The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

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Nolanator
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Nolanator »

eldanielfire wrote:
Nolanator wrote:Anyone who is of reasonable athletic ability plays Gaelic sports, it's absolutely massive around the country. The remainder mostly play football (soccer) and then rugby. After that you've a very small pool from which to choose potential Olympians.

We do have a women's 7s team; they missed out of qualification. Think they got to the semis of their last qualifying event, which they needed to win. They'd kick several shades of shite out of the Brazilian and Columbian women's teams; Europe is a harder qualification route.
We have a men's team that only really started properly in the last year, but they missed out on qualification too. The IRFU pumps money into the A team at the expense of a 7s program. There isn't the professional player base or financial ability to support both 7s and the A team, the latter of which is much more useful to the senior men's team.
there is a bit of a fallacy here, often repeated in sports science, it assumes the GAA athletes would be Olympic beaters in other sports. But as Union/league/7's have shown even in a similar sport can mean most competitors won't be world beaters if they move sport. It's rare that it's a successful move. They might be quite good but not podium level good. The best are the best by the smallest of margins in their genes and preparation, there is no universal athletic gene.
No one is claiming that all our GAA players could be successful Olympians, it's just that when you discount all t he GAA, football and rugby players in the country, there's a fairly small pool left over, particularly when you consider Ireland's population. Eliminate most of that small pool to find the few who are properly good at their sports (athletics or rowing or whatever) and you really have very few people.
Funding for such sports reflects the participation levels, so the facilities often aren't tippy top, which compounds the problem.


Basically, outside of the Olympics there is very little appetite amongst the general population for "non-mainstream" sports.
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eldanielfire
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by eldanielfire »

Nolanator wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
Nolanator wrote:Anyone who is of reasonable athletic ability plays Gaelic sports, it's absolutely massive around the country. The remainder mostly play football (soccer) and then rugby. After that you've a very small pool from which to choose potential Olympians.

We do have a women's 7s team; they missed out of qualification. Think they got to the semis of their last qualifying event, which they needed to win. They'd kick several shades of shite out of the Brazilian and Columbian women's teams; Europe is a harder qualification route.
We have a men's team that only really started properly in the last year, but they missed out on qualification too. The IRFU pumps money into the A team at the expense of a 7s program. There isn't the professional player base or financial ability to support both 7s and the A team, the latter of which is much more useful to the senior men's team.
there is a bit of a fallacy here, often repeated in sports science, it assumes the GAA athletes would be Olympic beaters in other sports. But as Union/league/7's have shown even in a similar sport can mean most competitors won't be world beaters if they move sport. It's rare that it's a successful move. They might be quite good but not podium level good. The best are the best by the smallest of margins in their genes and preparation, there is no universal athletic gene.
No one is claiming that all our GAA players could be successful Olympians, it's just that when you discount all t he GAA, football and rugby players in the country, there's a fairly small pool left over, particularly when you consider Ireland's population. Eliminate most of that small pool to find the few who are properly good at their sports (athletics or rowing or whatever) and you really have very few people.
Funding for such sports reflects the participation levels, so the facilities often aren't tippy top, which compounds the problem.


Basically, outside of the Olympics there is very little appetite amongst the general population for "non-mainstream" sports.
But that's the same in every country, including New Zealand.
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Nolanator »

eldanielfire wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
Nolanator wrote:Anyone who is of reasonable athletic ability plays Gaelic sports, it's absolutely massive around the country. The remainder mostly play football (soccer) and then rugby. After that you've a very small pool from which to choose potential Olympians.

We do have a women's 7s team; they missed out of qualification. Think they got to the semis of their last qualifying event, which they needed to win. They'd kick several shades of shite out of the Brazilian and Columbian women's teams; Europe is a harder qualification route.
We have a men's team that only really started properly in the last year, but they missed out on qualification too. The IRFU pumps money into the A team at the expense of a 7s program. There isn't the professional player base or financial ability to support both 7s and the A team, the latter of which is much more useful to the senior men's team.
there is a bit of a fallacy here, often repeated in sports science, it assumes the GAA athletes would be Olympic beaters in other sports. But as Union/league/7's have shown even in a similar sport can mean most competitors won't be world beaters if they move sport. It's rare that it's a successful move. They might be quite good but not podium level good. The best are the best by the smallest of margins in their genes and preparation, there is no universal athletic gene.
No one is claiming that all our GAA players could be successful Olympians, it's just that when you discount all the GAA, football and rugby players in the country, there's a fairly small pool left over, particularly when you consider Ireland's population. Eliminate most of that small pool to find the few who are properly good at their sports (athletics or rowing or whatever) and you really have very few people.
Funding for such sports reflects the participation levels, so the facilities often aren't tippy top, which compounds the problem.


Basically, outside of the Olympics there is very little appetite amongst the general population for "non-mainstream" sports.
But that's the same in every country, including New Zealand.
What, every country has it's own indigenous sport which takes most of the athletes and funding?
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Miguel Indurain
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Miguel Indurain »

eldanielfire wrote:But that's the same in every country, including New Zealand.
Is it?
Does rugby in New Zealand account for higher participation rates relative to GAA games participation rates in Ireland?
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Nolanator »

2-0 up

Edit, 3-0!
ZappaMan
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by ZappaMan »

Miguel Indurain wrote:
eldanielfire wrote: there is a bit of a fallacy here, often repeated in sports science, it assumes the GAA athletes would be Olympic beaters in other sports. But as Union/league/7's have shown even in a similar sport can mean most competitors won't be world beaters if they move sport. It's rare that it's a successful move. They might be quite good but not podium level good. The best are the best by the smallest of margins in their genes and preparation, there is no universal athletic gene.
I'm not sure that anyone here is making the argument that if there was no GAA that Ireland would be producing world class athletes in international sport.

Truth be told GAA consumes the highest proportion of athletic talent available in the country. It is the biggest sports organisation in terms of participation in this country.
Other sport codes pickup whatever other talent is available.

In sports like rugby we had guys who were also Olympians. Victor Costello and Gary Halpin were good enough to qualify for the Olympics. Halpin in the discus, Costello in the hammer.
Would they have been better at a given sport had the chosen to concentrate on one or the other code?
I thought Big Vic was a shot putter, no?
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Mr. Very Popular
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Mr. Very Popular »

nardol wrote:Cox - the person steering the boat, no cox in the irish boats usually only in the 8+
Recover - the part of the stroke above water
Slides - the rails the seat moves back on forth on
f**k - team GB
bow - front of the boat
Rigger - what the oars sit in

Actually the oars sit in the gate, which is on the rigger. :smug:
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Miguel Indurain »

ZappaMan wrote:
Miguel Indurain wrote:
eldanielfire wrote: there is a bit of a fallacy here, often repeated in sports science, it assumes the GAA athletes would be Olympic beaters in other sports. But as Union/league/7's have shown even in a similar sport can mean most competitors won't be world beaters if they move sport. It's rare that it's a successful move. They might be quite good but not podium level good. The best are the best by the smallest of margins in their genes and preparation, there is no universal athletic gene.
I'm not sure that anyone here is making the argument that if there was no GAA that Ireland would be producing world class athletes in international sport.

Truth be told GAA consumes the highest proportion of athletic talent available in the country. It is the biggest sports organisation in terms of participation in this country.
Other sport codes pickup whatever other talent is available.

In sports like rugby we had guys who were also Olympians. Victor Costello and Gary Halpin were good enough to qualify for the Olympics. Halpin in the discus, Costello in the hammer.
Would they have been better at a given sport had the chosen to concentrate on one or the other code?
I thought Big Vic was a shot putter, no?
You're correct, VC was a putter of the shot rather than a thrower of the hammer.
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Emily »

Thank you Darling. My heart can start beating again. :uhoh:
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by eldanielfire »

Nolanator wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
Nolanator wrote:Anyone who is of reasonable athletic ability plays Gaelic sports, it's absolutely massive around the country. The remainder mostly play football (soccer) and then rugby. After that you've a very small pool from which to choose potential Olympians.

We do have a women's 7s team; they missed out of qualification. Think they got to the semis of their last qualifying event, which they needed to win. They'd kick several shades of shite out of the Brazilian and Columbian women's teams; Europe is a harder qualification route.
We have a men's team that only really started properly in the last year, but they missed out on qualification too. The IRFU pumps money into the A team at the expense of a 7s program. There isn't the professional player base or financial ability to support both 7s and the A team, the latter of which is much more useful to the senior men's team.
there is a bit of a fallacy here, often repeated in sports science, it assumes the GAA athletes would be Olympic beaters in other sports. But as Union/league/7's have shown even in a similar sport can mean most competitors won't be world beaters if they move sport. It's rare that it's a successful move. They might be quite good but not podium level good. The best are the best by the smallest of margins in their genes and preparation, there is no universal athletic gene.
No one is claiming that all our GAA players could be successful Olympians, it's just that when you discount all the GAA, football and rugby players in the country, there's a fairly small pool left over, particularly when you consider Ireland's population. Eliminate most of that small pool to find the few who are properly good at their sports (athletics or rowing or whatever) and you really have very few people.
Funding for such sports reflects the participation levels, so the facilities often aren't tippy top, which compounds the problem.


Basically, outside of the Olympics there is very little appetite amongst the general population for "non-mainstream" sports.
But that's the same in every country, including New Zealand.
What, every country has it's own indigenous sport which takes most of the athletes and funding?

Does it matter if it's indigenous? It matters if fundin goes elsewhere in olympic sports for Olympic success and most of New Zealand's funding goes into Rugby as does the vast majority of the talent goes into Rugby and Football.
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Miguel Indurain »

eldanielfire wrote:Does it matter if it's indigenous? It matters if fundin goes elsewhere in olympic sports for Olympic success and most of New Zealand's funding goes into Rugby as does the vast majority of the talent goes into Rugby and Football.
Any update on the respective participation rates?
While you're at it, supply respective funding rates too, because short of supplying some facts all that you are supplying are opinions.
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Uncle Fester »

eldanielfire wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
there is a bit of a fallacy here, often repeated in sports science, it assumes the GAA athletes would be Olympic beaters in other sports. But as Union/league/7's have shown even in a similar sport can mean most competitors won't be world beaters if they move sport. It's rare that it's a successful move. They might be quite good but not podium level good. The best are the best by the smallest of margins in their genes and preparation, there is no universal athletic gene.
No one is claiming that all our GAA players could be successful Olympians, it's just that when you discount all the GAA, football and rugby players in the country, there's a fairly small pool left over, particularly when you consider Ireland's population. Eliminate most of that small pool to find the few who are properly good at their sports (athletics or rowing or whatever) and you really have very few people.
Funding for such sports reflects the participation levels, so the facilities often aren't tippy top, which compounds the problem.


Basically, outside of the Olympics there is very little appetite amongst the general population for "non-mainstream" sports.
But that's the same in every country, including New Zealand.
What, every country has it's own indigenous sport which takes most of the athletes and funding?

Does it matter if it's indigenous? It matters if fundin goes elsewhere in olympic sports for Olympic success and most of New Zealand's funding goes into Rugby as does the vast majority of the talent goes into Rugby and Football.
That's incorrect and to use the example you've provided,people participate in multiple sports in NZ and that's not really the case in Ireland as each of the three main sports tends to be exclusive of the others, i.e. soccer players will never play GAA or rugby for example. The keewees actively encourage kids to try multiple sports. The main sports in Ireland also hoover up most of the funding between them so even kids they do get exposure to the niche sports in the olympics, there will be no facilities for them to pursue that interest.

There are almost certainly potential stars in other codes lanquishing in the code they were "born into". They won't be found in the top echelon of GAA though. They'll be stuck on some intermediate B team in Ofally blissfully unaware that they had the raw physique to be very good rowers, etc.
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by waguser »

Punching people is on with the Stephen Donnelly TD
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

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Fair play to our lad for punching the head off the Mongolian lad
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Silvio Berlusconi »

donnelly is a classy boxer

tough ask in the QF though
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by nardol »

Why Ireland has so few competitors at the olympics is simply lack of funding.

GB Germany etc all have facilities for shooting - buy horses - build swimming pools, build athletic tracks / fields, judo .... mats??, etc etc etc None of this really exists in Ireland, I never came in to contact with any of this at school or elsewhere.

Nominal amounts of money pumped into facilities I would guess differ enormously between Ireland and most other countries.





ps
Siobhan Marie O'Connor yesterday obliterates and genetic argument.
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Crash_12 »

nardol wrote:Why Ireland has so few competitors at the olympics is simply lack of funding.

GB Germany etc all have facilities for shooting - buy horses - build swimming pools, build athletic tracks / fields, judo .... mats??, etc etc etc None of this really exists in Ireland, I never came in to contact with any of this at school or elsewhere.

Nominal amounts of money pumped into facilities I would guess differ enormously between Ireland and most other countries.





ps
Siobhan Marie O'Connor yesterday obliterates and genetic argument.
:lol:

It's Ireland not Malawi ffs, and even they have two swimmers.
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Miguel Indurain »

nardol wrote: ps
Siobhan Marie O'Connor yesterday obliterates and genetic argument.
I heard her named on the Beeb yesterday and I wondered had we missed something :lol:
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Post by nardol »

Whats your point??? Ireland has what 5 swimmers at the olympics?

The Dutch with far better facilities and more than 3x the population of ireland have 16.


On Another note, in the not likely but still possible situation that Murphy and Taylor win 2 gold medals that equals more than 20 golds for team GB on a per capita basis 8)
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Crash_12 »

It's not lack of funding you spanner.

So you never came into contact with a swimming pool at school? Or an athletics track? Or even a lowly gym mat?

And horses :lol:
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Miguel Indurain »

Crash_12 wrote:It's not lack of funding you spanner.

So you never came into contact with a swimming pool at school? Or an athletics track? Or even a lowly gym mat?
Lack of funding plays a large part.

There were only three race tracks in the entire region of Dublin when I was a kid growing up in the late 70's and early 1980's.
Morton Stadium, UCD and Eamonn Ceannt Park.
You'd see more sports facilities then in a borough of London.
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Post by Rumham »

Crash_12 wrote:It's not lack of funding you spanner.

So you never came into contact with a swimming pool at school? Or an athletics track? Or even a lowly gym mat?

And horses :lol:
Ireland didn't have an olympic standard pool in the entire country until about 10 years ago so yeah, funding and facilities are a bit of an issue.
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Post by Duff Paddy »

nardol wrote:Why Ireland has so few competitors at the olympics is simply lack of funding.

GB Germany etc all have facilities for shooting - buy horses - build swimming pools, build athletic tracks / fields, judo .... mats??, etc etc etc None of this really exists in Ireland, I never came in to contact with any of this at school or elsewhere.

Nominal amounts of money pumped into facilities I would guess differ enormously between Ireland and most other countries.





ps
Siobhan Marie O'Connor yesterday obliterates and genetic argument.
Lack of funding historically has been the major problem. It does run deeper than that though. We should probably be comparing ourselves to a country like New Zealand as they have a similar population. They have 3 medals so far. GB focus on niche sports like diving, kayaking and track cycling to spare their blushes.
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Post by MrBunhead »

Crash_12 wrote:It's not lack of funding you spanner.

So you never came into contact with a swimming pool at school? Or an athletics track? Or even a lowly gym mat?

And horses :lol:
PE in Irish schools, in general, is shite.

What school in Ireland has an athletics track?
I'm guessing the only swimming kids do in school is lessons on how to swim and that's it. That for me stopped in first year of secondary, actually no I didn't do it then either.
No gym mats in secondary and in primary probably only used a gym mat til first or second class.

In secondary on a Wednesday you were meant to do sports. If you didn't play rugby or football you were meant to do PE. PE usually involved waiting around for 20 mins or so for the teacher to show to say you could go home.

Granted I didn't go to very good schools but I can see the same thing happening in my nephew's schools as happened to me.
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Post by Duff Paddy »

MrBunhead wrote:
Crash_12 wrote:It's not lack of funding you spanner.

So you never came into contact with a swimming pool at school? Or an athletics track? Or even a lowly gym mat?

And horses :lol:
PE in Irish schools, in general, is shite.

What school in Ireland has an athletics track?
I'm guessing the only swimming kids do in school is lessons on how to swim and that's it. That for me stopped in first year of secondary, actually no I didn't do it then either.
No gym mats in secondary and in primary probably only used a gym mat til first or second class.

In secondary on a Wednesday you were meant to do sports. If you didn't play rugby or football you were meant to do PE. PE usually involved waiting around for 20 mins or so for the teacher to show to say you could go home.

Granted I didn't go to very good schools but I can see the same thing happening in my nephew's schools as happened to me.
It's a good point. We don't take physical education seriously in schools. Swimming lessons have improved but for a long time, unless your parents had the time and money for private swimming lessons then you wouldn't have learned how to swim. That is changing now with more community swimming pools, although these are all privately run which is not ideal. Another problem is that we probably have too many schools. In the states they have much larger schools so they can offer better facilities like athletics, a school band, school theatre etc.
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Post by YOYO »

Miguel Indurain wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:But that's the same in every country, including New Zealand.
Is it?
Does rugby in New Zealand account for higher participation rates relative to GAA games participation rates in Ireland?
There are about 3,000 GAA clubs in Ireland compared to about 600 rugby clubs in New Zealand (their national sport).
There are maybe 1500-2000 soccer clubs in Ireland. Let's be honest that there is a lot of cross over of players.
Rugby is a very poor relation. There are about 220 rugby clubs in Ireland. As was pointed out, rugby clubs and thus participation is sparse outside of a few pockets in Dublin, Cork and Limerick.
Who'd bother with athletes when all your mates are playing the other team sports.
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Post by anonymous_joe »

Individual sports aren't a big deal here. Almost everybody plays rugby, football or Gah depending on their background, or a combination of some or all of them. Individual sports are an afterthought for most.
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Post by ZappaMan »

Golf is huge, to be fair.
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Miguel Indurain »

MrBunhead wrote:
Crash_12 wrote:It's not lack of funding you spanner.

So you never came into contact with a swimming pool at school? Or an athletics track? Or even a lowly gym mat?

And horses :lol:
PE in Irish schools, in general, is shite.

What school in Ireland has an athletics track?
I'm guessing the only swimming kids do in school is lessons on how to swim and that's it. That for me stopped in first year of secondary, actually no I didn't do it then either.
No gym mats in secondary and in primary probably only used a gym mat til first or second class.

In secondary on a Wednesday you were meant to do sports. If you didn't play rugby or football you were meant to do PE. PE usually involved waiting around for 20 mins or so for the teacher to show to say you could go home.

Granted I didn't go to very good schools but I can see the same thing happening in my nephew's schools as happened to me.
In secondary school we had 90 minutes of PE a week, with PE compulsory for all pupils.
Outside of PE, we played Rugby at school. This meant training twice a week, with a match on Wednesday afternoon and perhaps another match on Saturday morning.

In primary school, we were brought to the local swimming pool to learn how to swim. We played GAA (football and hurling) at primary school. And basketball.


All of this was in a time when we used to walk to and from school.
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Post by Bullettyme »

It's poor coaching, poor administration and poor faculties, compounded by shite funding. The GAA receives huge funding from the government.

Have to laugh at the foreign spackers on this thread thinking they know it all.
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Post by ZW03 »

Lack of money isn't the problem. there's plenty of money. I remember seeing figures that showed we spend roughly the same percentage of our budget on sport as most other western european countries. It's just that most of it goes to GAA, Soccer and rugby.

There's little will for change either as gombeen GAA bogmen constitute 99.99999% of politicians in the history of the irish state.
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Post by CM11 »

I don't know what the facilities are like now but in my secondary school athletics was a summer term hobby with barely any organised training and a grass track reliant on the weather to be of any use. Discus/javelin etc were done on a rugby pitch (can't remember if we even had a discus/hammer enclosure - actually, can't even remember if we had a hammer).

And I went to a pretty affluent school.

There's very little community athletics.

In terms of swimming, as mentioned we didn't have an Olympic pool up to recently.

Ireland, in general, would always have viewed the Olympics as something to watch, with very little drive towards participation. That has changed a fair bit in the last 20-30 years, imo, but it's still hard to see where a massive increase in contenders is going to come from.
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Post by iarmhiman »

GAA take too much of the funding. Until the minister of sport changes that, a lot of young talent will go to waste.
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Post by Mr. Very Popular »

ZW03 wrote:Lack of money isn't the problem. there's plenty of money. I remember seeing figures that showed we spend roughly the same percentage of our budget on sport as most other western european countries. It's just that most of it goes to GAA, Soccer and rugby.

There's little will for change either as gombeen GAA bogmen constitute 99.99999% of politicians in the history of the irish state.
Nail on head, and the fact nearly all kids are exposed to GAA from a very early age but most kids would have to actively seek out sports like rugby, athletics, rowing swimming and cycling.
Nolanator
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Nolanator »

Crash_12 wrote:It's not lack of funding you spanner.

So you never came into contact with a swimming pool at school? Or an athletics track? Or even a lowly gym mat?

And horses :lol:
People have swimming lessons etc, but very few actually have the coaching to be competitive at it and develop their technique, relative to the coaching available for the team ball sports

Plus, Ireland only got its first Olympic size pool in 2003. Lack of funding is most definitely an issue for niche Olympic sports.
Last edited by Nolanator on Thu Aug 11, 2016 8:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Miguel Indurain
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Miguel Indurain »

Lack of funding didn't prevent talent like John Treacy, Eamonn Coughlan, Sonia O'Sullivan, Caterina McKiernan competing at the highest level of international sport.
Granted the collegiate system in the USA helped though.

We have no T&F athletes of any note today.
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Mr. Very Popular
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Mr. Very Popular »

Miguel Indurain wrote:Lack of funding didn't prevent talent like John Treacy, Eamonn Coughlan, Sonia O'Sullivan, Caterina McKiernan competing at the highest level of international sport.
Granted the collegiate system in the USA helped though.

We have no T&F athletes of any note today.
4, over how many years? Lack of funding leads to lack of facilities which leads to lack of quality athletes.
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Leinsterman
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by Leinsterman »

The biggest university in the country doesn't even have a running track anymore :((
ZW03
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by ZW03 »

Mr. Very Popular wrote:
Miguel Indurain wrote:Lack of funding didn't prevent talent like John Treacy, Eamonn Coughlan, Sonia O'Sullivan, Caterina McKiernan competing at the highest level of international sport.
Granted the collegiate system in the USA helped though.

We have no T&F athletes of any note today.
4, over how many years? Lack of funding leads to lack of facilities which leads to lack of quality athletes.

didnt they all go through the us collegiate system? Pretty much every irish great in athletics was on a scholarship to a us college to compete full time for 4 years, funding they wouldn't have gotten in ireland.

Anyway shhh the horse dancing is now on rte :shock:
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Re: The OFFICIAL replacement IRISH OLYMPIC BANDWAGON THREAD

Post by iarmhiman »

I sailed mirror, GP14 (with adults) and laser (16-18 years of age) all my teenage years. I raced in regattas in Athlone, Howth and Dun Laoghaire In a town like Mullingar, it's safe to say I wasn't cool compared to the GAA lads.

Fair play to my parents. Summers consisted of tennis during the mornings, and sailing in the afternoons. Very few kids in the midlands would ever get to sports like that...well maybe tennis but that was seen as a posh sport.

The GAA has too much of a grip from primary school onwards. Primary schools often have an affiliation with the parish GAA club....same jerseys, coaches etc. In rural areas, there is nothing else. There has to be a way of changing the culture.

For secondary school PE needs to become a subject, and have an exam and the end of year. After Junior Cert, those who don't to do it don't have to.
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