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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 8:55 pm 
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Petrol companies

Prices have dropped, considerably, the obvious price gouging by these companies should be stomped out for good after this is over. They have been milking it this entire time.

Fast food companies

I think everyone would agree that eating at home is alot less expensive and greater for your overall health. May it stay that way, our country could do without greasey chicken and chips, maccas etc.

Company operations

It seems so ridiculous to believe that in 2020 where we have the technology, that most office type jobs don't work from home as the norm! Not only does this reduce congestion on our roads, but provides greater flexibility and more than likely increase productivity. The days of droning to work like a worker ant should be over for some. Anybody that has access to the internet, computer, phone and a headset can and should work from home.

Television and newspapers

The scaremongering, misinformation, and lack of any real substance are forcing people to either resort to streaming entertainment, going outside for walks and exercise, spending quality time with family, or doing actual work around the house or occupation. Nobody really pays attention to the media noise that's propogating certain agendas to brainwash people. We just want to see our leaders do their jobs and officials speak using their own words, unparaphrased, no spin or opinion pieces.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 8:59 pm 
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I think the price of oil might have fallen a wee bit recently.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:16 pm 
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Company operations

It seems so ridiculous to believe that in 2020 where we have the technology, that most office type jobs don't work from home as the norm! Not only does this reduce congestion on our roads, but provides greater flexibility and more than likely increase productivity. The days of droning to work like a worker ant should be over for some. Anybody that has access to the internet, computer, phone and a headset can and should work from home.


I think it's too early to tell if the workforce is more productive from working at home. But if they are are productive and if efficiencies are discovered, I expect there will be changes to arrangements.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:19 pm 
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Gavin Duffy wrote:
I think the price of oil might have fallen a wee bit recently.


Don't let facts get in the way of an uninformed rant.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:20 pm 
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Journalists are useless activists. People on furlough drink too much.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:22 pm 
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Yea, I'll stick with my cabbage/couch multi theory


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:24 pm 
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I hate working from home. I like seeing my colleagues, I like putting on a suit in the morning to differentiate between work and leisure, I like seeing my clients face to face in a meeting, I even enjoy the drive to and from work.

At home, I am shut up in the top floor room, trying to do my job with the kids, cut off from my physical files (wet ink is still important for a lot of documents) and having a ton of distractions that simply don't exist in my workplace.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:25 pm 
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Leinsterman wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
I think the price of oil might have fallen a wee bit recently.


Don't let facts get in the way of an uninformed rant.

New Zealand is one of the most expensive places to purchase petrol in the world. Regardless of the current crude oil price we still don't see it drop any more than 5c/litre . And we have our own oil fields ffs!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:27 pm 
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:yawn:


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:28 pm 
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The Man Without Fear wrote:
I hate working from home. I like seeing my colleagues, I like putting on a suit in the morning to differentiate between work and leisure, I like seeing my clients face to face in a meeting, I even enjoy the drive to and from work.

At home, I am shut up in the top floor room, trying to do my job with the kids, cut off from my physical files (wet ink is still important for a lot of documents) and having a ton of distractions that simply don't exist in my workplace.


I agree to a certain extent but I’d favour 3/2 office to working from home schedule.
Plus under normal circumstances the kids would be at school/child minders, so working from home would be a f**k load easier.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:35 pm 
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how sexually frustrated a lot of boredies are.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:36 pm 
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The Man Without Fear wrote:
I hate working from home. I like seeing my colleagues, I like putting on a suit in the morning to differentiate between work and leisure, I like seeing my clients face to face in a meeting, I even enjoy the drive to and from work.

At home, I am shut up in the top floor room, trying to do my job with the kids, cut off from my physical files (wet ink is still important for a lot of documents) and having a ton of distractions that simply don't exist in my workplace.


I struggle to work from home. I've never been very good at self motivating and find myself going for walking tours of the house multiple times per day.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:41 pm 
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merry! wrote:
how sexually frustrated a lot of boredies are.

Now that's called projecting


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:46 pm 
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happyhooker wrote:
merry! wrote:
how sexually frustrated a lot of boredies are.

Now that's called projecting

it's not me being angsty and frustrated.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:47 pm 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:
I hate working from home. I like seeing my colleagues, I like putting on a suit in the morning to differentiate between work and leisure, I like seeing my clients face to face in a meeting, I even enjoy the drive to and from work.

At home, I am shut up in the top floor room, trying to do my job with the kids, cut off from my physical files (wet ink is still important for a lot of documents) and having a ton of distractions that simply don't exist in my workplace.


I agree to a certain extent but I’d favour 3/2 office to working from home schedule.
Plus under normal circumstances the kids would be at school/child minders, so working from home would be a f**k load easier.

I'd go with 3 home and 2 office. M W F at home.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:48 pm 
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merry! wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
merry! wrote:
how sexually frustrated a lot of boredies are.

Now that's called projecting

it's not me being angsty and frustrated.
Thought you were a virgin tbh.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:48 pm 
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Couch wrote:
Leinsterman wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
I think the price of oil might have fallen a wee bit recently.


Don't let facts get in the way of an uninformed rant.

New Zealand is one of the most expensive places to purchase petrol in the world. Regardless of the current crude oil price we still don't see it drop any more than 5c/litre . And we have our own oil fields ffs!


You do realise that a lot of the price of fuel is taxes


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:50 pm 
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Gavin Duffy wrote:
merry! wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
merry! wrote:
how sexually frustrated a lot of boredies are.

Now that's called projecting

it's not me being angsty and frustrated.
Thought you were a virgin tbh.

how old are you?


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:53 pm 
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Couch wrote:
Petrol companies

Prices have dropped, considerably, the obvious price gouging by these companies should be stomped out for good after this is over. They have been milking it this entire time.

Fast food companies

I think everyone would agree that eating at home is alot less expensive and greater for your overall health. May it stay that way, our country could do without greasey chicken and chips, maccas etc.

Company operations

It seems so ridiculous to believe that in 2020 where we have the technology, that most office type jobs don't work from home as the norm! Not only does this reduce congestion on our roads, but provides greater flexibility and more than likely increase productivity. The days of droning to work like a worker ant should be over for some. Anybody that has access to the internet, computer, phone and a headset can and should work from home.

Television and newspapers

The scaremongering, misinformation, and lack of any real substance are forcing people to either resort to streaming entertainment, going outside for walks and exercise, spending quality time with family, or doing actual work around the house or occupation. Nobody really pays attention to the media noise that's propogating certain agendas to brainwash people. We just want to see our leaders do their jobs and officials speak using their own words, unparaphrased, no spin or opinion pieces.


It's also exposed humaity is ncier and more caring than many would believe. Monibot has a good article on it,

Quote:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... s-covid-19

The horror films got it wrong. This virus has turned us into caring neighbours
George Monbiot

Across the world, Covid-19 has triggered community action on a vast scale. It’s a powerful riposte to both government and private money

Tue 31 Mar 2020 15.10 BSTLast modified on Wed 1 Apr 2020 08.13 BST
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You can watch neoliberalism collapsing in real time. Governments whose mission was to shrink the state, to cut taxes and borrowing and dismantle public services, are discovering that the market forces they fetishised cannot defend us from this crisis. The theory has been tested, and almost everywhere abandoned. It may not be true that there were no atheists in the trenches, but there are no neoliberals in a pandemic.

The shift is even more interesting than it first appears. Power has migrated not just from private money to the state, but from both market and state to another place altogether: the commons. All over the world, communities have mobilised where governments have failed.

In India, young people have self-organised on a massive scale to provide aid packages for “daily wagers”: people without savings or stores, who rely entirely on cash flow that has now been cut off. In Wuhan, in China, as soon as public transport was suspended, volunteer drivers created a community fleet, transporting medical workers between their homes and hospitals.

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In South Africa, communities in Johannesburg have made survival packs for people in informal settlements: hand sanitiser, toilet paper, bottled water and food. In Cape Town, a local group has GIS mapped all the district’s households, surveyed the occupants, and assembled local people with medical expertise, ready to step in if the hospitals are overwhelmed. Another community in the city has built washstands in the train station and is working to turn a pottery studio into a factory making sanitiser.

In the US, HospitalHero connects healthcare workers who don’t have time to meet their own needs with people who can offer meals and accommodation. A group called WePals, created by an eight-year-old, sets up virtual play dates for children. A new website, schoolclosures.org, finds teaching, meals and emergency childcare for overstretched parents. A network called Money During Corona texts news of job opportunities to people looking for work.


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In Norway, a group of people who have recovered from Covid-19 provide services that would be dangerous for non-immune people to offer. In Belgrade volunteers organise virtual coffee mornings and crisis counselling. Students in Prague are babysitting the children of doctors and nurses. Estates in Dublin have invented balcony bingo: the caller sits in the square between the blocks of flats with a large speaker, while the players sit on their balconies, taking down the numbers.

In the UK, thousands of mutual aid groups have been picking up shopping and prescriptions, installing digital equipment for elderly people and setting up telephone friendship teams. A mothers’ running group in Bristol have restyled themselves “drug runners”, keeping fit by delivering medicines from chemists’ shops to people who can’t leave their homes. A virtual pub quiz organised on Facebook brought togethermore than 100,000 people.

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Rooftop aerobics, singing and letters: how communities are coping in coronavirus quarantine – video
Around the world, self-organised groups of doctors, technicians, engineers and hackers are crowdsourcing missing equipment and expertise. In Latvia, programmers organised a 48-hour hackathon to design the lightest face shield components that could be produced with a 3D printer. A number of UK groups are encouraging companies with protective equipment in their storerooms to give it to frontline health workers. In the Philippines, fashion designers have repurposed their workshops to produce protective suits. Sharing techniques through the website PatternReview, home sewers have been mass-producing masks and scrubs.

In just one week, a group of doctors, technicians and other experts organised themselves to design a crowdsourced ventilator, the OxVent, which can be produced from widely available parts for under £1,000. Another design, VentilatorPAL, can be manufactured for $370, according to the community of technicians that created it. The Coronavirus Tech Handbook is an open-source library pooling technologies and new organisational models for beating the pandemic. In the US, self-organised expert groups are filling some of the catastrophic gaps in public health provision, carrying out testing and tracking projects, creating directories of vulnerable people and speed-matching medical specialists with the hospitals that need them.

As an isolated older person, I've been deeply moved by the sacrifices of others
Dorothy Byrne
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The horror films got it wrong. Instead of turning us into flesh-eating zombies, the pandemic has turned millions of people into good neighbours.

In their book Free, Fair and Alive, David Bollier and Silke Helfrich define the commons as “a social form that enables people to enjoy freedom without repressing others, enact fairness without bureaucratic control … and assert sovereignty without nationalism”. The commons are neither capitalist nor communist, market nor state. They are an insurgency of social power, in which we come together as equals to confront our shared predicaments.

A thousand books and films and business fables assure us that the fairytale ending to which we should all aspire is to become a millionaire. Then we can isolate ourselves from society in a mansion with high walls, with private healthcare, private education and a private jet. The commons envisages the opposite outcome: finding meaning, purpose and satisfaction by working together to enhance the lives of all. In times of crisis, we rediscover our social nature.

You can tell a lot about a society from its quirks of language. We repeatedly misuse the word “social”. We talk about social distancing when we mean physical distancing. We talk about social security and the social safety net when we mean economic security and the economic safety net. While economic security comes (or should come) from government, social security arises from community. One of the extraordinary features of the response to Covid-19 is that, during this self-isolation, some people – especially elderly people – feel less isolated than they have done for years, as their neighbours ensure they are not alone.

Coronavirus and volunteering: how can I help in the UK?
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We still need the state: to provide healthcare, education and an economic safety net, to distribute wealth between communities, to prevent any private interest from becoming too powerful, and to defend us from threats. It currently performs these functions poorly, by design. But if we rely on the state alone, we find ourselves sorted into silos of provisioning and highly vulnerable to cuts. Rich social lives are replaced with cold, transactional relations. Community, then, is not a substitute for the state, but an essential complement.

There is no guarantee that this resurgence of collective action will survive the pandemic. We could revert to the isolation and passivity that both capitalism and statism have encouraged. But I don’t think we will. I have the sense that something is taking root now, something we have been missing: the unexpectedly thrilling and transformative force of mutual aid.

George Monbiot is a Guardian columnist


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:57 pm 
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jambanja wrote:
Couch wrote:
Leinsterman wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
I think the price of oil might have fallen a wee bit recently.


Don't let facts get in the way of an uninformed rant.

New Zealand is one of the most expensive places to purchase petrol in the world. Regardless of the current crude oil price we still don't see it drop any more than 5c/litre . And we have our own oil fields ffs!


You do realise that a lot of the price of fuel is taxes

Petrol companies still make around 60% profit margin still after tax. Name a business besides Apple that make that type of margin???


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:57 pm 
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merry! wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
merry! wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
merry! wrote:
how sexually frustrated a lot of boredies are.

Now that's called projecting

it's not me being angsty and frustrated.
Thought you were a virgin tbh.

how old are you?

GROOMING ALERT


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 9:57 pm 
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:lol:

twat.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:14 pm 
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It's also exposed humaity is ncier and more caring than many would believe. Monibot has a good article on it


Which would explain why you can't get toilet paper :roll:


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:23 pm 
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merry! wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:
merry! wrote:
happyhooker wrote:
merry! wrote:
how sexually frustrated a lot of boredies are.

Now that's called projecting

it's not me being angsty and frustrated.
Thought you were a virgin tbh.

how old are you?


A question you should ask yourself. You’re being an even bigger bellend than usual.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:25 pm 
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jambanja wrote:
Quote:
It's also exposed humaity is ncier and more caring than many would believe. Monibot has a good article on it


Which would explain why you can't get toilet paper :roll:

But you can get toilet paper :roll: our supermarkets are stacked


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:27 pm 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
Quote:
Company operations

It seems so ridiculous to believe that in 2020 where we have the technology, that most office type jobs don't work from home as the norm! Not only does this reduce congestion on our roads, but provides greater flexibility and more than likely increase productivity. The days of droning to work like a worker ant should be over for some. Anybody that has access to the internet, computer, phone and a headset can and should work from home.


I think it's too early to tell if the workforce is more productive from working at home. But if they are are productive and if efficiencies are discovered, I expect there will be changes to arrangements.


I'd read a headline in the past year of a study showing that the lost productivity made work from home not that great a sale to companies. Perhaps this crisis will change that. I mean I think a lot of companies would openly welcome work from home, especially ones that don't actually make anything: they don't have to have a building and all the costs that come with that, things like electricity use and wi-fi their employees are on the hook for paying. Occupational safety and OSHA become irrelevant if there's no workplace. There is a social utility of work that gets lost. One of my co-workers today told me he didn't know if he could handle this til June.

My company has had a daily check-in at the start of the day and at the end you write a list of what you worked on. Government contract so we have to keep an accurate timekeeping according to federal law.


Last edited by Flyin Ryan on Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:30 pm 
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mr bungle wrote:
A question you should ask yourself. You’re being an even bigger bellend than usual.

:roll:

who are you again?


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:30 pm 
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The horror films got it wrong. This virus has turned us into caring neighbours


I personally thing that is bollocks. We're nowhere near the levels of deprivation that horror films suggest during zombie/pandemic type tales.

I feel fairly confident that if there was barely any food on the supermarket shelves, strict curfews in place backed by the military, and that there were severe rations in place, people would change for the worse.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:42 pm 
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Gavin Duffy wrote:
I think the price of oil might have fallen a wee bit recently.

When though? Dont fluctuations usually take a while to hit the pumps?


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:44 pm 
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The Man Without Fear wrote:
I hate working from home. I like seeing my colleagues, I like putting on a suit in the morning to differentiate between work and leisure, I like seeing my clients face to face in a meeting, I even enjoy the drive to and from work.

At home, I am shut up in the top floor room, trying to do my job with the kids, cut off from my physical files (wet ink is still important for a lot of documents) and having a ton of distractions that simply don't exist in my workplace.

Right - but the kids wouldn't be there if you worked from home as the norm. Wet ink is still important because we still work in offices, if thwlat changed it would hardly be an insurmountable obstacle.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:47 pm 
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Couch wrote:
jambanja wrote:
Quote:
It's also exposed humaity is ncier and more caring than many would believe. Monibot has a good article on it


Which would explain why you can't get toilet paper :roll:

But you can get toilet paper :roll: our supermarkets are stacked


There is more to this world than just New Zealand besides you've missed the point completely, where was the nice caring side of humanity when people were panic buying whatever they could get there hands on?
The kind and caring people in society will always be the kind and caring ones, no matter the situation, I just happen to believe they are the exception rather than the rule


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:50 pm 
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Jeff the Bear wrote:
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The horror films got it wrong. This virus has turned us into caring neighbours


I personally thing that is bollocks. We're nowhere near the levels of deprivation that horror films suggest during zombie/pandemic type tales.

I feel fairly confident that if there was barely any food on the supermarket shelves, strict curfews in place backed by the military, and that there were severe rations in place, people would change for the worse.


My take it it as well, the one thing horror films and shows like the walking dead did get wrong was peoples desire for bog roll, not one film or episode showed people running around with shopping trolleys full of bog roll...not one :?:


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 10:51 pm 
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The cruise industry is a destructive farce.

It leaves a massive footprint in all of the planets oceans/seas and takes money from imbeciles so they can be corralled like sheep in small uncomfortable spaces, meanwhile being infected with every single virus or bug going around.
If there is a silver lining to this situation the death of the cruise industry may be it.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 11:00 pm 
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Two things I've noticed:

*more people out for walks / bikes (some could be that they're not working as much / at all, so have more free time)

*people sharing / connecting more online (I've seen more rugby webinars available from my country in the last two weeks than the last two years... and everyone says "Why haven't we been doing this already?")


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 11:05 pm 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:
I hate working from home. I like seeing my colleagues, I like putting on a suit in the morning to differentiate between work and leisure, I like seeing my clients face to face in a meeting, I even enjoy the drive to and from work.

At home, I am shut up in the top floor room, trying to do my job with the kids, cut off from my physical files (wet ink is still important for a lot of documents) and having a ton of distractions that simply don't exist in my workplace.


I agree to a certain extent but I’d favour 3/2 office to working from home schedule.
Plus under normal circumstances the kids would be at school/child minders, so working from home would be a f**k load easier.


I miss my work. I like the social aspect of it, and the banter of the team. It's been lovely being at home with the family, but the smallness of the circle has made me appreciate the wider interactions. I find myself craving what used to be an annoyance. Also, the coffee machine at work. I miss that most of all!

I miss sharing a beer with people. My wife doesn't drink and my kids are too young.

I miss rugby. I really do. I look forward to seeing a season up and running again. I look forward to going down to the stadium in Wellington to watch a game in the flesh. I want the normality again.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 11:05 pm 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
The Man Without Fear wrote:
I hate working from home. I like seeing my colleagues, I like putting on a suit in the morning to differentiate between work and leisure, I like seeing my clients face to face in a meeting, I even enjoy the drive to and from work.

At home, I am shut up in the top floor room, trying to do my job with the kids, cut off from my physical files (wet ink is still important for a lot of documents) and having a ton of distractions that simply don't exist in my workplace.


I agree to a certain extent but I’d favour 3/2 office to working from home schedule.
Plus under normal circumstances the kids would be at school/child minders, so working from home would be a f**k load easier.


I miss my work. I like the social aspect of it, and the banter of the team. It's been lovely being at home with the family, but the smallness of the circle has made me appreciate the wider interactions. I find myself craving what used to be an annoyance. Also, the coffee machine at work. I miss that most of all!

I miss sharing a beer with people. My wife doesn't drink and my kids are too young.

I miss rugby. I really do. I look forward to seeing a season up and running again. I look forward to going down to the stadium in Wellington to watch a game in the flesh. I want the normality again.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 11:07 pm 
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I'm going to hate working from home. Work is my social life.

So many friends are made in doing things you don't want to do - turning up for the daily grind. If friend making is left to designated social occasions - it's forced fabricated fun. It feels completely different.

Sometimes you don't know who your close mates are until 6 months down the line. It's not like have a drink, talk about the weather and what you do, and then you're best mates.

We are going to lose a massive sense of connection as a society.


Last edited by J Man on Wed Apr 01, 2020 11:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 11:10 pm 
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Yeah, yeah, we get it kiwidutchie.

Also, marrying someone who doesn't drink????


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 11:10 pm 
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The Man Without Fear wrote:
I hate working from home. I like seeing my colleagues, I like putting on a suit in the morning to differentiate between work and leisure, I like seeing my clients face to face in a meeting, I even enjoy the drive to and from work.

At home, I am shut up in the top floor room, trying to do my job with the kids, cut off from my physical files (wet ink is still important for a lot of documents) and having a ton of distractions that simply don't exist in my workplace.


Amen

And as for the argument in the OP that working from home would increase productivity -- umm, yeah, I highly doubt that.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 01, 2020 11:14 pm 
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J Man wrote:
I'm going to hate working from home. Work is my social life.

So many friends are made in doing things you don't want to do - turning up for the daily grind. If friend making is left to designated social occasions - it's forced fabricated fun. It feels completely different.

Sometimes you don't know who your close mates are until 6 months down the line. It's not like have a drink, talk about the weather and what you do, and then you're best mates.

We are going to lose a massive sense of connection as a society.


Bang on

I'm glad others see it the way I do, 'cause when this all started it seemed like almost everyone was ecstatic about the prospect of working from home. Not me.


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