OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

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Whether you can or can't actually vote IRL, In, or Out

In
248
60%
Out
167
40%
 
Total votes: 415

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SamShark
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by SamShark »

That is the Guardian so we can't take it at all serious. There is dozens of journalists, "financial experts" and even posters here who have gone so hard on Brexit being an economic disaster that they have everything resting on it happening. It won't.
Doesn't really work like that.

If Brexit is a stunning success I'll probably just say nothing. I'll be happy. You can mock my hysterical remoaning if you like and I'll take it on the chin. I'd love to be wrong.

Or if you're wrong the country is f**ked for years.
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Nobleman
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Nobleman »

Some of these are great:

https://www.theneweuropean.co.uk/top-st ... -1-5745831

I can’t imagine there would be the same humour and carnival atmosphere at a ‘leave’ march.
La soule
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by La soule »

NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:
Blind Hookah wrote:
La soule wrote::lol: :lol:

OK, fine.

Lads, just stay in all right.

Seeing the like of bimbo, Nick and Co bleating to death will just be an added bonus.
I couldn't think of anything worse. It is clear the UK will leave and the minority of MPs and the media who are hell bent on stopping it are isolating more and more people daily.

UKIP won the 2014 EU elections, the Tories won the 2015 election with a promise of a vote. Leave won the vote in 2016. All parties that did well had a pro leave manifesto in the 2017 and seen the Lib Dems static and SNP hammered. Thats four elections where is has been a key issue and the remainers still won't accept it. If the UK turned their back on this now they would lose everything, both at home and abroad.
Well hurry up and leave so, we are waiting ages.
Well if you lot had spent less time begging for money and more time on getting FTAs agreed we would be a lot further down the line.......
Meh, your government and its supporters are too thick to achieve anything meaningful on behalf of the British population
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

Blind Hookah wrote:
sewa wrote:
Blind Hookah wrote:
That is the Guardian so we can't take it at all serious. There is dozens of journalists, "financial experts" and even posters here who have gone so hard on Brexit being an economic disaster that they have everything resting on it happening. It won't.

These articles serve as a time capsule on opinions and when looked back in a year or so will only make the writer look clueless and hysterical. All those careers and credibility on the line. James O'Brien, Owen Jones and the line with their whole careers in ruins. Can't wait.
What about the guys running JLR and all the other huge businesses in the UK who are clearly worried, why would I assume you to know more than the boss of major international business group Jaguar Land Rover?
Really, and I suppose you think the move to Slovakia was because of Brexit even though the whole thing was designed and done before the vote. I don't know about the decision process but I know the dates the submittals went in to my employer.

The media has an agenda, corporations have self interest and don't like change. Fact is when they have to change then they will and like you they will work out it was a fuss over nothing.

UK should leave no deal and any threats from the EU about planes, medicines and general unfriendly and hostile behaviour should be greeted with same. A stronger leader would have told them get stuffed a while back and we'd have seem them all kiss and make up by now.
Blah, blah, believe. Not of course the people running major businesses, scientists, trade experts, national farmers union etc. Just us brexit lot. Fudge business
NickC
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by NickC »

clementinfrance wrote:
NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:
Blind Hookah wrote:
La soule wrote::lol: :lol:

OK, fine.

Lads, just stay in all right.

Seeing the like of bimbo, Nick and Co bleating to death will just be an added bonus.
I couldn't think of anything worse. It is clear the UK will leave and the minority of MPs and the media who are hell bent on stopping it are isolating more and more people daily.

UKIP won the 2014 EU elections, the Tories won the 2015 election with a promise of a vote. Leave won the vote in 2016. All parties that did well had a pro leave manifesto in the 2017 and seen the Lib Dems static and SNP hammered. Thats four elections where is has been a key issue and the remainers still won't accept it. If the UK turned their back on this now they would lose everything, both at home and abroad.
Well hurry up and leave so, we are waiting ages.
Well if you lot had spent less time begging for money and more time on getting FTAs agreed we would be a lot further down the line.......
Ahh diddums is nasty EU not letting you have your cake and eat it...

The sense of entitlement displayed by many Brexiteers is simply astounding.
As you say it is our cake - we were happy to share it with you but like the greedy kids you are you wanted more, and more....

You'll make yourself sick before you stop whinging for more.

And the only entitlement is our entitlement to leave. Which we are.

(These fecking whiteouts.....)
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

NickC wrote:
As you say it is our cake - we were happy to share it with you but like the greedy kids you are you wanted more, and more....

You'll make yourself sick before you stop whinging for more.

And the only entitlement is our entitlement to leave. Which we are.

(These fecking whiteouts.....)
https://www.rte.ie/news/brexit/2018/102 ... 13-brexit/

A UK wide customs union, are you really leaving? Not if this is correct. This is staying in just with no influence. We were wrong looking at Canada or Norway, this is Turkey ++ and just in time for Xmas
etherman
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by etherman »

A No Deal will be the end of the UK one way or another. It would be flicking the switch on a constitutional timebomb. The Home Counties colonels either dont realise or dont care, or think everyone wants to suck England's dick. Probably the latter.
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Plato'sCave
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Plato'sCave »

etherman wrote:A No Deal will be the end of the UK one way or another. It would be flicking the switch on a constitutional timebomb. The Home Counties colonels either dont realise or dont care, or think everyone wants to suck England's dick. Probably the latter.
Wales will remain as England’s only bitch. That’s the future.
bimboman
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by bimboman »

etherman wrote:A No Deal will be the end of the UK one way or another. It would be flicking the switch on a constitutional timebomb. The Home Counties colonels either dont realise or dont care, or think everyone wants to suck England's dick. Probably the latter.

An Irish border deal in the Irish Sea kills the union quicker.

Who is paying for Scotland ? Or now oils climbed a bit will we just forget how stupid their finances will be.
Blind Hookah
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Blind Hookah »

sewa wrote:
NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:
NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:
Well hurry up and leave so, we are waiting ages.
Well if you lot had spent less time begging for money and more time on getting FTAs agreed we would be a lot further down the line.......
The onus is not on us, you are the ones who are supposed to be leaving so you prepare the proposals. It took quite a while for that message to sink in with your lot of thick as pig shit MP's.
We did - you lot just kept whinging...'no, take it back and give us more'....a very poor look.

Or acting like kids and taking the p*ss out of people involved in the negotiations. You need to take a long look
in the mirror, doubt if you'll like what you see.......
We are under no pressure. Our main concern is making sure its not a win win deal for you. We will achieve that in spades and then some
We you say- my god.

Leaving even with a no deal will be a win for the UK. If it meant so little to the EU then why the fuss. You only have an interest in the UK failing to try to say you are right but I assure you that you won't see that happen.
Every scenario outside of a 1928 collapse sees the UK winning as it gains the freedom to trade independently and not get caught up in this undemocratic unions march to being a single state. Not being inside the EU and not having this big recession you all claim is ultimately a big win and completely justifies the vote. Nothing short of economic disaster backs your stance. UK will be fine and it will focus on trading with the parts of the world where the real future is.
The EU cares for no nation and it will keep pushing for its EU army that Clegg and co scoffed at and then it will go for tax harmonisation which will screw nations like Ireland over. The veto will mean nothing as they have plans to make it useless.
Enjoy your "we" and "our" club.
bimboman
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by bimboman »

When there’s an EU army , do they inherit French nuclear weapons ?
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

Blind Hookah wrote:
We you say- my god.

Leaving even with a no deal will be a win for the UK. If it meant so little to the EU then why the fuss. You only have an interest in the UK failing to try to say you are right but I assure you that you won't see that happen.
Every scenario outside of a 1928 collapse sees the UK winning as it gains the freedom to trade independently and not get caught up in this undemocratic unions march to being a single state. Not being inside the EU and not having this big recession you all claim is ultimately a big win and completely justifies the vote. Nothing short of economic disaster backs your stance. UK will be fine and it will focus on trading with the parts of the world where the real future is.
The EU cares for no nation and it will keep pushing for its EU army that Clegg and co scoffed at and then it will go for tax harmonisation which will screw nations like Ireland over. The veto will mean nothing as they have plans to make it useless.
Enjoy your "we" and "our" club.
Have you read the papers your own government / government departments prepared for no deal planning? No of course not, if you did you wouldn't be writing this garbage. You'd understand the very real and direct impact that will kick in straight away if its no deal on April 1st. The papers are freely available, educate yourself.

As for what happens in our EU in the long term that is simply none of your business.
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camroc1
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by camroc1 »

Blind Hookah wrote:
sewa wrote:https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... nal-market

Brexit is like a Premier League side wanting to be relegated
William Keegan

The man who used to run the WTO says the EU single market, set up by Margaret Thatcher, is ‘the top league’. How right he is

This country is obsessed by football. Many of the people who voted to “leave Europe” follow closely the ups and downs of the teams in the Premier League, teams whose stars and managers are often from, well, “Europe”.

It is unimaginable that any football fan would want his or her team to descend from the Premier League to the lowest, just like that. Yet that is not unlike what this country would be doing if the wishes of the Brexit extremists were to be realised.

The analogy was made recently by a man who ought to know, namely the distinguished French civil servant Pascal Lamy. Lamy is a former director of the World Trade Organisation, into whose rulebook hard Brexiters wish to precipitate us if a stop is not put to Brexit.

At a recent event at the London School of Economics in honour of the late Peter Sutherland – the man who set up the WTO and whom Lamy succeeded – the latter could hardly have put it more plainly: “The internal market is the top league. The WTO is the bottom.”

The internal market is usually referred to in the UK as the single market, of which Mrs Thatcher was a passionate supporter, arguing that it would give the UK economy “access to over 300 million of the world’s most prosperous people, bigger than Japan, bigger than the US. It’s not some bureaucrat’s dream – it’s for real.”

The propagation and membership of the internal/single market was considered by former Tory chancellor Kenneth Clarke to be Margaret Thatcher’s greatest achievement.

But, thanks to the trade agreements the EU has with a fair proportion of the rest of the world, as the Office for Budget Responsibility reminds us in its Discussion Paper No 3, “when added to the 49% share of UK trade accounted for by members of the EU, altogether [existing] trade agreements reduce or eliminate tariffs for around 66% of UK trade.”

The idea of crashing out of the EU and trying to set up new trade agreements from scratch in a world that is going protectionist fast is, or ought to be, for the birds.

Now, most media comment about recent OBR pronouncements has concerned speculation about the “wiggle room” that might or might not be available to Philip Hammond in his budget next week. For me the OBR’s observations about the impact of even the mere prospect of Brexit are the real fascination.

The idea that Hammond has “room for manoeuvre” with a budget in the midst of the post-referendum chaos should be seen in the context of a timely report by the Nuffield Foundation and the National Institute of Economic and Social Research. Within the off-putting carapace of its title – Understanding and Confronting Uncertainty: Revisions to UK Government Expenditure Plans – the authors spell out how public spending plans are subject to continual adjustment as economic growth usually turns out to be less than indicated by the ambitious forecasts on which spending plans are based.

The OBR reminds us that, since the referendum, “the UK moved from being close to the top of the G7 GDP growth range in early 2016 to close to the bottom in 2018”.

It goes on: “Business investment appears to have been depressed by uncertainty … while the prospect of weakened access to foreign markets has pushed the exchange rate lower, raising inflation.” The traditional boost to the economy from a devaluation has been thwarted by the internationalisation of supply chains, “which means that many UK exports have a high import content”, but also (and I suspect principally) by “the uncertainty for exporters created by the referendum result (which may have inhibited investment in new capacity), and resilient demand for imports”.

What this economy needs is a statesmanlike – or stateswomanlike – decision to admit that continued membership of the EU is in our best interests, and an admission that we are living in cloud cuckoo land if we do not accept the argument of the veteran economist Robert Neild – referred to recently in this column – that better public services require higher taxes.

In his Quinlan lecture at the Foreign Office last week, Sir John Major described the prospect of Brexit as “a colossal misjudgment”. He went on to say that once the damage became clear, “I believe those who promised what will never be delivered will have much to answer for. They persuaded a deceived population to be weaker and poorer. That will never be forgotten – nor forgiven.”

But it is not too late. Do we really want to abdicate, to mix a sporting metaphor, from our pole position in the Premier League?
That is the Guardian so we can't take it at all serious. There is dozens of journalists, "financial experts" and even posters here who have gone so hard on Brexit being an economic disaster that they have everything resting on it happening. It won't.

These articles serve as a time capsule on opinions and when looked back in a year or so will only make the writer look clueless and hysterical. All those careers and credibility on the line. James O'Brien, Owen Jones and the line with their whole careers in ruins. Can't wait.
Whatever about slagging off the Guardian, William Keegan has been around since God was a young boy, and has a good enough reputation to at least have his opinion considered before being dismissed.
Mullet 2

Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Mullet 2 »

bimboman wrote:
etherman wrote:A No Deal will be the end of the UK one way or another. It would be flicking the switch on a constitutional timebomb. The Home Counties colonels either dont realise or dont care, or think everyone wants to suck England's dick. Probably the latter.

An Irish border deal in the Irish Sea kills the union quicker.

Who is paying for Scotland ? Or now oils climbed a bit will we just forget how stupid their finances will be.

Now he knows more about the North than a Northern Irishman

Go back to lying, it suits you better than trying to make actual points.
bimboman
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by bimboman »

Mullet 2 wrote:
bimboman wrote:
etherman wrote:A No Deal will be the end of the UK one way or another. It would be flicking the switch on a constitutional timebomb. The Home Counties colonels either dont realise or dont care, or think everyone wants to suck England's dick. Probably the latter.

An Irish border deal in the Irish Sea kills the union quicker.

Who is paying for Scotland ? Or now oils climbed a bit will we just forget how stupid their finances will be.

Now he knows more about the North than a Northern Irishman

Go back to lying, it suits you better than trying to make actual points.

Another question you’re trying to invalidate with bullshite because you can’t or won’t address it. Another day and no calls made fatty.
NickC
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by NickC »

sewa wrote:
Blind Hookah wrote:
We you say- my god.

Leaving even with a no deal will be a win for the UK. If it meant so little to the EU then why the fuss. You only have an interest in the UK failing to try to say you are right but I assure you that you won't see that happen.
Every scenario outside of a 1928 collapse sees the UK winning as it gains the freedom to trade independently and not get caught up in this undemocratic unions march to being a single state. Not being inside the EU and not having this big recession you all claim is ultimately a big win and completely justifies the vote. Nothing short of economic disaster backs your stance. UK will be fine and it will focus on trading with the parts of the world where the real future is.
The EU cares for no nation and it will keep pushing for its EU army that Clegg and co scoffed at and then it will go for tax harmonisation which will screw nations like Ireland over. The veto will mean nothing as they have plans to make it useless.
Enjoy your "we" and "our" club.
Have you read the papers your own government / government departments prepared for no deal planning? No of course not, if you did you wouldn't be writing this garbage. You'd understand the very real and direct impact that will kick in straight away if its no deal on April 1st. The papers are freely available, educate yourself.

As for what happens in our EU in the long term that is simply none of your business.
And along those lines - our future is none of your business.

I hope the EU Army does come to fruition - they'll have huge resources available - especially if you look at the the youth unemployment rate
across the EU - it's a disgrace.
bimboman
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by bimboman »

Will there be a European army conscription?
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

bimboman wrote:Will there be a European army conscription?
How would we know? You are the mystic meg on here, the rest of us rely on expert analysts and industry leaders. You just make it up as you go along
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

So the headline article in the Telegraph is about a UK wide customs union. Anyone of you Brexiters care to say how they feel about this gross UK capitulation? Brexit means staying in and obeying EU laws while still paying
Mullet 2

Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Mullet 2 »

bimboman wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
bimboman wrote:
etherman wrote:A No Deal will be the end of the UK one way or another. It would be flicking the switch on a constitutional timebomb. The Home Counties colonels either dont realise or dont care, or think everyone wants to suck England's dick. Probably the latter.

An Irish border deal in the Irish Sea kills the union quicker.

Who is paying for Scotland ? Or now oils climbed a bit will we just forget how stupid their finances will be.

Now he knows more about the North than a Northern Irishman

Go back to lying, it suits you better than trying to make actual points.

Another question you’re trying to invalidate with bullshite because you can’t or won’t address it. Another day and no calls made fatty.
I never post from work
bimboman
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by bimboman »

You never work from work, that’s for sure.
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

Mullet 2 wrote:
bimboman wrote:

Another question you’re trying to invalidate with bullshite because you can’t or won’t address it. Another day and no calls made fatty.
I never post from work
Genius :lol: :lol: :lol: :thumbup:
NickC
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by NickC »

sewa wrote:So the headline article in the Telegraph is about a UK wide customs union. Anyone of you Brexiters care to say how they feel about this gross UK capitulation? Brexit means staying in and obeying EU laws while still paying

Take it back and come up with something better. Thanks
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:So the headline article in the Telegraph is about a UK wide customs union. Anyone of you Brexiters care to say how they feel about this gross UK capitulation? Brexit means staying in and obeying EU laws while still paying

Take it back and come up with something better. Thanks
Its getting late in the day, you better accept whatever you can get. I mean its not all that bad :D
Blind Hookah
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Blind Hookah »

camroc1 wrote:
Blind Hookah wrote:
sewa wrote:https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... nal-market

Brexit is like a Premier League side wanting to be relegated
William Keegan

The man who used to run the WTO says the EU single market, set up by Margaret Thatcher, is ‘the top league’. How right he is

This country is obsessed by football. Many of the people who voted to “leave Europe” follow closely the ups and downs of the teams in the Premier League, teams whose stars and managers are often from, well, “Europe”.

It is unimaginable that any football fan would want his or her team to descend from the Premier League to the lowest, just like that. Yet that is not unlike what this country would be doing if the wishes of the Brexit extremists were to be realised.

The analogy was made recently by a man who ought to know, namely the distinguished French civil servant Pascal Lamy. Lamy is a former director of the World Trade Organisation, into whose rulebook hard Brexiters wish to precipitate us if a stop is not put to Brexit.

At a recent event at the London School of Economics in honour of the late Peter Sutherland – the man who set up the WTO and whom Lamy succeeded – the latter could hardly have put it more plainly: “The internal market is the top league. The WTO is the bottom.”

The internal market is usually referred to in the UK as the single market, of which Mrs Thatcher was a passionate supporter, arguing that it would give the UK economy “access to over 300 million of the world’s most prosperous people, bigger than Japan, bigger than the US. It’s not some bureaucrat’s dream – it’s for real.”

The propagation and membership of the internal/single market was considered by former Tory chancellor Kenneth Clarke to be Margaret Thatcher’s greatest achievement.

But, thanks to the trade agreements the EU has with a fair proportion of the rest of the world, as the Office for Budget Responsibility reminds us in its Discussion Paper No 3, “when added to the 49% share of UK trade accounted for by members of the EU, altogether [existing] trade agreements reduce or eliminate tariffs for around 66% of UK trade.”

The idea of crashing out of the EU and trying to set up new trade agreements from scratch in a world that is going protectionist fast is, or ought to be, for the birds.

Now, most media comment about recent OBR pronouncements has concerned speculation about the “wiggle room” that might or might not be available to Philip Hammond in his budget next week. For me the OBR’s observations about the impact of even the mere prospect of Brexit are the real fascination.

The idea that Hammond has “room for manoeuvre” with a budget in the midst of the post-referendum chaos should be seen in the context of a timely report by the Nuffield Foundation and the National Institute of Economic and Social Research. Within the off-putting carapace of its title – Understanding and Confronting Uncertainty: Revisions to UK Government Expenditure Plans – the authors spell out how public spending plans are subject to continual adjustment as economic growth usually turns out to be less than indicated by the ambitious forecasts on which spending plans are based.

The OBR reminds us that, since the referendum, “the UK moved from being close to the top of the G7 GDP growth range in early 2016 to close to the bottom in 2018”.

It goes on: “Business investment appears to have been depressed by uncertainty … while the prospect of weakened access to foreign markets has pushed the exchange rate lower, raising inflation.” The traditional boost to the economy from a devaluation has been thwarted by the internationalisation of supply chains, “which means that many UK exports have a high import content”, but also (and I suspect principally) by “the uncertainty for exporters created by the referendum result (which may have inhibited investment in new capacity), and resilient demand for imports”.

What this economy needs is a statesmanlike – or stateswomanlike – decision to admit that continued membership of the EU is in our best interests, and an admission that we are living in cloud cuckoo land if we do not accept the argument of the veteran economist Robert Neild – referred to recently in this column – that better public services require higher taxes.

In his Quinlan lecture at the Foreign Office last week, Sir John Major described the prospect of Brexit as “a colossal misjudgment”. He went on to say that once the damage became clear, “I believe those who promised what will never be delivered will have much to answer for. They persuaded a deceived population to be weaker and poorer. That will never be forgotten – nor forgiven.”

But it is not too late. Do we really want to abdicate, to mix a sporting metaphor, from our pole position in the Premier League?
That is the Guardian so we can't take it at all serious. There is dozens of journalists, "financial experts" and even posters here who have gone so hard on Brexit being an economic disaster that they have everything resting on it happening. It won't.

These articles serve as a time capsule on opinions and when looked back in a year or so will only make the writer look clueless and hysterical. All those careers and credibility on the line. James O'Brien, Owen Jones and the line with their whole careers in ruins. Can't wait.
Whatever about slagging off the Guardian, William Keegan has been around since God was a young boy, and has a good enough reputation to at least have his opinion considered before being dismissed.
Well it certainly is the most high profile piece his written since his books telling us how much a genius Gordon Brown was and how he saved the world.
La soule
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by La soule »

bimboman wrote:Will there be a European army conscription?
Why are you worrying about this?

You guys should really focus your energy on signing all those trade deals that have been promised to you.
NickC
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Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am

Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by NickC »

sewa wrote:
NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:So the headline article in the Telegraph is about a UK wide customs union. Anyone of you Brexiters care to say how they feel about this gross UK capitulation? Brexit means staying in and obeying EU laws while still paying

Take it back and come up with something better. Thanks
Its getting late in the day, you better accept whatever you can get. I mean its not all that bad :D
'waves £39 billion at the EU greedy masses'...........Come back with something better, thanks.
Rugby2023
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Rugby2023 »

Seems Sir Graham Brady has been playing silly buggers with the letters.
@Peston

A number of sources have told me Brady is no longer a wholly passive recipient of letters. When approached by MPs planning to hand in letters calling for May to go, he is reported to have said “must you? Not now...Not in the next few weeks”. They understandably draw the conclusion the tally of letters in his locked draw is perilously close to the 48 that would force him to go to @theresa_may and tell her that under the rules there has to be a vote to determine whether she can stay on. I have to say having known and observed Brady for a while, I am not sure I agree. He has always felt entitled to express a personal view about whether a leadership contest at a particular juncture is sensible or not.
@alexwickham

Some question mark earlier over whether Brady would actually do this. Now told he *has* said this to at least one MP who put in a letter. This is going down very badly with MPs who think it’s not his place...
etherman
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by etherman »

bimboman wrote:
etherman wrote:A No Deal will be the end of the UK one way or another. It would be flicking the switch on a constitutional timebomb. The Home Counties colonels either dont realise or dont care, or think everyone wants to suck England's dick. Probably the latter.

An Irish border deal in the Irish Sea kills the union quicker.

Who is paying for Scotland ? Or now oils climbed a bit will we just forget how stupid their finances will be.
How?
Last edited by etherman on Tue Oct 23, 2018 3:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Blind Hookah
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Blind Hookah »

sewa wrote:
bimboman wrote:Will there be a European army conscription?
How would we know? You are the mystic meg on here, the rest of us rely on expert analysts and industry leaders. You just make it up as you go along
Can't wait for when the poles tell them to go do one with their conscription. It will be a disaster.
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:
NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:So the headline article in the Telegraph is about a UK wide customs union. Anyone of you Brexiters care to say how they feel about this gross UK capitulation? Brexit means staying in and obeying EU laws while still paying

Take it back and come up with something better. Thanks
Its getting late in the day, you better accept whatever you can get. I mean its not all that bad :D
'waves £39 billion at the EU greedy masses'...........Come back with something better, thanks.
Ah no, this is a final proposal. We still want the 39 billion though. We want it in euros though, thanks
Mullet 2

Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Mullet 2 »

Conscription :lol:
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

Blind Hookah wrote:
sewa wrote:
bimboman wrote:Will there be a European army conscription?
How would we know? You are the mystic meg on here, the rest of us rely on expert analysts and industry leaders. You just make it up as you go along
Can't wait for when the poles tell them to go do one with their conscription. It will be a disaster.
So there will be conscription, where are you getting this info from or is it just more bullshit masquerading as knowedge?
Mullet 2

Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Mullet 2 »

So the noob can't wait for a fictional Polish reaction to a fictional proposal.

BLIGHTY!!
NickC
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by NickC »

sewa wrote:
NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:
NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:So the headline article in the Telegraph is about a UK wide customs union. Anyone of you Brexiters care to say how they feel about this gross UK capitulation? Brexit means staying in and obeying EU laws while still paying

Take it back and come up with something better. Thanks
Its getting late in the day, you better accept whatever you can get. I mean its not all that bad :D
'waves £39 billion at the EU greedy masses'...........Come back with something better, thanks.
Ah no, this is a final proposal. We still want the 39 billion though. We want it in euros though, thanks
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_ST ... 161_en.htm

Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed.

I know you lot are desperate.......
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

Yes, we are desperate. Thats why we are submitting letters demanding resignations and planning to stab our leaders in the guts :lol:
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camroc1
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by camroc1 »

Blind Hookah wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
Spoiler: show
[quote="Blind Hookah"][quote="sewa"]https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... nal-market

Brexit is like a Premier League side wanting to be relegated
William Keegan

The man who used to run the WTO says the EU single market, set up by Margaret Thatcher, is ‘the top league’. How right he is

This country is obsessed by football. Many of the people who voted to “leave Europe” follow closely the ups and downs of the teams in the Premier League, teams whose stars and managers are often from, well, “Europe”.

It is unimaginable that any football fan would want his or her team to descend from the Premier League to the lowest, just like that. Yet that is not unlike what this country would be doing if the wishes of the Brexit extremists were to be realised.

The analogy was made recently by a man who ought to know, namely the distinguished French civil servant Pascal Lamy. Lamy is a former director of the World Trade Organisation, into whose rulebook hard Brexiters wish to precipitate us if a stop is not put to Brexit.

At a recent event at the London School of Economics in honour of the late Peter Sutherland – the man who set up the WTO and whom Lamy succeeded – the latter could hardly have put it more plainly: “The internal market is the top league. The WTO is the bottom.”

The internal market is usually referred to in the UK as the single market, of which Mrs Thatcher was a passionate supporter, arguing that it would give the UK economy “access to over 300 million of the world’s most prosperous people, bigger than Japan, bigger than the US. It’s not some bureaucrat’s dream – it’s for real.”

The propagation and membership of the internal/single market was considered by former Tory chancellor Kenneth Clarke to be Margaret Thatcher’s greatest achievement.

But, thanks to the trade agreements the EU has with a fair proportion of the rest of the world, as the Office for Budget Responsibility reminds us in its Discussion Paper No 3, “when added to the 49% share of UK trade accounted for by members of the EU, altogether [existing] trade agreements reduce or eliminate tariffs for around 66% of UK trade.”

The idea of crashing out of the EU and trying to set up new trade agreements from scratch in a world that is going protectionist fast is, or ought to be, for the birds.

Now, most media comment about recent OBR pronouncements has concerned speculation about the “wiggle room” that might or might not be available to Philip Hammond in his budget next week. For me the OBR’s observations about the impact of even the mere prospect of Brexit are the real fascination.

The idea that Hammond has “room for manoeuvre” with a budget in the midst of the post-referendum chaos should be seen in the context of a timely report by the Nuffield Foundation and the National Institute of Economic and Social Research. Within the off-putting carapace of its title – Understanding and Confronting Uncertainty: Revisions to UK Government Expenditure Plans – the authors spell out how public spending plans are subject to continual adjustment as economic growth usually turns out to be less than indicated by the ambitious forecasts on which spending plans are based.

The OBR reminds us that, since the referendum, “the UK moved from being close to the top of the G7 GDP growth range in early 2016 to close to the bottom in 2018”.

It goes on: “Business investment appears to have been depressed by uncertainty … while the prospect of weakened access to foreign markets has pushed the exchange rate lower, raising inflation.” The traditional boost to the economy from a devaluation has been thwarted by the internationalisation of supply chains, “which means that many UK exports have a high import content”, but also (and I suspect principally) by “the uncertainty for exporters created by the referendum result (which may have inhibited investment in new capacity), and resilient demand for imports”.

What this economy needs is a statesmanlike – or stateswomanlike – decision to admit that continued membership of the EU is in our best interests, and an admission that we are living in cloud cuckoo land if we do not accept the argument of the veteran economist Robert Neild – referred to recently in this column – that better public services require higher taxes.

In his Quinlan lecture at the Foreign Office last week, Sir John Major described the prospect of Brexit as “a colossal misjudgment”. He went on to say that once the damage became clear, “I believe those who promised what will never be delivered will have much to answer for. They persuaded a deceived population to be weaker and poorer. That will never be forgotten – nor forgiven.”

But it is not too late. Do we really want to abdicate, to mix a sporting metaphor, from our pole position in the Premier League?
That is the Guardian so we can't take it at all serious. There is dozens of journalists, "financial experts" and even posters here who have gone so hard on Brexit being an economic disaster that they have everything resting on it happening. It won't.

These articles serve as a time capsule on opinions and when looked back in a year or so will only make the writer look clueless and hysterical. All those careers and credibility on the line. James O'Brien, Owen Jones and the line with their whole careers in ruins. Can't wait.
[/spoiler]
Whatever about slagging off the Guardian, William Keegan has been around since God was a young boy, and has a good enough reputation to at least have his opinion considered before being dismissed.[/quote]
Well it certainly is the most high profile piece his written since his books telling us how much a genius Gordon Brown was and how he saved the world.[/quote]
That is a somewhat uncharitable view of his work, including his written work.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Keegan
NickC
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by NickC »

sewa wrote:Yes, we are desperate. Thats why we are submitting letters demanding resignations and planning to stab our leaders in the guts :lol:

Deflection - - you don't get a cent until everything is agreed. :thumbup:
Mullet 2

Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by Mullet 2 »

When did the Pigdogs elect NickC and Bimbo to speak on their behalf

"You don't get"

You're some spa on the internet buddy, stop acting like you have a rashers. :lol:
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sewa
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Re: OFFICIAL EU/UK referendum thread

Post by sewa »

NickC wrote:
sewa wrote:Yes, we are desperate. Thats why we are submitting letters demanding resignations and planning to stab our leaders in the guts :lol:

Deflection - - you don't get a cent until everything is agreed. :thumbup:
The EU have a GDP ten times that of the entire UK, the money is small change. It would just be further evidence of you not being an honest broker as that money is due under existing agreed obligations, much like the way you clowns ''didn't understand'' the backstop.
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