The PR Book Thread

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Nieghorn
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Nieghorn »

Just finished the audiobook of Stephen King's "The Long Walk" ... oddly/appropriately enough, while out for a walk. Should have known that I'd be in for more questions than answers, but I think if you combined it and "The Running Man", you'd probably see the precursors for "Battle Royale" and "The Hunger Games".

While no big fan of The Hunger Games, part of me at least likes to have some of those 'what's going on in this society to get to this point?' questions answered ... though I'm not sure Collins even does it well (the first book was enough for me and I wasn't even into it, but I have seen the second film).


The Running Man is actually on a very small list for me: I prefer the movie to the book. While Stand By Me borrows heavily - even taking a lot of lines verbatim - from the book, I prefer that the film ignores a lot of the bits where the protagonist is reflecting on his life after the journey with his friends. Some of it's classic King - uber weird.
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HurricaneWasp
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by HurricaneWasp »

Anyone read "Phantoms in the Brain" by VS Ramachandran? Its a brilliant book and introduction to neuroscience.
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blindcider
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by blindcider »

Fangle wrote:
Red Chopper wrote:
Womack wrote:Reading ‘Tarka the Otter’ by Nazi sympathiser Henry Williamson at the moment, something I have been meaning to do for a while since reading ‘Waterlog’ by Roger Deakin, in which it is extolled as a near-mystical work of singular poetic luminosity and so on.

I can see that it is that, and certainly the evocation of the natural world is very impressive and detailed, and I am sort of enjoying it, but by ‘eck it’s hard work ploughing through endless descriptions of rills, guts, conduits, pools, weirs, banks, endless species of reeds, grasses, trees, insects, birds, mammals etc, probably two-thirds of which are unknown to me and therefore nigh-impossible to visualise.

I am quite surprised it is an enduring children’s classic, as I am fairly sure that as I child I would not have been able to force myself to keep reading through yet another passage describing every aspect of the latest stretch of water Tarka finds himself in, in a load of unfamiliar language. But perhaps I’m just hamstrung by my comparative ignorance of the natural world.

Edit: There is a line in it that made me think of this place:

"They were among birds what the Irish are among men, always ready in a merry and audacious life to go where there is trouble and not infrequently to be the cause of it" (talking about Jays).

Not that I agree with the sentiment, but I could imagine it causing a bit of minor outrage amongst the more sensitive members of The Swarm.
This, in a nutshell. Me, being a born and bred country boy, can easily relate to his descriptive prose, and also really appreciate some of his other books on post WW1 rural life as I'm old enough to have witnessed, as a child, the dying embers of lifestyles that had little changed for centuries. Books such as 'The Peregrine's Saga', 'Tales of Moorland and Estuary'' and 'Life in a Devon Village' are both authentic and beautifully descriptive in reflecting a way of life now consigned to history.
My father spoke a lot about growing up on a farm outside Hereford after the Great War, so I will be getting hold of some of these.
I'm from Hereford, would be interested to know your surname as my family from that era worked in agriculture and might know your relations.
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Fangle
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Fangle »

blindcider wrote: I'm from Hereford, would be interested to know your surname as my family from that era worked in agriculture and might know your relations.
As far as I know nobody with my surname lives there anymore. My Dad's farm was near Letton, and grandmother grew up at Bredwardine. He went to the cathedral school. My Dad's cousins included Dale (of Dale Turkeys?) and some of the numerous Powells.

If you really want my name, look up number 470 on the Comrades web site.
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blindcider
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by blindcider »

That really isnt far away at all from where I grew up :lol:
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Fangle
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Fangle »

I presume you've read Kilvert's Diary.
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DOB
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by DOB »

I'm looking for new books to read, and have never read Iain M Banks. Punched his name into my Kindle and Consider Phlebas is $3 right now. Good starting point?
Nolanator
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Nolanator »

That's his first sci-fi novel. He writes those as Iain M. Banks, his contemporary stuff is as Iain Banks.

Consider introduces you to his Culture stories. I'd definitely recommend reading them all, although I'm an unashamed fanboi.

Of his contemporary books, the Crow Road is one of his best. Although, most of his works are very good and there's a good chance you'll enjoy any one you pick at random.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Bindi »

I'm on the 3rd book of NK Jemisin's Broken Earth trilogy. Seriously good. 1st two both won the Hugo for best novel. Very dark fantasy with no elves or dwarfs or shit. Totally original and well written.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Nolanator »

Reading the second Takeshi Kovac's book. Really enjoying them. I like the very different feel of the two novels too. The first is a futuristic, steampunk whodunnit, while the second is much more military sci-fi with aliens, spec-ops soldiers and shit. :thumbup:
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sturginho
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by sturginho »

OptimisticJock wrote:What's everyone's opinion of the Dark Tower? I am struggling to get into it.
I'm onto the third book, loving it so far
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HKCJ
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by HKCJ »

Just finished A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry. Incredible book. Immensely powerful in a way that I haven't read for quite a while. Almost as good as Dickens in his characterisation.
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PourSomeRuggerOnMe
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by PourSomeRuggerOnMe »

Just finished Children of Time by Adrian Tchaikovsky. Fantastic piece of work, one of the most impressive sci-fi novels I've read in a long time. Pretty sure I bought it after seeing someone on here recommend it (possibly on another thread) so cheers, whoever that was.
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Gordon Bennett
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Gordon Bennett »

Finished all the Booker Prize winners, now moved on to Death of A River Guide by Richard Flanagan. Enjoying it so far, but not sure whether that's because I've rafted the Franklin River myself and there's a certain amount of sepia-toned nostalgia in reading about the locations and experiences of the Franklin.
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OptimisticJock
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by OptimisticJock »

Finished An Ordinary Soldier earlier.

It was a very genuine and honest account of a rough few weeks in Garmsir. It was also slightly surreal reading about places I've been and on occasion fought over too. I don't think I've read a book like this where I can accurately picture the area from memory rather that photos.

A lot of the questions, feelings and emotions he spoke about I've asked myself or felt. I completely understand his reaction to going back out too. Well worth a read particularly if you're a civvy with even a passing interest as it gives a good insight into the early days of Herrick and a squaddies tribulations.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by mileendmikey »

Reading Citizen Clem - John Bew’s biography of Clement Attlee. Wonderful writing and a great examination of the inner workings of the most radical government we,be ever had. For anyone who grew up in London’s east end like me the local history is fascinating.
JoeyFantastic
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by JoeyFantastic »

Conservative Eddie wrote:
echo wrote:
Tony Blair's Therapist wrote:
flaggETERNAL wrote:Anyone else read this? Currently reading it and it's fcuking fascinating, if a little uncomfortable at times.

Image
My brother recommended it. Next on my book list!
Its a reasonable popularisation but hardly revelatory.

Debt by Graeber is a far more complex and original work. Even though he avoids jargon its hard to get your head round some of what he says if you don't have an anthropology degree.
Not a book that'll be praised by Bill Gates or Mark Zuckerberg, unlike Sapiens. Worth reading alone for the chapter on "The Myth of Barter".

It skewers the sort of targets that don't get skewered enough.
Just finished Debt by Graeber.

Honestly found it tedious and poorly written, even if the underlying themes were interesting. Felt the book really needed a strict editor to rein in Graeber. Possibly this is down to my lack of an anthropology degree.
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Pat the Ex Mat
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Pat the Ex Mat »

Nolanator wrote:Reading the second Takeshi Kovac's book. Really enjoying them. I like the very different feel of the two novels too. The first is a futuristic, steampunk whodunnit, while the second is much more military sci-fi with aliens, spec-ops soldiers and shit. :thumbup:
Re-read them back to back a few months back.

Epic
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MrDominator
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by MrDominator »

Kazuo Ishiguro wins the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Brilliant :thumbup:
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Nolanator »

Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
Nolanator wrote:Reading the second Takeshi Kovac's book. Really enjoying them. I like the very different feel of the two novels too. The first is a futuristic, steampunk whodunnit, while the second is much more military sci-fi with aliens, spec-ops soldiers and shit. :thumbup:
Re-read them back to back a few months back.

Epic
I keep going to bed too late and falling asleep almost straight away. Have made very little progress into #3.
Need to get my arse in gear, since watching the Expanse on Netflix I now want to churn through the corresponding books.
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Dobbin
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Dobbin »

MrDominator wrote:Kazuo Ishiguro wins the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Brilliant :thumbup:
:thumbup:


the unconsoled was a strange old read but has stayed with me when other books have faded away
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Mahoney
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Mahoney »

Reading "Winged Victory" by V M Yeates; fascinating story of the air war from a Camel pilot's perspective through 1918. It's a semi fictionalised autobiography, as Yeates was himself a Camel pilot through that period; shades of Hornet's Sting, but with less absurd characterisations, and fantastically accurate for obvious reasons (though they do seem to encounter Fokker DVIIs a few weeks too early).
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by happyhooker »

Mahoney wrote:Reading "Winged Victory" by V M Yeates; fascinating story of the air war from a Camel pilot's perspective through 1918. It's a semi fictionalised autobiography, as Yeates was himself a Camel pilot through that period; shades of Hornet's Sting, but with less absurd characterisations, and fantastically accurate for obvious reasons (though they do seem to encounter Fokker DVIIs a few weeks too early).
That's class.

You read the last enemy by Richard hilliary. Best one of WWII imho
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Mahoney
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Mahoney »

Nope, thanks, I'll look it up.
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happyhooker
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by happyhooker »

Mahoney wrote:Nope, thanks, I'll look it up.
Slightly different, but one of the lives in three fatal Englishmen by faulks is a ww2 fighter pilot. Thought the whole book was fascinating
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Monk Zombie »

Image

a masterpiece.


i am amazed that i had never heard of Jackson before i bought this on a whim: you can see her influence in Patricia Highsmith and Donna Tartt
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by C69 »

I am going to revisit all my old classics in my library.Starting with Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago and One day in the life of Ivan Denisovich before moving on to Cancer Ward.
Not the most cheerful or easy read combo but if I can't get through them then it's Burroughs Naked Lunch or RA Wilson's Cosmic Trigger or Illuminatus Trilogy.
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HKCJ
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by HKCJ »

Speaking of classics just finished the Count of Monte Christo. Why did nobody tell me to read it as a kid? Why didn't we do it at school instead of Thomas f**king Hardy and the Bronte sisters. I may actually have enjoyed and stuck with reading if we had. Dumas must've been the Aaron Sorkin of his day. Kills it. The count is one evil, but respectfully awesome muthafcuka.
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slick
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by slick »

HKCJ wrote:Speaking of classics just finished the Count of Monte Christo. Why did nobody tell me to read it as a kid? Why didn't we do it at school instead of Thomas f**king Hardy and the Bronte sisters. I may actually have enjoyed and stuck with reading if we had. Dumas must've been the Aaron Sorkin of his day. Kills it. The count is one evil, but respectfully awesome muthafcuka.
Brilliant book. Always forget it when I do my top 5 but it has to be there.
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HKCJ
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by HKCJ »

slick wrote:
HKCJ wrote:Speaking of classics just finished the Count of Monte Christo. Why did nobody tell me to read it as a kid? Why didn't we do it at school instead of Thomas f**king Hardy and the Bronte sisters. I may actually have enjoyed and stuck with reading if we had. Dumas must've been the Aaron Sorkin of his day. Kills it. The count is one evil, but respectfully awesome muthafcuka.
Brilliant book. Always forget it when I do my top 5 but it has to be there.
Agreed. It's 1200 odd pages yet they just fly past it's so gripping. Great yarn, some nice twists, good characters, very well written and finishes strong. Can't say there are many books that tick all those boxes for me.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by JoeyFantastic »

HKCJ wrote:Speaking of classics just finished the Count of Monte Christo. Why did nobody tell me to read it as a kid? Why didn't we do it at school instead of Thomas f**king Hardy and the Bronte sisters. I may actually have enjoyed and stuck with reading if we had. Dumas must've been the Aaron Sorkin of his day. Kills it. The count is one evil, but respectfully awesome muthafcuka.
The Count isn't evil, he's been wronged, previously wronged.

Liked the slight lesbian scene too, just feels it bares mentioning.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by panamax »

c69 wrote:I am going to revisit all my old classics in my library.Starting with Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago and One day in the life of Ivan Denisovich before moving on to Cancer Ward.
Not the most cheerful or easy read combo but if I can't get through them then it's Burroughs Naked Lunch or RA Wilson's Cosmic Trigger or Illuminatus Trilogy.
on the gulag i would suggest to read Chalamov tales of Kolyma, a classic and a masterpiece as well
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by danny_fitz »

panamax wrote:
c69 wrote:I am going to revisit all my old classics in my library.Starting with Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago and One day in the life of Ivan Denisovich before moving on to Cancer Ward.
Not the most cheerful or easy read combo but if I can't get through them then it's Burroughs Naked Lunch or RA Wilson's Cosmic Trigger or Illuminatus Trilogy.
on the gulag i would suggest to read Chalamov tales of Kolyma, a classic and a masterpiece as well
Have a look at this one as well.

Image
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HKCJ
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by HKCJ »

JoeyFantastic wrote:
HKCJ wrote:Speaking of classics just finished the Count of Monte Christo. Why did nobody tell me to read it as a kid? Why didn't we do it at school instead of Thomas f**king Hardy and the Bronte sisters. I may actually have enjoyed and stuck with reading if we had. Dumas must've been the Aaron Sorkin of his day. Kills it. The count is one evil, but respectfully awesome muthafcuka.
The Count isn't evil, he's been wronged, previously wronged.

Liked the slight lesbian scene too, just feels it bares mentioning.
He was wronged yes but anyone that puts that much effort into the revenge he does has a few screws lose and let's not forget his machinations led to the death of an innocent child. Still, he's a respectable psycho.. a Walter White.
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flaggETERNAL
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by flaggETERNAL »

Bindi wrote:I'm on the 3rd book of NK Jemisin's Broken Earth trilogy. Seriously good. 1st two both won the Hugo for best novel. Very dark fantasy with no elves or dwarfs or shit. Totally original and well written.
Will check it out. Currently re-reading the Ender Wiggins books.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by JoeyFantastic »

HKCJ wrote:
JoeyFantastic wrote:
HKCJ wrote:Speaking of classics just finished the Count of Monte Christo. Why did nobody tell me to read it as a kid? Why didn't we do it at school instead of Thomas f**king Hardy and the Bronte sisters. I may actually have enjoyed and stuck with reading if we had. Dumas must've been the Aaron Sorkin of his day. Kills it. The count is one evil, but respectfully awesome muthafcuka.
The Count isn't evil, he's been wronged, previously wronged.

Liked the slight lesbian scene too, just feels it bares mentioning.
He was wronged yes but anyone that puts that much effort into the revenge he does has a few screws lose and let's not forget his machinations led to the death of an innocent child. Still, he's a respectable psycho.. a Walter White.
Ah, most of his victims had it coming, can't really recall the death of the innocent child but can't make omelettes etc.

Really great book.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by The Man Without Fear »

Just finished Rat Pack Confidential by Shawn Levy, a whistle stop autobiography of the five Summit stars. Well worth a read. Some of the shit they got away with...

Reading Rubicon by Tom Holland. Breezy and a good read.

Also attempting to finish the Gormenghast Trilogy again. Seventh try at it.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by OptimisticJock »

Blood Forest by Geraint Jones. A Bernard Cornwell type book about the Roman legions being massacred in German is.

I'd seen this pop up on Facebook months ago and finally got round to reading it. If I hadn't known the author was a vet I'd have guessed by the way it was written, some modern military language and slang used (that's not a criticism), a proper sense of camaraderie and a great insight into a struggling soldiers mind. I love these types of books and think from a soldiering point of view it's the best I've read. No other book has given me the same sense of things I've mentioned above, perhaps because he's been and done it, perhaps because I'm biased and like to see squaddies do well.
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Ramming Speed »

The Man Without Fear wrote:Just finished Rat Pack Confidential by Shawn Levy, a whistle stop autobiography of the five Summit stars. Well worth a read. Some of the shit they got away with...

Reading Rubicon by Tom Holland. Breezy and a good read.

Also attempting to finish the Gormenghast Trilogy again. Seventh try at it.
If you enjoyed Rat Pack Confidential, you might like Hellraisers by Robert Sellers, about the life and high times of Richard Harris, Richard Burton, Peter O'Toole and Oliver Reed. Not my usual tipple and it won't have won any prizes, but it's very entertaining.

Sample - POT is in a play in the West End. He finishes his last scene of the first half and nips into the pub next door. He meets a friend there and after a few quick ones, he sneaks him back into an empty box to watch the second half. "You'll like this next scene", whispers POT, "this is when I...sh*t".
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Re: The PR Book Thread

Post by Poshprop »

Ramming Speed wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:Just finished Rat Pack Confidential by Shawn Levy, a whistle stop autobiography of the five Summit stars. Well worth a read. Some of the shit they got away with...

Reading Rubicon by Tom Holland. Breezy and a good read.

Also attempting to finish the Gormenghast Trilogy again. Seventh try at it.
If you enjoyed Rat Pack Confidential, you might like Hellraisers by Robert Sellers, about the life and high times of Richard Harris, Richard Burton, Peter O'Toole and Oliver Reed. Not my usual tipple and it won't have won any prizes, but it's very entertaining.

Sample - POT is in a play in the West End. He finishes his last scene of the first half and nips into the pub next door. He meets a friend there and after a few quick ones, he sneaks him back into an empty box to watch the second half. "You'll like this next scene", whispers POT, "this is when I...sh*t".
Hellraisers is a great read really enjoyed it. There is a Hollywood Hellraisers too, focussing on Marlon Brandon, Dennis Hopper, Warren Beatty and Jack Nicolson which I found no where near as enjoyable
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