Americanisms in UK English

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Sefton
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Sefton »

'Spelled' gets right on my tits.
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globus
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by globus »

Mr Mike wrote:
Fish Sentinel wrote:You can be excused globby, having done the number of things you have claimed, it has to be accepted, you wouldn't have time to fit in an education in also

bit concerned why you be so close walking behind those 4 girls in school uniform, to hear their conversation
"Archiving"?
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Chuckles1188 »

Donger wrote:
Chuckles1188 wrote:Generally speaking American English is closer to the form of English spoken in Britain during the 15th-17th centuries than modern British English is. The reason their version of the language sounds different to ours is that it has mutated less, not more. The classic example is aluminum/aluminium. When discovered it was named aluminum by its discoverer, but was then altered to be aluminium later because it fit better with the rest of the elements in its column of the periodic table. Aluminum is the older version, aluminium newer

useful example...except aluminium was renamed in the 19th C.
Topical
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indomite
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by indomite »

Fangle wrote:Gifted, which somehow over the last thirty years snuck its way out of America. Check any older dictionary.
?

First reference in the OED is 1644. But that's a shit older dictionary.
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indomite
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by indomite »

Fenman wrote:It has to have been the Yanks who turned 'medal' into a verb, as in 'he is sure to medal at the Olympics. However my all time mixed metaphor came from a Brit (Liverpudlian, so allowances can be made) who asserted that 'we should go for the moral high ground on the level playing field'. Conjures up a variety of images.
Modern usage as an intransitive verb does seem to be American. Though Thackeray used it as a transitive verb, which to my ear sounds very peculiar.
Irving went home medalled by the king.
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indomite
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by indomite »

Dork Lard wrote:the got/gotten is definitely the iconic one. I said 'gotten' up until very recently when an english teacher friend stopped me and told me.
The shit thing is now every time I'll say for e.g. "the last time I'd got.." I find myself having to justify it's the correct way.
Your usage was perhaps ill-gotten?
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indomite
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by indomite »

Donger wrote:
c69 wrote:Al lum in um

Aks ffs
Axe was in the first translation of the Bible into English, and was the word Chaucer wrote.

it hung around in the South.
Pre-dates Chaucer. Was possibly æx first. But you'll find all sorts of spellings.
pontifex
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by pontifex »

A British form that seems new (is it?) that gets on my nerves is: "I was sat at the bar when my friend walked in". Past passive instead of past continuous.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by A5D5E5 »

pontifex wrote:A British form that seems new (is it?) that gets on my nerves is: "I was sat at the bar when my friend walked in". Past passive instead of past continuous.
I think this is just bad English rather than anything particularly new. "I was stood at the bus stop" etc have been common for as long as I can remember. I doubt many people would know or even care about the difference.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by danny_fitz »

do the 'math'

:x
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Tony Blair's Therapist
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Tony Blair's Therapist »

Dork Lard wrote:
Tony Blair's Therapist wrote:
Dork Lard wrote:the got/gotten is definitely the iconic one. I said 'gotten' up until very recently when an english teacher friend stopped me and told me.
The shit thing is now every time I'll say for e.g. "the last time I'd got.." I find myself having to justify it's the correct way.
"I gotten up" isn't and Americanism. It's just wrong. Simple past in American and English English is "got".
It's both wrong conjugation and an Americanism.

And btw there's the weird shit english people say that Americans don't. In the UK people constantly say "the team are", "that university are", which are wrong grammatically and Americans don't make that mistake. "Team", singular: the team is.
The grammar police is after you (see what I did there?) for your thinking that using a verb in the plural with a collective noun is a mistake.
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message #2527204
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

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'Back in the day' ... wtf?
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fraz
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by fraz »

Tony Blair's Therapist wrote:
Dork Lard wrote:
Tony Blair's Therapist wrote:
Dork Lard wrote:the got/gotten is definitely the iconic one. I said 'gotten' up until very recently when an english teacher friend stopped me and told me.
The shit thing is now every time I'll say for e.g. "the last time I'd got.." I find myself having to justify it's the correct way.
"I gotten up" isn't and Americanism. It's just wrong. Simple past in American and English English is "got".
It's both wrong conjugation and an Americanism.

And btw there's the weird shit english people say that Americans don't. In the UK people constantly say "the team are", "that university are", which are wrong grammatically and Americans don't make that mistake. "Team", singular: the team is.
The grammar police is after you (see what I did there?) for your thinking that using a verb in the plural with a collective noun is a mistake.
Ugh no. Shabby.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Turbogoat »

A girl from Texas and a girl from London were seated side by side on a flight. The girl from Texas, being friendly and all, said "So, where y'all from?"

The girl from London said "From a place where they know better than to use a preposition at the end of a sentence."

The girl from Texas sat quietly for a few moments and then replied "So, where y'all from, cunt?"
Rootheday
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Rootheday »

"It is what it is" has become almost universal within the past 10 years.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Gwenno »

A5D5E5 wrote:
pontifex wrote:A British form that seems new (is it?) that gets on my nerves is: "I was sat at the bar when my friend walked in". Past passive instead of past continuous.
I think this is just bad English rather than anything particularly new. "I was stood at the bus stop" etc have been common for as long as I can remember. I doubt many people would know or even care about the difference.
My English teacher at school used to say that it should be 'seated' or 'sitting' in that context, and that the use of 'sat' there implies that someone has put the person there - but he probably just didn't like it because he thought it was 'Northern' (English, not Gog)
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message #2527204
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by message #2527204 »

Rootheday wrote:"It is what it is" has become almost universal within the past 10 years.
followed by 'We are where we are'.

It's a euphemism. 'You've really f**ked this up' is the actual meaning.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Gwenno »

Turbogoat wrote:A girl from Texas and a girl from London were seated side by side on a flight. The girl from Texas, being friendly and all, said "So, where y'all from?"

The girl from London said "From a place where they know better than to use a preposition at the end of a sentence."

The girl from Texas sat quietly for a few moments and then replied "So, where y'all from, cunt?"
I love 'y'all' - makes a group even out of individuals.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Rootheday »

"Y'all" is quite endearing tbf
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Chuckles1188 »

Turbogoat wrote:A girl from Texas and a girl from London were seated side by side on a flight. The girl from Texas, being friendly and all, said "So, where y'all from?"

The girl from London said "From a place where they know better than to use a preposition at the end of a sentence."

The girl from Texas sat quietly for a few moments and then replied "So, where y'all from, cunt?"
It is the type of arrant pedantry up with which I will not put
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by fisgard792 »

message #2527204 wrote:
Rootheday wrote:"It is what it is" has become almost universal within the past 10 years.
followed by 'We are where we are'.

It's a euphemism. 'You've really f**k this up' is the actual meaning.
:) indeed,

there was a bullshit bingo full of this stuff a while back
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globus
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by globus »

Here is my "bible".

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Gwenno
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Gwenno »

globus wrote:Here is my "bible".

Image
I too have that. And Eric Partridge 'Usage and Abusage'
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globus
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by globus »

We really must get out more, Gwenno.
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sewa
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by sewa »

AND-y wrote:I know, right.
Haha, my 11 year old says this at least twice a day, drives me nuts :x
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Newsome
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Newsome »

I could care les about this thread. I've had a real good time reading it.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Gwenno »

globus wrote:We really must get out more, Gwenno.
..and start the grumbling old farts' club. :lol:
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by globus »

Gwenno wrote:
globus wrote:We really must get out more, Gwenno.
..and start the grumbling old farts' club. :lol:
I'm in it already. A fully paid subscriber.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Sandstorm »

Turbogoat wrote:A girl from Texas and a girl from London were seated side by side on a flight. The girl from Texas, being friendly and all, said "So, where y'all from?"

The girl from London said "From a place where they know better than to use a preposition at the end of a sentence."

The girl from Texas sat quietly for a few moments and then replied "So, where y'all from, cunt?"
Did they kiss and make up afterwards?
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by message #2527204 »

Gwenno wrote:
globus wrote:We really must get out more, Gwenno.
..and start the grumbling old farts' club. :lol:
More the farting old grumblers' club.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Gwenno »

message #2527204 wrote:
Gwenno wrote:
globus wrote:We really must get out more, Gwenno.
..and start the grumbling old farts' club. :lol:
More the farting old grumblers' club.
Sign me up for that!
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message #2527204
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by message #2527204 »

computer 'mouses'
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DOB
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by DOB »

Turbogoat wrote:A girl from Texas and a girl from London were seated side by side on a flight. The girl from Texas, being friendly and all, said "So, where y'all from?"

The girl from London said "From a place where they know better than to use a preposition at the end of a sentence."

The girl from Texas sat quietly for a few moments and then replied "So, where y'all from, cunt?"
I call bullshit. Now way the Texan chick used the C word. Maybe "sweetheart," or "darlin," more than likely in a very patronizing tone of voice. Maybe even "bitch." But never plum.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by message #2527204 »

DOB wrote:
Turbogoat wrote:A girl from Texas and a girl from London were seated side by side on a flight. The girl from Texas, being friendly and all, said "So, where y'all from?"

The girl from London said "From a place where they know better than to use a preposition at the end of a sentence."

The girl from Texas sat quietly for a few moments and then replied "So, where y'all from, cunt?"
I call bullshit. Now way the Texan chick used the C word. Maybe "sweetheart," or "darlin," more than likely in a very patronizing tone of voice. Maybe even "bitch." But never plum.
An almost perfect balance of hyperbole, juxtaposition and taboo, and you call bullshit?
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by message #2527204 »

Biweekly meeting when you mean fortnightly meeting. Biweekly is obviously twice a week.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Tim13 »

sewa wrote:
AND-y wrote:I know, right.
Haha, my 11 year old says this at least twice a day, drives me nuts :x
also...

Wait, what?
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Donger »

This weekend vs. Next weekend.

:x
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by message #2527204 »

The point of language is to communicate effectively. Why create misunderstanding by talking bollocks unless confusion is your aim?
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Donger »

Man In Black wrote:I love how irritated pedantic f**k get about this stuff. Who cares. :lol:
:x "pedantic f**ks", thank you.
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Re: Americanisms in UK English

Post by Fangle »

Donger wrote:This weekend vs. Next weekend.

:x
This isn't limited to America. I always clarify by asking if it is 3 or 10 days time.
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