The official cycling thread

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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Womack wrote:
duke wrote:
Womack wrote:Is that a genuine ad, Duke?
Apparently so - according to Morvelo, it's in one of the bike mags this month.
I only ask because of the abovementioned blog - it's a ludicrously widely-used stock photo (in fact series of photos of the same bloke) that crops up everywhere in bike-related ads, posters etc, despite the guy not exactly fulfilling the approved look for the majority of the road cyclists these ads are usually aimed at. The guy that writes the blog calls him the 'time traveling t-shirt-wearing retro-Fred from the planet Tridork'
In fairness, that probably makes him the exact cyclist that WD40 are aiming their product at.
Spyglass
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

BlackMac wrote:Had about 10 rides on the new bike, furthest about 25 miles over some pretty hill terrain. What has surprised me is how devastating the wind is and how f**king terrible some of the roads are. Really enjoying it though.

A quick question, I have bought some fairly cheap shorts from Decathlon and although I am not having too much trouble, just how much benefit is there in the padding of the ones that are £50 plus.
Yes the wind, headwind or crosswind, can have a significant effect on your speed. Around Houston we don't have any hills to mention but we have wind, so I generally try to plan my routes out against the wind and back with it. Just like hills it's a mental thing, just remember to get low/aero and shift gears to keep you cadence high. If you have a power meter or heart rate monitor it helps you keep your effort reasonably constant.

Ditch the shorts and get some bibs, much more comfortable and everything stays in place. Like everything in cycling, bibs have a diminishing returns price curve, you pay for better design 3D chamois, etc.) and materials upto a point. My experience is US pricing, but using normal exchange rates GBP50 should get you a decent pair.
Spyglass
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

DOB wrote:
Womack wrote:
duke wrote:
Womack wrote:Is that a genuine ad, Duke?
Apparently so - according to Morvelo, it's in one of the bike mags this month.
I only ask because of the abovementioned blog - it's a ludicrously widely-used stock photo (in fact series of photos of the same bloke) that crops up everywhere in bike-related ads, posters etc, despite the guy not exactly fulfilling the approved look for the majority of the road cyclists these ads are usually aimed at. The guy that writes the blog calls him the 'time traveling t-shirt-wearing retro-Fred from the planet Tridork'
In fairness, that probably makes him the exact cyclist that WD40 are aiming their product at.
Exactly, WD40 doesn't go anywhere near my bike
Armchair_Superstar
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

BlackMac wrote:Had about 10 rides on the new bike, furthest about 25 miles over some pretty hill terrain. What has surprised me is how devastating the wind is and how f**king terrible some of the roads are. Really enjoying it though.

A quick question, I have bought some fairly cheap shorts from Decathlon and although I am not having too much trouble, just how much benefit is there in the padding of the ones that are £50 plus.
I use dhb ones from wiggle.co.uk, they've got very good quality padding for the money. You can get chamois cream as well, basically its ballbag lubricant, works a treat.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Spyglass wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Had about 10 rides on the new bike, furthest about 25 miles over some pretty hill terrain. What has surprised me is how devastating the wind is and how f**king terrible some of the roads are. Really enjoying it though.
Yes the wind, headwind or crosswind, can have a significant effect on your speed. Around Houston we don't have any hills to mention but we have wind, so I generally try to plan my routes out against the wind and back with it. Just like hills it's a mental thing, just remember to get low/aero and shift gears to keep you cadence high. If you have a power meter or heart rate monitor it helps you keep your effort reasonably constant.

If I have to choose between hills or wind on any given day, I take hills every time.

But I am noticing that to maintain speed into the wind, I'm often better off shifting up and hammering out a big gear. When you shift down, you start to slow down. Then you shift down again, and again, and again. Next thing you know you're doing 10mph on the small ring and getting nowhere.
Spyglass
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

DOB wrote:
Spyglass wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Had about 10 rides on the new bike, furthest about 25 miles over some pretty hill terrain. What has surprised me is how devastating the wind is and how f**king terrible some of the roads are. Really enjoying it though.
Yes the wind, headwind or crosswind, can have a significant effect on your speed. Around Houston we don't have any hills to mention but we have wind, so I generally try to plan my routes out against the wind and back with it. Just like hills it's a mental thing, just remember to get low/aero and shift gears to keep you cadence high. If you have a power meter or heart rate monitor it helps you keep your effort reasonably constant.

If I have to choose between hills or wind on any given day, I take hills every time.

But I am noticing that to maintain speed into the wind, I'm often better off shifting up and hammering out a big gear. When you shift down, you start to slow down. Then you shift down again, and again, and again. Next thing you know you're doing 10mph on the small ring and getting nowhere.
Agreed, the key is to maintain a constant effort, you can achieve this by using a PM or HRM. My knees start to complain if I start mashing a big gear at a lower cadence, so I try to maintain a cadence of 90 to 95 rpm and use my aerobic engine rather that pure leg strength to deal with wind or hills.

Basically whatever works for you.
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Nieghorn
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

Interesting article to show that change is a comin' in Canada ... or at least small boroughs of yuppies ... gotta start somewhere!

http://walrusmagazine.com/articles/2012 ... bike-lane/

Key excerpt:
Ferrandez’s power is limited; City Hall, led by Union Montréal’s Gérald Tremblay for the past decade, has the ultimate say on major infrastructure projects. But the boroughs do have the power to determine the direction of one-way streets, and Projet Montréal has focused on creating traffic mazes that channel drivers back to such major arteries as rue Saint-Denis and Saint-Laurent. These calming measures come at a time when Montreal’s roads, sewers, and gas lines (not to mention its bridges and tunnels) all seem to be reaching their best-before dates, provoking a spate of construction that threatens to paralyze such north-south thoroughfares as avenue de Parc and avenue Papineau for years to come. The result, in the summer of 2011, was borough-wide gridlock. As Bixi riders wove around immobilized cars, talk radio callers lambasted Montreal’s most visible, and vocal, opponent of the automobile as a dictator, a Nazi, and even Satan.

“I accept that some people think I’m the devil!” Ferrandez shouted over his shoulder, making a right onto rue de Brébeuf. “For them, the Plateau doesn’t exist. It is just a place to be driven through. I don’t give a shit about these people. They’ve abandoned the idea that humans can live together.”
Armchair_Superstar
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

Spyglass wrote:
DOB wrote:
Spyglass wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Had about 10 rides on the new bike, furthest about 25 miles over some pretty hill terrain. What has surprised me is how devastating the wind is and how f**king terrible some of the roads are. Really enjoying it though.
Yes the wind, headwind or crosswind, can have a significant effect on your speed. Around Houston we don't have any hills to mention but we have wind, so I generally try to plan my routes out against the wind and back with it. Just like hills it's a mental thing, just remember to get low/aero and shift gears to keep you cadence high. If you have a power meter or heart rate monitor it helps you keep your effort reasonably constant.

If I have to choose between hills or wind on any given day, I take hills every time.

But I am noticing that to maintain speed into the wind, I'm often better off shifting up and hammering out a big gear. When you shift down, you start to slow down. Then you shift down again, and again, and again. Next thing you know you're doing 10mph on the small ring and getting nowhere.
Agreed, the key is to maintain a constant effort, you can achieve this by using a PM or HRM. My knees start to complain if I start mashing a big gear at a lower cadence, so I try to maintain a cadence of 90 to 95 rpm and use my aerobic engine rather that pure leg strength to deal with wind or hills.

Basically whatever works for you.
I have a naturally slow cadence, I see a big benefit in giving myself an extra gear and more RPM if I am trying to go long.

Can't decide between a rip on the proper road bike or the SS crosser today. Its nice and sunny and I should really get the fast bike out, but I'm in the mood for a philospohical bimble.
fisgard792
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by fisgard792 »

did the 'tour de ben nevis' last weekend

66 km off road, with some special downhill stages, river crossings and hike a biking

really good endurance event, however, not quite the daddy, cant see me ever doing this

http://www.montane.co.uk/ultra-events/m ... ielder-100
Armchair_Superstar
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Armchair_Superstar »

fisgard792 wrote:did the 'tour de ben nevis' last weekend

66 km off road, with some special downhill stages, river crossings and hike a biking

really good endurance event, however, not quite the daddy, cant see me ever doing this

http://www.montane.co.uk/ultra-events/m ... ielder-100
Good effort! Lots of steep descents or more of an XC route?

I did Kielder a couple of years back, its a long day.
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slick
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by slick »

I've just had a call from the bike shop where my bike is having its first 6 month service and they tell me i need a new chain and cassette. This smells a little of bullshit to me.

Could I really need those after 6 months? Ive only really used this bike for commuting each day.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

slick wrote:I've just had a call from the bike shop where my bike is having its first 6 month service and they tell me i need a new chain and cassette. This smells a little of bullshit to me.

Could I really need those after 6 months? Ive only really used this bike for commuting each day.
With correct maintenance you should see around 2000 miles from a typical OEM chain, however if you generally ride in poor conditions and don't clean and lube you chain regularly then it won't last that long. Cassettes should last a long time provided you replace your chain at it's useable service life (there's some rule about the amount of acceptable stretch per 12") , however they will wear out prematurely if use ride with a badly worn chain.

It's easy and much cheaper to change them yourself
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Bike4work is open again at my company so I have ordered myself a £1000 voucher.

Now I just need to decide what to spend it on - Contendors are:

Giant Defy 1 - more likely a Defy 2 and some extra gear, Tiagra rather than 105's though (at least it's not the hateful SORA crap)
Spoiler: show
Image
Ribble Sportive - specced to around the £1k
Image

Any other suggestions or opinions?
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Bindi
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Bindi »

blindcider wrote:Bike4work is open again at my company so I have ordered myself a £1000 voucher.

Now I just need to decide what to spend it on - Contendors are:

Giant Defy 1 - more likely a Defy 2 and some extra gear, Tiagra rather than 105's though (at least it's not the hateful SORA crap)
Spoiler: show
Image
Ribble Sportive - specced to around the £1k
Image

Any other suggestions or opinions?
Get the Giant - it's a nice bike. The other one is a piece of shit trying to pass itself off as an expensive bike. Suspect the aero rims weigh a tonne and would drastically slow you down (rotating mass and all).

As for tiagra - save a bit longer and get the 105; it will last.
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Bindi wrote:
blindcider wrote:Bike4work is open again at my company so I have ordered myself a £1000 voucher.

Now I just need to decide what to spend it on - Contendors are:

Giant Defy 1 - more likely a Defy 2 and some extra gear, Tiagra rather than 105's though (at least it's not the hateful SORA crap)
Spoiler: show
Image
Ribble Sportive - specced to around the £1k
Image

Any other suggestions or opinions?
Get the Giant - its a nice bike. The other one is a piece of shit trying to pass itself off as an expensive bike. Suspect this aero rims weight a tonne and would drastically slow you down (rotating mass and all).

As for toagra - save a bit longer and get the 105; it will last.
The Ribble is an interesting case because you spec your own bike to the frame - those rims wouldn't be what I would spec. I was looking at speccing Tiagra on this one as well, but could squeeze 105's in at the expense of cheaper wheels.
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slick
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by slick »

Spyglass wrote:
slick wrote:I've just had a call from the bike shop where my bike is having its first 6 month service and they tell me i need a new chain and cassette. This smells a little of bullshit to me.

Could I really need those after 6 months? Ive only really used this bike for commuting each day.
With correct maintenance you should see around 2000 miles from a typical OEM chain, however if you generally ride in poor conditions and don't clean and lube you chain regularly then it won't last that long. Cassettes should last a long time provided you replace your chain at it's useable service life (there's some rule about the amount of acceptable stretch per 12") , however they will wear out prematurely if use ride with a badly worn chain.

It's easy and much cheaper to change them yourself
Cheers, I call bullshit then. I really should do more of my own maintenance just worried I will balls the whole thing up and it will cost me more.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

I would lean toward the better wheels and run with Tiagra. My bike came with a mix of 105 and Tiagra. The 105 fd was the first part to break. I replaced it with a Tiagra which lasted slightly longer.

The main advantage I can see to new 105 is the internal routed gear cables. If you prefer the tidier look on your bars, go that route.

Also, it looks from the pics like the Giant has a compact and the Ribble a 52/42. I'd definitely go for the wider gear range.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Slick, I've read that a chain link is exactly one inch long, so a good wear check is to take a ruler and line up the zero end with one link and see if the 12" end lines up with the same spot on the link 12 links down. Obviously there'll be some stretch, but you can judge for yourself what is and isn't acceptable.

Wear on the cassette is less easily measured, but have look yourself at the teeth. If they're still square at the ends, he's having you on.
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

DOB wrote:I would lean toward the better wheels and run with Tiagra. My bike came with a mix of 105 and Tiagra. The 105 fd was the first part to break. I replaced it with a Tiagra which lasted slightly longer.

The main advantage I can see to new 105 is the internal routed gear cables. If you prefer the tidier look on your bars, go that route.

Also, it looks from the pics like the Giant has a compact and the Ribble a 52/42. I'd definitely go for the wider gear range.
The Giant is a compact. I have had 3 Giant's and never had a problem with any of them.

I specced a triple Tiagra on the Ribble for the £1k - you can spec anything from Sora's up to the top Ultegra and SRAM's. I like the idea of being able to pick and choose my parts more than the factory specced Giant.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

blindcider wrote:
DOB wrote:I would lean toward the better wheels and run with Tiagra. My bike came with a mix of 105 and Tiagra. The 105 fd was the first part to break. I replaced it with a Tiagra which lasted slightly longer.

The main advantage I can see to new 105 is the internal routed gear cables. If you prefer the tidier look on your bars, go that route.

Also, it looks from the pics like the Giant has a compact and the Ribble a 52/42. I'd definitely go for the wider gear range.
The Giant is a compact. I have had 3 Giant's and never had a problem with any of them.

I specced a triple Tiagra on the Ribble for the £1k - you can spec anything from Sora's up to the top Ultegra and SRAM's. I like the idea of being able to pick and choose my parts more than the factory specced Giant.
Is the 105 10spd? I forgot there's that difference between the 2 groups now also; I'd definitely be more inclined to go with a 10spd compact than a 9spd triple. Sram have 32t sprockets now, and don't make triples for the road any more. A 50/34 with an 11-26 gives you a wider gear range than a 52/42/32 with a 12-25.
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slick
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by slick »

Just found out that TFL are closing the secure bike park on Tooley Street (London), bit annoyed and not sure what to do with my bike when I ride to work now.

Not enough racks on the street and the bikes are regularly nicked or damaged there anyway. Boris/TFL just seems to be making life more and more difficult to cycle to work.
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

DOB wrote:
blindcider wrote:
DOB wrote:I would lean toward the better wheels and run with Tiagra. My bike came with a mix of 105 and Tiagra. The 105 fd was the first part to break. I replaced it with a Tiagra which lasted slightly longer.

The main advantage I can see to new 105 is the internal routed gear cables. If you prefer the tidier look on your bars, go that route.

Also, it looks from the pics like the Giant has a compact and the Ribble a 52/42. I'd definitely go for the wider gear range.
The Giant is a compact. I have had 3 Giant's and never had a problem with any of them.

I specced a triple Tiagra on the Ribble for the £1k - you can spec anything from Sora's up to the top Ultegra and SRAM's. I like the idea of being able to pick and choose my parts more than the factory specced Giant.
Is the 105 10spd? I forgot there's that difference between the 2 groups now also; I'd definitely be more inclined to go with a 10spd compact than a 9spd triple. Sram have 32t sprockets now, and don't make triples for the road any more. A 50/34 with an 11-26 gives you a wider gear range than a 52/42/32 with a 12-25.
The 105 is 10spd, yes. Triple is just what I'm comfortable with I guess, I am leaning towards the Defy1 again so that will be a compact. Interested in trying a SRAM system but I've heard they take some getting used to if you are used to shimano.

Any other suggestions on bikes at this price point? - The Boardman Team seems to get good reviews but I've also heard horror stories about how the Halfords Monkeys put them together. Not too keen on the Trek Domane or Specialized Tarmac and haven't found anyone stocking the Forme Longcliffe which i read a good review of
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bealonian
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bealonian »

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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Yeah, jeez, using WD40 on Dura-Ace? What the fudge is wrong with him?
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Mad-Scientist
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Mad-Scientist »

blindcider wrote:
DOB wrote:I would lean toward the better wheels and run with Tiagra. My bike came with a mix of 105 and Tiagra. The 105 fd was the first part to break. I replaced it with a Tiagra which lasted slightly longer.

The main advantage I can see to new 105 is the internal routed gear cables. If you prefer the tidier look on your bars, go that route.

Also, it looks from the pics like the Giant has a compact and the Ribble a 52/42. I'd definitely go for the wider gear range.
The Giant is a compact. I have had 3 Giant's and never had a problem with any of them.

I specced a triple Tiagra on the Ribble for the £1k - you can spec anything from Sora's up to the top Ultegra and SRAM's. I like the idea of being able to pick and choose my parts more than the factory specced Giant.
Ribble has a good rep, but I find this Whistle mouth wateringly good.
Image

All carbon frame, 105 gtoupset, for a grand.
http://www.hargreaves-cycles.co.uk/prod ... oad_Racing
or with campy zenon.
http://www.hargreaves-cycles.co.uk/prod ... oad_Racing
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Laurent
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Laurent »

DOB wrote:
Yeah, jeez, using WD40 on Dura-Ace? What the fudge is wrong with him?
What is that snobery with WD40
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cheese cutter
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by cheese cutter »

I went over the handlebars last week and banged my elbow on landing - just got a couple of wee cuts but I am impressed with the bruise:

Image

I hit a hole in the track that was the same shape and size as my mtb wheel and went over the front. My front wheel ended up too buckled to rotate through the forks but I had read about bashing them on the ground to straighten it.
A few heavy whacks on the ground straightened it enough that I was able to ride the 3-4 miles back to the car - might be worth remembering if you are hard on your toys like I am.
London Pride
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by London Pride »

Lucky - I broke my elbow when the same happend to me a few months back, although I did get away without wrecking the wheel - only just back riding now - this week is the first time I've cycled to work four times for over a year. I feel like shit.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by cheese cutter »

Yeah, I think I was pretty lucky not to do more damage to myself - was wearing a helmet but going but the dirt on my shirt and pack I must have somersaulted as well. It was all pretty quick.
How long's your commute? It will get easier.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by London Pride »

Not long - five miles, but I get finished off by short sharp climbs at either end, particularly when I've been out of action for a while (usually over the winter when the weather's been bad). As you say, it is defninitely getting easier again; been spending as much time as possible hiking up hills in the meantime - think that's helped a fair bit.

So glad I was wearing a helmet too, given I opened up my chin by an inch or so, and and took the skin off one side of my face.
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Okay, think I have decided on the FELT Z85. Nice spec (Shimano 105's, Mavic wheels) a comfortable ride and £925.

http://www.feltbicycles.com/USA/2013/Ro ... s/Z85.aspx

Image
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

Once you take it for a spin, let us know how it felt .... bwahahahhahah ...

:uhoh: Sorry. Coat please!




I should have my 'new' single speed ready to go this week. Managed to snap the frame close to the drop outs on the previous one - which is annoying, as I'd just painted it a month ago.
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Nieghorn wrote:Once you take it for a spin, let us know how it felt .... bwahahahhahah ...

:uhoh: Sorry. Coat please!




I should have my 'new' single speed ready to go this week. Managed to snap the frame close to the drop outs on the previous one - which is annoying, as I'd just painted it a month ago.
It felt good actually, light and responsive.

The shop (Bristol triathlon shop for anyone local to Briz) will do a free video fitting and two free services every year for as long as you own the bike which is pretty good. Leaves me £75 for pedals and lights as well
fisgard792
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by fisgard792 »

cheese cutter wrote:I went over the handlebars last week and banged my elbow on landing - just got a couple of wee cuts but I am impressed with the bruise:

Image

I hit a hole in the track that was the same shape and size as my mtb wheel and went over the front. My front wheel ended up too buckled to rotate through the forks but I had read about bashing them on the ground to straighten it.
A few heavy whacks on the ground straightened it enough that I was able to ride the 3-4 miles back to the car - might be worth remembering if you are hard on your toys like I am.
good that it was only a bruise

had a few otb moments but normally in slomo, one time i went over quick with no response was coming down ben lomond, my hand ended up a similar colour
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bobbity
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by bobbity »

Been trying to find something to train on and then ride on a sportive next Oct. Finding it quite difficult to turn up anything on ebay for decent money, suspect it may be wise to wait until after Christmas.

There is something that I found yesterday that I'm trying not to think about doing - someone is selling a new bike with 105/Tiagra drivetrain components for £500. The frame is too big, so I'd need to use it as a donor bike, and get a frame I like. The full spec of the 105 bike is:

Fork - 700c Carbon Fibre with Tapered Aero Blades
Gears - Shimano 105 20 Speed Gears with Shimano 105 STI Dual Control Levers
Freewheel - Shimano Tiagra 11/25 Tooth Cassette Freewheel
Chainset - Shimano FCR-5500 Hollowtech 39/53 Tooth Double Chainset with 170mm Alloy Cranks
Bottom Bracket - Shimano Cartridge
Rims - Viking 700c Alloy Double Wall 32 Hole
Hubs/Spokes - Quando Alloy Quick Release Hubs with Black Spokes
Tyres - 700c x 23c Kenda Koncept Road Tyres
Brakes - Alloy Dual Pivot Side Pull with Shimano Alloy Levers
Handlebar - Zoom Oversize Alloy Road
Stem - Zoom Oversize Alloy A-Head
Saddle - Selle San Marco Road Saddle with Micro-Adjust Alloy Seatpost

The question is - are the other components up to snuff to make it worthwhile thinking about doing or should I keep cruising ebay for something with Sora/Tiagra? I wouldn't want to add more than the cost of a new frame to the £500.

Missed out on a Bianchi Via Nirone with low end Campag stuff over the weekend. Possibly could have got it for £300ish.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

blindcider wrote:
DOB wrote:
blindcider wrote:
DOB wrote:I would lean toward the better wheels and run with Tiagra. My bike came with a mix of 105 and Tiagra. The 105 fd was the first part to break. I replaced it with a Tiagra which lasted slightly longer.

The main advantage I can see to new 105 is the internal routed gear cables. If you prefer the tidier look on your bars, go that route.

Also, it looks from the pics like the Giant has a compact and the Ribble a 52/42. I'd definitely go for the wider gear range.
The Giant is a compact. I have had 3 Giant's and never had a problem with any of them.

I specced a triple Tiagra on the Ribble for the £1k - you can spec anything from Sora's up to the top Ultegra and SRAM's. I like the idea of being able to pick and choose my parts more than the factory specced Giant.
Is the 105 10spd? I forgot there's that difference between the 2 groups now also; I'd definitely be more inclined to go with a 10spd compact than a 9spd triple. Sram have 32t sprockets now, and don't make triples for the road any more. A 50/34 with an 11-26 gives you a wider gear range than a 52/42/32 with a 12-25.
The 105 is 10spd, yes. Triple is just what I'm comfortable with I guess, I am leaning towards the Defy1 again so that will be a compact. Interested in trying a SRAM system but I've heard they take some getting used to if you are used to shimano.

Any other suggestions on bikes at this price point? - The Boardman Team seems to get good reviews but I've also heard horror stories about how the Halfords Monkeys put them together. Not too keen on the Trek Domane or Specialized Tarmac and haven't found anyone stocking the Forme Longcliffe which i read a good review of
Check out the Tarmac, it's a great bike, I have an 2010 Expert, I've put over 6,000 miles on it in two years without any problems. Just changed the chain every 2,000 miles, cassette to a 12-23 (too large steps with the 11-28 it came with) and just recently cables (didn't really need changing I just like super slick shifting). It's very comfortable once you get it dialed in, fine for centuries and crazy fast group rides.

Unless you absolutely have to have new, I'd look at used around one year old, there are excellent bargains out there, if you're buying carbon make sure you carefully inspect the frame.
Spyglass
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Spyglass »

DOB wrote:Slick, I've read that a chain link is exactly one inch long, so a good wear check is to take a ruler and line up the zero end with one link and see if the 12" end lines up with the same spot on the link 12 links down. Obviously there'll be some stretch, but you can judge for yourself what is and isn't acceptable.

Wear on the cassette is less easily measured, but have look yourself at the teeth. If they're still square at the ends, he's having you on.
Links on a 10 speed chain are 1/2", wear limit is 1/16" per 12". You can either measure it with a ruler or use a a chain wear go/no-go gauge.
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AYEAYE
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by AYEAYE »

Pushy parent much?









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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Love the streamlined helmet.

Only thing that could make that pic better would be if the racer had stabilisers and the boy was already in the racing crouch with both feet in the clips.
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Nieghorn
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

Wales trip on hold as I've been invited on a free trip to the Caymans as coach for a rugby tour. Will do some cycling there, that's for sure. 8)
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