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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2020 2:50 pm 
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backrow wrote:
Here you go - i drew a cartoon so you’d know it was a genuine question from me :thumbup:

Image

Edit - unsure why the pic has gone square though as it misses some of the cartoon, but if you click on it all will be revealed - anyhows is the plant a weed ?


Just reading in the paper about an app called "PictureThis - Plant Identifier". Apparently you take a pic of the plant and it will come back with a result. Plantsnap is another one. No idea if they're any good.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2020 5:29 pm 
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Munster-fogs wrote:
backrow wrote:
Here you go - i drew a cartoon so you’d know it was a genuine question from me :thumbup:

Image

Edit - unsure why the pic has gone square though as it misses some of the cartoon, but if you click on it all will be revealed - anyhows is the plant a weed ?


Just reading in the paper about an app called "PictureThis - Plant Identifier". Apparently you take a pic of the plant and it will come back with a result. Plantsnap is another one. No idea if they're any good.


There’s a group called ‘plant identification’ on FB.
Upload a photo. Include location and environment of plant and they’ll nail it for you.
Serious plant nerd group. They’ll give you the Latin name and that’s it.
No chit chat or “Is this edible or can I use it to treat athlete's foot etc. ?” allowed.
Prevents stinking up the front page with bumped posts.
Latin name and fudge off basically.
Very effective bunch of people.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2020 5:55 pm 
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[quote=“Geek”] If your potatoes are in a patch how do you earth them up? [/quote]

I only had about a dozen plants so it was easy enough to reach in there with a shovel full of soil.
I might have to organize them a bit more this year though. Apocalypse and all.

My father always planted them in ridges in the garden 3 1/2 ft wide banks of soil with 3 rows of spuds in each.
Very handy for access and minimized digging. The upturned soil from the trenches at either side would form the ridge, and when it came to mounding them up he’d just shave the side of the ridge and use that soil ( thereby “weeding” the sides of the ridges as well),
Great for drainage too.

It’s far too dry here for me to use that method though, and I have sandy soil.
Planting them in a patch is the best way for me to keep them watered.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2020 7:15 pm 
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Ewinkum wrote:
Munster-fogs wrote:
backrow wrote:
Here you go - i drew a cartoon so you’d know it was a genuine question from me :thumbup:

Image

Edit - unsure why the pic has gone square though as it misses some of the cartoon, but if you click on it all will be revealed - anyhows is the plant a weed ?


Just reading in the paper about an app called "PictureThis - Plant Identifier". Apparently you take a pic of the plant and it will come back with a result. Plantsnap is another one. No idea if they're any good.


There’s a group called ‘plant identification’ on FB.
Upload a photo. Include location and environment of plant and they’ll nail it for you.
Serious plant nerd group. They’ll give you the Latin name and that’s it.
No chit chat or “Is this edible or can I use it to treat athlete's foot etc. ?” allowed.
Prevents stinking up the front page with bumped posts.
Latin name and fudge off basically.
Very effective bunch of people.


Thanks lads will try, probably with a picture just of the plant and not an ASCII jizzing cock


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2020 12:18 am 
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So, anyone here ever experienced chainsaw kickback?

Terrifying :uhoh:


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2020 10:28 pm 
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feckwanker wrote:
So, anyone here ever experienced chainsaw kickback?

Terrifying :uhoh:

Were you using the top side or the end of the bar?
If so, you're a dope.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2020 11:46 pm 
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Uncle Fester wrote:
feckwanker wrote:
So, anyone here ever experienced chainsaw kickback?

Terrifying :uhoh:

Were you using the top side or the end of the bar?
If so, you're a dope.

Nope. The log i was cutting rolled out of the teeth of the saw buck and jumped up spinning causing the saw to jump back. Quite scary.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 12:56 am 
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Another beautiful day to be working from home

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 7:06 am 
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feckwanker wrote:
Uncle Fester wrote:
feckwanker wrote:
So, anyone here ever experienced chainsaw kickback?

Terrifying :uhoh:

Were you using the top side or the end of the bar?
If so, you're a dope.

Nope. The log i was cutting rolled out of the teeth of the saw buck and jumped up spinning causing the saw to jump back. Quite scary.


Safety gear isnt a bad investment - something like this will pay for itself the first time its needed

https://www.stihl.com.au/STIHL-Products ... Chaps.aspx

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 8:13 am 
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Quote:

Quote:
If your potatoes are in a patch how do you earth them up?


I only had about a dozen plants so it was easy enough to reach in there with a shovel full of soil.
I might have to organize them a bit more this year though. Apocalypse and all.

My father always planted them in ridges in the garden 3 1/2 ft wide banks of soil with 3 rows of spuds in each.
Very handy for access and minimized digging. The upturned soil from the trenches at either side would form the ridge, and when it came to mounding them up he’d just shave the side of the ridge and use that soil ( thereby “weeding” the sides of the ridges as well),

Great for drainage too.

It’s far too dry here for me to use that method though, and I have sandy soil.
Planting them in a patch is the best way for me to keep them watered.


Thanks for the explanation. Yep, I've been doing the parallel ridges as well. It makes the whole thing very easy and quick to do when it comes to earthing up, especially now I've doubled the number of rows this year.

Gonna put some of the carrot seeds in today or tomorrow. I'll try your trick of putting the fertiliser 5 inches underneath and see what happens. Last year all of our carrots were eaten by carrot fly (despite installing a net around them half way through the season). My neighbour, who has been here 30+ years, tells me she has never managed to grow carrots. Still, I'm willing to keep trying.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 9:00 am 
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Geek wrote:
Ewinkum wrote:
[quote=“Geek”] If your potatoes are in a patch how do you earth them up?


I only had about a dozen plants so it was easy enough to reach in there with a shovel full of soil.
I might have to organize them a bit more this year though. Apocalypse and all.

My father always planted them in ridges in the garden 3 1/2 ft wide banks of soil with 3 rows of spuds in each.
Very handy for access and minimized digging. The upturned soil from the trenches at either side would form the ridge, and when it came to mounding them up he’d just shave the side of the ridge and use that soil ( thereby “weeding” the sides of the ridges as well),
Great for drainage too.

It’s far too dry here for me to use that method though, and I have sandy soil.
Planting them in a patch is the best way for me to keep them watered.

Thanks for the explanation. Yep, I've been doing the parallel ridges as well. It makes the whole thing very easy and quick to do when it comes to earthing up, especially now I've doubled the number of rows this year.

Gonna put some of the carrot seeds in today or tomorrow. I'll try your trick of putting the fertiliser 5 inches underneath and see what happens. Last year all of our carrots were eaten by carrot fly (despite installing a net around them half way through the season). My neighbour, who has been here 30+ years, tells me she has never managed to grow carrots. Still, I'm willing to keep trying.[/quote]

Good luck with them.
Another tip from my old man. Don’t grow them in the same place twice.
Carrot fly larvae overwinter in the soil apparently.
Hard to relocate too far in a garden I know.

Try planting your onions and carrots in alternate rows. The onion scent is supposed to deter them.
I do that and I haven’t had any problems yet, which proves nothing in fairness.
I’d still use the net though for peace of mind.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 9:33 am 
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Speaking of companion planting, theres another group that go really well together.
Sweet corn, beans and squash.
It’s attributed to the natives here who call it ‘“The 3 Sisters”
I’ve been doing it for the past couple of years with great success.

Give the corn a decent head start (a foot tall or so) before you plant the beans (climbing variety, not Bush),
and whatever pumpkin type you fancy.

The corn provides a trellis for the beans to climb.
The beans fix nitrogen, and will keep producing pods for as long as you keep picking, while the massive pumpkin leaves out-compete all the weeds and help to retain moisture by providing shade to the roots.

Corn should be planted in a block for best pollination (wind). 20 inch spacing is recommended but I’ve been going with 16 inches and getting 2 decent cobs per plant.
Beans at the base of each corn plant.
Pumpkins about 4 feet apart. They grow like crazy. Train the runners wherever you want them.
Pinch out some of the runners to encourage fruit production. Hand pollinate them.

It’s a pretty low effort system, and you get a great return on your square footage.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 10:02 am 
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Good website here for general tips and beginners.
https://www.gardenate.com/zones/


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2020 9:33 pm 
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Any good UK sites for buying plants for pots and borders for delivery?


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:26 pm 
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This is what my Dad built, I'm very impressed. The frame is for the fine netting I bought. Plus we have two rails around the garden for hanging baskets toms.

I planted swift earlies pots, baby carrots, turnip, beetroot, onions, spring onions, mustard spinish, kale, rocket, radish and got 4 squares left.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 8:58 am 
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feckwanker wrote:
So, anyone here ever experienced chainsaw kickback?

Terrifying :uhoh:


Yeah, it's brutal. A stihl saw even more so.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 9:13 am 
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Sefton wrote:
Any good UK sites for buying plants for pots and borders for delivery?

Nurseries usually only supply locally, as young plants are fragile and expensive to transport, but chains like https://www.gardenstoreonline.co.uk/ might be of use?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 10:31 am 
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Suttons can be more expensive but always had top quality plants from them and there are website offers.

Also hearing rumours of DIY/homeware stores letting their plant stock go to waste. Could be bollocks but my local B&Q said they're only letting people buy on a 'ucky dip basis though the website and if it goes on another week or so likely to give it away rather than go to waste. Maybe give yours a ring.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 7:36 pm 
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Ewinkum wrote:
Munster-fogs wrote:
backrow wrote:
Here you go - i drew a cartoon so you’d know it was a genuine question from me :thumbup:

Image

Edit - unsure why the pic has gone square though as it misses some of the cartoon, but if you click on it all will be revealed - anyhows is the plant a weed ?


Just reading in the paper about an app called "PictureThis - Plant Identifier". Apparently you take a pic of the plant and it will come back with a result. Plantsnap is another one. No idea if they're any good.


There’s a group called ‘plant identification’ on FB.
Upload a photo. Include location and environment of plant and they’ll nail it for you.
Serious plant nerd group. They’ll give you the Latin name and that’s it.
No chit chat or “Is this edible or can I use it to treat athlete's foot etc. ?” allowed.
Prevents stinking up the front page with bumped posts.
Latin name and fudge off basically.
Very effective bunch of people.


bump - joined this, had an answer in about 30 mins, its a Spanish Bluebell. will end up being pretty, so it can stay, despite being an imported wildflower.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 8:06 pm 
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backrow wrote:
Ewinkum wrote:
Munster-fogs wrote:
backrow wrote:
Here you go - i drew a cartoon so you’d know it was a genuine question from me :thumbup:

Image

Edit - unsure why the pic has gone square though as it misses some of the cartoon, but if you click on it all will be revealed - anyhows is the plant a weed ?


Just reading in the paper about an app called "PictureThis - Plant Identifier". Apparently you take a pic of the plant and it will come back with a result. Plantsnap is another one. No idea if they're any good.


There’s a group called ‘plant identification’ on FB.
Upload a photo. Include location and environment of plant and they’ll nail it for you.
Serious plant nerd group. They’ll give you the Latin name and that’s it.
No chit chat or “Is this edible or can I use it to treat athlete's foot etc. ?” allowed.
Prevents stinking up the front page with bumped posts.
Latin name and fudge off basically.
Very effective bunch of people.


bump - joined this, had an answer in about 30 mins, its a Spanish Bluebell. will end up being pretty, so it can stay, despite being an imported wildflower.

Spreads by itself or can be divided.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 10:31 pm 
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backrow wrote:
Ewinkum wrote:
Munster-fogs wrote:
backrow wrote:
Here you go - i drew a cartoon so you’d know it was a genuine question from me :thumbup:

Image

Edit - unsure why the pic has gone square though as it misses some of the cartoon, but if you click on it all will be revealed - anyhows is the plant a weed ?


Just reading in the paper about an app called "PictureThis - Plant Identifier". Apparently you take a pic of the plant and it will come back with a result. Plantsnap is another one. No idea if they're any good.


There’s a group called ‘plant identification’ on FB.
Upload a photo. Include location and environment of plant and they’ll nail it for you.
Serious plant nerd group. They’ll give you the Latin name and that’s it.
No chit chat or “Is this edible or can I use it to treat athlete's foot etc. ?” allowed.
Prevents stinking up the front page with bumped posts.
Latin name and fudge off basically.
Very effective bunch of people.


bump - joined this, had an answer in about 30 mins, its a Spanish Bluebell. will end up being pretty, so it can stay, despite being an imported wildflower.


Sound, will check them out

Though tbf Glaston already called it on here first :nod:


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 8:39 pm 
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Decided to expedite digging in the rest of my veggie patch.

Now got about 60 square metres ready to plant. Got a pretty good crop from the summer veggies, despite only being able to get it in place in December and suffering through a heatwave and drought. Tomatoes, corn, zucchini, pumpkins, silverbeet and eggplants dig particularly well. Beans and brassicas not so much.

Image

Now digging out some more squares for the food-forest - we have about an inch to 6 inches of top-soil, then a layer of gravelly shit that has to be broken through (trees don't get their roots through it and water barely penetrates). So each square (between 3x3 and 5x5 metres, depending on the central fruit tree being planted) has to have the turf removes, the gravel broken out with a fork and then organic matter added, the turf added back in upside down, another layer of organic matter and then soil and compost added to the top. Takes a day to do each. Have 2 apples, one orange, one lemon, one tangelo, one fig and a pomegranate in so far and started planting the berries, herbs and support/green manure/beneficial insect attracting crops around them. Also planted my first banana tree and a hedge of meyer lemons elsewhere.

Image

Chickens are hard at work turning the green-waste piles into compost. First three have just started laying, and the other eight shouldn't be far off.

Image

So food outlet looking good.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 10:48 pm 
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lemonhead wrote:
backrow wrote:
Ewinkum wrote:
Munster-fogs wrote:
backrow wrote:
Here you go - i drew a cartoon so you’d know it was a genuine question from me :thumbup:

Image

Edit - unsure why the pic has gone square though as it misses some of the cartoon, but if you click on it all will be revealed - anyhows is the plant a weed ?


Just reading in the paper about an app called "PictureThis - Plant Identifier". Apparently you take a pic of the plant and it will come back with a result. Plantsnap is another one. No idea if they're any good.


There’s a group called ‘plant identification’ on FB.
Upload a photo. Include location and environment of plant and they’ll nail it for you.
Serious plant nerd group. They’ll give you the Latin name and that’s it.
No chit chat or “Is this edible or can I use it to treat athlete's foot etc. ?” allowed.
Prevents stinking up the front page with bumped posts.
Latin name and fudge off basically.
Very effective bunch of people.


bump - joined this, had an answer in about 30 mins, its a Spanish Bluebell. will end up being pretty, so it can stay, despite being an imported wildflower.


Sound, will check them out

Though tbf Glaston already called it on here first :nod:

Lolz I totally missed Glaston saying this - I only replied to his ‘wiping the picture ‘ thing and totally didn’t see he was suggesting a plant name !

My posts have had ‘bell’ replied to them, I guess I just went on autopilot posting ! :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 12:11 am 
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Nice work Demilich!


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2020 7:09 pm 
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Discovered these, looks like they work so bought some. This year i will not be bested by slugs

Tested - https://www.slughelp.com/slug-fence-tes ... nce-check/


Collar - https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Plastic-Slug ... Swh-JePXz2

strip - https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/8-metre-gree ... 2749.l2649


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2020 10:06 pm 
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Bit of a weird question, I've googled it with no luck.

I planted all my 1st early seed pots 2weeks ago in the raised bed.

I was going to plant 2nd and mains but turns out the 2nds are actually late mains :roll: So I've done all I want of those in containers. The first earlies are the best pots I think so I wouldn't mind moving 3 of them into a planter. Planted 2 weeks ago, ok to do?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2020 4:36 am 
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Demilich wrote:
Decided to expedite digging in the rest of my veggie patch.

Now got about 60 square metres ready to plant. Got a pretty good crop from the summer veggies, despite only being able to get it in place in December and suffering through a heatwave and drought. Tomatoes, corn, zucchini, pumpkins, silverbeet and eggplants dig particularly well. Beans and brassicas not so much.

Image

Now digging out some more squares for the food-forest - we have about an inch to 6 inches of top-soil, then a layer of gravelly shit that has to be broken through (trees don't get their roots through it and water barely penetrates). So each square (between 3x3 and 5x5 metres, depending on the central fruit tree being planted) has to have the turf removes, the gravel broken out with a fork and then organic matter added, the turf added back in upside down, another layer of organic matter and then soil and compost added to the top. Takes a day to do each. Have 2 apples, one orange, one lemon, one tangelo, one fig and a pomegranate in so far and started planting the berries, herbs and support/green manure/beneficial insect attracting crops around them. Also planted my first banana tree and a hedge of meyer lemons elsewhere.

Image

Chickens are hard at work turning the green-waste piles into compost. First three have just started laying, and the other eight shouldn't be far off.

Image

So food outlet looking good.


‘kenoath it’s looking good!

Two questions: is the protection around the young trees aimed at keeping possums out, and what type of chook are the speckled ones?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2020 10:04 am 
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I’ve completely ruined my lawn, bought the kids a slip’n’slide, one hour later it looked like Glastonbury.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2020 10:17 am 
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Cherry blossoms Magnolia etc on the street are going very well, we will soon be buried in pink petals.
Anyone know if the Rowan tree has white flowers/bracts, will look it up.
Reliant on trees and shrubs also tulips and camellias for colour in the back garden.
The cherry tree at the footpath is gorgeous now, but by God it's ugly and gnarled when not blooming.
Got some lawn seed and ferdilizer in a little hardware shop that's open.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2020 12:07 pm 
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1000s of Rowans out there. Majority have white, some pink.

Looking to get a Kashmir one at the front if we can squeeze in two trees.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2020 12:08 pm 
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lemonhead wrote:
1000s of Rowans out there. Majority have white, some pink.

Looking to get a Kashmir one at the front if we can squeeze in two trees.

Thanks for that, it is a rowan after all.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2020 10:10 pm 
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Garden seems awash with bluebells, looks pretty but yet another plant species that has spread far to much.
Fighting battles against grape hyacinth, evening primrose, bugleweed,montbretia and oregano, my previous laissez faire treatment of the garden plants just doesnt work against such aggressive spreaders.


One good thing this year is that the Judas tree looks like it will actually get a decent flowering.
For some reason in recent years it had been well into leaf before flowering and you barely noticed the flowers.


Peppers/Aubergines/Toms/sweet corn/kale/Pak choi/herbs all looking good, touch wood I think we are past the frosts.
My few spuds did get hit a little bit last week with 3 mornings of frosts but have survived.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2020 3:05 am 
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MungoMan wrote:
Demilich wrote:
Decided to expedite digging in the rest of my veggie patch.

Now got about 60 square metres ready to plant. Got a pretty good crop from the summer veggies, despite only being able to get it in place in December and suffering through a heatwave and drought. Tomatoes, corn, zucchini, pumpkins, silverbeet and eggplants dig particularly well. Beans and brassicas not so much.

Image

Now digging out some more squares for the food-forest - we have about an inch to 6 inches of top-soil, then a layer of gravelly shit that has to be broken through (trees don't get their roots through it and water barely penetrates). So each square (between 3x3 and 5x5 metres, depending on the central fruit tree being planted) has to have the turf removes, the gravel broken out with a fork and then organic matter added, the turf added back in upside down, another layer of organic matter and then soil and compost added to the top. Takes a day to do each. Have 2 apples, one orange, one lemon, one tangelo, one fig and a pomegranate in so far and started planting the berries, herbs and support/green manure/beneficial insect attracting crops around them. Also planted my first banana tree and a hedge of meyer lemons elsewhere.

Image

Chickens are hard at work turning the green-waste piles into compost. First three have just started laying, and the other eight shouldn't be far off.

Image

So food outlet looking good.


‘kenoath it’s looking good!

Two questions: is the protection around the young trees aimed at keeping possums out, and what type of chook are the speckled ones?


It's two-fold: 1) wind-break, as we're up in the hills and can get pretty windy - still establishing the wind-break trees and tagastase/tree lucerne support, and 2) basic deterrent for rabbits/hares. They can chew through it, but hopefully enough other stuff around to make them not bother. The apples/pears also have lengths of black PVC pipe around the trunks to help prevent ring-barking. I've shot a bunch of the rabbits, but the current lot only seem to come out really late at night. Possums I deal with with traps - they far prefer the rat poison that I bait the traps with than any vegetation, so it's pretty effective at keeping them out. Population seems to have exploded at the moment - nailed 8 of them in 4 days, from just the 3 traps we have around the house.

The chickens are Plymouth Barred Rock:

Image

Excellent egg layers, good sized table bird, excellent foragers and you can sex the chicks when their first feathers come in at about 2 weeks and dispose of roosters if you only want pullets. From spring I will breed a second generation to use as table birds. They aren't noted for going clucky readily, so the black chooks (Australorps) are there to sit on the eggs/raise the chicks and also raise the Pekin ducklings once I get a flock of those next year.

I originally intended to get Light Sussex hens and a Rhode Island Red rooster, which cross to produce chickens with much the same properties, but the chicks can be sexed as soon as they hatch (roosters are yellow chicks and hens red), but Light Sussex are pretty difficult to source here (though the guy I got the Australorps from had just established a breeding flock, so might be available next year). Happy with what I ended up with though. :thumbup:

Lock-down pro-gardening tip

If you have an area where you want to suppress weeds, or some edging that would look good with green-leafy plants, plant a bunch of comfrey.

Image

It's a fairly plain looking plant, but it is incredible as a green compost/fertiliser. It sends down a long tap root, which draws up nutrients from deep down in the soil and produces mass amounts of leaves. Every few months cut all the leaves off and either just drop them around plants in the garden, or store them in a bucket of water to rot down and make a liquid fertiliser. An excellent way to bring nutrients to the surface for surface feeders. All my fruit trees are surrounded by comfrey, as they prevent grass growing (which is terrible for competing for nutrients, particularly with citrus), without competing with the tree's surface feeding roots and allow you to "chop and drop" those nutrients straight back to the surface. You'll find lots of recipes for using comfrey roots/leaves (particularly "organic" medicine) - be aware that it's now considered toxic, and can cause liver damage over time.

If you're working on a larger scale, tree lucerne/tagasaste is similar in tree form. This sends down a tap root up to 10m deep and also has the benefits of being nitrogen fixing, amazing firewood, able to be used as fodder for livestock and flowers in winter, attracting masses of bees and birds. The same "chop and drop" strategy can be used with it's foliage. Closely related to gorse, without the down-sides of being a thorn-infested-cunt or being anywhere near as invasive.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2020 7:55 am 
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Comfrey's a godsend for nitrogen, but can be an absolute thug in its own right. Big job digging the fecker up back home and replace with bocking 14 variety which is sterile and stays where you plant it.

Glaston - of all those would be weeds, never had issues with any except monbretia, which seeds and divides. Destroy, with fire.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2020 8:14 am 
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lemonhead wrote:
Comfrey's a godsend for nitrogen, but can be an absolute thug in its own right. Big job digging the fecker up back home and replace with bocking 14 variety which is sterile and stays where you plant it.


Right you are - should have mentioned that - avoid the ones that spread via seed. You want one of the varieties that clump - just dig it up and split out into separate crowns to propagate it (to establish my nursery crop of it, I received a single large plant and split it into 45 smaller plants, all of which survived - I have now split some of those into a further 50 plants after about 3 months).


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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 10:36 am 
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Thread needs a bump.


Weather has almost been to good

All my coriander and some of my Pak choi and salad leaves are bolting.
First year of growing pak choi and they are really easy to grow and doing very well.
Just need to find the best method for freezing them.
Peppers have started flowering and Aubergines have flowerbuds

4 mornings of frost last week was a bit crazy.
Had my spuds wrapped up like a xmas parcel and the greenhouse completely filled with plants in pots at night.
Grapevine lost some shoots and my hanging basket fuschias are gooorne.



Garden has had 2 areas of Monbretia for many years, really only noticing this year how much they have spread. :x
Digging the corms out of a stone bank is rather hard work, my sharp pointy trowel is very misshapen now.


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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 11:22 am 
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Sefton wrote:
I’ve completely ruined my lawn, bought the kids a slip’n’slide, one hour later it looked like Glastonbury.


My wife did the same about 15 years ago. Invited half the kids in the neighbourhood and poured a whole bottle of washing up liquid on it. Took me about 2 years to sort it out.


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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 4:23 pm 
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So, have weeded the garden, lay down the first layer or weed suppression membranes , going to fill the back garden with blueberries bushes to go with our existing fruit bonanza of bpack berries, raspberries , apple, plum, pear trees, and planted herbs and strawberries.
What bark or mulch do you chaps recommend to go over the membrane ? Or doesn’t really matter ?

Front garden will be wild flowers and flowering bushes and some nice smelling plants - as you may guess, I’m a big fan of a tidy, nice smelling front garden. :o


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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 4:30 pm 
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Phone some local tree surgeons and ask have they any well rotted wood chip. You'll probably get it for free


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PostPosted: Fri May 22, 2020 11:24 pm 
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Mare's tail back for its annual ravage of our garden.
Any suggestions?


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