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 Post subject: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:16 am 
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Has anyone done this before or is currently doing it on here? How did you go about it? Is there anything you wish you'd known when you started out? What's your current situation, if so?

I've always been fascinated by the idea of being the master of my own destiny and living as self sufficiently as possible at some point down the track. Talking to a few good mates from uni about the current situation and the amount of uncertainty going forward in every way, now seems to be as good a time as any to start putting a plan like this in to action. We're still in the early planning stages right now, but the current idea is for a syndicate of four or five of us to buy a plot of land of maybe 4-5 acres somewhere in the Manawatu/Whanganui region (temperate, west coast location gives more reliable rainfall, relatively affordable land prices etc), get some solar panels, potentially a turbine, chickens, sheep, vege plot etc and essentially be as self sufficient as possible. We're still hammering out details right now but PR has never let me down in terms of obscure stuff people are up to and willing to give their 2c on. Any advice or experiences would be greatly appreciated :thumbup:


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:28 am 
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Will you continue to work and earn a wage or would you move to this property and support yourself with farming, hunting etc? That would be my concern, if you were still working then how would you have the time to do everything needed to maintain a self sustaining lifestyle? And if you didn't work, how will you access cash?


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:47 am 
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Ali's Choice wrote:
Will you continue to work and earn a wage or would you move to this property and support yourself with farming, hunting etc? That would be my concern, if you were still working then how would you have the time to do everything needed to maintain a self sustaining lifestyle? And if you didn't work, how will you access cash?


One member of the syndicate has a stake in their family business in the region so proximity to this is a further reason why we are keen on this location over others. Another is able to do their job remotely from home and the remaining two of us have an online business we are planning to run which isn't location dependent. The fifth potential member grew up on a farm and has worked on farms and ranches before so we are hoping to tap in to his expertise for livestock and other things we might have going on that front. All of us except for one (job in town) would be on site at all times. We have a fair chunk of cash saved already and our Kiwisaver accounts to pour in to this project. All of us were planning to get on the property ladder sooner rather than later anyway, this just seems like a good chance to do something all of us had wanted to do but had never had the right catalyst to get the ball rolling.

Theoretically, we want to be able to continue doing what we would be doing anyway with our lives, but basing ourselves on a small holding that is able to support our food needs and give us the sort of lifestyle we want in a sustainable way. None of us are envisaging being completely 100% totally self sustained, but the goal is to get as close to this as possible. There's nothing stopping us going in to town to the supermarket to buy things if we want, of course. But we feel NZ is endowed with a lot of natural resources (decent soil, sunshine, rainfall, clean air) that make this possible where it might not be in other parts of the world. All members of the syndicate except one currently live outside of NZ and feel that the time is right to make a go of this while none of us have families of our own or other aspects of accountability that might not make it possible otherwise.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:54 am 
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Make sure you nail down all the legal stuff over the land ownership between you first.
What happens if various people want out in the future etc etc.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:55 am 
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Good luck in your endeavours. I'd love to have the land and more importantly the skills to do this kind of thing.

I must admit to enjoying watching off-grid types in the UK and Canada as they go about setting up and transitioning to this way of life. Shawn James is a must watch for anyone who likes a bit of self reliance and outdoor lifestyle.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIMXKi ... q2UJePJEog
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5L_M7 ... 4FzEbwKCAg

These guys too:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX49PV ... e5mZe1LIyA


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:06 am 
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Am I the only one thinking what are you guys (I'm assuming the syndicate is 5 guys) going to do for sex?
Are you's all straight or gay?
I'd struggle to believe 5 straight guys could live off the grid together without taking a trip into town 2 or 3 nights a week to chase fanny. Then what happens if one of your group falls in love and wants to cash out?
Would be much more convenient if every one in the syndicate was gay tbf.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:12 am 
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By pure accident, we are actually not far away from self sufficiency for utilities, and have looked at making ourselves completely self sufficient.

We have not done anything yet, but are investigating.

We have a private water system. It uses high volume and flow speed to prevent freezing. High volume and flow speed is obviously exactly what you want for hydro so we could use the outflow.

At the moment we are only toying with the idea, but we have been looking at various options for pico hydro generators, one of which is a NZ design. Google pico /micro hydro generators.

Astonishingly small systems produce enough power to power a house. The problem is they do not produce enough at any one time. Batteries solve that issue, which can also take input from solar.

Our current heating is wood pellets. We have looked at harnessing a log boiler to the system with the pellet only kicking in when the log boiler was not operating. There are now log boilers that will sit outside and do not need a heat store as they self regulate the burn to match the demand. https://www.bfsheating.co.uk/wp-content ... -FINAL.pdf


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:19 am 
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If you want to continue to live a "normal life" I think you're vastly underestimating the amount of work involved


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:22 am 
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Another concern is how long would this 'syndicate' last until someones gets married, wants to have kids or just changes their mind? A better model might be to wait a bit and do this with a partner/spouse or your own family as they're more likely to be in it for the long haul.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:31 am 
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Glaston wrote:
Make sure you nail down all the legal stuff over the land ownership between you first.
What happens if various people want out in the future etc etc.



I assume you will be running projects together rather than each having your own chickens, separate water systems etc. If so you also have to consider in advance how you would go about kicking someone out. Say 4 of you are prepared to do the 16 hour days that might be required but the 5th only wants to do a 6 hour day.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:31 am 
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If you go into this make sure only you get an automatic gun. This will help with decision making later.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:33 am 
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Thinking about getting some tigers too. Nothing's off limits at this point.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:55 am 
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Can you give us a breakdown of the characters along with their personality traits? We could have a contest to see which one of you is most likely to have a breakdown, smear animal faeces on his face and machete the rest of you in the middle of the night.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:58 am 
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Mum mum does. She lives in the Wollemi forest on rain water and solar power. But she does have gas tanks delivered (they power the fridge and hot water system).

She's 75 years old and by herself, so if she can do it, I'm sure any of you blokes can.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 12:12 pm 
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Mog The Almighty wrote:
Mum mum does. She lives in the Wollemi forest on rain water and solar power. But she does have gas tanks delivered (they power the fridge and hot water system).

She's 75 years old and by herself, so if she can do it, I'm sure any of you blokes can.


Ha - the f**king legend :thumbup:


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 12:28 pm 
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I've been trying to figure out what a good balance looks like. I've been working in IT for about 20 years now and earning decent money - so the idea of transitioning hard into a self sufficient lifestyle scares me a bit - i'm way too soft for it.

About 8 years back - after burning out hard working for a large management consultancy company - i quit work and took a bit of time to chill. Ended up going to Oregon for 8 weeks and doing a Permaculture and Sustainable living skills course. It was f**king amazing - really enjoyed it and gave me the goo for more.

Returned to Ireland and set up my own company and started working as a contractor - saved a decent bit of cash in the company and bought 4 acres in the Dublin mountains about a 10/15 minute drive from my house.

Over the last 2/3 years I have been slowly working on the land, putting up a deer fence, planting trees and some fruit - just trying to get it slowly producing some food.

Am currently digging a pond as I have no water on the land (which is shit - if you are doing something like this - make sure you have a water source).

No idea where it will all end up - but I am hoping to ramp down the IT work and put more effort into the land over time. Planning restrictions mean i'll probably never be able to live there full time - but with a house 15 mins away that is no big issue really. I'll put some structure up there at some stage - a 'toolshed' which will happen to have a solid fuel burner, solar panels and a toilet/shower of some sort (probably outdoor) and just go from there.

I really am loving the work, loads of hard graft, mixed in with BBQ's and beers with my mates.

I think/hope it has the potential to be a decent lifestyle...hopefully transitioning to fully off the grid at some point...

Naki - I have a load of respect for anyone even considering your type of lifestyle change. I honestly think it is an amazing idea and with the way 'working' is changing these days it is a totally obtainable lifestyle that has huge benefits in terms of self reliance. Good luck with it - hope it all works out.

I think a lot of people are going to be looking at what is going on in the world at the moment and moving towards this kind of lifestyle.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 12:34 pm 
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fatcat wrote:
Can you give us a breakdown of the characters along with their personality traits? We could have a contest to see which one of you is most likely to have a breakdown, smear animal faeces on his face and machete the rest of you in the middle of the night.


Thinking more a Jim Jones character in there.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 12:44 pm 
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MrJonno wrote:
Glaston wrote:
Make sure you nail down all the legal stuff over the land ownership between you first.
What happens if various people want out in the future etc etc.



I assume you will be running projects together rather than each having your own chickens, separate water systems etc. If so you also have to consider in advance how you would go about kicking someone out. Say 4 of you are prepared to do the 16 hour days that might be required but the 5th only wants to do a 6 hour day.


We're still at the brainstorming stage right now but our initial thoughts are to have some general areas that we all take shared responsibility for while other areas might be more delegated to one specific person depending on skill set and level of enthusiasm. We aren't exactly sure which kinds of livestock we'd be running but definitely some chickens, sheep and possibly a cow or two. A lot would depend on the size of the section we buy and the gradient of the land etc as to what we can run and how many.

Regarding previous points about people dropping out, shacking up etc, we're planning to have a contract written out at the start with equal shares put in to the deposit on the land and clauses for if you want to cash out, what happens if someone dies etc. We would need to get wills written up and/or updated obviously. We're also planning to contribute a monthly contribution (unsure of specific amounts yet) to a 'hardship fund' if someone for whatever reason due to unforeseen reasons like sickness or death is unable to meet their financial obligations. This article here gave us a few ideas about other shared living arrangements and the idea for the hardship fund: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/home ... ing-a-home

A bit more context about the guys involved; we have all flatted together before in multiple circumstances both at uni and after. Three of the guys were at boarding school together and we've all been friends for a decade or more, traveled together, etc so the ties are fairly watertight we feel. In saying that, things do come up and relationships do sour, so we're thinking of appointing an outside arbitrator written in to the contract at the start to mediate any dispute that got out of hand and threatened the viability of the syndicate staying together. One of the guys involved is also a CFA who has been quite handy for running numbers by and what would and wouldn't be feasible in x or y situation. We are all currently single and there'd be clauses in the contract about having another half move in or what would happen in that situation.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 12:55 pm 
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Technically not 'off grid' but just getting 'back to the land' and essentially setting up your own commune or homestead then.

Friends in British Columbia kind of have something like this. Bought a small run-down farm and have slowly been fixing, clearing, etc. They started with the things that were quick to set up and get a return on: chickens. I can't remember what else they went with in the short term, but the first year spent spare time clearing land and got orchards in.

Both still have jobs, so it's very much a hobby farm and the intent was never to go off the grid, but to live a slower life and have some element of self-sufficiency.

The other bonus is that they rent a basement suite and the guest house to friends, so pull in upwards of $2000 a month from them (with obvious landlordly expenses)... and that's giving them a friends deal because rent for what those people have in terms of space and location is MUCH more in that part of BC.


As mentioned above - and I'm very interested in the 'homesteading' aspect myself - I think the crucial bit is to sort out the legal ownership / succession plan. I haven't really looked into it myself, but I suspect it has to start in whether or not the land you want can actually be zoned for multiple dwellings... then there's all the other stuff about utility bills (if not truly 'off grid') and upkeep / repair costs, division of labour, etc. let alone succession if someone wants out / dies.

I haven't followed a lot of stories of people doing this - and some of what you see on TV looks idyllic if you're big into nature - but I'm also a rural-raised history buff. I know that farms fail / have bad years, and that the pioneers had both a very hard life and often themselves were ruined. As such, I think it's wisest to go like my friends. Own your own plot, be smart about what you raise/grow (high yield/reliability/demand), go slow with developments, and rent to good people.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 12:59 pm 
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Edinburgh01 wrote:
By pure accident, we are actually not far away from self sufficiency for utilities, and have looked at making ourselves completely self sufficient.

We have not done anything yet, but are investigating.

We have a private water system. It uses high volume and flow speed to prevent freezing. High volume and flow speed is obviously exactly what you want for hydro so we could use the outflow.

At the moment we are only toying with the idea, but we have been looking at various options for pico hydro generators, one of which is a NZ design. Google pico /micro hydro generators.

Astonishingly small systems produce enough power to power a house. The problem is they do not produce enough at any one time. Batteries solve that issue, which can also take input from solar.

Our current heating is wood pellets. We have looked at harnessing a log boiler to the system with the pellet only kicking in when the log boiler was not operating. There are now log boilers that will sit outside and do not need a heat store as they self regulate the burn to match the demand. https://www.bfsheating.co.uk/wp-content ... -FINAL.pdf


That sounds like a solid setup you're running there - and the hydro generators sound really interesting, will definitely look in to those :thumbup:

Out of curiosity, how are you getting your water? Is it from a spring? Did you have to drill a bore?


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:01 pm 
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shabadoo wrote:
I've been trying to figure out what a good balance looks like. I've been working in IT for about 20 years now and earning decent money - so the idea of transitioning hard into a self sufficient lifestyle scares me a bit - i'm way too soft for it.

About 8 years back - after burning out hard working for a large management consultancy company - i quit work and took a bit of time to chill. Ended up going to Oregon for 8 weeks and doing a Permaculture and Sustainable living skills course. It was f**king amazing - really enjoyed it and gave me the goo for more.

Returned to Ireland and set up my own company and started working as a contractor - saved a decent bit of cash in the company and bought 4 acres in the Dublin mountains about a 10/15 minute drive from my house.

Over the last 2/3 years I have been slowly working on the land, putting up a deer fence, planting trees and some fruit - just trying to get it slowly producing some food.

Am currently digging a pond as I have no water on the land (which is shit - if you are doing something like this - make sure you have a water source).

No idea where it will all end up - but I am hoping to ramp down the IT work and put more effort into the land over time. Planning restrictions mean i'll probably never be able to live there full time - but with a house 15 mins away that is no big issue really. I'll put some structure up there at some stage - a 'toolshed' which will happen to have a solid fuel burner, solar panels and a toilet/shower of some sort (probably outdoor) and just go from there.

I really am loving the work, loads of hard graft, mixed in with BBQ's and beers with my mates.

I think/hope it has the potential to be a decent lifestyle...hopefully transitioning to fully off the grid at some point...

Naki - I have a load of respect for anyone even considering your type of lifestyle change. I honestly think it is an amazing idea and with the way 'working' is changing these days it is a totally obtainable lifestyle that has huge benefits in terms of self reliance. Good luck with it - hope it all works out.

I think a lot of people are going to be looking at what is going on in the world at the moment and moving towards this kind of lifestyle.


Cheers for sharing mate, that sounds like you have a good balance there for sure. And I totally agree that more people will be doing this going forward - that's why we want to be ahead of the curve on that front and not left wondering 'what if' or 'I wish we had' in 20 or 30 years down the track.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:02 pm 
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Did anyone ever end up buying this village in NZ? https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/home ... l-interest


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:05 pm 
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No interest in doing it myself, but stumbled across this guy's YouTube vids a few years ago which I found quite interesting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lD54W6cJKOM


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:16 pm 
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How much of a one-way ticket is it?

Have you though about retirement?


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:16 pm 
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You might also broaden your search by looking into tiny homes, slow movement, downshifting, homesteading, etc. as they will also have useful tips on certain aspects.

I'm really just interested in having a smaller home on a plot of land (not an actual 'tiny home' - lived in a 600 sq foot cottage near the beach last year for five months and it was great). I started following this blog years ago... it's still going strong, unlike many blogs, and occasionally has articles related to self-sustainability (just run a search for whatever). https://tinyhouseblog.com/blog/


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:19 pm 
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Nieghorn wrote:
Technically not 'off grid' but just getting 'back to the land' and essentially setting up your own commune or homestead then.

Friends in British Columbia kind of have something like this. Bought a small run-down farm and have slowly been fixing, clearing, etc. They started with the things that were quick to set up and get a return on: chickens. I can't remember what else they went with in the short term, but the first year spent spare time clearing land and got orchards in.

Both still have jobs, so it's very much a hobby farm and the intent was never to go off the grid, but to live a slower life and have some element of self-sufficiency.

The other bonus is that they rent a basement suite and the guest house to friends, so pull in upwards of $2000 a month from them (with obvious landlordly expenses)... and that's giving them a friends deal because rent for what those people have in terms of space and location is MUCH more in that part of BC.


As mentioned above - and I'm very interested in the 'homesteading' aspect myself - I think the crucial bit is to sort out the legal ownership / succession plan. I haven't really looked into it myself, but I suspect it has to start in whether or not the land you want can actually be zoned for multiple dwellings... then there's all the other stuff about utility bills (if not truly 'off grid') and upkeep / repair costs, division of labour, etc. let alone succession if someone wants out / dies.

I haven't followed a lot of stories of people doing this - and some of what you see on TV looks idyllic if you're big into nature - but I'm also a rural-raised history buff. I know that farms fail / have bad years, and that the pioneers had both a very hard life and often themselves were ruined. As such, I think it's wisest to go like my friends. Own your own plot, be smart about what you raise/grow (high yield/reliability/demand), go slow with developments, and rent to good people.


Yeah, you are right that the intention is not to go totally 'off the grid', but more 'back to the land'. That's a better way to put it.

We haven't discussed a 'homestead' aspect to it, but we are all guys in our late 20s and our lifestyle and standards would probably not necessarily be what other people might envisage.


Last edited by naki111 on Sat Apr 04, 2020 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 1:44 pm 
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Yes, only place i can afford to do it is in france though.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 7:02 pm 
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which of you plays banjo?


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 7:17 pm 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
Am I the only one thinking what are you guys (I'm assuming the syndicate is 5 guys) going to do for sex?
Are you's all straight or gay?
I'd struggle to believe 5 straight guys could live off the grid together without taking a trip into town 2 or 3 nights a week to chase fanny. Then what happens if one of your group falls in love and wants to cash out?
Would be much more convenient if every one in the syndicate was gay tbf.

Some well thought out questions Jim.

naki, have you considered all this stuff?

Assuming you are all late 20’s to the 30 mark, there might be sexual tensions with someone breaking rank and ruining it for the rest of you.
Or will it be like a commune where lady or boy friends are welcome to live with you all?


Last edited by YOYO on Sat Apr 04, 2020 7:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 7:30 pm 
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When this comes up amongst a larger group of friends, that’s the vibe we always get! :lol: “Um, this sounds like a cult!” We now call it the “non-creepy commune”... no weird sex stuff, no religion, no mass suicide, and you don’t have to sign over your bank account.

Canada’s a good place for it if you don’t mind moving north and months of snow. A woman I used to coach and her BF have co-bought with parents and grandparents a 250 acre farm in the mountains for 600k. Some still have jobs, but are also slowly building towards leaning more on their livestock.

Not this specifically, but a lot like...

Spoiler: show
Image


They asked if I wanted to house sit over Christmas. I thought about it, but it now certainly looks like the great escape from ‘civilization’. The ‘remote’ places in NZ look much better due to not actually being as far away as you could be here and the more temperate climate.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 8:01 pm 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
Am I the only one thinking what are you guys (I'm assuming the syndicate is 5 guys) going to do for sex?
Are you's all straight or gay?
I'd struggle to believe 5 straight guys could live off the grid together without taking a trip into town 2 or 3 nights a week to chase fanny. Then what happens if one of your group falls in love and wants to cash out?
Would be much more convenient if every one in the syndicate was gay tbf.

They are friends. Just because they are gay doesn't mean they would fuck each other.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:39 pm 
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This whole western "off grid " lifestyle is a bit amusing in some ways.
BTW not knocking you


For huge numbers of the world population its their normal daily way of life.

Thinking back to my early years.
We had no utilities
No mains water/sewage/electricity.

Water was rainfall that went into tanks.
Sewage was either a pit latrine or septic tank (as a kid I had an uncanny knack of blocking the bog which irritated the feck out of my old man, the fly swatter was my punishment)
Electricity we had roughly from 4am till 9 and from 3pm till 8pm: milking time and milk cooling time.
Fridge was kerosene powered.
Showers were always cold water



This was all a luxury compared to my fathers childhood.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:49 pm 
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Reminds me of the family I stayed with in Marlborough for a week. They had a shower, but I seem to recall the only way you could get hot water is if it was heated via a stove. So it was either you go with cold or scalding hot (I imagine they had a subtle method of getting to the right temp but I never learned that).

They were definitely diverse... had fruit trees, sheep, a few cows, and farmed mussels. Also rented a nice cabin to anglers and I think their son took people on guided hunting trips (open season on deer in NZ?).


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:56 pm 
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Location: Land of milk and honey
I sell off grid solar systems
cost for a small place 2 people would be around mid $20k with lithium batteries.
Ive sold a $100k system to a big house on Great barrier island, and everything in between
Plenty of people in NZ very interested atm in this.
The emotional feeling of Independence is cool, but i deal with dozens of people where it does not match the reality.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 11:00 pm 
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Naki.....sounds like the first port of call would be to Gloriavale to look at thier living and environmental systems......not their people stuff!


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 12:26 am 
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We are almost there now last week the council turned off the electric BBQ in the park. I fully expect deer to move in next week.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 12:57 am 
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Jim Lahey wrote:
Am I the only one thinking what are you guys (I'm assuming the syndicate is 5 guys) going to do for sex?
Are you's all straight or gay?
I'd struggle to believe 5 straight guys could live off the grid together without taking a trip into town 2 or 3 nights a week to chase fanny. Then what happens if one of your group falls in love and wants to cash out?
Would be much more convenient if every one in the syndicate was gay tbf.


They plan to have sheep on the reservation.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 2:15 am 
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naki111 wrote:
Has anyone done this before or is currently doing it on here? How did you go about it? Is there anything you wish you'd known when you started out? What's your current situation, if so?

I've always been fascinated by the idea of being the master of my own destiny and living as self sufficiently as possible at some point down the track. Talking to a few good mates from uni about the current situation and the amount of uncertainty going forward in every way, now seems to be as good a time as any to start putting a plan like this in to action. We're still in the early planning stages right now, but the current idea is for a syndicate of four or five of us to buy a plot of land of maybe 4-5 acres somewhere in the Manawatu/Whanganui region (temperate, west coast location gives more reliable rainfall, relatively affordable land prices etc), get some solar panels, potentially a turbine, chickens, sheep, vege plot etc and essentially be as self sufficient as possible. We're still hammering out details right now but PR has never let me down in terms of obscure stuff people are up to and willing to give their 2c on. Any advice or experiences would be greatly appreciated :thumbup:


naki111 is a young Hopeful Christian and I claim my light blue dress shirt.


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 2:49 am 
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This thread is a good reminder..... I'm not sure if my wife has seen The Good Life. That's one for the Lock-in


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 Post subject: Re: Living off the grid
PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 2:53 am 
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naki111 wrote:
We are all currently single

We have all flatted together before in multiple circumstances both at uni and after. Three of the guys were at boarding school together and we've all been friends for a decade or more, traveled together, etc


As long as 2 of you are versatile I see no issues here.


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