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Whos Going to Lead the Labor Rabble
Albo 38%  38%  [ 5 ]
Plibbers 8%  8%  [ 1 ]
Bowen 8%  8%  [ 1 ]
Chalmers 23%  23%  [ 3 ]
Uncle Tony 8%  8%  [ 1 ]
Clive Palmer 15%  15%  [ 2 ]
George Smith 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 13
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 5:34 am 
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guy smiley wrote:
kiwinoz wrote:
AC very true , NSW already looking at loosening restrictions by May. If Vic and Qld go down a similar path then Federal Govt becomes irrelevant again.


We’re watching a delicate Fandango between state and federal govts throughout this crisis. It’s interesting, to put it mildly.

A brave and progressive govt would seize the chance to reform heavily now knowing public sentiment will support good initiative regardless of scare campaigns. I don’t think the Coalition are that party.

I’m working in SA. Our site is viable and operating but there has been a lot of pressure from the state govt regarding isolation and healthy distancing practises. You get the feeling any slip up could see it closed down, a massively expensive exercise in itself not to mention the loss of revenue. I’m currently on enforced leave, in semi isolation in a hotel in Adelaide after working a month straight. Like many, I can’t go home due to isolation policies at both ends. While I’ve been here new rosters have been rolled out and it looks like the whole site will move to 2&2 rosters. A fortnight on and off... I’m guessing they’ll pay for accommodation for those of us stranded in SA. That’s a massive expense of course but it keeps the operation viable and revenue flowing for the owner and the state.

This looks like being our world for now. A lot of guys are talking about leaving. I’m just grateful to have a job.

That sounds kinda dismal, even allowing for your continued employment. Try not go madder than is already the case.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 5:37 am 
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Negative gearing only works for people with lots of cash/assets - you still have to pay up front for stuff.

I'd be happy to see it grandfathered and removed.

It will still take more than Covid 19 to generate action on Family Trusts though :frown:


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 7:42 am 
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kiwinoz wrote:
AC very true , NSW already looking at loosening restrictions by May. If Vic and Qld go down a similar path then Federal Govt becomes irrelevant again.



Federal Government will never become irrelevant when it holds the big bucket of tax revenue.



Incidentally, "states rights" has been a rallying cry for the hard right for as long as I can remember.



So I do not think it is all that simple. The IPA, for example, will be absolutely delighted to see the states going their own way.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 7:45 am 
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wamberal99 wrote:
kiwinoz wrote:
AC very true , NSW already looking at loosening restrictions by May. If Vic and Qld go down a similar path then Federal Govt becomes irrelevant again.

Federal Government will never become irrelevant when it holds the big bucket of tax revenue.

Incidentally, "states rights" has been a rallying cry for the hard right for as long as I can remember.

So I do not think it is all that simple. The IPA, for example, will be absolutely delighted to see the states going their own way.

Correct.

I think AC was on a semi-troll, and gathered a following in his wake.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 7:49 am 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
Pat the Ex Mat wrote:
Watching them squeal on the news was a great example of Schadenfreude!

"But, we're not like the other Unemployed"!


There was a young, professional looking woman on TV the other night, newly unemployed, sobbing hysterically and saying that she always thought she was better than people who were on the dole. It was confronting and hilarious in equal measures.

:nod:


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 7:52 am 
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kiap wrote:
wamberal99 wrote:
kiwinoz wrote:
AC very true , NSW already looking at loosening restrictions by May. If Vic and Qld go down a similar path then Federal Govt becomes irrelevant again.

Federal Government will never become irrelevant when it holds the big bucket of tax revenue.

Incidentally, "states rights" has been a rallying cry for the hard right for as long as I can remember.

So I do not think it is all that simple. The IPA, for example, will be absolutely delighted to see the states going their own way.

Correct.

I think AC was on a semi-troll, and gathered a following in his wake.


I wasn't trolling. I said that in the wake of this crisis, "COVID-19 will change the way Australians look at our Federation and governance". I said that the Federal govt's powers are supreme when its business as usual, because they get to decide who get's what slice of the taxation and economic pie. They decide our economic winners and losers. However in times of crisis it's increasingly the states who have to make the big decisions and who control all the key services that save lives and support people.

The Federal government has been reduced to a money dispenser right now, all Morrison has to talk about at his pressers is who he's giving borrowed money to. The Premiers are the ones talking about the hospitals, service provision, how schools will run and the new laws & restrictions that police will be enforcing. We're not even following national COVID-19 tables any more, we are following state by state.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 8:00 am 
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Just wait a while and you will see.

wamberal99 wrote:
We are all socialists now!!!


Yeah, definitely swinging to a socialist phase now after an excess peak capitalism over decades.

Yin and yang. I think it's not possible to get exclusively either - even under (say) a Kim Jong-un, to extend the metaphor.

The interesting question for me is what happens in America ... perhaps eventually a new New Deal?


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 8:33 am 
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kiap wrote:
Just wait a while and you will see.

wamberal99 wrote:
We are all socialists now!!!


Yeah, definitely swinging to a socialist phase now after an excess peak capitalism over decades.



The Country/National Party has always been bloody socialist when it suited them. In fact the coalition was extremely protectionist during the sixties in particular. There was little real competition in many important industries. Steel making for example. BHP had a monopoly, they papered it over a bit by having a few different names on their facilities.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 12:42 pm 
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wamberal99 wrote:
kiap wrote:
Just wait a while and you will see.

wamberal99 wrote:
We are all socialists now!!!


Yeah, definitely swinging to a socialist phase now after an excess peak capitalism over decades.



The Country/National Party has always been bloody socialist when it suited them. In fact the coalition was extremely protectionist during the sixties in particular. There was little real competition in many important industries. Steel making for example. BHP had a monopoly, they papered it over a bit by having a few different names on their facilities.

Yes, Black Jack McEwen was the Master of Tarrifs. The Whitlam Government began chipping away at that vast edifice only to be replaced by a Fraser regime that did nowt.

The second coming of the ALP - the Keating Government especially - drove a stake through its heart.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 11:17 pm 
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MungoMan wrote:

Yes, Black Jack McEwen was the Master of Tarrifs. The Whitlam Government began chipping away at that vast edifice only to be replaced by a Fraser regime that did nowt.

The second coming of the ALP - the Keating Government especially - drove a stake through its heart.



IMHO the single person who did most to get rid of protectionism was a conservative politician. Bert Kelly was his name, he had been in Gorton's ministry for a while. I am a bit hazy about why he got out, maybe he lost his seat, but he began writing a wonderful column for the AFR, under the nom de guerre of "Modest Farmer", pointing out the true costs of protectionism, example after example, on and on, for bloody years. Drip, drip, drip.


I read it every week, it was absolutely brilliant, and I reckon it would have been a must-read for every serious follower of Federal politics.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 4:23 am 
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wamberal99 wrote:
MungoMan wrote:

Yes, Black Jack McEwen was the Master of Tarrifs. The Whitlam Government began chipping away at that vast edifice only to be replaced by a Fraser regime that did nowt.

The second coming of the ALP - the Keating Government especially - drove a stake through its heart.



IMHO the single person who did most to get rid of protectionism was a conservative politician. Bert Kelly was his name, he had been in Gorton's ministry for a while. I am a bit hazy about why he got out, maybe he lost his seat, but he began writing a wonderful column for the AFR, under the nom de guerre of "Modest Farmer", pointing out the true costs of protectionism, example after example, on and on, for bloody years. Drip, drip, drip.


I read it every week, it was absolutely brilliant, and I reckon it would have been a must-read for every serious follower of Federal politics.

Bloody hell! I now recall reading Fin Review columns by that fella godnose how many years ago. (Very kind of my employers to buy copies and leave then lying around).


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 5:38 am 
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MungoMan wrote:
Yes, Black Jack McEwen was the Master of Tarrifs. The Whitlam Government began chipping away at that vast edifice only to be replaced by a Fraser regime that did nowt.



I sat next to the late Margaret Whitlam on a flight back from Adelaide to Sydney on one memorable occasion. It was a party from beginning to end!! One memorable thing she said to me: "Gough was just not interested in economics, you know!" And he wasn't, of course. Treasury must have got him at a weak moment where his attention was on something more interesting and he just absent-mindedly agreed with them to get them out of his office!

Incidentally, the protectionism of the sixties was pretty much bipartisan. In the case of BHP, the unions were in absolutely lock step with them (I think the Ironworkers were the lead union?).


To give credit where it is due, Howard wholeheartedly supported the Keating reforms, he could have played politics, but he didn't.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:27 am 
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wamberal99 wrote:
MungoMan wrote:
Yes, Black Jack McEwen was the Master of Tarrifs. The Whitlam Government began chipping away at that vast edifice only to be replaced by a Fraser regime that did nowt.



I sat next to the late Margaret Whitlam on a flight back from Adelaide to Sydney on one memorable occasion. It was a party from beginning to end!! One memorable thing she said to me: "Gough was just not interested in economics, you know!" And he wasn't, of course. Treasury must have got him at a weak moment where his attention was on something more interesting and he just absent-mindedly agreed with them to get them out of his office!

Incidentally, the protectionism of the sixties was pretty much bipartisan. In the case of BHP, the unions were in absolutely lock step with them (I think the Ironworkers were the lead union?).


To give credit where it is due, Howard wholeheartedly supported the Keating reforms, he could have played politics, but he didn't.


The old FIA would almost certainly have been the major Union involved. You may remember it was headed for yonks by Laurie Short, a former Trotskyist who got so thoroughly sick of the Communist Party giving him grief he eventually ended up quite right-wing.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:44 am 
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MungoMan wrote:
The old FIA would almost certainly have been the major Union involved. You may remember it was headed for yonks by Laurie Short, a former Trotskyist who got so thoroughly sick of the Communist Party giving him grief he eventually ended up quite right-wing.



I worked at the Port Kembla steelworks in the sixties, the place was an absolute disgrace, the pollution had to be seen to be believed. The boss (not my direct boss, the top banana) was an alcoholic. The sales department did not do any actual selling, all they did was book orders and tell the grateful customers when their order would be ready.


As for Laurie's crew, it was well known that whenever a spot of maintenance needed to take place, he would call a strike so that the job could be done without the inconvenience of paying the workers for doing nothing.


Those were the days, my friend. :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 11:45 pm 
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Anyone know when the next unemployment figures will be released in Australia? It's as if media companies have been forbidden to discuss the jobless figures. I'm not blaming the Federal govt for how many people have lost their jobs but I'd like to know what the figure is, a quick search on google still says we're officially at 5.2% which is very outdated.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2020 12:19 am 
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I would have thought that the ABS would release figures like this? 6 million according to the ABC this morning.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2020 12:19 am 
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The old adage 'never waste a crisis' is certainly ringing true. The Coalition have always hated compulsory superannuation and in particular hated Industry super funds. The policy, made without industry consultation, to allow unemployed people to access their super tax free will have a disastrous effect on many super funds and weaken the entire sector.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2020 12:20 am 
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wamberal99 wrote:
I would have thought that the ABS would release figures like this? 6 million according to the ABC this morning.


In the past they've been released monthly but the last figures I can find are from early Feb.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2020 1:23 am 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
wamberal99 wrote:
I would have thought that the ABS would release figures like this? 6 million according to the ABC this morning.


In the past they've been released monthly but the last figures I can find are from early Feb.



I am absolutely not a statistician, but I could imagine that the sheer scale of the impact on the economy has meant that they have had to increase the sample size? But I sincerely doubt that they would be deliberately fudging the process. There is pretty much bipartisan agreement on most aspects of economic policy at the moment. It is actually in the interests of the major parties that the full grim picture is revealed.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2020 5:15 am 
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The ongoing and sustained ideological war on superannuation continues today in the Nine papers.

https://www.smh.com.au/money/super-and- ... 1586400625
Quote:
Super is for a rainy day, but we are in a cyclone
Tony Shepherd
April 9, 2020 — 12.43pm


The government is doing an outstanding job in keeping the economy going while the restrictions imposed appear to be flattening the infection curve, but it’s too early to say that with certainty. There is a limit to how much the government can borrow to deal with the economic challenges.

A simple non-budget solution would be to legislate so that for the next six months every salary and wage earner in Australia may choose to take their compulsory 9.5 per cent superannuation contribution in their pay packet. Compulsory contributions will automatically return to normal at the expiration of the legislation unless otherwise approved by Parliament.

That is equivalent to a 9.5 per cent overnight increase in pay available to every working Australian. An increase on which they will pay tax according to their tax bracket. There is no cost to government and, in fact, an increase in income tax revenue. There is no cost to business, which is important as many businesses are struggling to survive.

Theoretically the Australian annual GDP is approximately $2 trillion ($1.89 trillion in 2019) and wages and salaries are approximately 55 per cent of that - say $1 trillion a year. A 9.5 per cent increase is worth approximately $100 billion a year. Last year super contributions totalled $120 billion. Assuming conservatively that 50 per cent choose to keep paying into their super, that is an instant $50 billion to $60 billion per year increase in overall pay. This would be a much needed boost to a dissolving economy and just as importantly would give a lift to consumer and business confidence.

The super funds have $3 trillion under management. I understand that this could cause some short-term liquidity problems for the funds and in particular for the smaller funds. This is a better solution than eating into existing super balances at a time of depressed asset values. The Reserve Bank could establish a facility to help with any short-term liquidity problems. Given that compulsory contributions would commence again in six months, the funds are eminently bankable.

The super funds are a major portion of our savings pool. This is not a proposal to dip into the existing pool. It is a proposal to temporarily reduce the growth of the pool at a time of great economic and social distress. Most of business is suffering and are playing their part in keeping things going. It is not unreasonable to ask the super funds who have a rare, privileged position in our economy to make a short-term contribution. It is, after all, the members' money and they should have the opportunity to decide how they use it over a defined short period in these strained times.

I never thought I would see the day when average hard-working Australians were lining up at Centrelink. Our focus must be on keeping the economy going, helping the many who are suffering and then speeding up the recovery. An injection of $50 billion to $60 billion per annum or more into wages satisfies all three criteria without adding further to the growing deficit. Super is for a rainy day but we are in a cyclone. This is the people’s money and their future. It is a time for reality and not a time for paternalism.

Tony Shepherd is Chairman of GWS Giants and former President of the Business Council of Australia.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2020 7:36 am 
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Gosh, says business. We aren't paying our workers enough. What can we do about this?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 2:16 am 
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Shit seems to be going down in Tasmania. Two hospitals in Burnie have been completely closed down after a cluster of COVID-19 has emerged in Northwest Tasmania. Nearly 6,000 people have been placed into quarantine, which is comprised mainly of 1200 hospital workers and their families. Not ideal.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 2:32 am 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
Shit seems to be going down in Tasmania. Two hospitals in Burnie have been completely closed down after a cluster of COVID-19 has emerged in Northwest Tasmania. Nearly 6,000 people have been placed into quarantine, which is comprised mainly of 1200 hospital workers and their families. Not ideal.



And the CMO has just linked the outbreak to a rumored dinner party of medical staff. If that's actually true it beggars belief. The Covid-19 crisis really has outed a few selfish do as we say but not as we do types


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 2:34 am 
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Sundy wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:
Shit seems to be going down in Tasmania. Two hospitals in Burnie have been completely closed down after a cluster of COVID-19 has emerged in Northwest Tasmania. Nearly 6,000 people have been placed into quarantine, which is comprised mainly of 1200 hospital workers and their families. Not ideal.



And the CMO has just linked the outbreak to a rumored dinner party of medical staff. If that's actually true it beggars belief. The Covid-19 crisis really has outed a few selfish do as we say but not as we do types


The Tasmanian Premier savagely rebuked the CMO on television just minutes ago, saying that "dinner party" allegation was just a rumour.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 3:00 am 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
Sundy wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:
Shit seems to be going down in Tasmania. Two hospitals in Burnie have been completely closed down after a cluster of COVID-19 has emerged in Northwest Tasmania. Nearly 6,000 people have been placed into quarantine, which is comprised mainly of 1200 hospital workers and their families. Not ideal.



And the CMO has just linked the outbreak to a rumored dinner party of medical staff. If that's actually true it beggars belief. The Covid-19 crisis really has outed a few selfish do as we say but not as we do types


The Tasmanian Premier savagely rebuked the CMO on television just minutes ago, saying that "dinner party" allegation was just a rumour.



But on the other hand has asked the Tasmanian Police to investigate the rumour. Either way this could be a disaster for Tassie if they don't get on top of it.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 3:18 am 
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MungoMan wrote:
kiwinoz wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:
wamberal99 wrote:
We are all socialists now!!!


Those of us who vote Labor have been calling for higher taxation and better service provision for years. That's the platform that Bill Shorten took to the last election (actually he proposed lowering tax for the poor but increasing it for the wealthy) and he was rejected. There are thousands of Australians who voted for the Coalition who are now dealing with a grossly under-funded Centrelink and being cared for in underfunded hospitals. I hope they reflect on their choices.



Get rid of negative gearing. Let millenials buy their first home.

‘kenoath! Also, a general FÚCK YOU to the notion that the housing market=crucial aspect of ‘national wealth’. The prime function of the housing market should be providing housing to those that need it.


A friend of a friend on FB was whinging about the risk to them via their three rental properties. If you want to take advantage of 'the market' especially via an artificial device ie negative geared residential property, then you should be well aware of the concepts of market risks and failures. If you're not tough shit, it isn't a guaranteed investment.

Maybe they should offset income from the money provided by the feds against investment interest. In the interest of mutual obligation of course. The BCA guy should have been advocating a reduction in tax for capital gains against residential property.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 5:10 am 
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Brumbie_Steve wrote:
If you want to take advantage of 'the market' especially via an artificial device ie negative geared residential property, then you should be well aware of the concepts of market risks and failures. If you're not tough shit, it isn't a guaranteed investment.
.


That's pretty much, in a nutshell, how the liberals have maintained power for so long - look, we'll guarantee your investments.

With Franking credits, it's created an artificial market

Clever, sadly


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 7:05 am 
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The CMO has withdrawn his earlier comment about an illegal "dinner party" in Tasmania. Apparently the Nurses Union was not impressed with his flippant comment.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 7:40 am 
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Prime Minister Scott Morrison was interviewed by Chris Kenny on Sky News today, and he repeatedly said that he would like schools to open for all students and operate as normal. He repeated his often made claims that there is no risk to children from COVID-19 and that the economy depends on schools being open.

This is interesting for two reasons, firstly it shows clearly that the Premiers have acted against the Federal govt when it comes to schools. They ignored his demands, Victoria are open to children of 'essential workers' only for all of Term 2 and QLD has announced similar restrictions for the first half of Term 2. NSW is expected to follow the same route.

And secondly it shows that Morrison is still prioritising the economy over the health of Australians. It's not a coincidence that the curve has fattened markedly over the last couple of weeks when all states and territories have been on school holidays or Student Free Days.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 10:52 pm 
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Major cracks are once again emerging between the state and federal governments.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/paren ... b4aea8894a

We now have a PM who is openly at odds with the Premiers and states when it comes to schools. Scott Morrison is demanding that schools return to normal operations, and insisting that teachers and students are at no risk of catching COVID-19 in schools.

Image


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 11:49 pm 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
Major cracks are once again emerging between the state and federal governments.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/paren ... b4aea8894a

We now have a PM who is openly at odds with the Premiers and states when it comes to schools. Scott Morrison is demanding that schools return to normal operations, and insisting that teachers and students are at no risk of catching COVID-19 in schools.

Image

WTF!

Also how is that a 'lifestyle' story? I assume news.com.au is the Murdoch online news site?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 11:58 pm 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
Major cracks are once again emerging between the state and federal governments.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/paren ... b4aea8894a

We now have a PM who is openly at odds with the Premiers and states when it comes to schools. Scott Morrison is demanding that schools return to normal operations, and insisting that teachers and students are at no risk of catching COVID-19 in schools.

Image


Interesting poll results 49% for returning and 51% against, guess parents are either wanting kids to get back to school so they can get back to work or they're at their wits end, this is like school holidays on steroids...the bad kind


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 11:58 pm 
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UncleFB wrote:
WTF!

Also how is that a 'lifestyle' story? I assume news.com.au is the Murdoch online news site?


Yes it is.

The problem with today's spat is that it sends mixed messages to parents. I've been getting emails all morning from parents wanting to know if they should send their kids to school or not. Here in QLD we are open for parents who are working and who cannot make other supervision arrangements. It will be interesting to see how many students attend on Monday. If Scott Morrison had his way we would be open for 'business as usual' but that would not be aligned to all the other social distancing rules that are being imposed on Australian society.

Personally I think this is a political stunt by Morrison because he's copping from flack from the conservative media who are demanding an immediate economic 'snap back'.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:02 am 
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jambanja wrote:
Interesting poll results 49% for returning and 51% against, guess parents are either wanting kids to get back to school so they can get back to work or they're at their wits end, this is like school holidays on steroids...the bad kind


It would be both.

I am going to be at work regardless, so this doesn't impact me. But teachers and staff are genuinely worried about their health and safety right now. Beaches, playgrounds and parks are closed. We cannot gather in groups greater than two, funerals are reduced to ten attendees and weddings are reduced to five. All pubs, bars, restaurants and clubs are closed but we're been told it's perfectly fine to have 28 students together in a classroom. Those messages don't exactly align.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:09 am 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
UncleFB wrote:
WTF!

Also how is that a 'lifestyle' story? I assume news.com.au is the Murdoch online news site?


Yes it is.

The problem with today's spat is that it sends mixed messages to parents. I've been getting emails all morning from parents wanting to know if they should send their kids to school or not. Here in QLD we are open for parents who are working and who cannot make other supervision arrangements. It will be interesting to see how many students attend on Monday. If Scott Morrison had his way we would be open for 'business as usual' but that would not be aligned to all the other social distancing rules that are being imposed on Australian society.

Personally I think this is a political stunt by Morrison because he's copping from flack from the conservative media who are demanding an immediate economic 'snap back'.

This has been the main issue I've had with the entire Australian approach ... it's been mixed messages the entire time.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:13 am 
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UncleFB wrote:
This has been the main issue I've had with the entire Australian approach ... it's been mixed messages the entire time.


That's because quite early on the states realised that Morrison was too slow to act on anything, and so basically started making all the big decisions themselves. I'm just not sure how we can be in a position where you get fined $1600 for sitting on an empty park bench or gathering with more than one other person, but keeping 28 kids squashed together in a classroom for 6 hours is totally fine and healthy.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:23 am 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
UncleFB wrote:
This has been the main issue I've had with the entire Australian approach ... it's been mixed messages the entire time.


That's because quite early on the states realised that Morrison was too slow to act on anything, and so basically started making all the big decisions themselves. I'm just not sure how we can be in a position where you get fined $1600 for sitting on an empty park bench or gathering with more than one other person, but keeping 28 kids squashed together in a classroom for 6 hours is totally fine and healthy.

Agree.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:44 am 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
UncleFB wrote:
This has been the main issue I've had with the entire Australian approach ... it's been mixed messages the entire time.


That's because quite early on the states realised that Morrison was too slow to act on anything, and so basically started making all the big decisions themselves. I'm just not sure how we can be in a position where you get fined $1600 for sitting on an empty park bench or gathering with more than one other person, but keeping 28 kids squashed together in a classroom for 6 hours is totally fine and healthy.


Its been a cluster all round. We seem to be ok now, but looks like another cluster coming when the individual states do as they please either lifting or extending lockdowns.

At the start, I thought we were going to do well, Scomo had a press conference early on, and they were talking about a pandemic and being ready, before the WHO called it.

Turns out the WHO f*cked up, and Scomo has been sending mixed messages ever since that day.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:50 am 
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Sensible Stephen wrote:
Its been a cluster all round. We seem to be ok now, but looks like another cluster coming when the individual states do as they please either lifting or extending lockdowns.

At the start, I thought we were going to do well, Scomo had a press conference early on, and they were talking about a pandemic and being ready, before the WHO called it.

Turns out the WHO f*cked up, and Scomo has been sending mixed messages ever since that day.


In terms of data, we are doing well. But that's because the Premiers started making tough decisions whilst Morrison was still boasting about going to the footy. We have had a lockdown imposed on us by stealth, whilst our PM has simultaneously refused to even use the term 'lockdown' and spent almost the entirety of the pandemic encouraging parents to send their kids to school and demanding that businesses stay open. We are living in a strange world when people are getting fined $1600 for driving to get a take away coffee, from a coffee shop that is open and able to trade.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2020 1:30 am 
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Omg, just watched the Federal Education Minister Dan Tehan demand that schools stay open and insist that kids are perfectly safe, but then admit that his own kids were unlikely to attend school themselves. He got drilled by a coalition friendly Sky News anchor - complete car crash of an interview.


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