Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

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Duff Paddy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Duff Paddy »

CM11 wrote:There's a lot of people who are in emergency accommodation. Arguing over the number is just petty point scoring. What I'd like is for the charities to stop equating homelessness and rough sleeping.

A bit of honesty would actually help because the right discussions could then be had.
Fully agree. We all know there aren’t 15,000 genuinely homeless. At the same time we do have an issue with rough sleepers, beggars, children being raised in hotels. Yes I know it is all relative but these are still issues facing our society that should be dealt with. The charities have become a bit of a monster and they don’t appear to be making much progress given their resources.
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Liathroidigloine
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Liathroidigloine »

Duff Paddy wrote:
CM11 wrote:There's a lot of people who are in emergency accommodation. Arguing over the number is just petty point scoring. What I'd like is for the charities to stop equating homelessness and rough sleeping.

A bit of honesty would actually help because the right discussions could then be had.
Fully agree. We all know there aren’t 15,000 genuinely homeless. At the same time we do have an issue with rough sleepers, beggars, children being raised in hotels. Yes I know it is all relative but these are still issues facing our society that should be dealt with. The charities have become a bit of a monster and they don’t appear to be making much progress given their resources.
Why would they, the worse it gets, the bigger they get.
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Mullet 2
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Mullet 2 »

Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.

Hav UK mg alot of success with apartment block planning out your way? Research has also shown the vast majority of older people dont want to move.

More houses thanks. Not pipe dreams that wont dent the surface.
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Duff Paddy »

Mullet 2 wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.

Hav UK mg alot of success with apartment block planning out your way? Research has also shown the vast majority of older people dont want to move.

More houses thanks. Not pipe dreams that wont dent the surface.
It always struck me as strange how immobile we are in Ireland. Even in England you usually move out for uni and it’s much more common to retire and downsize in a totally different area. In Ireland a lot of people live at home for college, stay at home until their 30’s, buy a starter house then upgrade to a larger family house then aim to stay there until they die. I think there’s a lack of developments in Dublin aimed at people looking to downsize - small cul de sacs of bungalows close to a town centre. The planners could help with this but they’d probably end up costing too much.
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Luckycharmer
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Luckycharmer »

Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.
It depends problem with appartments are they are quite isolating, no real neighbourhood spirit. Often people don't know their neighbours, there are often problems with parking and can have large yearly management fees.
Why would a retired couple want to move into town when their whole lives revolves around the suburb they have lived in.
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Luckycharmer
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Luckycharmer »

Duff Paddy wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.

Hav UK mg alot of success with apartment block planning out your way? Research has also shown the vast majority of older people dont want to move.

More houses thanks. Not pipe dreams that wont dent the surface.
It always struck me as strange how immobile we are in Ireland. Even in England you usually move out for uni and it’s much more common to retire and downsize in a totally different area. In Ireland a lot of people live at home for college, stay at home until their 30’s, buy a starter house then upgrade to a larger family house then aim to stay there until they die. I think there’s a lack of developments in Dublin aimed at people looking to downsize - small cul de sacs of bungalows close to a town centre. The planners could help with this but they’d probably end up costing too much.
Why do you assume older people want to move closer to town. My mum is currently downsizing and last thing she would want to do is live closer to town.
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Duff Paddy »

Luckycharmer wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.
It depends problem with appartments are they are quite isolating, no real neighbourhood spirit. Often people don't know their neighbours, there are often problems with parking and can have large yearly management fees.
Why would a retired couple want to move into town when their whole lives revolves around the suburb they have lived in.
There’s often soundproofing problems in Irish apartments too
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Duff Paddy »

Luckycharmer wrote:
Duff Paddy wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.

Hav UK mg alot of success with apartment block planning out your way? Research has also shown the vast majority of older people dont want to move.

More houses thanks. Not pipe dreams that wont dent the surface.
It always struck me as strange how immobile we are in Ireland. Even in England you usually move out for uni and it’s much more common to retire and downsize in a totally different area. In Ireland a lot of people live at home for college, stay at home until their 30’s, buy a starter house then upgrade to a larger family house then aim to stay there until they die. I think there’s a lack of developments in Dublin aimed at people looking to downsize - small cul de sacs of bungalows close to a town centre. The planners could help with this but they’d probably end up costing too much.
Why do you assume older people want to move closer to town. My mum is currently downsizing and last thing she would want to do is live closer to town.
To be less isolated. Closer to shops, GP, church, post office etc. If they are outside of town and the GP puts them off the road due to eyesight they are in trouble.
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Luckycharmer
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Luckycharmer »

Duff Paddy wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.

Hav UK mg alot of success with apartment block planning out your way? Research has also shown the vast majority of older people dont want to move.

More houses thanks. Not pipe dreams that wont dent the surface.
It always struck me as strange how immobile we are in Ireland. Even in England you usually move out for uni and it’s much more common to retire and downsize in a totally different area. In Ireland a lot of people live at home for college, stay at home until their 30’s, buy a starter house then upgrade to a larger family house then aim to stay there until they die. I think there’s a lack of developments in Dublin aimed at people looking to downsize - small cul de sacs of bungalows close to a town centre. The planners could help with this but they’d probably end up costing too much.
It depends on where you are brought up I guess. If you from somewhere rural you often don't have a choice about moving if you want to get a decent job or go to university. UK like the states has a culture of people moving to go to UNI and would have who areas of cities which would be mainly made up of student accomadaton like say Headingly in Leeds. We don't have anything really similar here especially in Dublin.
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Luckycharmer
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Luckycharmer »

Duff Paddy wrote:
Luckycharmer wrote:
Duff Paddy wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.

Hav UK mg alot of success with apartment block planning out your way? Research has also shown the vast majority of older people dont want to move.

More houses thanks. Not pipe dreams that wont dent the surface.
It always struck me as strange how immobile we are in Ireland. Even in England you usually move out for uni and it’s much more common to retire and downsize in a totally different area. In Ireland a lot of people live at home for college, stay at home until their 30’s, buy a starter house then upgrade to a larger family house then aim to stay there until they die. I think there’s a lack of developments in Dublin aimed at people looking to downsize - small cul de sacs of bungalows close to a town centre. The planners could help with this but they’d probably end up costing too much.
Why do you assume older people want to move closer to town. My mum is currently downsizing and last thing she would want to do is live closer to town.

To be less isolated. Closer to shops, GP, church, post office etc. If they are outside of town and the GP puts them off the road due to eyesight they are in trouble.
Every suburb in Dublin has all of the above. I am guessing you are talking about people who live in rural regions.
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nardol
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by nardol »

We need more towns with city facilities. Greystones would be perfect only its now too expensive and you would downsize for double the price of your existing home.

Places like wexford would be perfect if they upped the facilities. Maybe improve the rail line for the monthly visit to St Vincent's.

It does happen. I know of 2 people who have downsized to wexford and numerous to West Cork. Some have moved back up to live with children when husbands have died. Loneliness is probably their biggest fear.
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Luckycharmer »

nardol wrote:We need more towns with city facilities. Greystones would be perfect only its now too expensive and you would downsize for double the price of your existing home.

Places like wexford would be perfect if they upped the facilities. Maybe improve the rail line for the monthly visit to St Vincent's.

It does happen. I know of 2 people who have downsized to wexford and numerous to West Cork. Some have moved back up to live with children when husbands have died. Loneliness is probably their biggest fear.
Were they couples? I know someone who downsized from Rathfarnham to Blackrock and were back in Rathfarnham within 2 years as too far away from family etc. Grass isn't always greener and really depends on what you are involved in where you currently live.
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nardol
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by nardol »

Duff Paddy wrote:
CM11 wrote:There's a lot of people who are in emergency accommodation. Arguing over the number is just petty point scoring. What I'd like is for the charities to stop equating homelessness and rough sleeping.

A bit of honesty would actually help because the right discussions could then be had.
Fully agree. We all know there aren’t 15,000 genuinely homeless. At the same time we do have an issue with rough sleepers, beggars, children being raised in hotels. Yes I know it is all relative but these are still issues facing our society that should be dealt with. The charities have become a bit of a monster and they don’t appear to be making much progress given their resources.
Move out the country and you are guaranteed a house.
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nardol
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by nardol »

Luckycharmer wrote:
nardol wrote:We need more towns with city facilities. Greystones would be perfect only its now too expensive and you would downsize for double the price of your existing home.

Places like wexford would be perfect if they upped the facilities. Maybe improve the rail line for the monthly visit to St Vincent's.

It does happen. I know of 2 people who have downsized to wexford and numerous to West Cork. Some have moved back up to live with children when husbands have died. Loneliness is probably their biggest fear.
Were they couples? I know someone who downsized from Rathfarnham to Blackrock and were back in Rathfarnham within 2 years as too far away from family etc. Grass isn't always greener and really depends on what you are involved in where you currently live.
Interesting that blackcock is considered too far away.

I suppose Irish people would be a lot more family orientated than others. Definitely more so than the Dutch.
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Duff Paddy
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Duff Paddy »

Do you go to Blackcock often :lol:
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HighKingLeinster
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by HighKingLeinster »

:lol:

Thats one hell of an autocorrect
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by anonymous_joe »

Nolanator wrote:
anonymous_joe wrote:A public service fúcked up, some women died.
Those two statements are unrelated.
Not the finding of the RCOG.

Nor has the High Court found there was no relationship between errors and people's health.

It seems to cause a lot of confusion here, so let me clear, not all mistakes are negligent, but some mistakes are negligent.
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camroc1
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by camroc1 »

anonymous_joe wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
anonymous_joe wrote:A public service fúcked up, some women died.
Those two statements are unrelated.
Not the finding of the RCOG.

Nor has the High Court found there was no relationship between errors and people's health.

It seems to cause a lot of confusion here, so let me clear, not all mistakes are negligent, but some mistakes are negligent.
And what "mistakes" were made when the stats of the Irish screening system, are the same as its international peers ?
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by lorcanoworms »

Duff Paddy wrote:
Luckycharmer wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:And thinking a retired couple out in the burbs will go into a two bed apartment in town is not the answer.
Doesn't have to be in town.
A neighbour of my grandparents in Goatstown moved out of the family semi-d and into a new apartment complex around the corner after his wife died. Still lived in the same approximate neighbourhood but in something that he could manage. Family home was sold.
It depends problem with appartments are they are quite isolating, no real neighbourhood spirit. Often people don't know their neighbours, there are often problems with parking and can have large yearly management fees.
Why would a retired couple want to move into town when their whole lives revolves around the suburb they have lived in.
There’s often soundproofing problems in Irish apartments too
Agree soundproofing is a big problem.
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Leinsterman
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Leinsterman »

WORLD CLASS WHINGE to start off the day.
Stjudes
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Stjudes »

"It was 2008 when I moved to Dublin. I doubled the pay-check I'd been getting in Belfast and my husband and I (then boyfriend and girlfriend) moved into a swanky D4 apartment at a not-unreasonable €1,300 a month. Over the next few years we embraced city life with its gigs, theatres, brunches and dinners. I visited art exhibitions, pop-up events and hopped on and off the Dart, never too bothered if it was crowded or a little late. As far as I was concerned, Dublin city life was wonderful.

Then we had kids and all changed, changed utterly.

Dublin is not a family-friendly place to live."

Why save my money when I can blame someone else?
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Leinsterman
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Post by Leinsterman »

"Kids are expensive" - she deserves a doctorate for that level of insight.
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danthefan
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Post by danthefan »

We looked further afield in Fingal but found that limited public transport options and little in the way of amenities, ruled out many locations for our one-car family.
Not enough amenities you say?
Earlier this year we moved in to a new-build, four-bed, detached home in a village, 20 miles outside Belfast in Co Down.
Ah yeah 20 miles outside of Belfast is a real amenity hotspot I heard.


I dunno how anyone with an ounce of self-awareness can put their name to one of these pieces. This one isn't quite as bad as that one who moved from New York to Belfast but it's not far off.
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Leinsterman
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Post by Leinsterman »

And the husband is now a contributor to the property mess by Airbnbing a few days a week because he's still working in Dublin. You couldn't make it up :lol:
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The Sun God
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by The Sun God »

Leinsterman wrote:WORLD CLASS WHINGE to start off the day.
Living in a Capital City = expensive. Living in a village outside a shithole provincial town = easy..... Why do newspapers like the Indo print that kind of shite ?
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Leinsterman
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Leinsterman »

"We have concerns over Brexit"

They'll be the first to whinge if things turn out badly too.
"Nobody told us this could happen..."

I wish I could live my life with zero personal responsibility and look for answers to life from everyone else
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The Sun God
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by The Sun God »

Leinsterman wrote:"We have concerns over Brexit"

They'll be the first to whinge if things turn out badly too.
"Nobody told us this could happen..."

I wish I could live my life with zero personal responsibility and look for answers to life from everyone else
So they are double hedging with hubby still taking a salary from Ireland while she freelances in the UK.... I assume that HMRC and the revenue commissioners are fully appraised.
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paddyor
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Post by paddyor »

So mullet, I hear you’re a commie now, should we all be commies?
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camroc1
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Post by camroc1 »

The floppy haired one had a pretty decent article in the Times on Saturday about why, at the end of the day, GDP/GNI/GNI* didn't matter a damn when compared to the effects of FDI/MNCs on the ground in Ireland. And that jealousy plays its part in more sclerotic countries reaction to our success.
David McWilliams: Without multinationals, Ireland is a bad-weather Albania
Subscriber only
Multinationals have transformed Ireland for the better, plugging us into the globe
Sat, Dec 7, 2019, 06:00

David McWilliams

68
Before the multinationals: from 1921 to 1991 the Irish economy was the worst performer in western Europe; this photograph, by Hans Silvester of Gamma-Rapho, shows Toomey’s bar in Hollywood, Co Wicklow, in the 1950s


It’s easy to be a little perplexed by attitudes towards multinationals, given their transformative impact on our economy, their complete upgrading of our industrial base and the enormous capital and technological transfer their presence in Ireland has facilitated.

Economically, without multinational investment, Ireland would be Albania with brutal weather. Politically, without multinational commitment to Ireland, Ireland would likely have succumbed to the populist, nationalist, protectionist disease that is afflicting most western politics.

Ireland’s economic performance can be divided into two time zones; premultinationals and postmultinationals. In the premultinational period, from 1921 to 1991, when multinational investment was modest here, the Irish economy was the worst performer, in terms of income per head, in western Europe. Not the fifth-worst, not the third-worst; the worst. Since the multinationals began to select Ireland as a bridgehead into the EU, from the early 1990s onwards, Ireland has been the best performer economically in western Europe. Not the fifth best; the best.

Our national upswing is apparent not just from economic statistics but also from improvements in life expectancy, educational achievement and, critically, standard of living
This national upswing is apparent not just from economic statistics but also from improvements in life expectancy, educational achievement, the size of the middle classes and, critically, the standard of living. Ireland has experienced enormous social uplift, the most impressive in the EU, according to the Pew Research Institute.

The centre has not only held; it has also flourished – in direct contrast to the rest of the West, where the middle class has shrunk, leaving people unmoored. In Ireland a whole new multinational industrial base has been created.

The economic recovery from recession has the fingerprints of the multinationals all over it. The easiest way to see this is to compare Irish performance with that of our neighbours and then speculate why that difference might have arisen. What was going on here that wasn’t going on in other countries?


Taking national income in the period 2010 to 2018, whatever measure you use – whether gross domestic product (GDP), gross national income (GNI) or modified GNI – the Irish economy has grown much faster than those of our European neighbours. Multinationals play a major role in this story, both in distorting the figures and in having a material impact on the real economy. Two things can be true at the same time.

Some economists understandably get exercised about the exactness of the statistics and cite problems with multinational money coming in and out. These issues are legitimate. However, we should never forget that it’s far better to be roughly right than precisely wrong.


If evidence points to an upward trend then this is what is happening, and it’s better to see the big trend and be roughly accurate. If we’re nitpicking over the quality of the data, in the microscopic world of number-crunching, then we’ll miss the real story or lack the confidence to tie all the information together and make a big call.

When we examine the basic foundations of any economy – employment, labour-force growth and population – we see Ireland continually outperforming the rest of the EU. Again the multinationals are the missing link, present in Ireland, absent elsewhere.

All over the world there are conferences extolling the Irish model of tatty rags to reasonable riches
Let’s look at these basic foundations. Between 2010 and 2018, employment growth in Ireland has been nearly three times stronger than the EU average, our population growth has been twice the EU average over the period, and every year Ireland posts the most rapid growth in population in the EU. The difference between us and the rest is that there are far more multinationals here per capita than anywhere else. They plug us into the globe. Yet the critical positive role of the multinationals has been denigrated from almost every side.


The equality-concerned left sees them as errant tax-avoiders who don’t pay enough tax, which the left claims is inherently unfair. The fiscally concerned right worries that they actually pay far too much tax, which the right claims is inherently unstable.

Pro-European integrationists accuse them of smashing European solidarity by playing beggar-my-neighbour against our EU neighbours, while some of our EU neighbours, such as the Netherlands, have no problem playing the tax-arbitrage game deftly.

Across the water, English nationalists of the Brexit persuasion accuse us of trousering money that is rightfully theirs, while planning to set up a buccaneering low-tax haven as soon as they take Number 10. Scottish nationalists talk the language of the socialist Keir Hardie but admit they’ll pay for it by copying the Irish industrial policy of the capitalist Jack Welch.

All over the world there are conferences extolling the Irish model of tatty rags to reasonable riches, while here at home you could happily fill a talkshow with multinational-bashing.

Like all national conversations, there’s a bit of truth in all these positions, but – and this is a big but – policy is never black and white. Economic policy is ambiguous, operating in the grey. It regularly throws up uncomfortable dilemmas, particularly for those who prefer to take the side of the angels.

Today, western countries are mired in what the former US treasury secretary Larry Summers calls “secular stagnation”. This term describes an economic recovery that is extremely weak, because demand is not strong enough. It creates the conditions for populism all over the West because people feel threatened and they vote for those who promise to protect them.

Ireland has avoided this, which I believe is down to the much stronger performance of our economy. Multinationals boost internal demand with wages and employment. This difference in performance between us and the rest is driven by multinational investment, multinational jobs, multinational tax revenue and the dramatic upskilling of the Irish workforce associated with multinational corporations here.


In addition, people from the multinationals are heading out on their own, armed with the knowledge, contacts and experience garnered from working in a big corporation.

Small countries trade or die – simple. Multinationals have allowed us to trade
Many years ago, Ireland decided to transcend the limitation of geography, free itself of the tyranny of our own small market, break our dependency on Britain and play in the global world. We have done this with a decent degree of success. It is also our future.

Small countries trade or die – simple. Multinationals have allowed us to trade and have employed hundreds of thousands of us in the process.

In 1978, Deng Xiaoping, ushering in the opening of China, stated: “I don’t care whether the cat is black or white as long as it catches mice.” He meant that his job was to improve the lives of Chinese people and he didn’t care whether it was communism or capitalism that achieved this, so long as it did its job.

Maybe we might take this advice in the context of the multinationals. It is easy to criticise, from the certainty of the moral left and the righteous right, but we must be careful what we wish for, because plenty of countries would trade places with us right now and deal with their ambiguities. We live in a complicated, compromised world. All cats are grey in the dark. And we all live in the half-light
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EverReady
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Post by EverReady »

HighKingLeinster wrote::lol:

Thats one hell of an autocorrect
:lol: it all comes out in the wash
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nardol
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Post by nardol »

EverReady wrote:
HighKingLeinster wrote::lol:

Thats one hell of an autocorrect
:lol: it all comes out in the wash
Its a new phone... It hasn't had time to learn my words yet :uhoh:
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camroc1
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Post by camroc1 »

The Sun God wrote:
Leinsterman wrote:"We have concerns over Brexit"

They'll be the first to whinge if things turn out badly too.
"Nobody told us this could happen..."

I wish I could live my life with zero personal responsibility and look for answers to life from everyone else
So they are double hedging with hubby still taking a salary from Ireland while she freelances in the UK.... I assume that HMRC and the revenue commissioners are fully appraised.
Hubbie got the short end of the straw, though. He AirBNB's in Dublin during the week, working all the hours he can to pay for her rural vision of domesticity, near enough to a city mind you, whilst she minds baby, has coffee mornings with her friends, and "freelances".

He'll be burnt out in 5 years.
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CM11
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by CM11 »

As always these things are presented in full out moan mode with no balance or context. For starters, it sounds like she moved back close to home. Also, LM's point about the husband, not only from a property perspective but also sounds like she's traded cheap toddler mornings with her husband getting more time with the kids (and herself). I love the bit about overpriced popcorn, did they go through their whole life up to that stage having never gone to the cinema? And just bring a bag with your own, ffs!

She's not wrong that there could be more for children indoors but she bitches about the zoo and then finishes with all the free outdoor stuff she could do with her kids. NI is cheaper, this isn't news and even cheaper again outside the city.

She lived in the most expensive part of Dublin initially and then found out she couldn't have the same lifestyle with kids in as nice an area. A well trodden path.
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EverReady
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by EverReady »

nardol wrote:
EverReady wrote:
HighKingLeinster wrote::lol:

Thats one hell of an autocorrect
:lol: it all comes out in the wash
Its a new phone... It hasn't had time to learn my words yet :uhoh:
Listen I am cool with a mans peccadillos and who hasn't wanted to be Linforded
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anonymous_joe
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by anonymous_joe »

camroc1 wrote:
anonymous_joe wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
anonymous_joe wrote:A public service fúcked up, some women died.
Those two statements are unrelated.
Not the finding of the RCOG.

Nor has the High Court found there was no relationship between errors and people's health.

It seems to cause a lot of confusion here, so let me clear, not all mistakes are negligent, but some mistakes are negligent.
And what "mistakes" were made when the stats of the Irish screening system, are the same as its international peers ?
The mistakes highlighted in the RCOG report.

The Roche v Peilow defence hasn't worked in decades.
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camroc1
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by camroc1 »

anonymous_joe wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
anonymous_joe wrote:
Nolanator wrote:
anonymous_joe wrote:A public service fúcked up, some women died.
Those two statements are unrelated.
Not the finding of the RCOG.

Nor has the High Court found there was no relationship between errors and people's health.

It seems to cause a lot of confusion here, so let me clear, not all mistakes are negligent, but some mistakes are negligent.
And what "mistakes" were made when the stats of the Irish screening system, are the same as its international peers ?
The mistakes highlighted in the RCOG report.

The Roche v Peilow defence hasn't worked in decades.
Spell them out, if you don't mind ?
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Blackrock Bullet
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Blackrock Bullet »

Saw some of Dublin Landings incl the new hotel up close, the finish is really brilliant. Hopefully Ballymore do the same at Connolly.
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CM11
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by CM11 »

You mean a screening process that you take part in knowing that mistakes can happen has actually been proven to be a screening process where mistakes happen?

Call the press!!

If I take part in a screening process where I'm told that they're trying to catch signs of me being sick before I'm actually sick but sometimes we don't see it and they tell me that they couldn't see any signs but I need to look out for symptoms myself, I'm not going to turn around and start accusing the same people of not diagnosing me with something I didn't even have at the time.

It is terrible that we can't have a 100% accurate system but we can't. The whole point of the thing is that things are missed. That's the very definition of a false negative.
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camroc1
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by camroc1 »

Blackrock Bullet wrote:Saw some of Dublin Landings incl the new hotel up close, the finish is really brilliant. Hopefully Ballymore do the same at Connolly.
Amongst the best of the recent buildings in Dublin.

Image
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Floppykid
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Re: Rugby NAMA thread Revisited Rugby

Post by Floppykid »

CM11 wrote:You mean a screening process that you take part in knowing that mistakes can happen has actually been proven to be a screening process where mistakes happen?

Call the press!!

If I take part in a screening process where I'm told that they're trying to catch signs of me being sick before I'm actually sick but sometimes we don't see it and they tell me that they couldn't see any signs but I need to look out for symptoms myself, I'm not going to turn around and start accusing the same people of not diagnosing me with something I didn't even have at the time.

It is terrible that we can't have a 100% accurate system but we can't. The whole point of the thing is that things are missed. That's the very definition of a false negative.
Thank Christ's Fat Cock for solicitors is all I'll say.
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