Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

Gavin Duffy wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 7:43 pm I assume making death threats carries some sort of penalty?
In what context?
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by Duff Paddy »

anonymous_joe wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 9:58 pm
Gavin Duffy wrote: Tue Sep 22, 2020 7:43 pm I assume making death threats carries some sort of penalty?
In what context?
In the context of threatening to kill somebody
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HighKingLeinster
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by HighKingLeinster »

So that pyscho young one is to be released and the Gardai have issued a nationwide alert but cannot disclose where she is being released

https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/g ... 58022.html

Also, the article mentions she is on bail for 2 charges of sexual assault and one of threatening to kill. Which begs the question why was somebody who is clearly extremely dangerous granted bail for what are 3 very serious charges........
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by Duff Paddy »

HighKingLeinster wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 9:50 am So that pyscho young one is to be released and the Gardai have issued a nationwide alert but cannot disclose where she is being released

https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/g ... 58022.html

Also, the article mentions she is on bail for 2 charges of sexual assault and one of threatening to kill. Which begs the question why was somebody who is clearly extremely dangerous granted bail for what are 3 very serious charges........
Seems a bit hard to explain alright - sure if and when she does attack someone there’ll be no consequences
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Mullet 2
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by Mullet 2 »

Because our judges are fûckheads
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normilet
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by normilet »

Does the nationwide alert have a description? Haven't seen anything on any of the other news outlets etc. Otherwise whats the point..

"18 year old teenager, wearing mask, somewhere round the place, likes knives, might rape and kill you, we're all in this together" etc.
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camroc1
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by camroc1 »

Hmmm. As I said earlier, asylum from whatever demons she has.
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

HighKingLeinster wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 9:50 am So that pyscho young one is to be released and the Gardai have issued a nationwide alert but cannot disclose where she is being released

https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/g ... 58022.html

Also, the article mentions she is on bail for 2 charges of sexual assault and one of threatening to kill. Which begs the question why was somebody who is clearly extremely dangerous granted bail for what are 3 very serious charges........
Constitutional rights.
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camroc1
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by camroc1 »

anonymous_joe wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:23 pm
HighKingLeinster wrote: Thu Sep 24, 2020 9:50 am So that pyscho young one is to be released and the Gardai have issued a nationwide alert but cannot disclose where she is being released

https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/g ... 58022.html

Also, the article mentions she is on bail for 2 charges of sexual assault and one of threatening to kill. Which begs the question why was somebody who is clearly extremely dangerous granted bail for what are 3 very serious charges........
Constitutional rights.
Really.

Surely not for referral to a mental institution ?
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

Can't lock somebody else just in case.

And personality disorders aren't sufficient to lock somebody up in a mental health facility.

Up to the Oireachtas to fix it.
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camroc1
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by camroc1 »

anonymous_joe wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:26 pm Can't lock somebody else just in case.

And personality disorders aren't sufficient to lock somebody up in a mental health facility.

Up to the Oireachtas to fix it.
So not constitutional then.

There are people who need institutionalised care (ie not prison) both for their own good and the good of society. I know that such powers were used in the past as a method of removing, principally, unwanted family members, but it must be possible to get medical opinions , reviewed on a regular basis, that can accommodate this.
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

Detaining people unlawfully is unconstitutional.
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camroc1
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by camroc1 »

anonymous_joe wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:35 pm Detaining people unlawfully is unconstitutional.
A bit circular that.

Answer me this : can people be detained in mental institutions, on foot of medical reports, against their will ?
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

camroc1 wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:46 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:35 pm Detaining people unlawfully is unconstitutional.
A bit circular that.

Answer me this : can people be detained in mental institutions, on foot of medical reports, against their will ?
The Constitution expressly prohibits the detention of people against their will.

It allows for exceptions.

One of the most obvious is a custodial sentence.

At the current time, it's also noteworthy that the State can in extremis quarantine people with a disease.

In terms of mental health, personality disorders cannot be used as grounds to detain somebody.
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danthefan
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by danthefan »

anonymous_joe wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 10:40 am
camroc1 wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:46 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:35 pm Detaining people unlawfully is unconstitutional.
A bit circular that.

Answer me this : can people be detained in mental institutions, on foot of medical reports, against their will ?
The Constitution expressly prohibits the detention of people against their will.

It allows for exceptions.

One of the most obvious is a custodial sentence.

At the current time, it's also noteworthy that the State can in extremis quarantine people with a disease.

In terms of mental health, personality disorders cannot be used as grounds to detain somebody.
The last two sentences appear to contradict each other. Is a personality disorder not a disease?
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camroc1
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by camroc1 »

anonymous_joe wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 10:40 am
camroc1 wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:46 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:35 pm Detaining people unlawfully is unconstitutional.
A bit circular that.

Answer me this : can people be detained in mental institutions, on foot of medical reports, against their will ?
The Constitution expressly prohibits the detention of people against their will.

It allows for exceptions.

One of the most obvious is a custodial sentence.

At the current time, it's also noteworthy that the State can in extremis quarantine people with a disease.

In terms of mental health, personality disorders cannot be used as grounds to detain somebody.
What if someones mental disorder is such that they cannot give informed consent ?
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camroc1
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by camroc1 »

Actually, about 10 seconds of googling led me to the HSE website which specifically states that, under the Mental Health Act, people in Ireland can be detained against their will. The spelling mistake is the HSE's.
What if I believe the person is in real danger?
In certain circumstances, where a real danger to the person (or others) exists, and it is considered in the best interest of the person that they are admitted to hospital, and they won't go voluntarily, the Mental Health Act can be used to detain and treat a person without their consent.
There are limited circumstances in which this can be used and very clear procedures that must be followed.
Click here for further information and guidance on this process provided by the Mental Health Commission. If this is used, the person living in our catchment will most likely be brought to Tallaght or St James's Hospital depending on where they live.
Involuntary Admission is considered a last resource. The service will make every effort to avoid involuntarily detaining anybody. However if it is warrented we will try to minimise distress to everybody involved and will try to ensure the involuntary admission is for the shortest duration possible.
If there is some reason it is impossible for a relative or friend to be an applicant, there are certain members of staff who are Authorised Officers. They can make an application for involuntary admission.
https://www.hse.ie/eng/services/list/4/ ... o-me-.html
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

camroc1 wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 11:08 am
anonymous_joe wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 10:40 am
camroc1 wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:46 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:35 pm Detaining people unlawfully is unconstitutional.
A bit circular that.

Answer me this : can people be detained in mental institutions, on foot of medical reports, against their will ?
The Constitution expressly prohibits the detention of people against their will.

It allows for exceptions.

One of the most obvious is a custodial sentence.

At the current time, it's also noteworthy that the State can in extremis quarantine people with a disease.

In terms of mental health, personality disorders cannot be used as grounds to detain somebody.
What if someones mental disorder is such that they cannot give informed consent ?
People with personality disorders can give consent. That's the problem.
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by Duff Paddy »

anonymous_joe wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 12:10 pm
camroc1 wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 11:08 am
anonymous_joe wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 10:40 am
camroc1 wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:46 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 9:35 pm Detaining people unlawfully is unconstitutional.
A bit circular that.

Answer me this : can people be detained in mental institutions, on foot of medical reports, against their will ?
The Constitution expressly prohibits the detention of people against their will.

It allows for exceptions.

One of the most obvious is a custodial sentence.

At the current time, it's also noteworthy that the State can in extremis quarantine people with a disease.

In terms of mental health, personality disorders cannot be used as grounds to detain somebody.
What if someones mental disorder is such that they cannot give informed consent ?
People with personality disorders can give consent. That's the problem.
That’s fair but I thought there was provision for someone who was an immediate danger to themselves or to society
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

Nope.

If they have a mental disorder they can be locked up, but if they have a personality disorder they can't.

(The specific list of which is which I'd have to check.)

The person involved is fully aware of what their actions would involve, they just don't appear to care.
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by Duff Paddy »

At long last
https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/cou ... 74780.html

Unconstitutional to limit awards :lol: yeah lads sure
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

There's already a cap?

Did you not know that? :lol:
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by Duff Paddy »

anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:11 am There's already a cap?

Did you not know that? :lol:
This cap will be much lower 8)
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 12:19 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:11 am There's already a cap?

Did you not know that? :lol:
This cap will be much lower 8)
I doubt it tbh. No government would be foolish enough to reduce the maximum cap for catastrophic injuries because they'd end up with a very pointed judgment awarding somebody less than they would deserve and the media would have a field day.
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by Duff Paddy »

anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:14 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 12:19 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:11 am There's already a cap?

Did you not know that? :lol:
This cap will be much lower 8)
I doubt it tbh. No government would be foolish enough to reduce the maximum cap for catastrophic injuries because they'd end up with a very pointed judgment awarding somebody less than they would deserve and the media would have a field day.
It’s the €40,000 for a sore neck they’re after
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lorcanoworms
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by lorcanoworms »

I have surfers ear and it wasn't my fault.
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camroc1
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by camroc1 »

Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:58 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:14 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 12:19 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:11 am There's already a cap?

Did you not know that? :lol:
This cap will be much lower 8)
I doubt it tbh. No government would be foolish enough to reduce the maximum cap for catastrophic injuries because they'd end up with a very pointed judgment awarding somebody less than they would deserve and the media would have a field day.
It’s the €40,000 (+ co$t$) for a sore neck they’re after
Corrected.
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CM11
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by CM11 »

https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/cou ... 75484.html

Just another naive legal professional not understanding how society works.
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:58 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:14 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 12:19 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:11 am There's already a cap?

Did you not know that? :lol:
This cap will be much lower 8)
I doubt it tbh. No government would be foolish enough to reduce the maximum cap for catastrophic injuries because they'd end up with a very pointed judgment awarding somebody less than they would deserve and the media would have a field day.
It’s the €40,000 for a sore neck they’re after
If such awards existed I'd be typing this on a solid gold laptop.
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:34 pm https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/cou ... 75484.html

Just another naive legal professional not understanding how society works.
Oooh, I wonder what judge.

It'll turn out to be some looper down the country, I suspect.
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CM11
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by CM11 »

anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:36 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:58 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:14 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 12:19 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 10:11 am There's already a cap?

Did you not know that? :lol:
This cap will be much lower 8)
I doubt it tbh. No government would be foolish enough to reduce the maximum cap for catastrophic injuries because they'd end up with a very pointed judgment awarding somebody less than they would deserve and the media would have a field day.
It’s the €40,000 for a sore neck they’re after
If such awards existed I'd be typing this on a solid gold laptop.
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-a ... 8?mode=amp
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CM11
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by CM11 »

anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:37 pm
CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:34 pm https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/cou ... 75484.html

Just another naive legal professional not understanding how society works.
Oooh, I wonder what judge.

It'll turn out to be some looper down the country, I suspect.
Surprised it's not common knowledge in the legal profession after 4 years.
rfurlong

Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by rfurlong »

CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:38 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:36 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:58 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:14 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 12:19 pm

This cap will be much lower 8)
I doubt it tbh. No government would be foolish enough to reduce the maximum cap for catastrophic injuries because they'd end up with a very pointed judgment awarding somebody less than they would deserve and the media would have a field day.
It’s the €40,000 for a sore neck they’re after
If such awards existed I'd be typing this on a solid gold laptop.
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-a ... 8?mode=amp
:lol:
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:39 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:37 pm
CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:34 pm https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/cou ... 75484.html

Just another naive legal professional not understanding how society works.
Oooh, I wonder what judge.

It'll turn out to be some looper down the country, I suspect.
Surprised it's not common knowledge in the legal profession after 4 years.
Procul ab urbe, would be my guess.
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by anonymous_joe »

CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:38 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:36 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:58 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:14 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 12:19 pm

This cap will be much lower 8)
I doubt it tbh. No government would be foolish enough to reduce the maximum cap for catastrophic injuries because they'd end up with a very pointed judgment awarding somebody less than they would deserve and the media would have a field day.
It’s the €40,000 for a sore neck they’re after
If such awards existed I'd be typing this on a solid gold laptop.
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-a ... 8?mode=amp
High Court PIs for "whiplash" are unusual.

The vast majority are brought in the District and Circuit Courts for sums comfortably below €20k.
rfurlong

Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by rfurlong »

anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:42 pm
CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:39 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:37 pm
CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:34 pm https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/cou ... 75484.html

Just another naive legal professional not understanding how society works.
Oooh, I wonder what judge.

It'll turn out to be some looper down the country, I suspect.
Surprised it's not common knowledge in the legal profession after 4 years.
Procul ab urbe, would be my guess.
This judge is obviously a dipshit of the highest order and should get reprimanded for contacting the woman (after the case was over if I'm reading it right?)

However, I'm struggling to see how this has ended up with GSOC ..... what exactly is the nature of the cover up that this woman is implying?

Is this a prelude to a damages case by her?
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CM11
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by CM11 »

Average award for whiplash is around 20k. You don't get an average of 20k if most awards are below 20k (technically possible but unlikely).
rfurlong

Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by rfurlong »

anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:44 pm
CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:38 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:36 pm
Duff Paddy wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:58 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 2:14 pm
I doubt it tbh. No government would be foolish enough to reduce the maximum cap for catastrophic injuries because they'd end up with a very pointed judgment awarding somebody less than they would deserve and the media would have a field day.
It’s the €40,000 for a sore neck they’re after
If such awards existed I'd be typing this on a solid gold laptop.
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-a ... 8?mode=amp
High Court PIs for "whiplash" are unusual.

The vast majority are brought in the District and Circuit Courts for sums comfortably below €20k.
commonly referred to as 'paracetemol injuries' that miraculously clear up after 2 nurofen and a decent nights kip
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CM11
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Re: Glorious examples of the calibre of the Irish Judiciary

Post by CM11 »

rfurlong wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:45 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:42 pm
CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:39 pm
anonymous_joe wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:37 pm
CM11 wrote: Wed Sep 30, 2020 4:34 pm https://m.independent.ie/irish-news/cou ... 75484.html

Just another naive legal professional not understanding how society works.
Oooh, I wonder what judge.

It'll turn out to be some looper down the country, I suspect.
Surprised it's not common knowledge in the legal profession after 4 years.
Procul ab urbe, would be my guess.
This judge is obviously a dipshit of the highest order and should get reprimanded for contacting the woman (after the case was over if I'm reading it right?)

However, I'm struggling to see how this has ended up with GSOC ..... what exactly is the nature of the cover up that this woman is implying?

Is this a prelude to a damages case by her?
Well, in the article it does mention GSOC decided an offence the Gardai originally ignored was a serious offence.
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