Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

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Gavin Duffy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Gavin Duffy »

CM11 wrote:It's in 71 nursing homes now. Safe to assume it's probably in all of them. How many do we have?
800 or something like that?
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camroc1
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by camroc1 »

ID2 wrote:
Flametop wrote:So either the Irish Cheltenham cûnts brought Covid 19 with them or they brought it back.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland ... 3?mode=amp
Those fucks should have been forced to quarantine upon return. Still pisses me off when I think about it going ahead.

Air travel in general is one area where we could/should have done more, that and masks in public
Face masks are going to be the next snow shovels.

Everyone will buy a box of 200 masks, and carefully put them away, never to be used as we don't suffer another pandemic for 20 years.
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Gavin Duffy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Gavin Duffy »

camroc1 wrote:Indeed, and it sticks the likes of Una Mulally's whinge about Varadkar, in today's IT, back up where the sun don't shine.
You have a subscription? Could you c&p it up? (spoilered of course, to protect the rest of the board)
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camroc1
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by camroc1 »

Gavin Duffy wrote:
camroc1 wrote:Indeed, and it sticks the likes of Una Mulally's whinge about Varadkar, in today's IT, back up where the sun don't shine.
You have a subscription? Could you c&p it up? (spoilered of course, to protect the rest of the board)
Spoiler: show
[quote]Una Mullally: Leo Varadkar’s mask drops again
Subscriber only
His callous off-the-cuff remark reminds us that he is not beyond scrutiny

Una Mullally

184


Something changed last week. The mood shifted. With the initial shock of the pandemic’s arrival on our shores dissipating, a grim numbness has taken hold. Alongside the remarkable collective spirit shown across Ireland, an unease about the scramble to confront the virus on multiple fronts is growing.

At one point, our caretaker Taoiseach dispensed with caring for a moment, standing at a podium and delivering a seemingly off-the-cuff remark. “I have heard stories of people who have asked their employers to lay them off because they’d be better off on the €350 payment than maybe working 20 hours a week for €11,” he said, “you know, do the maths yourself.” Leo Varadkar then caught himself, but decided on another little dig. “I would just say to anyone who’s thinking that, we are all in this together, and nobody in any walk of life should seek to be better off, or seek to make a profit out of this crisis.” We are all in this together? It didn’t sound like it in that moment.

The Taoiseach was speaking out of both sides of his mouth: let’s band together while I re-enforce divisions. Varadkar is accusing people with very little of being cheats, and not for the first time. His strange obsession with the fantasy of large-scale welfare fraud is a social vista of his own composition, full of blanks, within which he paints the less well-off as scroungers.

The wheels often come off Varadkar’s train when he’s experiencing a surge of popularity and support. He gets comfortable, and then says something obnoxious
Giving people who have lost their jobs and work a kicking at this time is unconscionable. Lives have fallen apart over the past month. Does Varadkar know the numbness of traipsing across town to get an emergency payment form printed? Or the ache of serious sit-down conversations about how bills will get paid? Does he understand the impossible choice of whether to ask for a mortgage freeze and emerge from this period with more debt, or deciding to somehow pay the mortgage and still come out of this period with more debt? Does he feel the shudder that accompanies a large grocery bill total at the till?




Does he know the defeat of boarding up a shop, or pulling the shutters down on a thriving business and telling your staff you don’t know when they’ll have jobs again? Does he get the build-up of nerves before ringing a landlord to tell them there’s no money for rent? Does he understand the careers on pause? The opportunities lost? The humiliation?

At a time when the half-in-half-out Taoiseach implored people to ignore fake news, to follow only quality news sources, to stop spreading unsubstantiated rumour, he spun an anecdotal tale without offering any evidence to back it up. “I have heard stories.” Where? WhatsApp? One would think the gravity of the crisis would snap him out of a pattern that contributed to Fine Gael’s downfall in the most recent election.

The wheels often come off Varadkar’s train when he’s experiencing a surge of popularity and support. He gets comfortable, and then says something obnoxious. It’s a particular type of foot in mouth that leaves other mouths agape; an unprompted remark, almost always Tory-like, and at odds with the temperature of the room. There is a lot of chatter about masks at the moment, and last week, Varadkar’s slipped, and he reverted to type.

Worrying vagueness
We must remember that twice in a decade, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael governments left our society inadequately prepared for crises. It doesn’t matter how unprecedented those crises were. We emerged from the Celtic Tiger with very little to show for ourselves as a society in terms of public infrastructure where it matters most, across health, public housing, decent rural transport, childcare. And this decade, while the Government spun yarns about a booming economy, the gaps became chasms when a crisis hit. The next time it has to be different. And the only way it can be different is if Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil are as far away from the decision-making processes as possible. For now, Fine Gael should remember that they are in charge by an accident of post-electoral stasis.


Last week, there was often a worrying vagueness to responses from ministers about whether we are doing everything necessary and everything right. Pat answers abound. There are questions about the supply of PPE, who should be wearing it, whether we should all be wearing masks, the alarmingly high rate of infection among health workers, a brutal crisis in nursing homes, and the low number of tests being carried out. Nobody is asking journalists to sharpen their knives for the sake of it, but the public needs to be protected from the virus, not from knowing the failings of the response to it.

People in Ireland want our political leaders to do a good job. We’re depending on them. Not so long ago, Varadkar stood, rocking on his heels in a count centre, absorbing the kicking the Irish electorate gave his party for being disconnected, arrogant, and out of touch. And yet, when this crisis coalesced, people put aside party politics, ideologies, resentment, and “sides”, and got behind the caretaker government.

We praised the speeches, delivered as if from disaster films, and the politicians making them. We stood at our doors and applauded health workers. We are absorbing the shock. People in Ireland have shown maturity, resolve, and non-partisan support for those leading the response. We don’t want things to go sour. We don’t need division. Don’t make this any harder than it already is.[/quote]
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The Sun God
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by The Sun God »

Great gesture from Leo and I am not his greatest fan but it shows true leadership.
Talking to one of my political contacts over the weekend.....
Best we all get used to the current lock-down arrangements until the end of May anyway..
ID2
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by ID2 »

camroc1 wrote:
ID2 wrote:
Flametop wrote:So either the Irish Cheltenham cûnts brought Covid 19 with them or they brought it back.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland ... 3?mode=amp
Those fucks should have been forced to quarantine upon return. Still pisses me off when I think about it going ahead.

Air travel in general is one area where we could/should have done more, that and masks in public
Face masks are going to be the next snow shovels.

Everyone will buy a box of 200 masks, and carefully put them away, never to be used as we don't suffer another pandemic for 20 years.
Maybe, or with more countries shifting their position on using them, they might end up being a requirement when the lockdown rules loosen
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Leinsterman
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Leinsterman »

camroc1 wrote:Face masks are going to be the next snow shovels.

Everyone will buy a box of 200 masks, and carefully put them away, never to be used as we don't suffer another pandemic for 20 years.

Yep, store them with the snow tyres from 2010 and the snow shovels from 2018. :lol:

The Sun God wrote: Best we all get used to the current lock-down arrangements until the end of May anyway..
Certainly seems that way. Courts aren't expected back until the middle of June anyway. That's a pretty good indicator as to when the public sector will be getting back to normal.
I'm sure our ambulance-chasing barrister can confirm that
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Gavin Duffy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Gavin Duffy »

camroc1 wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
camroc1 wrote:Indeed, and it sticks the likes of Una Mulally's whinge about Varadkar, in today's IT, back up where the sun don't shine.
You have a subscription? Could you c&p it up? (spoilered of course, to protect the rest of the board)
Spoiler: show
[quote]Una Mullally: Leo Varadkar’s mask drops again
Subscriber only
His callous off-the-cuff remark reminds us that he is not beyond scrutiny

Una Mullally

184


Something changed last week. The mood shifted. With the initial shock of the pandemic’s arrival on our shores dissipating, a grim numbness has taken hold. Alongside the remarkable collective spirit shown across Ireland, an unease about the scramble to confront the virus on multiple fronts is growing.

At one point, our caretaker Taoiseach dispensed with caring for a moment, standing at a podium and delivering a seemingly off-the-cuff remark. “I have heard stories of people who have asked their employers to lay them off because they’d be better off on the €350 payment than maybe working 20 hours a week for €11,” he said, “you know, do the maths yourself.” Leo Varadkar then caught himself, but decided on another little dig. “I would just say to anyone who’s thinking that, we are all in this together, and nobody in any walk of life should seek to be better off, or seek to make a profit out of this crisis.” We are all in this together? It didn’t sound like it in that moment.

The Taoiseach was speaking out of both sides of his mouth: let’s band together while I re-enforce divisions. Varadkar is accusing people with very little of being cheats, and not for the first time. His strange obsession with the fantasy of large-scale welfare fraud is a social vista of his own composition, full of blanks, within which he paints the less well-off as scroungers.

The wheels often come off Varadkar’s train when he’s experiencing a surge of popularity and support. He gets comfortable, and then says something obnoxious
Giving people who have lost their jobs and work a kicking at this time is unconscionable. Lives have fallen apart over the past month. Does Varadkar know the numbness of traipsing across town to get an emergency payment form printed? Or the ache of serious sit-down conversations about how bills will get paid? Does he understand the impossible choice of whether to ask for a mortgage freeze and emerge from this period with more debt, or deciding to somehow pay the mortgage and still come out of this period with more debt? Does he feel the shudder that accompanies a large grocery bill total at the till?




Does he know the defeat of boarding up a shop, or pulling the shutters down on a thriving business and telling your staff you don’t know when they’ll have jobs again? Does he get the build-up of nerves before ringing a landlord to tell them there’s no money for rent? Does he understand the careers on pause? The opportunities lost? The humiliation?

At a time when the half-in-half-out Taoiseach implored people to ignore fake news, to follow only quality news sources, to stop spreading unsubstantiated rumour, he spun an anecdotal tale without offering any evidence to back it up. “I have heard stories.” Where? WhatsApp? One would think the gravity of the crisis would snap him out of a pattern that contributed to Fine Gael’s downfall in the most recent election.

The wheels often come off Varadkar’s train when he’s experiencing a surge of popularity and support. He gets comfortable, and then says something obnoxious. It’s a particular type of foot in mouth that leaves other mouths agape; an unprompted remark, almost always Tory-like, and at odds with the temperature of the room. There is a lot of chatter about masks at the moment, and last week, Varadkar’s slipped, and he reverted to type.

Worrying vagueness
We must remember that twice in a decade, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael governments left our society inadequately prepared for crises. It doesn’t matter how unprecedented those crises were. We emerged from the Celtic Tiger with very little to show for ourselves as a society in terms of public infrastructure where it matters most, across health, public housing, decent rural transport, childcare. And this decade, while the Government spun yarns about a booming economy, the gaps became chasms when a crisis hit. The next time it has to be different. And the only way it can be different is if Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil are as far away from the decision-making processes as possible. For now, Fine Gael should remember that they are in charge by an accident of post-electoral stasis.


Last week, there was often a worrying vagueness to responses from ministers about whether we are doing everything necessary and everything right. Pat answers abound. There are questions about the supply of PPE, who should be wearing it, whether we should all be wearing masks, the alarmingly high rate of infection among health workers, a brutal crisis in nursing homes, and the low number of tests being carried out. Nobody is asking journalists to sharpen their knives for the sake of it, but the public needs to be protected from the virus, not from knowing the failings of the response to it.

People in Ireland want our political leaders to do a good job. We’re depending on them. Not so long ago, Varadkar stood, rocking on his heels in a count centre, absorbing the kicking the Irish electorate gave his party for being disconnected, arrogant, and out of touch. And yet, when this crisis coalesced, people put aside party politics, ideologies, resentment, and “sides”, and got behind the caretaker government.

We praised the speeches, delivered as if from disaster films, and the politicians making them. We stood at our doors and applauded health workers. We are absorbing the shock. People in Ireland have shown maturity, resolve, and non-partisan support for those leading the response. We don’t want things to go sour. We don’t need division. Don’t make this any harder than it already is.
[/quote]
:thumbup:
What a c*nt, by the way.
Last edited by Gavin Duffy on Mon Apr 06, 2020 12:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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HighKingLeinster
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by HighKingLeinster »

ID2 wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
ID2 wrote:
Flametop wrote:So either the Irish Cheltenham cûnts brought Covid 19 with them or they brought it back.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland ... 3?mode=amp
Those fucks should have been forced to quarantine upon return. Still pisses me off when I think about it going ahead.

Air travel in general is one area where we could/should have done more, that and masks in public
Face masks are going to be the next snow shovels.

Everyone will buy a box of 200 masks, and carefully put them away, never to be used as we don't suffer another pandemic for 20 years.
Maybe, or with more countries shifting their position on using them, they might end up being a requirement when the lockdown rules loosen
yep, Ze Germans have mandatory face masks in public as one of their major requirements for ending ze lock down
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The Sun God
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by The Sun God »

Gavin Duffy wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
camroc1 wrote:Indeed, and it sticks the likes of Una Mulally's whinge about Varadkar, in today's IT, back up where the sun don't shine.
You have a subscription? Could you c&p it up? (spoilered of course, to protect the rest of the board)
Spoiler: show
[quote]Una Mullally: Leo Varadkar’s mask drops again
Subscriber only
His callous off-the-cuff remark reminds us that he is not beyond scrutiny

Una Mullally

184


Something changed last week. The mood shifted. With the initial shock of the pandemic’s arrival on our shores dissipating, a grim numbness has taken hold. Alongside the remarkable collective spirit shown across Ireland, an unease about the scramble to confront the virus on multiple fronts is growing.

At one point, our caretaker Taoiseach dispensed with caring for a moment, standing at a podium and delivering a seemingly off-the-cuff remark. “I have heard stories of people who have asked their employers to lay them off because they’d be better off on the €350 payment than maybe working 20 hours a week for €11,” he said, “you know, do the maths yourself.” Leo Varadkar then caught himself, but decided on another little dig. “I would just say to anyone who’s thinking that, we are all in this together, and nobody in any walk of life should seek to be better off, or seek to make a profit out of this crisis.” We are all in this together? It didn’t sound like it in that moment.

The Taoiseach was speaking out of both sides of his mouth: let’s band together while I re-enforce divisions. Varadkar is accusing people with very little of being cheats, and not for the first time. His strange obsession with the fantasy of large-scale welfare fraud is a social vista of his own composition, full of blanks, within which he paints the less well-off as scroungers.

The wheels often come off Varadkar’s train when he’s experiencing a surge of popularity and support. He gets comfortable, and then says something obnoxious
Giving people who have lost their jobs and work a kicking at this time is unconscionable. Lives have fallen apart over the past month. Does Varadkar know the numbness of traipsing across town to get an emergency payment form printed? Or the ache of serious sit-down conversations about how bills will get paid? Does he understand the impossible choice of whether to ask for a mortgage freeze and emerge from this period with more debt, or deciding to somehow pay the mortgage and still come out of this period with more debt? Does he feel the shudder that accompanies a large grocery bill total at the till?




Does he know the defeat of boarding up a shop, or pulling the shutters down on a thriving business and telling your staff you don’t know when they’ll have jobs again? Does he get the build-up of nerves before ringing a landlord to tell them there’s no money for rent? Does he understand the careers on pause? The opportunities lost? The humiliation?

At a time when the half-in-half-out Taoiseach implored people to ignore fake news, to follow only quality news sources, to stop spreading unsubstantiated rumour, he spun an anecdotal tale without offering any evidence to back it up. “I have heard stories.” Where? WhatsApp? One would think the gravity of the crisis would snap him out of a pattern that contributed to Fine Gael’s downfall in the most recent election.

The wheels often come off Varadkar’s train when he’s experiencing a surge of popularity and support. He gets comfortable, and then says something obnoxious. It’s a particular type of foot in mouth that leaves other mouths agape; an unprompted remark, almost always Tory-like, and at odds with the temperature of the room. There is a lot of chatter about masks at the moment, and last week, Varadkar’s slipped, and he reverted to type.

Worrying vagueness
We must remember that twice in a decade, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael governments left our society inadequately prepared for crises. It doesn’t matter how unprecedented those crises were. We emerged from the Celtic Tiger with very little to show for ourselves as a society in terms of public infrastructure where it matters most, across health, public housing, decent rural transport, childcare. And this decade, while the Government spun yarns about a booming economy, the gaps became chasms when a crisis hit. The next time it has to be different. And the only way it can be different is if Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil are as far away from the decision-making processes as possible. For now, Fine Gael should remember that they are in charge by an accident of post-electoral stasis.


Last week, there was often a worrying vagueness to responses from ministers about whether we are doing everything necessary and everything right. Pat answers abound. There are questions about the supply of PPE, who should be wearing it, whether we should all be wearing masks, the alarmingly high rate of infection among health workers, a brutal crisis in nursing homes, and the low number of tests being carried out. Nobody is asking journalists to sharpen their knives for the sake of it, but the public needs to be protected from the virus, not from knowing the failings of the response to it.

People in Ireland want our political leaders to do a good job. We’re depending on them. Not so long ago, Varadkar stood, rocking on his heels in a count centre, absorbing the kicking the Irish electorate gave his party for being disconnected, arrogant, and out of touch. And yet, when this crisis coalesced, people put aside party politics, ideologies, resentment, and “sides”, and got behind the caretaker government.

We praised the speeches, delivered as if from disaster films, and the politicians making them. We stood at our doors and applauded health workers. We are absorbing the shock. People in Ireland have shown maturity, resolve, and non-partisan support for those leading the response. We don’t want things to go sour. We don’t need division. Don’t make this any harder than it already is.
:thumbup:
What a c*nt, by the way.[/quote]

She really is. If you have ever read any of her moronic columns for The Guardian, they would make you squirm.
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Floppykid
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Floppykid »

The Sun God wrote:Great gesture from Leo and I am not his greatest fan but it shows true leadership.
Talking to one of my political contacts over the weekend.....
Best we all get used to the current lock-down arrangements until the end of May anyway..
That would be optimisitic.
No chance of kids going back to school anyway.
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Floppykid »

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Leinsterman
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Leinsterman »

Floppykid wrote:
The Sun God wrote:Great gesture from Leo and I am not his greatest fan but it shows true leadership.
Talking to one of my political contacts over the weekend.....
Best we all get used to the current lock-down arrangements until the end of May anyway..
That would be optimisitic.
No chance of kids going back to school anyway.
I reckon they'll try to get them back for the last week of June at least. That's still over two months away. A lot can change in that time. [/blind optimism]
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Liathroidigloine
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Liathroidigloine »

redderneck wrote:
CM11 wrote:It's in 71 nursing homes now. Safe to assume it's probably in all of them. How many do we have?
NHI claim that that there are over 460 nursing homes in Ireland providing care to over 25,000 people. No idea if that's accurate, spun hard, or if there are nursing homes which would not for some reason be NHI members...
The way to control in NH will create really miserable conditions for residents. Confined to rooms with meals in rooms and limited interaction with small number of staff. I know it's better than the alternative but it's a horrible existence.
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Liathroidigloine »

camroc1 wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
camroc1 wrote:Indeed, and it sticks the likes of Una Mulally's whinge about Varadkar, in today's IT, back up where the sun don't shine.
You have a subscription? Could you c&p it up? (spoilered of course, to protect the rest of the board)
Spoiler: show
[quote]Una Mullally: Leo Varadkar’s mask drops again
Subscriber only
His callous off-the-cuff remark reminds us that he is not beyond scrutiny

Una Mullally

184


Something changed last week. The mood shifted. With the initial shock of the pandemic’s arrival on our shores dissipating, a grim numbness has taken hold. Alongside the remarkable collective spirit shown across Ireland, an unease about the scramble to confront the virus on multiple fronts is growing.

At one point, our caretaker Taoiseach dispensed with caring for a moment, standing at a podium and delivering a seemingly off-the-cuff remark. “I have heard stories of people who have asked their employers to lay them off because they’d be better off on the €350 payment than maybe working 20 hours a week for €11,” he said, “you know, do the maths yourself.” Leo Varadkar then caught himself, but decided on another little dig. “I would just say to anyone who’s thinking that, we are all in this together, and nobody in any walk of life should seek to be better off, or seek to make a profit out of this crisis.” We are all in this together? It didn’t sound like it in that moment.

The Taoiseach was speaking out of both sides of his mouth: let’s band together while I re-enforce divisions. Varadkar is accusing people with very little of being cheats, and not for the first time. His strange obsession with the fantasy of large-scale welfare fraud is a social vista of his own composition, full of blanks, within which he paints the less well-off as scroungers.

The wheels often come off Varadkar’s train when he’s experiencing a surge of popularity and support. He gets comfortable, and then says something obnoxious
Giving people who have lost their jobs and work a kicking at this time is unconscionable. Lives have fallen apart over the past month. Does Varadkar know the numbness of traipsing across town to get an emergency payment form printed? Or the ache of serious sit-down conversations about how bills will get paid? Does he understand the impossible choice of whether to ask for a mortgage freeze and emerge from this period with more debt, or deciding to somehow pay the mortgage and still come out of this period with more debt? Does he feel the shudder that accompanies a large grocery bill total at the till?




Does he know the defeat of boarding up a shop, or pulling the shutters down on a thriving business and telling your staff you don’t know when they’ll have jobs again? Does he get the build-up of nerves before ringing a landlord to tell them there’s no money for rent? Does he understand the careers on pause? The opportunities lost? The humiliation?

At a time when the half-in-half-out Taoiseach implored people to ignore fake news, to follow only quality news sources, to stop spreading unsubstantiated rumour, he spun an anecdotal tale without offering any evidence to back it up. “I have heard stories.” Where? WhatsApp? One would think the gravity of the crisis would snap him out of a pattern that contributed to Fine Gael’s downfall in the most recent election.

The wheels often come off Varadkar’s train when he’s experiencing a surge of popularity and support. He gets comfortable, and then says something obnoxious. It’s a particular type of foot in mouth that leaves other mouths agape; an unprompted remark, almost always Tory-like, and at odds with the temperature of the room. There is a lot of chatter about masks at the moment, and last week, Varadkar’s slipped, and he reverted to type.

Worrying vagueness
We must remember that twice in a decade, Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael governments left our society inadequately prepared for crises. It doesn’t matter how unprecedented those crises were. We emerged from the Celtic Tiger with very little to show for ourselves as a society in terms of public infrastructure where it matters most, across health, public housing, decent rural transport, childcare. And this decade, while the Government spun yarns about a booming economy, the gaps became chasms when a crisis hit. The next time it has to be different. And the only way it can be different is if Fine Gael and Fianna Fáil are as far away from the decision-making processes as possible. For now, Fine Gael should remember that they are in charge by an accident of post-electoral stasis.


Last week, there was often a worrying vagueness to responses from ministers about whether we are doing everything necessary and everything right. Pat answers abound. There are questions about the supply of PPE, who should be wearing it, whether we should all be wearing masks, the alarmingly high rate of infection among health workers, a brutal crisis in nursing homes, and the low number of tests being carried out. Nobody is asking journalists to sharpen their knives for the sake of it, but the public needs to be protected from the virus, not from knowing the failings of the response to it.

People in Ireland want our political leaders to do a good job. We’re depending on them. Not so long ago, Varadkar stood, rocking on his heels in a count centre, absorbing the kicking the Irish electorate gave his party for being disconnected, arrogant, and out of touch. And yet, when this crisis coalesced, people put aside party politics, ideologies, resentment, and “sides”, and got behind the caretaker government.

We praised the speeches, delivered as if from disaster films, and the politicians making them. We stood at our doors and applauded health workers. We are absorbing the shock. People in Ireland have shown maturity, resolve, and non-partisan support for those leading the response. We don’t want things to go sour. We don’t need division. Don’t make this any harder than it already is.
[/quote]

He said exactly what happened. Employees divided into three categories.

1 Those who are better off on the subsidy scheme
2 Those who are better off on the Pandemic Payment
3 Those who are laid off short term and go on social welfare

Employees and employers worked together to get the best fit for both.
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Floppykid
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Floppykid »

The "Leo is landlord" SU leftie crew went mad about it on queue though.
They just need their red meat populist talking points.
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by ticketlessinseattle »

Leinsterman wrote:
Floppykid wrote:
The Sun God wrote:Great gesture from Leo and I am not his greatest fan but it shows true leadership.
Talking to one of my political contacts over the weekend.....
Best we all get used to the current lock-down arrangements until the end of May anyway..
That would be optimisitic.
No chance of kids going back to school anyway.
I reckon they'll try to get them back for the last week of June at least. That's still over two months away. A lot can change in that time. [/blind optimism]
yeah, think this would be the goal ; hard to know what the end game or mid term game is in all of this ; its not like if we wait this out for a few rough months then its all good/bye bye covid-19 ; faucci lad in US already talking about it making a return in "the fall" - probably why we'll never see him again ; but given that a vaccine is at least 12 months away (dunno how much I'd fancy that kind of a fast tracked vaccine) what happens in the interim ? German type parallel society with antibody passport holders etc until some type of actual herd immunity is built up ? fcuk knows
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by JoeyFantastic »

The Sun God wrote: She really is. If you have ever read any of her moronic columns for The Guardian, they would make you squirm.
The Guardian do a "little old Ireland throws off its oppression" article every few months for some reason. She is a prime example, but there's no shortage of gits willing to write them.

Not even sure what she wants Leo to do, fly to China and supervise the production of PPE himself?
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CM11
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by CM11 »

JoeyFantastic wrote:
The Sun God wrote: She really is. If you have ever read any of her moronic columns for The Guardian, they would make you squirm.
The Guardian do a "little old Ireland throws off its oppression" article every few months for some reason. She is a prime example, but there's no shortage of gits willing to write them.

Not even sure what she wants Leo to do, fly to China and supervise the production of PPE himself?
Seems she wants him to understand people have it hard. Because he's clearly shown little empathy to date. :roll:
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Blackrock Bullet »

Leinsterman wrote:
camroc1 wrote:Face masks are going to be the next snow shovels.

Everyone will buy a box of 200 masks, and carefully put them away, never to be used as we don't suffer another pandemic for 20 years.

Yep, store them with the snow tyres from 2010 and the snow shovels from 2018. :lol:

The Sun God wrote: Best we all get used to the current lock-down arrangements until the end of May anyway..
Certainly seems that way. Courts aren't expected back until the middle of June anyway. That's a pretty good indicator as to when the public sector will be getting back to normal.
I'm sure our ambulance-chasing barrister can confirm that
The Europeans are widely discussing the next phase or the "new normal", talking about lifting restrictions from next week (including the Danes, who have very similar numbers to us). There will be some restrictions lifted by the end of the month on the proviso that the curve continues to flatten and they are confident that they have the infrastructure in place (continued contact tracing, ICU beds headroom, requisite PPE headroom and supply and improved diagnostics).

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/e ... -1.4221946
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alliswell
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by alliswell »

ID2 wrote:
Flametop wrote:So either the Irish Cheltenham cûnts brought Covid 19 with them or they brought it back.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland ... 3?mode=amp
Those fucks should have been forced to quarantine upon return. Still pisses me off when I think about it going ahead.

Air travel in general is one area where we could/should have done more, that and masks in public
I was starting to think the mad search for scapegoats was getting a bit creepy but I just read Brian O'Connor's piece in the IT and now I am back in the lynch mob.
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by paddyor »

Blackrock Bullet wrote:
camroc1 wrote:Indeed, and it sticks the likes of Una Mulally's whinge about Varadkar, in today's IT, back up where the sun don't shine.
She was tweeting out a few weeks ago how "working" was low energy/no buzz anyway, implying this was great. I know she must enjoy her pontification in the Irish Times weekly and won't see it really as work but not everyone else is in as fortunate a position or will feel particularly great to be out of work, government scheme or not.
T'was only last week that Capitalism and work caused misery

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Sundy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Sundy »

The Sun God wrote: Best we all get used to the current lock-down arrangements until the end of May anyway..

We are straight up being told 6 months here in Australia which when you consider everything is probably more realistic.
We can go back to normal when the virus is controlled/gone or we have a therapeutic drug that works, other than that it only takes 1 infected person to set everything off again.

Restrictions could be eased only to be back a month alter
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CM11
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by CM11 »

Having looked into this further, it seems Varadkar was answering a question about people asking to be made redundant. He wasn't even the one who brought it up!

She really is a scummy, disingenuous, irresponsible journalist.
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Floppykid »

Bit of good news, Milne's been told to fudge off. :thumbup:
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paddyor
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by paddyor »

ID2 wrote:
Flametop wrote:So either the Irish Cheltenham cûnts brought Covid 19 with them or they brought it back.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland ... 3?mode=amp
Those fucks should have been forced to quarantine upon return. Still pisses me off when I think about it going ahead.

Air travel in general is one area where we could/should have done more, that and masks in public
It's nice to dunk on horsey set and all. But the link to cheltenham via Birmingham is tenuous at best. No mention of the 1000s who travel weekly to Britain for business or to watch the EPL. Granted business travel was being scaled back massively by that week. There hasn't been any Cheltenham bulge and we're 3 weeks on so if they're were going to infect thousands and thousands it would have shown up . The virus has proceeded as if it would've without it. The problem now is Nursing homes and HC staff.

We didn't have the power to quarantine people at the time and it's debatable as to whether the current raft of powers are constitutional(hence the fudging over whether powers were transferred to the Gardai). So I suppose

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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Gavin Duffy »

Floppykid wrote:Bit of good news, Milne's been told to fudge off. :thumbup:
Milne?
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Floppykid
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Floppykid »

Gavin Duffy wrote:
Floppykid wrote:Bit of good news, Milne's been told to fudge off. :thumbup:
Milne?
Seamus.
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Liathroidigloine
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Liathroidigloine »

paddyor wrote:
ID2 wrote:
Flametop wrote:So either the Irish Cheltenham cûnts brought Covid 19 with them or they brought it back.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland ... 3?mode=amp
Those fucks should have been forced to quarantine upon return. Still pisses me off when I think about it going ahead.

Air travel in general is one area where we could/should have done more, that and masks in public
It's nice to dunk on horsey set and all. But the link to cheltenham via Birmingham is tenuous at best. No mention of the 1000s who travel weekly to Britain for business or to watch the EPL. Granted business travel was being scaled back massively by that week. There hasn't been any Cheltenham bulge and we're 3 weeks on so if they're were going to infect thousands and thousands it would have shown up . The virus has proceeded as if it would've without it. The problem now is Nursing homes and HC staff.

We didn't have the power to quarantine people at the time and it's debatable as to whether the current raft of powers are constitutional(hence the fudging over whether powers were transferred to the Gardai). So I suppose

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Number of cases around Mullingar directly linked to Cheltenham. I'm aware of 5.
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by de_Selby »

I know of another guy in critical condition who picked it up at cheltenham too. Mid 50s only and essentially on the verge of death :frown:
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Gavin Duffy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Gavin Duffy »

Floppykid wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
Floppykid wrote:Bit of good news, Milne's been told to fudge off. :thumbup:
Milne?
Seamus.
Seumas apparently.
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CM11
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by CM11 »

Heard of someone who tried to go to his local after Cheltenham, owner/manager asked him to come back in two weeks. Guy is in critical condition, almost certainly will die.

Good on the guy who refused him entry but obvious sympathies to the patient's family.
Nolanator
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Nolanator »

Winnie wrote:
CM11 wrote:What possible downside could there be? Your ridiculous 'there might be a crisis and he'll have to say he's busy' comment is just that, ridiculous. He's not going to continue seeing patients if he's urgently needed. He's just making himself available. It's better than not being available and no one is going to tie him to an appointment if the country needs him.

You're making this into something much bigger than it needs to be.
Not wanting to hijack your thread
But this is the perfect response
Its a fantastic gesture from your PM, and one that should win him plaudits across the board
Whether he does any medical work at all is irrelevant, its the action itself that he deserves the kudos for

Im amazed people are having a go at him for it
You're grand, why would you be hijacking the thread by joining in on an active topic of discussion?

It's not like there's an unofficial "Nordies Out" policy.
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HighKingLeinster
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by HighKingLeinster »

paddyor wrote:
ID2 wrote:
Flametop wrote:So either the Irish Cheltenham cûnts brought Covid 19 with them or they brought it back.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland ... 3?mode=amp
Those fucks should have been forced to quarantine upon return. Still pisses me off when I think about it going ahead.

Air travel in general is one area where we could/should have done more, that and masks in public
It's nice to dunk on horsey set and all. But the link to cheltenham via Birmingham is tenuous at best. No mention of the 1000s who travel weekly to Britain for business or to watch the EPL. Granted business travel was being scaled back massively by that week. There hasn't been any Cheltenham bulge and we're 3 weeks on so if they're were going to infect thousands and thousands it would have shown up . The virus has proceeded as if it would've without it. The problem now is Nursing homes and HC staff.

We didn't have the power to quarantine people at the time and it's debatable as to whether the current raft of powers are constitutional(hence the fudging over whether powers were transferred to the Gardai). So I suppose

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ah Elsa, the hottest of Disney characters :thumbup:
Nolanator
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Nolanator »

Jasmine FTW
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HighKingLeinster
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by HighKingLeinster »

Nolanator wrote:
Winnie wrote:
CM11 wrote:What possible downside could there be? Your ridiculous 'there might be a crisis and he'll have to say he's busy' comment is just that, ridiculous. He's not going to continue seeing patients if he's urgently needed. He's just making himself available. It's better than not being available and no one is going to tie him to an appointment if the country needs him.

You're making this into something much bigger than it needs to be.
Not wanting to hijack your thread
But this is the perfect response
Its a fantastic gesture from your PM, and one that should win him plaudits across the board
Whether he does any medical work at all is irrelevant, its the action itself that he deserves the kudos for

Im amazed people are having a go at him for it
You're grand, why would you be hijacking the thread by joining in on an active topic of discussion?

It's not like there's an unofficial "Nordies Out" policy.
yeah its more of a provisional policy really
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camroc1
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by camroc1 »

HighKingLeinster wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Winnie wrote:
CM11 wrote:What possible downside could there be? Your ridiculous 'there might be a crisis and he'll have to say he's busy' comment is just that, ridiculous. He's not going to continue seeing patients if he's urgently needed. He's just making himself available. It's better than not being available and no one is going to tie him to an appointment if the country needs him.

You're making this into something much bigger than it needs to be.
Not wanting to hijack your thread
But this is the perfect response
Its a fantastic gesture from your PM, and one that should win him plaudits across the board
Whether he does any medical work at all is irrelevant, its the action itself that he deserves the kudos for

Im amazed people are having a go at him for it
You're grand, why would you be hijacking the thread by joining in on an active topic of discussion?

It's not like there's an unofficial "Nordies Out" policy.
yeah its more of a provisional policy really
And now that the 12th has been cancelled, it's mission accomplished.
Nolanator
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Nolanator »

HighKingLeinster wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Winnie wrote:
CM11 wrote:What possible downside could there be? Your ridiculous 'there might be a crisis and he'll have to say he's busy' comment is just that, ridiculous. He's not going to continue seeing patients if he's urgently needed. He's just making himself available. It's better than not being available and no one is going to tie him to an appointment if the country needs him.

You're making this into something much bigger than it needs to be.
Not wanting to hijack your thread
But this is the perfect response
Its a fantastic gesture from your PM, and one that should win him plaudits across the board
Whether he does any medical work at all is irrelevant, its the action itself that he deserves the kudos for

Im amazed people are having a go at him for it
You're grand, why would you be hijacking the thread by joining in on an active topic of discussion?

It's not like there's an unofficial "Nordies Out" policy.
yeah its more of a provisional policy really
It's very Real.
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HighKingLeinster
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by HighKingLeinster »

Nolanator wrote:
HighKingLeinster wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Winnie wrote:
CM11 wrote:What possible downside could there be? Your ridiculous 'there might be a crisis and he'll have to say he's busy' comment is just that, ridiculous. He's not going to continue seeing patients if he's urgently needed. He's just making himself available. It's better than not being available and no one is going to tie him to an appointment if the country needs him.

You're making this into something much bigger than it needs to be.
Not wanting to hijack your thread
But this is the perfect response
Its a fantastic gesture from your PM, and one that should win him plaudits across the board
Whether he does any medical work at all is irrelevant, its the action itself that he deserves the kudos for

Im amazed people are having a go at him for it
You're grand, why would you be hijacking the thread by joining in on an active topic of discussion?

It's not like there's an unofficial "Nordies Out" policy.
yeah its more of a provisional policy really
It's very Real.
and has excellent continuity.
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HighKingLeinster
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by HighKingLeinster »

camroc1 wrote:
HighKingLeinster wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Winnie wrote:
CM11 wrote:What possible downside could there be? Your ridiculous 'there might be a crisis and he'll have to say he's busy' comment is just that, ridiculous. He's not going to continue seeing patients if he's urgently needed. He's just making himself available. It's better than not being available and no one is going to tie him to an appointment if the country needs him.

You're making this into something much bigger than it needs to be.
Not wanting to hijack your thread
But this is the perfect response
Its a fantastic gesture from your PM, and one that should win him plaudits across the board
Whether he does any medical work at all is irrelevant, its the action itself that he deserves the kudos for

Im amazed people are having a go at him for it
You're grand, why would you be hijacking the thread by joining in on an active topic of discussion?

It's not like there's an unofficial "Nordies Out" policy.
yeah its more of a provisional policy really
And now that the 12th has been cancelled, it's mission accomplished.
Undefeated Policy :thumbup:
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