one won't have as much room for mudguards Bobs, which could be a drawback. Have you considered a drop-bar? It would go great on the road with a set of road tyres, and handle about the same off-road. With those bikes the limiter is really the skinnier tyres and lack of suspension.

The Boardmans are incredible value, don't just go into Halfords though, look for discount codes. They do about 10% for NUS and never check the cards, and they also do "online discounts" with store pickups. They're usually on cashback sites as well.
User avatar
bobbity
Posts: 5598
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bobbity »

Don't like drop bars, I know everyone says that and six months later buys a drop bar bike. I have done turbo trainer sessions on my brothers gf's Ribble Audax, really didn't get on with them. Figured bar ends would give me a couple of different positions for longer rides. I envisage that sportive as the top end of my range.

There's £40 off bikes between £400 and £700 this weekend. I'm studiously ignoring the £70 off bikes over £700. Guess I just go for it, and think about sticking a cyclocross fork on it in the future if I find that I want to take it off road. Looking at the spec - do you think that would be a relatively straightforward thing to do? It's got discs, but they're UCI legal now so lots of newer 'crossers have them.
Armchair_Superstar
Posts: 13521
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

bobbity wrote:Don't like drop bars, I know everyone says that and six months later buys a drop bar bike. I have done turbo trainer sessions on my brothers gf's Ribble Audax, really didn't get on with them. Figured bar ends would give me a couple of different positions for longer rides. I envisage that sportive as the top end of my range.

There's £40 off bikes between £400 and £700 this weekend. I'm studiously ignoring the £70 off bikes over £700. Guess I just go for it, and think about sticking a cyclocross fork on it in the future if I find that I want to take it off road. Looking at the spec - do you think that would be a relatively straightforward thing to do? It's got discs, but they're UCI legal now so lots of newer 'crossers have them.
Bar-ends are a decent option for more hand positions. Changing the fork out for a CX one might slacken the head angle slightly and make it slightly better off-road, and you would probably be able to get bigger tires in. Its easy to swap a fork as long as you can get one that fits your steerer tube and headset arrangement.

For a road-biased hybrid you might as well go for the cheaper one, they are a solid brand and you're not likely to break parts off it.
fisgard792
Posts: 4515
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by fisgard792 »

just to keep the cycling balance amongst the lycra loving fraternity, i did my first run down the the fort william downhill world cup track (minus road jump) last week, felt every inch of the track, 18 stone down a hill is never a smooth run though
User avatar
BlackMac
Posts: 7210
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Middle of the Lothians

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by BlackMac »

Right folks, I have an old Carerra road bike which I bought in 1987. Really expensive model, cost me just shy of a grand at the time. Used to ride 30 miles a day to work but it has been lying in the shed for the last 12 years. About 5 years ago I tried to get it going and stripped it down but never got round to putting it back together. I want to get it back on the road and other than it being in bits the only problem is that both wheeels will be a bit buckled and will need new rubber. The questions are, is it worth it and how much would it cost (ball park) to get a bike shop to do it for me??
Armchair_Superstar
Posts: 13521
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

BlackMac wrote:Right folks, I have an old Carerra road bike which I bought in 1987. Really expensive model, cost me just shy of a grand at the time. Used to ride 30 miles a day to work but it has been lying in the shed for the last 12 years. About 5 years ago I tried to get it going and stripped it down but never got round to putting it back together. I want to get it back on the road and other than it being in bits the only problem is that both wheeels will be a bit buckled and will need new rubber. The questions are, is it worth it and how much would it cost (ball park) to get a bike shop to do it for me??
Are the rims f**ked? It depends what you want to spend but you could probably get basic wheels and tyres for less than £100. Retro/classic road bikes like that are very popular these days so you would probably be ble to find somebody to do a nice restoration if it has any sentimental value.

Fisgard :thumbup: Is the bike still in one piece?
User avatar
BlackMac
Posts: 7210
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Middle of the Lothians

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by BlackMac »

Nah, the rims are fine, just a bit out of shape. In good condition otherwise, just a tidy up and everything back together. Just wondering whether bikes have moved on so much that I would be better of spending £600-£700 on a basic modern one or £300 to £400 getting this one back on the road.
Armchair_Superstar
Posts: 13521
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

BlackMac wrote:Nah, the rims are fine, just a bit out of shape. In good condition otherwise, just a tidy up and everything back together. Just wondering whether bikes have moved on so much that I would be better of spending £600-£700 on a basic modern one or £300 to £400 getting this one back on the road.
Road bikes have moved on a bit, but if I were you I would be looking for a quality bike shop with some retro experience to help you tidy up the Carrera. If you're in Edinburgh The Bike Chain are decent for MTB stuff, if they wouldn't sort it themselves they would certainly know who could tart it up for you.
Mick Mannock
Posts: 25954
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Mick Mannock »

BlackMac wrote:Right folks, I have an old Carerra road bike which I bought in 1987. Really expensive model, cost me just shy of a grand at the time. Used to ride 30 miles a day to work but it has been lying in the shed for the last 12 years. About 5 years ago I tried to get it going and stripped it down but never got round to putting it back together. I want to get it back on the road and other than it being in bits the only problem is that both wheeels will be a bit buckled and will need new rubber. The questions are, is it worth it and how much would it cost (ball park) to get a bike shop to do it for me??
Good steel frame? Downtube shifters? You might want to measure the rear drop outs. Modern wheels that take cassette instead of freewheels are a different size.

I would get it roadworthy. If nothing else, it will be far more attractive/elegant than today's models. Unless you are super-fit, you will not find it any slower either.
User avatar
BlackMac
Posts: 7210
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Middle of the Lothians

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by BlackMac »

Mick Mannock wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Right folks, I have an old Carerra road bike which I bought in 1987. Really expensive model, cost me just shy of a grand at the time. Used to ride 30 miles a day to work but it has been lying in the shed for the last 12 years. About 5 years ago I tried to get it going and stripped it down but never got round to putting it back together. I want to get it back on the road and other than it being in bits the only problem is that both wheeels will be a bit buckled and will need new rubber. The questions are, is it worth it and how much would it cost (ball park) to get a bike shop to do it for me??
Good steel frame? Downtube shifters? You might want to measure the rear drop outs. Modern wheels that take cassette instead of freewheels are a different size.

I would get it roadworthy. If nothing else, it will be far more attractive/elegant than today's models. Unless you are super-fit, you will not find it any slower either.
It'll be fine then!!
User avatar
DOB
Posts: 20133
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

You can still get wheels for a narrow spacing at the back. How many speeds, BM? 2 at the front 6/7 at the back?


f**king front derailleur broke today. Again. What is up with the spring catch on these Shimano triple shifters? Same bit broken, twice, on this bike. Every other part (other than wear-and-tear stuff) still working like new after 6 years and umpteen thousand miles.
Seez
Posts: 1923
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Seez »

Mick Mannock wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Right folks, I have an old Carerra road bike which I bought in 1987. Really expensive model, cost me just shy of a grand at the time. Used to ride 30 miles a day to work but it has been lying in the shed for the last 12 years. About 5 years ago I tried to get it going and stripped it down but never got round to putting it back together. I want to get it back on the road and other than it being in bits the only problem is that both wheeels will be a bit buckled and will need new rubber. The questions are, is it worth it and how much would it cost (ball park) to get a bike shop to do it for me??
Good steel frame? Downtube shifters? You might want to measure the rear drop outs. Modern wheels that take cassette instead of freewheels are a different size.

I would get it roadworthy. If nothing else, it will be far more attractive/elegant than today's models. Unless you are super-fit, you will not find it any slower either.
You can re-space steel frames quite easily. Get a length of threaded rod, a couple of repair washers and a couple of bolts. To stretch it, put the washers and bolts on the inside of the dropouts and then tighten the bolts. You may need to go quite a bit further than the target spacing to get it to stick, and make sure you remove the rod and measure the spacing regularly so you don't go too far. I re-spaced a 120mm track frame to 135mm like this and it hasn't gone wrong yet!

Make sure it is steel before you do this!
Seez
Posts: 1923
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Seez »

DOB wrote:You can still get wheels for a narrow spacing at the back. How many speeds, BM? 2 at the front 6/7 at the back?


f**king front derailleur broke today. Again. What is up with the spring catch on these Shimano triple shifters? Same bit broken, twice, on this bike. Every other part (other than wear-and-tear stuff) still working like new after 6 years and umpteen thousand miles.
It's telling you to MTFU and get a double.
Seez
Posts: 1923
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Seez »

BlackMac wrote:Right folks, I have an old Carerra road bike which I bought in 1987. Really expensive model, cost me just shy of a grand at the time. Used to ride 30 miles a day to work but it has been lying in the shed for the last 12 years. About 5 years ago I tried to get it going and stripped it down but never got round to putting it back together. I want to get it back on the road and other than it being in bits the only problem is that both wheeels will be a bit buckled and will need new rubber. The questions are, is it worth it and how much would it cost (ball park) to get a bike shop to do it for me??
Do you need gears or is converting it to a single speed / fixie a possibility?
User avatar
cheese cutter
Posts: 794
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Edinburgh via Raukapuka

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by cheese cutter »

fisgard792 wrote:just to keep the cycling balance amongst the lycra loving fraternity, i did my first run down the the fort william downhill world cup track (minus road jump) last week, felt every inch of the track, 18 stone down a hill is never a smooth run though
Cool - I am a lycra-free zone as well. I had my first ride at Glentress last week which was good fun. Will probably get down there again later this week, and the chap I went with is keen to have a go at the Ben Nevis circuit (45 miles or so) in a couple of months time, so I'll be looking at getting fitter for that.
Mick Mannock
Posts: 25954
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Mick Mannock »

Seez wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Right folks, I have an old Carerra road bike which I bought in 1987. Really expensive model, cost me just shy of a grand at the time. Used to ride 30 miles a day to work but it has been lying in the shed for the last 12 years. About 5 years ago I tried to get it going and stripped it down but never got round to putting it back together. I want to get it back on the road and other than it being in bits the only problem is that both wheeels will be a bit buckled and will need new rubber. The questions are, is it worth it and how much would it cost (ball park) to get a bike shop to do it for me??
Do you need gears or is converting it to a single speed / fixie a possibility?
Be a shame to convert what sounds like a nice bike into a Hoxton Horror.
User avatar
blindcider
Posts: 8333
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Started to plan my John O'Groats to Lands End ride for April/May next year after putting it off for 2 years. All the advice is to go the other way yet I want the long travel segment first as I live much nearer to Lands End.

First decision is to decide on a route and time span.

Also considering whether I should try and get some team mates or do it solo.

New bike on the next bike for work scheme as a present to myself as well...

42km ride yesterday curtailed by a blow out though :x

Loving the Strava phone app as well BTW. Only following Womack at the mopment though.
fisgard792
Posts: 4515
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by fisgard792 »

cheese cutter wrote:
fisgard792 wrote:just to keep the cycling balance amongst the lycra loving fraternity, i did my first run down the the fort william downhill world cup track (minus road jump) last week, felt every inch of the track, 18 stone down a hill is never a smooth run though
Cool - I am a lycra-free zone as well. I had my first ride at Glentress last week which was good fun. Will probably get down there again later this week, and the chap I went with is keen to have a go at the Ben Nevis circuit (45 miles or so) in a couple of months time, so I'll be looking at getting fitter for that.
yeah, was thinking about the tour de ben nevis too, (details are on the no fuss events website btw)

GT is brilliant as an intro, you can have great days at innerleithen, both on the xc red with a caddon bank finish, or the numerous downhill tracks, its the perfect pastime for an ex rugby player tbh, fitness, brains, and the ability to go again after you have mashed yourself on the rocks

leave the road work to the ex 2nds players :)
User avatar
cheese cutter
Posts: 794
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Edinburgh via Raukapuka

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by cheese cutter »

fisgard792 wrote:
yeah, was thinking about the tour de ben nevis too, (details are on the no fuss events website btw)

GT is brilliant as an intro, you can have great days at innerleithen, both on the xc red with a caddon bank finish, or the numerous downhill tracks, its the perfect pastime for an ex rugby player tbh, fitness, brains, and the ability to go again after you have mashed yourself on the rocks

leave the road work to the ex 2nds players :)
The tour de ben didn't look too bad, I do a bit of riding in the Pentlands near embra but I think I'd have to start doing some longer days to build the stamina. Would be good to do it before the darkness settles in for the year but will see how I go with work and other trips coming up.
Are you based up near FW?

Edit; Have just read a bit more, the tdb sounds fairly wet. Might wait for next summer...

Blindcider - :thumbup: good luck with the jogle.
User avatar
blindcider
Posts: 8333
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

cheese cutter wrote: Blindcider - :thumbup: good luck with the jogle.
Cheers Mate
frillage
Posts: 6663
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by frillage »

Dumbledore wrote:Just got linked to this clip of a Melbourne trial rider, he is absolutely insane.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zJHayGJG ... r_embedded#!
Danny Mc makes your Melbourne lad his prison bitch, he owns him.
Post Reply