Investing

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TranceNRG
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Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

Ladies and gents, please share your investment strategies, portfolios, etc here

I'll get the ball rolling:

I have the following funds in an ISA account with Fidelity
AXA Framlington Biotech Fund Z Acc
AXA Framlington Health Fund Z Acc
Baring Eur Select Trust Class I GBP Inc
BlackRock Gold & General Fund D Acc
Fidelity Emerging Markets W-Acc (UK)
Fidelity MoneyBuilder Income Y-Acc-Gross
Fidelity UK Smaller Companies W-Acc
Stewart Investors Asia Pacf Leaders B Ac
Fundsmith Equity Fund I Class Acc
Henderson European Focus Fund I Acc
Jupiter India Fund I Class Acc
CF Lindsell Train UK Equity Fund Acc
Newton Asian Income Inst W Acc
Old Mutual North American Equity R Acc
Old Mutual UK Mid Cap Fund R Acc
Schroder Tokyo Fund L Acc
Vanguard U.S. Equity Index Acc
Vanguard UK Long Duration Gilt Index Acc
CF Woodford Equity Income Fund C Acc
Woodford Patient Capital Trust Plc
I've made some decent gains so far but looking to reduce the number of funds to about 15.

I also have some banking shares I bought after Referendum vote held at Hargreaves Lansdown:

Barclays
Lloyds
RBS

Have some cash in a high interst current account (Santander 123) as well which is paying 3% at the moment but going to be reduced to 1.5% :(

I think I'll continue to invest in funds but occasionally buy shares. It's a bit annoying Fidelity don't have share dealing on their platform.

Edit - Wish I'd bought some HSBC shares
Last edited by TranceNRG on Sat Sep 03, 2016 1:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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globus
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Re: Investing

Post by globus »

TranceNRG wrote:Have some cash in a high interst current account (Santander 123) as well which is paying 3% at the moment but going to be reduced to 1.5%
Yep. I know a bit about that. I used to work for their predecessors and we have that account. It's just the markets.

If you managed to nab a Zero card, that's useful. Not available now.

(I still do a little bit of consultancy for the bank through colleagues I've known. They are getting few and far between now.)
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

globus wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:Have some cash in a high interst current account (Santander 123) as well which is paying 3% at the moment but going to be reduced to 1.5%
Yep. I know a bit about that. I used to work for their predecessors and we have that account. It's just the markets.

If you managed to nab a Zero card, that's useful. Not available now.

(I still do a little bit of consultancy for the bank through colleagues I've known. They are getting few and far between now.)
Yeah I am not complaning too much about the low interest rates. I'm already getting a very good rate for my mortgage and next year when I remortgage, I'll get an even better rate :o
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Demilich
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Re: Investing

Post by Demilich »

I invest in a mix of ETF's, as I currently have neither the time nor inclination to spend the time required to make fully researched individual stock picks and identify under-priced companies. Set a mix of local, overseas, emerging markets, dividend orientated and REITs.

I have also just started investing in Peer-to-peer lending. Not likely to make up a huge amount of my mix (< 5%), but will be interesting to see how the industry develops moving forward. Seeing a fixed return interest rate above 8% reminds me of the good old days of bank accounts (though obviously much higher risk).
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

Demilich wrote:I invest in a mix of ETF's, as I currently have neither the time nor inclination to spend the time required to make fully researched individual stock picks and identify under-priced companies. Set a mix of local, overseas, emerging markets, dividend orientated and REITs.

I have also just started investing in Peer-to-peer lending. Not likely to make up a huge amount of my mix (< 5%), but will be interesting to see how the industry develops moving forward.
I looked in to this a while ago but thought the risk was a bit too high than investing in funds/shares
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Demilich
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Re: Investing

Post by Demilich »

The one I am mostly going through charges borrowers an extra couple of percent and uses that as a cushion fund to refund the principal on defaulted loans. Obviously that means lower returns than they could possibly give, but it's a nice insurance policy against getting a particularly bad run.

How such companies do in a financial melt-down is the bigger question, rather than individual defaults.
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globus
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Re: Investing

Post by globus »

TranceNRG wrote:
Demilich wrote:I invest in a mix of ETF's, as I currently have neither the time nor inclination to spend the time required to make fully researched individual stock picks and identify under-priced companies. Set a mix of local, overseas, emerging markets, dividend orientated and REITs.

I have also just started investing in Peer-to-peer lending. Not likely to make up a huge amount of my mix (< 5%), but will be interesting to see how the industry develops moving forward.
I looked in to this a while ago but thought the risk was a bit too high than investing in funds/shares
Don't lend money to your relatives! I've had my fingers burnt twice.
bimboman
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Re: Investing

Post by bimboman »

Long term is all with a manager so don't have much idea.

Trance, why buy shares rather than spreads on IG? No tax issues and no stamp duty.
bimboman
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Re: Investing

Post by bimboman »

TranceNRG wrote:
Demilich wrote:I invest in a mix of ETF's, as I currently have neither the time nor inclination to spend the time required to make fully researched individual stock picks and identify under-priced companies. Set a mix of local, overseas, emerging markets, dividend orientated and REITs.

I have also just started investing in Peer-to-peer lending. Not likely to make up a huge amount of my mix (< 5%), but will be interesting to see how the industry develops moving forward.
I looked in to this a while ago but thought the risk was a bit too high than investing in funds/shares

Guys be very careful with peer to peer, it's not regulated and when the fails come they'll be thick and fast.
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

bimboman wrote:Long term is all with a manager so don't have much idea.

Trance, why buy shares rather than spreads on IG? No tax issues and no stamp duty.
It's not something I looked in to, to be honest. Doesn't it involve a lot more risk and require more time?
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

What's IG like as a platform? They don't do funds do they?
bimboman
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Re: Investing

Post by bimboman »

TranceNRG wrote:What's IG like as a platform? They don't do funds do they?

Not really funds, but for shares they're great, you pay on margin so yes it is a leveraged bet, however if you're buying shares to be long just d the account when prices drop a bit. As I said no stamp, or,any tax on profits if you make any.
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grubberkick
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Re: Investing

Post by grubberkick »

I would suggest 'slow and steady' as the mantra for today's markets, with capital preservation paramount. Example funds, Troy Trojan, Ruffer Total Return. Avoid what has historically shown high volatility.
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Yourmother
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Re: Investing

Post by Yourmother »

TranceNRG wrote:What's IG like as a platform? They don't do funds do they?
Can do indices in place of funds. Ie like ETFs

Must admit, I'm not a big spread better, but I have a play account for the kicks of intraday. But not heard of many doing long term investments in it, or the deals you get there.

In any case, for my ISA I've been lazy, to avoid transaction fees and rebalancing, I have been going with single solution funds eg Standard Life Myfolio. But most of these are quite expensive annual fee as fund of funds. So right now, I've been looking at the Vanguard life strategy range. Only 0.24% OCF. It is basically a fund of ETFs. They have equity/bond mixes as well as lifecycle target maturity ones.

Think I might take a punt on this. Great global diversification exposure for a cheap price.
backrow
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Re: Investing

Post by backrow »

For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

backrow wrote:For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

Yourmother wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:What's IG like as a platform? They don't do funds do they?
Can do indices in place of funds. Ie like ETFs

Must admit, I'm not a big spread better, but I have a play account for the kicks of intraday. But not heard of many doing long term investments in it, or the deals you get there.

In any case, for my ISA I've been lazy, to avoid transaction fees and rebalancing, I have been going with single solution funds eg Standard Life Myfolio. But most of these are quite expensive annual fee as fund of funds. So right now, I've been looking at the Vanguard life strategy range. Only 0.24% OCF. It is basically a fund of ETFs. They have equity/bond mixes as well as lifecycle target maturity ones.

Think I might take a punt on this. Great global diversification exposure for a cheap price.
If you hold a few good performing and rated funds you can achieve good diversification with an average OCF less than 1%
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

Where are all the PR millionaires?
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Yourmother
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Re: Investing

Post by Yourmother »

For any building block/core funds you should be paying well under 1%. Though, trackers you can get for around 0.15%.

Top ratings for "many" managers are not sustainable. Success of strategies in cyclical often.

For example your fund smith equity fund. The guy has done well simply because never invests in mining/banks. So he looks like he's smashed it. But while that strategy has been effective in the past ... Who knows.

Having said that there are some top quality managers, who over decades have succeeded, because they can stock pick well.
backrow
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Re: Investing

Post by backrow »

TranceNRG wrote:
backrow wrote:For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?
Property - house and 3 flats in London , mix of new build and do er uppers
Family property in Devon , Edinburgh , South Africa and Romania

Shares - strictly try to follow the Ben graham / Seth klarman style value investing, still currently building up dividend yielding blue chips. Research a company, invest, if price goes down, buy some more. Re invest all dividends. Will give you an example of how this works: bought house builder persimmon back in March at 20 quid. Within six weeks was at 22 quid. Brexit vote, price crashed to 13 quid. Got some more. Price now 18 quid, am up overall. I was happy in my initial decision to invest and thought their sales would increase - misjudged the brexit vote totally but took opportunity to buy some more shares cheaply, rather than panic sell.

This doesn't always work, have lost plenty on tesco for example
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Yourmother
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Re: Investing

Post by Yourmother »

If you are happy with your funds, but just want to cut back, you do have a lot of overlap there in terms of asset classes.

Vanguard US Index as well as Old Mutual North America. I presume the latter is pretty much US anyway. Not to mention fundsmith has 60% US.

You have so many UK equity funds as well, which I'm sure could be reduced and without losing exposure to niche segments. You've got micro cap (patient), equity income, small cap, mid cap, as well as having a broad UK fund in Lindsell.

Anyway, I suggest you group them in terms of asset class, and thin from there.


You might want to consider Corp bonds, global property as well (HSBC do a great one).
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J Man
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Re: Investing

Post by J Man »

Age 30, currently rent in a flatshare situation with others, own no major assets.

6 Months worth of expenses in a 3% Savings account (my emergency fund).

8% of salary goes to Kiwisaver (high growth mutual fund for pension or first house).

$200 per fortnight goes into a high growth mutual fund with my bank.

Any spare cash after that I will put into shares myself in fairly conservative assets (ETFs in Vanguard 500 or ports/utility companies).

Any finance types with criticisms/comments of the above I'd be interested to hear.

I like the work of John Bogle on this. This forum is very good:

https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/index. ... f72563b9e4
bimboman
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Re: Investing

Post by bimboman »

J Man wrote:Age 30, currently rent in a flatshare situation with others, own no major assets.

6 Months worth of expenses in a 3% Savings account (my emergency fund).

8% of salary goes to Kiwisaver (high growth mutual fund for pension or first house).

$200 per fortnight goes into a high growth mutual fund with my bank.

Any spare cash after that I will put into shares myself in fairly conservative assets (ETFs in Vanguard 500 or ports/utility companies).

Any finance types with criticisms/comments of the above I'd be interested to hear.

I like the work of John Bogle on this. This forum is very good:

https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/index. ... f72563b9e4

That's awesome.
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Yourmother
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Re: Investing

Post by Yourmother »

backrow wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
backrow wrote:For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?
Property - house and 3 flats in London , mix of new build and do er uppers
Family property in Devon , Edinburgh , South Africa and Romania

Shares - strictly try to follow the Ben graham / Seth klarman style value investing, still currently building up dividend yielding blue chips. Research a company, invest, if price goes down, buy some more. Re invest all dividends. Will give you an example of how this works: bought house builder persimmon back in March at 20 quid. Within six weeks was at 22 quid. Brexit vote, price crashed to 13 quid. Got some more. Price now 18 quid, am up overall. I was happy in my initial decision to invest and thought their sales would increase - misjudged the brexit vote totally but took opportunity to buy some more shares cheaply, rather than panic sell.

This doesn't always work, have lost plenty on tesco for example
It's a great strategy IMO. Never sell when down, buy more (unless it's a Zimbabwe). Balls of steel stuff. Not looked at it at a stock level though, just markets. Is it the same where you buy it it goes down, and then if it keeps going down, buy even more?
Last edited by Yourmother on Sat Sep 03, 2016 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
backrow
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Re: Investing

Post by backrow »

J Man wrote:Age 30, currently rent in a flatshare situation with others, own no major assets.

6 Months worth of expenses in a 3% Savings account (my emergency fund).

8% of salary goes to Kiwisaver (high growth mutual fund for pension or first house).

$200 per fortnight goes into a high growth mutual fund with my bank.

Any spare cash after that I will put into shares myself in fairly conservative assets (ETFs in Vanguard 500 or ports/utility companies).

Any finance types with criticisms/comments of the above I'd be interested to hear.

I like the work of John Bogle on this. This forum is very good:

https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/index. ... f72563b9e4
Um, would get yourself on the property ladder ASAP and give yourself and overnight several hundred dollar payrise . You don't say if you have any debts like credit cards or car loan, presume not as you seem to be doing pretty well for a 30 y o

Pretty much every book on how to get rich , says buy property, refinance , use the deposit to buy another, repeat . At end of day you have to live somewhere so if your work place is stable and you can manage it, it's rarely a bad idea to buy yourself a wee place.
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grubberkick
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Re: Investing

Post by grubberkick »

J Man wrote:Age 30, currently rent in a flatshare situation with others, own no major assets.

6 Months worth of expenses in a 3% Savings account (my emergency fund).

8% of salary goes to Kiwisaver (high growth mutual fund for pension or first house).

$200 per fortnight goes into a high growth mutual fund with my bank.

Any spare cash after that I will put into shares myself in fairly conservative assets (ETFs in Vanguard 500 or ports/utility companies).

Any finance types with criticisms/comments of the above I'd be interested to hear.

I like the work of John Bogle on this. This forum is very good:

https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/index. ... f72563b9e4
Check what the bank charges for the privilege of investing with them and check the relative performance of their fund ..... if you haven't already done so.
backrow
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Re: Investing

Post by backrow »

Yourmother wrote:
backrow wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
backrow wrote:For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?
Property - house and 3 flats in London , mix of new build and do er uppers
Family property in Devon , Edinburgh , South Africa and Romania

Shares - strictly try to follow the Ben graham / Seth klarman style value investing, still currently building up dividend yielding blue chips. Research a company, invest, if price goes down, buy some more. Re invest all dividends. Will give you an example of how this works: bought house builder persimmon back in March at 20 quid. Within six weeks was at 22 quid. Brexit vote, price crashed to 13 quid. Got some more. Price now 18 quid, am up overall. I was happy in my initial decision to invest and thought their sales would increase - misjudged the brexit vote totally but took opportunity to buy some more shares cheaply, rather than panic sell.

This doesn't always work, have lost plenty on tesco for example
It's a great strategy IMO. Never sell when down, buy more. Balls of steel stuff. Not looked at it at a stock level though, just markets. Is it the same where you buy it it goes down, and then if it keeps going down, buy even more?
Yes, within reason. I first got tesco at 440, then 300, then 250, then 150..
Am now rather heavily weighted on it and the bastards have suspended the dividend for last 2 years so not even get a trickle cheaply. I suspect I won't be getting any more of this stock, especially as I now indirectly work for them and go to welyn garden city often !
bimboman
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Re: Investing

Post by bimboman »

backrow wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
backrow wrote:For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?
Property - house and 3 flats in London , mix of new build and do er uppers
Family property in Devon , Edinburgh , South Africa and Romania

Shares - strictly try to follow the Ben graham / Seth klarman style value investing, still currently building up dividend yielding blue chips. Research a company, invest, if price goes down, buy some more. Re invest all dividends. Will give you an example of how this works: bought house builder persimmon back in March at 20 quid. Within six weeks was at 22 quid. Brexit vote, price crashed to 13 quid. Got some more. Price now 18 quid, am up overall. I was happy in my initial decision to invest and thought their sales would increase - misjudged the brexit vote totally but took opportunity to buy some more shares cheaply, rather than panic sell.

This doesn't always work, have lost plenty on tesco for example

Averaging down is an emotional investment rather than a rational one.
bimboman
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Re: Investing

Post by bimboman »

backrow wrote:
J Man wrote:Age 30, currently rent in a flatshare situation with others, own no major assets.

6 Months worth of expenses in a 3% Savings account (my emergency fund).

8% of salary goes to Kiwisaver (high growth mutual fund for pension or first house).

$200 per fortnight goes into a high growth mutual fund with my bank.

Any spare cash after that I will put into shares myself in fairly conservative assets (ETFs in Vanguard 500 or ports/utility companies).

Any finance types with criticisms/comments of the above I'd be interested to hear.

I like the work of John Bogle on this. This forum is very good:

https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/index. ... f72563b9e4
Um, would get yourself on the property ladder ASAP and give yourself and overnight several hundred dollar payrise . You don't say if you have any debts like credit cards or car loan, presume not as you seem to be doing pretty well for a 30 y o

Pretty much every book on how to get rich , says buy property, refinance , use the deposit to buy another, repeat . At end of day you have to live somewhere so if your work place is stable and you can manage it, it's rarely a bad idea to buy yourself a wee place.

Are your properties on repayment mortgages or interest only?
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grubberkick
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Re: Investing

Post by grubberkick »

backrow wrote:
Yourmother wrote:
backrow wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
backrow wrote:For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?
Property - house and 3 flats in London , mix of new build and do er uppers
Family property in Devon , Edinburgh , South Africa and Romania

Shares - strictly try to follow the Ben graham / Seth klarman style value investing, still currently building up dividend yielding blue chips. Research a company, invest, if price goes down, buy some more. Re invest all dividends. Will give you an example of how this works: bought house builder persimmon back in March at 20 quid. Within six weeks was at 22 quid. Brexit vote, price crashed to 13 quid. Got some more. Price now 18 quid, am up overall. I was happy in my initial decision to invest and thought their sales would increase - misjudged the brexit vote totally but took opportunity to buy some more shares cheaply, rather than panic sell.

This doesn't always work, have lost plenty on tesco for example
It's a great strategy IMO. Never sell when down, buy more. Balls of steel stuff. Not looked at it at a stock level though, just markets. Is it the same where you buy it it goes down, and then if it keeps going down, buy even more?
Yes, within reason. I first got tesco at 440, then 300, then 250, then 150..
Am now rather heavily weighted on it and the bastards have suspended the dividend for last 2 years so not even get a trickle cheaply. I suspect I won't be getting any more of this stock, especially as I now indirectly work for them and go to welyn garden city often !
Sometimes markets can stay irrational for longer than you can stay solvent.
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Yourmother
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Re: Investing

Post by Yourmother »

Yeah, that's not great. But you're not selling. So sounds like a long game one here. Pretty sure they are not a BHS type case, IMO.

But like I say, I wouldn't really do it stock level.
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Yourmother
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Re: Investing

Post by Yourmother »

grubberkick wrote:
backrow wrote:
Yourmother wrote:
backrow wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?
Property - house and 3 flats in London , mix of new build and do er uppers
Family property in Devon , Edinburgh , South Africa and Romania

Shares - strictly try to follow the Ben graham / Seth klarman style value investing, still currently building up dividend yielding blue chips. Research a company, invest, if price goes down, buy some more. Re invest all dividends. Will give you an example of how this works: bought house builder persimmon back in March at 20 quid. Within six weeks was at 22 quid. Brexit vote, price crashed to 13 quid. Got some more. Price now 18 quid, am up overall. I was happy in my initial decision to invest and thought their sales would increase - misjudged the brexit vote totally but took opportunity to buy some more shares cheaply, rather than panic sell.

This doesn't always work, have lost plenty on tesco for example
It's a great strategy IMO. Never sell when down, buy more. Balls of steel stuff. Not looked at it at a stock level though, just markets. Is it the same where you buy it it goes down, and then if it keeps going down, buy even more?
Yes, within reason. I first got tesco at 440, then 300, then 250, then 150..
Am now rather heavily weighted on it and the bastards have suspended the dividend for last 2 years so not even get a trickle cheaply. I suspect I won't be getting any more of this stock, especially as I now indirectly work for them and go to welyn garden city often !
Sometimes markets can stay irrational for longer than you can stay solvent.
I think it goes without saying it won't be 100% of his portfolio though, there's a limit to how much you should pile in. And yes, we've all heard that quote.
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J Man
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Re: Investing

Post by J Man »

backrow wrote: You don't say if you have any debts like credit cards or car loan, presume not as you seem to be doing pretty well for a 30 y o
$10,000 student loan but it has no interest so paying that off as slowly as legally allowed.

No other debt - I drive a 1996 Toyota Corolla :lol:
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Re: Investing

Post by backrow »

bimboman wrote:
backrow wrote:
J Man wrote:Age 30, currently rent in a flatshare situation with others, own no major assets.

6 Months worth of expenses in a 3% Savings account (my emergency fund).

8% of salary goes to Kiwisaver (high growth mutual fund for pension or first house).

$200 per fortnight goes into a high growth mutual fund with my bank.

Any spare cash after that I will put into shares myself in fairly conservative assets (ETFs in Vanguard 500 or ports/utility companies).

Any finance types with criticisms/comments of the above I'd be interested to hear.

I like the work of John Bogle on this. This forum is very good:

https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/index. ... f72563b9e4
Um, would get yourself on the property ladder ASAP and give yourself and overnight several hundred dollar payrise . You don't say if you have any debts like credit cards or car loan, presume not as you seem to be doing pretty well for a 30 y o

Pretty much every book on how to get rich , says buy property, refinance , use the deposit to buy another, repeat . At end of day you have to live somewhere so if your work place is stable and you can manage it, it's rarely a bad idea to buy yourself a wee place.

Are your properties on repayment mortgages or interest only?
The big one I live in, repayment. The b2L are all int only in the uk, owned outright or repayment abroad
backrow
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Re: Investing

Post by backrow »

J Man wrote:
backrow wrote: You don't say if you have any debts like credit cards or car loan, presume not as you seem to be doing pretty well for a 30 y o
$10,000 student loan but it has no interest so paying that off as slowly as legally allowed.

No other debt - I drive a 1996 Toyota Corolla :lol:
That must get you a lot of pussy tbf, nowt gets them wetter than a 2 decade old grandpa mobile
bimboman
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Re: Investing

Post by bimboman »

Have a plan for when those mortgages run out Yeeb. Make sure they mature at differant times.
backrow
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Re: Investing

Post by backrow »

bimboman wrote:
backrow wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
backrow wrote:For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?
Property - house and 3 flats in London , mix of new build and do er uppers
Family property in Devon , Edinburgh , South Africa and Romania

Shares - strictly try to follow the Ben graham / Seth klarman style value investing, still currently building up dividend yielding blue chips. Research a company, invest, if price goes down, buy some more. Re invest all dividends. Will give you an example of how this works: bought house builder persimmon back in March at 20 quid. Within six weeks was at 22 quid. Brexit vote, price crashed to 13 quid. Got some more. Price now 18 quid, am up overall. I was happy in my initial decision to invest and thought their sales would increase - misjudged the brexit vote totally but took opportunity to buy some more shares cheaply, rather than panic sell.

This doesn't always work, have lost plenty on tesco for example

Averaging down is an emotional investment rather than a rational one.
Almost completely disagree with you - for an established company such as a blue chip dividend paying company that always makes some kind of profit, if the prices goes down by a significant amount for no reason other market sentiment, that is a buying opportunity . If it goes down for a real reason like BP and its leak then the actual worth of the firm may have materially changed

Sorry Am knackered so not explaining myself well, but price goes down on a blue chip then it's usually a buying op for me, if price goes down on one of my real punts... Then time prob to walk away. On this, I see what you mean because it's like doubling up on a bet.
Tbf I only really have one punt, the rest are blue chips
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

Yourmother wrote:If you are happy with your funds, but just want to cut back, you do have a lot of overlap there in terms of asset classes.

Vanguard US Index as well as Old Mutual North America. I presume the latter is pretty much US anyway. Not to mention fundsmith has 60% US.

You have so many UK equity funds as well, which I'm sure could be reduced and without losing exposure to niche segments. You've got micro cap (patient), equity income, small cap, mid cap, as well as having a broad UK fund in Lindsell.

Anyway, I suggest you group them in terms of asset class, and thin from there.


You might want to consider Corp bonds, global property as well (HSBC do a great one).
Yep, the reason I want to reduce the number of funds is because the asset classes overlap plus it's just easier to manage when you don't have so many funds but pretty much all my funds have returned decent profit. I bought most of these couple of years ago when I was starting out.

The Fidelity moneybuilder account mainly invests in corporate bonds. I did have the Blackrock global corporate bond tracker but sold it.
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Re: Investing

Post by backrow »

bimboman wrote:Have a plan for when those mortgages run out Yeeb. Make sure they mature at differant times.
Just keep on refinancing on the int only ones , they are no nearer being paid off than when I started .
Working back in time 25 years, finding say 50k to repay a house now worth 500k should not be too much of a problem. Ultimate aim would be to sell one of them off to fully repay everything else, but am still in the accumulation phase of my life. Will wait for my old man to pop off before I think about paying anything off, he's 82 but as stubborn as me so will be around a while still I reckon.
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TranceNRG
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Re: Investing

Post by TranceNRG »

backrow wrote:
TranceNRG wrote:
backrow wrote:For the private investor , I think some form of tracker should be the main regular component. Personally I am wary of active managers, seeing as only a few percent of them beat 'the market' over the long term. I also have self select share isas as I like the buzz of investing and making my own decisions. Presume this thread is not for non share and fund based investments like property or fine wines.
True but there are still actively managed funds that have beaten tracker funds over 5 years, 10 years. People like Terry Smith and Nick Train have consistently beaten the market thus rated highly by analysts on Morningstar and Trustnet. I am happy with my choice of active funds at the moment but I'm looking to reduce the number of funds.

Definitely share your investment property (and other types) success stories. Where are your properties and are they flats or houses?

Property - house and 3 flats in London , mix of new build and do er uppers

Family property in Devon , Edinburgh , South Africa and Romania

Shares - strictly try to follow the Ben graham / Seth klarman style value investing, still currently building up dividend yielding blue chips. Research a company, invest, if price goes down, buy some more. Re invest all dividends. Will give you an example of how this works: bought house builder persimmon back in March at 20 quid. Within six weeks was at 22 quid. Brexit vote, price crashed to 13 quid. Got some more. Price now 18 quid, am up overall. I was happy in my initial decision to invest and thought their sales would increase - misjudged the brexit vote totally but took opportunity to buy some more shares cheaply, rather than panic sell.

This doesn't always work, have lost plenty on tesco for example
Currently I have a property in West London but I may well buy a flat somewhere in the UK(BTL) in a few years time.
Would you consider buying anymore now that the stamp duty fees have gone up for BTL properties?
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