The official cycling thread

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booji boy
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

Jim Lahey wrote:Found the culprit!
The tiniest of metal shards coming through the outer tyre that caused a slow puncture on both tubes.
Only did a quick check yesterday when changing the tube as I was getting the devil stare from the missus for abandoning her with the two monsters.
I’ve changed tube again (will need to get a repair kit as both punctures are small and easily fixed) so hopefully when I get on it tomorrow I’ll be sorted :thumbup:
:thumbup:

I had a puncture once where I replaced the inner tube 3 times before the penny dropped and I double checked the tyre itself. There was a thorn sticking through the sidewalk of the tyre. Funny thing was each time I replaced the inner tube in the middle of a ride it was fine for the remainder of the ride only for me to find it flat again the next day.
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Re: The official cycling thread

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dinsdale wrote: I will never buy a modern bike without discs again.
I just can't see the point of pads
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Anonymous 1 »

Jim Lahey wrote:Found the culprit!
The tiniest of metal shards coming through the outer tyre that caused a slow puncture on both tubes.
Only did a quick check yesterday when changing the tube as I was getting the devil stare from the missus for abandoning her with the two monsters.
I’ve changed tube again (will need to get a repair kit as both punctures are small and easily fixed) so hopefully when I get on it tomorrow I’ll be sorted :thumbup:
Can't believe you've not got one already. I'm just a commuter and use marathons so don't get punctures but still carry a spare tube and repair kit.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Jim Lahey wrote:Found the culprit!
The tiniest of metal shards coming through the outer tyre that caused a slow puncture on both tubes.
Only did a quick check yesterday when changing the tube as I was getting the devil stare from the missus for abandoning her with the two monsters.
I’ve changed tube again (will need to get a repair kit as both punctures are small and easily fixed) so hopefully when I get on it tomorrow I’ll be sorted :thumbup:
I once had a piece of wire as long as the thickness of the tire carcass get jammed in there. Took 3 flats before I finally found the bugger. I ended up tossing the tire after anyway.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Nieghorn »

booji boy wrote:When I bought my mountain bike about 5 years, after a break from the sport of over 10 years, I knew as a minimum I wanted a Deore drive train.

Shimano Drivechains:

Altus - riding with the kids around the neighborhood
Acera - bike paths, easy trails
Alivio - entry level mountain bike trails
Deore - good performance and reliable enough for real mountain biking
SLX - perfect blend of quality, performance and reliability for 99% of weekend warriors
XT - XT and above is just getting lighter and smoother so if you're racing it might be important but not necessary for most of us.

I've had no reliability problems with my 'entry level' hardtail and the only upgrade was from the Suntour spring fork to a Rockshox Reba Air Sprung fork. That was a game changer and transformed the handling of the bike from decent to excellent.

I've since purchased a couple of higher specced full suspension mountain bikes and whilst they are both superb I haven't noticed much difference in terms of the performance of the components compared to my entry level hardtail. So I think others are correct that whilst the lowest grade components won't stand up to the rigour of normal use you don't need to buy top of the line components. Mid grade components are excellent and get the job done for the majority of us. The trickle down technology means that as the top stuff gets better and better the lower to mid range stuff improves to the point that it is as good as the top of the line stuff was about 5 years ago.
:thumbup:

What was on mine doesn't seem to fit the chart, even. :) "Tourney"?

Anyway, I upgraded to Deore and a 9-speed rather than 7. Mostly stick to country roads and easy-mod trails. Much smoother changes has been a treat!

All in all, not complaining as this 29er really suits me. At the time, I wasn't interested in spending $1000 on a MTB when I was living in an urban enviro well away from good trails. Now I live on a farm outside the city...
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by dinsdale »

Nieghorn wrote:
booji boy wrote:When I bought my mountain bike about 5 years, after a break from the sport of over 10 years, I knew as a minimum I wanted a Deore drive train.

Shimano Drivechains:

Altus - riding with the kids around the neighborhood
Acera - bike paths, easy trails
Alivio - entry level mountain bike trails
Deore - good performance and reliable enough for real mountain biking
SLX - perfect blend of quality, performance and reliability for 99% of weekend warriors
XT - XT and above is just getting lighter and smoother so if you're racing it might be important but not necessary for most of us.

I've had no reliability problems with my 'entry level' hardtail and the only upgrade was from the Suntour spring fork to a Rockshox Reba Air Sprung fork. That was a game changer and transformed the handling of the bike from decent to excellent.

I've since purchased a couple of higher specced full suspension mountain bikes and whilst they are both superb I haven't noticed much difference in terms of the performance of the components compared to my entry level hardtail. So I think others are correct that whilst the lowest grade components won't stand up to the rigour of normal use you don't need to buy top of the line components. Mid grade components are excellent and get the job done for the majority of us. The trickle down technology means that as the top stuff gets better and better the lower to mid range stuff improves to the point that it is as good as the top of the line stuff was about 5 years ago.
:thumbup:

What was on mine doesn't seem to fit the chart, even. :) "Tourney"?

Anyway, I upgraded to Deore and a 9-speed rather than 7. Mostly stick to country roads and easy-mod trails. Much smoother changes has been a treat!

All in all, not complaining as this 29er really suits me. At the time, I wasn't interested in spending $1000 on a MTB when I was living in an urban enviro well away from good trails. Now I live on a farm outside the city...
Tourney is the lowest end groupset Shimano make :)

Deore is decent and the lowest end kit I'd want to use for any serious riding. My first MTB (£650 in 2001) had Deore and it held up pretty well to a lot of abuse for several years.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Tourney is Shimano's bottom tier groupset. You will occasionally see the cheapest big box bikes with a square-ish derailleur marked just "shimano" with no groupset label, and you'll find Tourney on the slightly less cheap bike next to it.

http://www.bikeroar.com/tips/difference ... components

I've ridden with people that got good mileage out of Acera and Claris (the road equivalent to the the Altus/Acera level) parts, and I want to say I've seen road bikes with Claris 8-spd brake/shifters and a Tourney derailleur. It's up to a certain standard, but if/when your Tourney derailleur breaks down you'll probably find it's just as cheap/easy to replace it with Sora or Altus.
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booji boy
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

Nieghorn wrote:
booji boy wrote:When I bought my mountain bike about 5 years, after a break from the sport of over 10 years, I knew as a minimum I wanted a Deore drive train.

Shimano Drivechains:

Altus - riding with the kids around the neighborhood
Acera - bike paths, easy trails
Alivio - entry level mountain bike trails
Deore - good performance and reliable enough for real mountain biking
SLX - perfect blend of quality, performance and reliability for 99% of weekend warriors
XT - XT and above is just getting lighter and smoother so if you're racing it might be important but not necessary for most of us.

I've had no reliability problems with my 'entry level' hardtail and the only upgrade was from the Suntour spring fork to a Rockshox Reba Air Sprung fork. That was a game changer and transformed the handling of the bike from decent to excellent.

I've since purchased a couple of higher specced full suspension mountain bikes and whilst they are both superb I haven't noticed much difference in terms of the performance of the components compared to my entry level hardtail. So I think others are correct that whilst the lowest grade components won't stand up to the rigour of normal use you don't need to buy top of the line components. Mid grade components are excellent and get the job done for the majority of us. The trickle down technology means that as the top stuff gets better and better the lower to mid range stuff improves to the point that it is as good as the top of the line stuff was about 5 years ago.
:thumbup:

What was on mine doesn't seem to fit the chart, even. :) "Tourney"?

Anyway, I upgraded to Deore and a 9-speed rather than 7. Mostly stick to country roads and easy-mod trails. Much smoother changes has been a treat!

All in all, not complaining as this 29er really suits me. At the time, I wasn't interested in spending $1000 on a MTB when I was living in an urban enviro well away from good trails. Now I live on a farm outside the city...
I knew there was an even lower grade than Altus but couldn't remember what it was called. Tourney, that's it. :)

Deore is great. I bought a full suspension bike with SLX shifters and front derailleur and XT on the rear derailleur. It's great but really the difference between that and the Deore on my hardtail is infinitesimal and a rider that isn't obsessed about equipment like me wouldn't even know there was a difference. Both superb and have never failed me.

I have a newer bike with SRAM 1 x 12 Eagle drivetrain which has taken a bit of getting used to with the dual thumb shifters vs the Shimano finger/thumb shifters. I think I prefer the Shimano setup.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

How do you post images?
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BlackMac
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by BlackMac »

Jim Lahey wrote:Found the culprit!
The tiniest of metal shards coming through the outer tyre that caused a slow puncture on both tubes.
Only did a quick check yesterday when changing the tube as I was getting the devil stare from the missus for abandoning her with the two monsters.
I’ve changed tube again (will need to get a repair kit as both punctures are small and easily fixed) so hopefully when I get on it tomorrow I’ll be sorted :thumbup:
A good tip in future is turn the tyre inside out and then check it. That tends to make these wee shits protrude and easier to find
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

booji boy wrote:How do you post images?
If the image is online, copy the url for it.

Click on the box marked "img" just over your reply, and paste the url in the middle between the 2 sets of square brackets.
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booji boy
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

DOB wrote:
booji boy wrote:How do you post images?
If the image is online, copy the url for it.

Click on the box marked "img" just over your reply, and paste the url in the middle between the 2 sets of square brackets.
Keep trying that but all I get is this.

Image
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Man In Black wrote:I just bought the entry level Bianchi to get back into road cycling. Knowing PR someone will no doubt be along soon to tell me it’s a shit bike and a terrible choice but I like it. The brake set seems a bit ropey though, they’ve clearly saved some money there. Also Celeste is a hot colour.
The Via Nirone?

Bianchi do make good bikes. Unless you got a big discount, you probably paid more than a similar specced bike by a different brand. But the celeste is nice, and the bike will last for you. At the very worst, you have a frame that is worthy of whatever upgrades you choose to put on it in the future.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

booji boy wrote:
DOB wrote:
booji boy wrote:How do you post images?
If the image is online, copy the url for it.

Click on the box marked "img" just over your reply, and paste the url in the middle between the 2 sets of square brackets.
Keep trying that but all I get is this.

Image
Your link should end with .jpg or .gif or similar.

I followed the link in your post, right-clicked on the photo and let's see if it works...
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booji boy
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

DOB wrote:
booji boy wrote:
DOB wrote:
booji boy wrote:How do you post images?
If the image is online, copy the url for it.

Click on the box marked "img" just over your reply, and paste the url in the middle between the 2 sets of square brackets.
Keep trying that but all I get is this.

Image
Your link should end with .jpg or .gif or similar.

I followed the link in your post, right-clicked on the photo and let's see if it works...
Great so what was I doing wrong?
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Sorry, I should finish; I right-clicked on the image in your link, and clicked on "open image in new tab." The url in the new tab was what I posted above. I think you right clicked on the image and clicked "copy image url," which seemingly doesn't do what it says it does.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

DOB wrote:Sorry, I should finish; I right-clicked on the image in your link, and clicked on "open image in new tab." The url in the new tab was what I posted above. I think you right clicked on the image and clicked "copy image url," which seemingly doesn't do what it says it does.
Thank DOB. I'm trying to do it from a tablet so no right click option really.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

Anyway the point of posting that picture is that it is my latest purchase. A 160/150mm Trek Remedy 8 trail bike designed to handle the steepest, gnarliest trails, drops, jumps etc. Only problem is during this lockdown it would be pretty silly taking on those kind of trails and risking accident or injury so I will stick to riding my XC bike and taking on much flatter, tamer trails.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Man In Black wrote:
DOB wrote:
Man In Black wrote:I just bought the entry level Bianchi to get back into road cycling. Knowing PR someone will no doubt be along soon to tell me it’s a shit bike and a terrible choice but I like it. The brake set seems a bit ropey though, they’ve clearly saved some money there. Also Celeste is a hot colour.
The Via Nirone?

Bianchi do make good bikes. Unless you got a big discount, you probably paid more than a similar specced bike by a different brand. But the celeste is nice, and the bike will last for you. At the very worst, you have a frame that is worthy of whatever upgrades you choose to put on it in the future.
That’s the one. To be honest, I kinda knew that when I bought it. I probably could have got a more mainstream brand for cheaper with better spec but as you say I can add to is at time goes on. It’s a nice looking bike and the reviews of it are largely very good. The only criticism is the relative low quality of the group set, but I’ll look to upgrade that when the time is right.
Claris/Sora are perfectly serviceable groups, no need to upgrade anything until it breaks/you really want to get into some long rides. Especially now that Shimano's lower tier groups have dropped the crappy thumb shifter they used to have. If you're going to spend any on upgrading it, go wheels first, then BB, and then whenever your chain and cassette wear out, switch the drivetrain to something with more speeds like 105.

Thing is, keep it clean and in good condition, and you'll always get someone turn their head and go "nice Bianchi!" I have a Brava frame stripped down in my garage, it's a dirty muddy red colour, cheap 520 steel, but it always gets approving looks whenever I take it out. Possibly in part to the Campag group on it, but even that's low-tier.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Pat the Ex Mat »

booji boy wrote:Anyway the point of posting that picture is that it is my latest purchase. A 160/150mm Trek Remedy 8 trail bike designed to handle the steepest, gnarliest trails, drops, jumps etc. Only problem is during this lockdown it would be pretty silly taking on those kind of trails and risking accident or injury so I will stick to riding my XC bike and taking on much flatter, tamer trails.
Looks good - although the old-school in me can't get my head around the front ring.

My new purchase is on hold for 6 months as my new commute is only a few Kms. No point spending cash in this climate if I don't need to
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
booji boy wrote:Anyway the point of posting that picture is that it is my latest purchase. A 160/150mm Trek Remedy 8 trail bike designed to handle the steepest, gnarliest trails, drops, jumps etc. Only problem is during this lockdown it would be pretty silly taking on those kind of trails and risking accident or injury so I will stick to riding my XC bike and taking on much flatter, tamer trails.
Looks good - although the old-school in me can't get my head around the front ring.

My new purchase is on hold for 6 months as my new commute is only a few Kms. No point spending cash in this climate if I don't need to
Yeah I'm still nostalgic for the old 3 x at the front which I still have on my other two bikes. I tend to live in the middle ring 80% of the ride and drop to the granny when you need to on the really steep climbs. The big ring only gets used on the road riding to or from the trail.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Pat the Ex Mat »

I have an old 26" Orbea that I commute on - There were guys doing 25Km + on those front rings.

I was surprised they didn't top out
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

Pat the Ex Mat wrote:I have an old 26" Orbea that I commute on - There were guys doing 25Km + on those front rings.

I was surprised they didn't top out
Well the front ring is 32T whilst the rear cassette is 10-50, 12-speed.

On my old bikes it's more like front 24/32/42 and rear cassette 11-36, 10-speed.

I'm sure someone else knows how to calculate the gearing ratios but the range seems good on the modern 1 x 12 system just different operating procedures to the old 3 x 10 (or 7 or 8 or 9 depending how old the bike is).
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Pat the Ex Mat »

Yeah, I'm sure it's fine but it messes with your head

I foolishly said yes to a mate's 50th next year in Derby, Tas. Supposed to be the best MTBing in Oz.

I have 10 months to get ready for it :?
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

Pat the Ex Mat wrote:Yeah, I'm sure it's fine but it messes with your head

I foolishly said yes to a mate's 50th next year in Derby, Tas. Supposed to be the best MTBing in Oz.

I have 10 months to get ready for it :?
Where are you based?

I agreed to a MTB ride in the Noosa Headlands at Xmas on 4 weeks notice. I wasn't fit as had mostly been playing golf and drinking beer in the lead up but thought I'd be Ok as my mate isn't that fit. But he showed up with an awesome E-Bike and the rest of the crew were fit Mtbing junkies. I was bringing up the rear all day but it was still some fun riding.
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Pat the Ex Mat
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Pat the Ex Mat »

Sydney. A pain to get out of but I've got a mate who imports and sells bike so will head out with him to get a few

My mate did imply there are E-bikes...... :lol:

TBH, I did Mt Stromlo a few years back and it's not the gas I have problems with - it's age. If you clench up a bit downhill, you tend to stack more than going full on.
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booji boy
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

Pat the Ex Mat wrote:Sydney. A pain to get out of but I've got a mate who imports and sells bike so will head out with him to get a few

My mate did imply there are E-bikes...... :lol:

TBH, I did Mt Stromlo a few years back and it's not the gas I have problems with - it's age. If you clench up a bit downhill, you tend to stack more than going full on.
Know the feeling.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Pat the Ex Mat »

:lol:
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by dinsdale »

Man In Black wrote:
DOB wrote:
Man In Black wrote:
DOB wrote:
Man In Black wrote:I just bought the entry level Bianchi to get back into road cycling. Knowing PR someone will no doubt be along soon to tell me it’s a shit bike and a terrible choice but I like it. The brake set seems a bit ropey though, they’ve clearly saved some money there. Also Celeste is a hot colour.
The Via Nirone?

Bianchi do make good bikes. Unless you got a big discount, you probably paid more than a similar specced bike by a different brand. But the celeste is nice, and the bike will last for you. At the very worst, you have a frame that is worthy of whatever upgrades you choose to put on it in the future.
That’s the one. To be honest, I kinda knew that when I bought it. I probably could have got a more mainstream brand for cheaper with better spec but as you say I can add to is at time goes on. It’s a nice looking bike and the reviews of it are largely very good. The only criticism is the relative low quality of the group set, but I’ll look to upgrade that when the time is right.
Claris/Sora are perfectly serviceable groups, no need to upgrade anything until it breaks/you really want to get into some long rides. Especially now that Shimano's lower tier groups have dropped the crappy thumb shifter they used to have. If you're going to spend any on upgrading it, go wheels first, then BB, and then whenever your chain and cassette wear out, switch the drivetrain to something with more speeds like 105.

Thing is, keep it clean and in good condition, and you'll always get someone turn their head and go "nice Bianchi!" I have a Brava frame stripped down in my garage, it's a dirty muddy red colour, cheap 520 steel, but it always gets approving looks whenever I take it out. Possibly in part to the Campag group on it, but even that's low-tier.
Thanks for the tips. One of the great things about cycling beyond the health and fitness aspect is being able to nerd out and upgrade components. Eventually you end up with a pretty well full bespoke bike just to ones liking.
True!

I bought my first MTB in 2001 - a Trek 6500. The only components remaining are the seatpost and stem :)
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

DOB wrote:
Man In Black wrote:
DOB wrote:
Man In Black wrote:I just bought the entry level Bianchi to get back into road cycling. Knowing PR someone will no doubt be along soon to tell me it’s a shit bike and a terrible choice but I like it. The brake set seems a bit ropey though, they’ve clearly saved some money there. Also Celeste is a hot colour.
The Via Nirone?

Bianchi do make good bikes. Unless you got a big discount, you probably paid more than a similar specced bike by a different brand. But the celeste is nice, and the bike will last for you. At the very worst, you have a frame that is worthy of whatever upgrades you choose to put on it in the future.
That’s the one. To be honest, I kinda knew that when I bought it. I probably could have got a more mainstream brand for cheaper with better spec but as you say I can add to is at time goes on. It’s a nice looking bike and the reviews of it are largely very good. The only criticism is the relative low quality of the group set, but I’ll look to upgrade that when the time is right.
Claris/Sora are perfectly serviceable groups, no need to upgrade anything until it breaks/you really want to get into some long rides. Especially now that Shimano's lower tier groups have dropped the crappy thumb shifter they used to have. If you're going to spend any on upgrading it, go wheels first, then BB, and then whenever your chain and cassette wear out, switch the drivetrain to something with more speeds like 105.

Thing is, keep it clean and in good condition, and you'll always get someone turn their head and go "nice Bianchi!" I have a Brava frame stripped down in my garage, it's a dirty muddy red colour, cheap 520 steel, but it always gets approving looks whenever I take it out. Possibly in part to the Campag group on it, but even that's low-tier.

I'd get some 105 or Tiagra brakes cheapish and replace the rubbish ones as a priority. having good brakes helps you go faster as you have so much more confidence. Nothing wrong with the Via Nirone its a lovely bike
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Jim Lahey »

Another puncture this morning FFS.
Can’t be f**ked with the tyre at this stage, binning it and getting a new one ordered!
Any recommendations?
I’m eyeing up this one: Continental Grand Prix 4 Season Folding Bike Tyre
£42 off Amazon.
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blindcider
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

Jim Lahey wrote:Another puncture this morning FFS.
Can’t be f**ked with the tyre at this stage, binning it and getting a new one ordered!
Any recommendations?
I’m eyeing up this one: Continental Grand Prix 4 Season Folding Bike Tyre
£42 off Amazon.
GP4S is good and provides decent protection whilst rolling pretty fast (compared to gatorskins). Quite pricey though.

Shwalbe Marathon is my choice of boots for commuting, seem to last forever.
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DOB
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

I've got Kenda Kwest 25c tires on my commuter. Cheap as chips, and I've only ever had (I think) 2 punctures on them over the last several years, both when I smashed my rim into a pothole.

I had Gatorskins on my road bike in the past, and to be honest, I haven't had any more frequent punctures since I switched to GP4000s (now the 5000s). And the ride is a lot nicer.

My Cannondale came with Schwalbes, and after the Prologo saddle, they were the worst thing about the bike and the first thing I took off. I have had an irrational hatred of all things to do with both brands ever since, though a lot of people whose opinion I respect recommend Schwalbes. The remaining one of those tires is now my trainer tire.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by blindcider »

DOB wrote:I've got Kenda Kwest 25c tires on my commuter. Cheap as chips, and I've only ever had (I think) 2 punctures on them over the last several years, both when I smashed my rim into a pothole.

I had Gatorskins on my road bike in the past, and to be honest, I haven't had any more frequent punctures since I switched to GP4000s (now the 5000s). And the ride is a lot nicer.

My Cannondale came with Schwalbes, and after the Prologo saddle, they were the worst thing about the bike and the first thing I took off. I have had an irrational hatred of all things to do with both brands ever since, though a lot of people whose opinion I respect recommend Schwalbes. The remaining one of those tires is now my trainer tire.
Irrational hatred is best hatred. I had some issues with Vittoria tyres and have similarly steered clear since despite having great reviews.

To be honest the original tyres that come with bikes are nearly always the nastiest most horrible tyres they can source anyway.
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Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

blindcider wrote: To be honest the original tyres that come with bikes are nearly always the nastiest most horrible tyres they can source anyway.
I can't help thinking someone's missing a trick there. Spend the extra $20 to shod your bike with top-notch rubber, add $50 to the price tag, and make sure the customers are doing test rides.
dinsdale
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Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2012 11:01 am
Location: SW London

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by dinsdale »

DOB wrote:
blindcider wrote: To be honest the original tyres that come with bikes are nearly always the nastiest most horrible tyres they can source anyway.
I can't help thinking someone's missing a trick there. Spend the extra $20 to shod your bike with top-notch rubber, add $50 to the price tag, and make sure the customers are doing test rides.
The odds of anybody noticing any tyre differences between tyres of similar pressure and width on a test ride are close to zero.

I have Schwalbe Marathons on my touring bike and Gatorskins on several of my road bikes. I have not noticed Gatorskins reducing the number of punctures. vs other tyres. The Marathons seem pretty solid and haven't punctured yet. They are bigger and heavier though.
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DOB
Posts: 18308
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by DOB »

Man In Black wrote:So what you guys are saying is I'm going to need new tires pretty soon. :)
:nod:
It's pretty much the first "upgrade" you get to make with any bike, as it's the number 1 wear item.
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booji boy
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Joined: Sun May 19, 2013 9:12 am

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by booji boy »

Jim Lahey wrote:Another puncture this morning FFS.
Can’t be f**ked with the tyre at this stage, binning it and getting a new one ordered!
Any recommendations?
I’m eyeing up this one: Continental Grand Prix 4 Season Folding Bike Tyre
£42 off Amazon.
I asked this earlier but do you have rim tape protecting the inner tube? I remember getting punctures nearly every ride on my old road bike until I put rim tape on and didn't get another puncture after that.
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Petej
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Location: Monmouthshire

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by Petej »

Any recommendations on a road bike for the uk for about 1000-1500pounds? I guess driving to go mountain biking is not a essential travel.
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rustycruiser
Posts: 226
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Baltimore, MD, USA

Re: The official cycling thread

Post by rustycruiser »

We are all going to die. Might as well get a new bike. Just delivered today. My first ever NBD.

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