The official cycling thread

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The Ginger Jedi
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by The Ginger Jedi »

Not sure if this has been mentioned but has anyone else noticed (since the Olympics) how tolerant and accommodating motorists have been to us cyclists? Not sure how long it will last but is a nice surprise.
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Miguel Indurain
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Miguel Indurain »

The clip/clipless debate died in the mid 1990's folks :lol:
But the debate is live and well on PR :roll:

Reading this thread I can see both sides of the argument.
Depending on the cycling purpose, it is an individual choice as to whether to go clipped (strapped) or clipless (non-strapped).

If you're a commuter for example, it might make sense to have the clipped option.
If you cycle (race cycling, touring cycling,) it makes sense to go the clipless.
It is much more efficient for pedalling.

I think Sean Kelly was the professional cyclist to convert to the clipless regime.
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terryfinch
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by terryfinch »

Cycling friends, my misses has offered to buy me a road bike for Xmas. I have a hybrid already which I love. How much should I spend and what brands shoud I choose/avoid. Any buying tips?
Seez
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Seez »

terryfinch wrote:Cycling friends, my misses has offered to buy me a road bike for Xmas. I have a hybrid already which I love. How much should I spend and what brands shoud I choose/avoid. Any buying tips?
You can get some good bargains on line but you want to make sure it fits you. Best bet is to go to a a good local bike shop and try some out, or even pay for a proper fitting somewhere. That will tell you the geometry you want to look for in shops or online.

It's a good time to buy now as next year's stock is coming out soon. As for brands to avoid, if your budget is over £500 you don't really need to worry. They are all made in the same factories anyway, except for a few top end frames.
Armchair_Superstar
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

Miguel Indurain wrote:The clip/clipless debate died in the mid 1990's folks :lol:
But the debate is live and well on PR :roll:

Reading this thread I can see both sides of the argument.
Depending on the cycling purpose, it is an individual choice as to whether to go clipped (strapped) or clipless (non-strapped).

If you're a commuter for example, it might make sense to have the clipped option.
If you cycle (race cycling, touring cycling,) it makes sense to go the clipless.
It is much more efficient for pedalling.

I think Sean Kelly was the professional cyclist to convert to the clipless regime.
Wilhelm, if you paid attention you would realise that we are discussing off-road applications.
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Nieghorn
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

Seez wrote:
terryfinch wrote:Cycling friends, my misses has offered to buy me a road bike for Xmas. I have a hybrid already which I love. How much should I spend and what brands shoud I choose/avoid. Any buying tips?
You can get some good bargains on line but you want to make sure it fits you. Best bet is to go to a a good local bike shop and try some out, or even pay for a proper fitting somewhere. That will tell you the geometry you want to look for in shops or online.

It's a good time to buy now as next year's stock is coming out soon. As for brands to avoid, if your budget is over £500 you don't really need to worry. They are all made in the same factories anyway, except for a few top end frames.
This. And do your research / talk to a trusted local bike shop person. I did quite a lot of shopping around before settling on my hybrid, and for the price I was willing to pay got a great deal on a lesser-known brand (Brodie - well respected smaller company from British Columbia) as they tend to put a better set of components on than other company's bikes in the same price range.

Check out the quality of components on the bike. In my case, I've never ridden a bike that changed through the gears so smoothly. Wouldn't have discovered that had I not shopped around and did my research.
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Miguel Indurain
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Miguel Indurain »

Armchair_Superstar wrote:
Miguel Indurain wrote:The clip/clipless debate died in the mid 1990's folks :lol:
But the debate is live and well on PR :roll:

Reading this thread I can see both sides of the argument.
Depending on the cycling purpose, it is an individual choice as to whether to go clipped (strapped) or clipless (non-strapped).

If you're a commuter for example, it might make sense to have the clipped option.
If you cycle (race cycling, touring cycling,) it makes sense to go the clipless.
It is much more efficient for pedalling.

I think Sean Kelly was the professional cyclist to convert to the clipless regime.
Wilhelm, if you paid attention you would realise that we are discussing off-road applications.
I could have sworn that there was plenty of discussion here http://forum.planet-rugby.com/viewtopic ... &start=960
about on road applications, arsewipe.
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Miguel Indurain
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Miguel Indurain »

Nieghorn wrote:
Seez wrote:
terryfinch wrote:Cycling friends, my misses has offered to buy me a road bike for Xmas. I have a hybrid already which I love. How much should I spend and what brands shoud I choose/avoid. Any buying tips?
You can get some good bargains on line but you want to make sure it fits you. Best bet is to go to a a good local bike shop and try some out, or even pay for a proper fitting somewhere. That will tell you the geometry you want to look for in shops or online.

It's a good time to buy now as next year's stock is coming out soon. As for brands to avoid, if your budget is over £500 you don't really need to worry. They are all made in the same factories anyway, except for a few top end frames.
This. And do your research / talk to a trusted local bike shop person. I did quite a lot of shopping around before settling on my hybrid, and for the price I was willing to pay got a great deal on a lesser-known brand (Brodie - well respected smaller company from British Columbia) as they tend to put a better set of components on than other company's bikes in the same price range.

Check out the quality of components on the bike. In my case, I've never ridden a bike that changed through the gears so smoothly. Wouldn't have discovered that had I not shopped around and did my research.
Buying a bike with the correct frame size is the #rule.

The local bike store will be able to measure the rider's body measurement, inside leg (oohhh) measurement, should to finger tip measurement and overall height measurement.
Using those measurements, your local bike store should be able to tell you the correct bike frame size to purchase.
Armchair_Superstar
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

Miguel Indurain wrote:
Armchair_Superstar wrote:
Miguel Indurain wrote:The clip/clipless debate died in the mid 1990's folks :lol:
But the debate is live and well on PR :roll:

Reading this thread I can see both sides of the argument.
Depending on the cycling purpose, it is an individual choice as to whether to go clipped (strapped) or clipless (non-strapped).

If you're a commuter for example, it might make sense to have the clipped option.
If you cycle (race cycling, touring cycling,) it makes sense to go the clipless.
It is much more efficient for pedalling.

I think Sean Kelly was the professional cyclist to convert to the clipless regime.
Wilhelm, if you paid attention you would realise that we are discussing off-road applications.
I could have sworn that there was plenty of discussion here http://forum.planet-rugby.com/viewtopic ... &start=960
about on road applications, arsewipe.
There was indeed, but there was also discussion about off-road applications.

Since professional cyclist Brook MacDonald won the last UCI World Cup Downhill event using flat pedals you are mistaken on a number of counts.

You can apologize at your leisure.
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Paradox
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Paradox »

I love my SPDs. Nothing better than clipping in and being able to transfer your power efficiently..and no slips off the pedals. They are a lot of fun.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

Here's one from the Neighorn school of mountain bike photography:
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Image
Bedgebury forest and pinetum in the wild borderlands of Kent and East Sussex. Possibly not as rugged as rural Quebec but fun nonetheless.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Us roadies can play at the Niegs/Wommers game.
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Sonoma County and San Pablo Bay in the background. I'll try and get up there later in the day some time and if the fog lifts maybe I'll be able to see San Francisco and the Golden Gate Bridge.


I broke my chain on a 1 in 8 climb, fixed it, and kept going, on the way to taking this pic. So appreciate it.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

:lol: Great shots! Keep 'em coming ... I think it's great to see what you guys see on your rides. I should take some in-town shots as well as that's where the bulk of my riding is done.

My last photo was a bit deceptive, I'll admit. It faces away from the trail, while the trail was hard-packed gravel. There are no really 'rough' trails close by - I need to take the hard-packed probably 8kms into the park to get to them. I need to get up to the tougher trails tomorrow, though, as I'm in for a rather large leg tattoo on Weds and will be out of commission (for dirty mtb rides, at least) for a couple of weeks... and then school starts. :(
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theo
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by theo »

The Ginger Jedi wrote:Not sure if this has been mentioned but has anyone else noticed (since the Olympics) how tolerant and accommodating motorists have been to us cyclists? Not sure how long it will last but is a nice surprise.
Agreed. Though summer time tends to be better.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

Nieghorn wrote: My last photo was a bit deceptive, I'll admit. It faces away from the trail, while the trail was hard-packed gravel. There are no really 'rough' trails close by - I need to take the hard-packed probably 8kms into the park to get to them.
Yeah, mine was off the trail too for optimum 'boreal forest' effect. It's a national forestry commission forest with a purpose built singletrack circuit, quite good fun if a bit short on downhill sections for my liking. Not really that gnarly though, the odd tree root or stump aside.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Brazil »

I invested in this baby yesterday. It actually purrs.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

Very nice :thumbup:

How do you find the position? I struggled a bit with braking when I first switched to drop bars. NB if you don't already have one, a decent track pump is a good investment, you want to keep the tyres well inflated to get the maximum benefit out of them.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Brazil »

Womack wrote:Very nice :thumbup:

How do you find the position? I struggled a bit with braking when I first switched to drop bars. NB if you don't already have one, a decent track pump is a good investment, you want to keep the tyres well inflated to get the maximum benefit out of them.
I'm getting used to it pretty quickly, though getting my feet into the pedals is proving embarassing at times. The big change is just how responsive the brakes are and also the difference having a bigger range on the cassette makes. I've not gone flat out yet, largely because I'm not totally comfortable with the position and balance yet.

My chum Mr Wonky saw it and said "What have you done? You're going to die. In Lycra".
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

:lol:

I remember feeling like I was going to headbutt the tarmac the first time I got out of the saddle for a sprint. It doesn't take long before you're chucking it about though.

Re cassette range, the benefit is you only have to worry about the rear shifter. In fact you should only really require the inner chainring for the most fearsome of hors categorie climbs - if you're any kind of a man, that is... :P
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Petej »

Womack wrote:
Nieghorn wrote: My last photo was a bit deceptive, I'll admit. It faces away from the trail, while the trail was hard-packed gravel. There are no really 'rough' trails close by - I need to take the hard-packed probably 8kms into the park to get to them.
Yeah, mine was off the trail too for optimum 'boreal forest' effect. It's a national forestry commission forest with a purpose built singletrack circuit, quite good fun if a bit short on downhill sections for my liking. Not really that gnarly though, the odd tree root or stump aside.
Nothing wrong with purpose built circuits. Cannock Chase is my local single track circuit. It is great fun. Intending to go to the peak district this weekend and try the Jacobs ladder route.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by clifton cowboy »

the exmoor beast is coming up

not for girls
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

Armchair_Superstar wrote:
Nieghorn wrote:I'm going to consider the clipless pedals. Cheers for both opinions. More would be welcome. What's easier now - than when I used my mtb for everything - is that this new one only goes mountain biking.

Edit: I always forget that "clipless" means shoes that click in, and "toe clips" are the 'baskets/cages' you stick your shoes in. I was thinking of the latter. No way I'll go with clipless. Tried on my buddy's spinner at home and couldn't get the hang of it.

And found this when looking into it: http://www.bikejames.com/strength/which ... al-stroke/
Niegs that guy does some great conditioning routines for MTB but he is a bit of a crank when it comes to pedals. I'm not saying clipless is shit, its more efficient for road or XC work and worth persevering with I just find it too fiddly for techy downhill type riding.
I use the Shimano M647 which are a clipless pedal with a small platform, so when you get to a technical bit you and unclip and still pedal. Likewise if you are trying to get going, etc. you can still get some power down without being clipped in. Also you can get a dual exit SPD cleat that give more latitude for getting unclipped in a panic situation. Give them a shot.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

Spyglass wrote:
Armchair_Superstar wrote:
Nieghorn wrote:I'm going to consider the clipless pedals. Cheers for both opinions. More would be welcome. What's easier now - than when I used my mtb for everything - is that this new one only goes mountain biking.

Edit: I always forget that "clipless" means shoes that click in, and "toe clips" are the 'baskets/cages' you stick your shoes in. I was thinking of the latter. No way I'll go with clipless. Tried on my buddy's spinner at home and couldn't get the hang of it.

And found this when looking into it: http://www.bikejames.com/strength/which ... al-stroke/
Niegs that guy does some great conditioning routines for MTB but he is a bit of a crank when it comes to pedals. I'm not saying clipless is shit, its more efficient for road or XC work and worth persevering with I just find it too fiddly for techy downhill type riding.
I use the Shimano M647 which are a clipless pedal with a small platform, so when you get to a technical bit you and unclip and still pedal. Likewise if you are trying to get going, etc. you can still get some power down without being clipped in. Also you can get a dual exit SPD cleat that give more latitude for getting unclipped in a panic situation. Give them a shot.
I have a couple of sets of SPDs that I already use on my cyclocross and XC bikes, the XC bike has the caged ones. Since I use hard-soled shoes, unclipping early isn't really an option as it just compromises grip even more. I've experimented a fair bit and I find 5Tens and flats far, far better for descent-orientated riding.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

Womack wrote:
Nieghorn wrote:It's not so much getting out but it's getting the shoes back in that annoys me. I always have a chuckle when I over-take someone at a green light as he's struggling to get his shoe into the clipless pedal. I also can't remember the last time my foot slipped - even in the rain! I've got some pretty angry pedals on all my bikes that provide plenty of grip and always ride with shoes that have just a bit of grip and aren't too knobby / flat.
This is what I mean by not seeing the need. I honestly don't think my ability to cycle is impeded in any way by using flats, and frankly the only good reason I can see for using SPDs is to fit in. It's possible I could try them and it be a revelation, but I just don't see that happening - I think it's more likely that I'll find it a ball-ache getting used to them.

Re pedals, I've got a pair of generic V8s on my road bike which looks frankly ridiculous, but there's no way my foot's coming off that thing when I'm laying down the power awesome.
I can understand peoples reluctance to use clipless on an MTB, but on the road it's a no-brainer. Try them, you wouldn't believe the improvement in your ability to spin smoothly at high cadence, put the power down (especially during 30+ mph sprints) and to keep your feet, knees, etc. aligned to mitigate repetitive motion injuries.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

Armchair_Superstar wrote:
Spyglass wrote:
Armchair_Superstar wrote:
Nieghorn wrote:I'm going to consider the clipless pedals. Cheers for both opinions. More would be welcome. What's easier now - than when I used my mtb for everything - is that this new one only goes mountain biking.

Edit: I always forget that "clipless" means shoes that click in, and "toe clips" are the 'baskets/cages' you stick your shoes in. I was thinking of the latter. No way I'll go with clipless. Tried on my buddy's spinner at home and couldn't get the hang of it.

And found this when looking into it: http://www.bikejames.com/strength/which ... al-stroke/
Niegs that guy does some great conditioning routines for MTB but he is a bit of a crank when it comes to pedals. I'm not saying clipless is shit, its more efficient for road or XC work and worth persevering with I just find it too fiddly for techy downhill type riding.
I use the Shimano M647 which are a clipless pedal with a small platform, so when you get to a technical bit you and unclip and still pedal. Likewise if you are trying to get going, etc. you can still get some power down without being clipped in. Also you can get a dual exit SPD cleat that give more latitude for getting unclipped in a panic situation. Give them a shot.
I have a couple of sets of SPDs that I already use on my cyclocross and XC bikes, the XC bike has the caged ones. Since I use hard-soled shoes, unclipping early isn't really an option as it just compromises grip even more. I've experimented a fair bit and I find 5Tens and flats far, far better for descent-orientated riding.
Totally agree re downhill, flats are the way to go (not that I'm really qualified to talk about downhill living in Houston :lol: )
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by fisgard792 »

Petej wrote:
Womack wrote:
Nieghorn wrote: My last photo was a bit deceptive, I'll admit. It faces away from the trail, while the trail was hard-packed gravel. There are no really 'rough' trails close by - I need to take the hard-packed probably 8kms into the park to get to them.
Yeah, mine was off the trail too for optimum 'boreal forest' effect. It's a national forestry commission forest with a purpose built singletrack circuit, quite good fun if a bit short on downhill sections for my liking. Not really that gnarly though, the odd tree root or stump aside.
Nothing wrong with purpose built circuits. Cannock Chase is my local single track circuit. It is great fun. Intending to go to the peak district this weekend and try the Jacobs ladder route.
How did the Jacobs Ladder go, seen it on youtube, looks quite good, certainly might entice me down south

i do a lot of natural stuff now in the north west highlands and the cairngorms and the like, using the 7 stanes trail centres for fitness work and the downhill tracks at Innerleithen and Ae for a bit of fun, mountain biking is the most addictive sport i've ever done, like cocaine but more expensive
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

Saw a middle aged woman in SPDs bail hard today ... heard a loud bang and she slowly fell over. I thought she'd been shot for a second! Husband helped her up, I checked to see if they needed help. She was winded pretty bad, but didn't seem concussed. Tire seemed to blow as they were either slowing down for the slight incline or about to stop. Either way, she didn't seem to have the time to click out before she went down. :?

On a more positive note, I got onto some more gnarly hills / track today for what will probably be my last ride in a while as I go in for a big leg tattoo tomorrow. Was mostly uphill on the track, but a good ride nonetheless. (Couldn't resist taking the road back down as the speeds one can get to on the tarmac is quite the rush, even on an MTB!)
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Nieghorn wrote:Saw a middle aged woman in SPDs bail hard today ... heard a loud bang and she slowly fell over. I thought she'd been shot for a second! Husband helped her up, I checked to see if they needed help. She was winded pretty bad, but didn't seem concussed. Tire seemed to blow as they were either slowing down for the slight incline or about to stop. Either way, she didn't seem to have the time to click out before she went down. :?
Just remembered, when my chain broke going up the aforementioned 1in8 slope to take the pic above, I very nearly ate it twice and had to scramble each time to get out of my SPDs and get my foot to the ground before my face. When your chain snaps like that, you do at least 2 pedal revs before you realise what's happening, and you don't have the momentum to coast very far going up something that steep...
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Signed up last minute for Sundays Bristol to London sportive. 117 miles from @Bristol to Kempton Park.

Not quite sure what I've let myself in for (other than a sore arse) tbh.

The good news is after the first 35 miles or so it's mostly downhill with the biggest hill en route at about the 10 mile point. If I can get to 35 miles in about 3 hours I should be ok.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

Got to 2nd overall on a short sprint section on Strava yesterday, only to find that some fucker has subsequently gone KOM, so I now have to find an additional 6 seconds instead of the doable 3 :x
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Womack »

After a brief flurry of getting back into it, I've binned it again as it just starts to get silly. You end up flogging yourself for a succession of sprints, only for something to slow you down and waste the whole effort. Then if you do post a decent time, it's not long before some git comes along and makes it look crap. :x

If it's any consolation, my one and only KOM lasted all of about 2 hours :(
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Dumbledore »

plum need to stop riding in front of me at the lights, I'm faster than you :x
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Womack wrote:After a brief flurry of getting back into it, I've binned it again as it just starts to get silly. You end up flogging yourself for a succession of sprints, only for something to slow you down and waste the whole effort. Then if you do post a decent time, it's not long before some git comes along and makes it look crap. :x

If it's any consolation, my one and only KOM lasted all of about 2 hours :(
I use it for distance and route logging mainly rather than worrying about time. Wind, traffic and obstructions are so variable I don't pay much attention to that side of things.

EDIT: That obviously means I'm following/stalking you on strava for no reason Womack :evil:
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

Lads there is a very good sale on at Chain Reaction at the minute, got myself a few bargains last night.
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bealonian
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

blindcider wrote:
Womack wrote:After a brief flurry of getting back into it, I've binned it again as it just starts to get silly. You end up flogging yourself for a succession of sprints, only for something to slow you down and waste the whole effort. Then if you do post a decent time, it's not long before some git comes along and makes it look crap. :x

If it's any consolation, my one and only KOM lasted all of about 2 hours :(
I use it for distance and route logging mainly rather than worrying about time. Wind, traffic and obstructions are so variable I don't pay much attention to that side of things.

EDIT: That obviously means I'm following/stalking you on strava for no reason Womack :evil:
I do like the competitive element though...and it seems to be a better GPS tracker than runkeeper.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

Dumbledore wrote:plum need to stop riding in front of me at the lights, I'm faster than you :x
The second most annoying thing I encounter regularly, after more arrogant plum simply running the the light.

Saw one almost do it on is fixie yesterday, but there was a Mountie sitting at the light in the opposite direction. Didn't stop him skidding through the cross walk, with a couple of feet to spare with a pedestrian on each side of him. Stood in the middle of the cross walk doing the teetering pedal stand and then jumped the red a few seconds before the light turned green. Copper in his car did fudge all... probably not worthy of a citation, but a little 'whoop, whoop' from his siren and a point would send a message.

(Had one do that to me on the highway when he spotted that my passenger didn't have his seat belt on.)
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

Yes! Cut 9 seconds to jump from 3rd to KOM on the short Bishop's Way sprint. Take that you lycra bedecked knobbers and score one for the fatboys.
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

bealonian wrote:
blindcider wrote:
Womack wrote:After a brief flurry of getting back into it, I've binned it again as it just starts to get silly. You end up flogging yourself for a succession of sprints, only for something to slow you down and waste the whole effort. Then if you do post a decent time, it's not long before some git comes along and makes it look crap. :x

If it's any consolation, my one and only KOM lasted all of about 2 hours :(
I use it for distance and route logging mainly rather than worrying about time. Wind, traffic and obstructions are so variable I don't pay much attention to that side of things.

EDIT: That obviously means I'm following/stalking you on strava for no reason Womack :evil:
I do like the competitive element though...and it seems to be a better GPS tracker than runkeeper.
well of course I always look at my times and try to beat them the next time given ideal conditions.
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bealonian
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Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

bealonian wrote:Yes! Cut 9 seconds to jump from 3rd to KOM on the short Bishop's Way sprint. Take that you lycra bedecked knobbers and score one for the fatboys.
Looks like the lycra bedecked knobbers have the last laugh as that segment has now seemingly been declared unsafe, so there's no ratings anymore :x
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BlackMac
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Location: Middle of the Lothians

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by BlackMac »

Gave up on the idea of resurrecting the old Carerra, the bike shop reckoned the alloy frame weakens over time and 20 years in the shed might have done for it!! :(

Anyway just got myself a nice wee cyclocross from the Edinburgh Bicycle Warehouse. Bit embarrassing admitting you are starting again from scratch and also need about 250 quids worth of accessories!! :blush:
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