€100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

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Harveys
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Harveys »

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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

bimboman wrote:The Camorra coin looks good.

Let's be honest there's a whole heap,of theft going on isn't there. ?
What is this?
bimboman
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by bimboman »

sorCrer wrote:
bimboman wrote:The Camorra coin looks good.

Let's be honest there's a whole heap,of theft going on isn't there. ?
What is this?

A bit of a jibe at the criminal opportunities available with crypto coins currently.
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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

bimboman wrote:
sorCrer wrote:
bimboman wrote:The Camorra coin looks good.

Let's be honest there's a whole heap,of theft going on isn't there. ?
What is this?

A bit of a jibe at the criminal opportunities available with crypto coins currently.
Eh? It has a last recorded market cap of $351 and from what I can tell hasn't been traded since Sept 2015.
ukjim
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by ukjim »

tbf buying hashing power and coin tumbling is a very good way to launder money...
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Leinster in London
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Leinster in London »

ukjim wrote:tbf buying hashing power and coin tumbling is a very good way to launder money...
You would want to do the laundering soon. The major economies will put pressure on the companies registered in their jurisdiction to apply serious KYC legislation. This will push the companies to those ultra secure countries like Russia, Ukraine, and China.
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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

Leinster in London wrote:
ukjim wrote:tbf buying hashing power and coin tumbling is a very good way to launder money...
You would want to do the laundering soon. The major economies will put pressure on the companies registered in their jurisdiction to apply serious KYC legislation. This will push the companies to those ultra secure countries like Russia, Ukraine, and China.
I've had to KYC every exchange account I've created since 2013.
Santa
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Santa »

I was convinced that this time things would be different.
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Sandstorm
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Sandstorm »

Santa wrote:I was convinced that this time things would be different.
That's what we were told! :((
Nabberuk
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Nabberuk »

Read the other days that those dodgy folk are going to start using Litecoin instead of Bitcoin due to quicker transactions
goeagles
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by goeagles »

Bitgrail saga sucks for those who got their money stolen. Probably Nano's Mt Gox event.
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Harveys
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Harveys »

We’re excited about our work with @WesternUnion towards a pilot implementation of xRapid, which uses $XRP in payment flows.
https://t.co/Aq6wmqNouN
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Anonymous 1
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Anonymous 1 »

Harveys wrote:
We’re excited about our work with @WesternUnion towards a pilot implementation of xRapid, which uses $XRP in payment flows.
https://t.co/Aq6wmqNouN
It's all bollox
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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

Harveys wrote:
We’re excited about our work with @WesternUnion towards a pilot implementation of xRapid, which uses $XRP in payment flows.
https://t.co/Aq6wmqNouN
:thumbup: :nod:
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kiwinoz
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by kiwinoz »

So the Australian Commonwealth Bank who has 25% of all credit cards has banned buying bitcoin by credit card as they deem it "inappropriate". So much for capitalism.
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paddyor
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by paddyor »

kiwinoz wrote:So the Australian Commonwealth Bank who has 25% of all credit cards has banned buying bitcoin by credit card as they deem it "inappropriate". So much for capitalism.
Kiddo, I don't know how to break it to you but, that's capitalism. They don't have to extend credit to people if they don't want to because "reasons".
goeagles
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by goeagles »

The nocoiners get tired of dancing on Bitcoin's grave?
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kiwinoz
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by kiwinoz »

Its nanny State Capitalism. Want to buy pron, Lotto tickets or margin to the hilt on shares? All good.

12 months from now a long BTC/ short Nasdaq/S&P/FTSE/ASX would be a good trade.
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Cartman
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Cartman »

Trading USD/JPY today
Bit oversold me thinks
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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

On one of our major chat radio stations 702 this morning the announced the BTC price with the spot prices. 8)
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Harveys
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Harveys »

bimboman wrote:
Harveys wrote:I am across this to the degree that I have been doing bits a pieces of research over the last month on line and reading forums, I’m sure there are more knowledgeable posters on the subject. I hold XRP so look at through that lenses as well.

I'm looking for the issue that if it becomes a standard payment tech (like swift ) then the XRP has to become a standard price or worthless as banks and the payment system would be hostage to fortune.

Plus they'll have regulatory issues galore in he holding of an asset.
bimboman wrote:It's difficult to value ripple if they become intrinsic as the regulators won't allow it.
Bimbo can you please enlarge on the above I am interested and want to better understand these issues.
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Harveys
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Harveys »

Suppose Ripple is successful positioning XRP as a settlement currency for payments. Banks could still use market makers for settlement. The market makers would have to hold XRP in order to pay each other. Whether a particular bank will hold XRP or not depends on a lot of factors.

One is whether they can accomplish it from a regulatory perspective. This used to be a big obstacle but has not been such a big issue recently. While some banks cannot hold a speculative asset, they can get around this by employing a third party to act as the legal owner of the XRP. This third party would take the risk of a drop in value and gain the benefit of an increase in value.

How this would be structured depends on what the risk profile of holding XRP actually is. If the benefits of holding XRP exceed the risk, then the third party would pay the bank. If the risk exceeds the benefits, the bank would pay the third party. Banks typically consist of a large number of legal entities, not all of which are technically banks. So the third party can be an arm of the bank that is not itself a bank.
A bank will hold XRP if:

It saves them money.
They cannot get as good or better service from market makers.
They can overcome any regulatory hurdles involved.

Ripple is actively pursuing strategies (such as xRapid) that allow XRP to act as a settlement currency without requiring FIs to hold XRP. Ensuring that there is sufficient market making to allow XRP liquidity into key corridors is also one of those strategies.

Even if banks do not hold XRP though, there are lots of other parties that would be heavily incentivized to hold a currency that is used as a settlement currency.

For one thing, you can acquire a settlement currency very cheaply, possibly even at below market rates. You do this by waiting for someone to make a payment that delivers that asset you want to get rid of. You take the XRP they got in exchange for the asset they’re paying with. So companies (like Uber or AirBNB) that makes lots of payments can acquire XRP cheaply by market making, which also provides liquidity for other people’s payments.

Why would companies like Uber and AirBNB want to acquire XRP cheaply? Because if it’s a settlement currency in many corridors they need to make payments to, they can make their payments cheaply if they already have XRP. Instead of having to buy XRP from a market maker, they’ll already have it and only have to pay for the “from XRP” side of the payment.

So if Ripple is successful in positioning XRP as a settlement currency, even if FIs don’t hold XRP, companies that make lots of payments around the world would be incentivized to act as market makers to acquire XRP cheaply and then use that XRP to make outbound payments cheaply. This could be a significant source of demand.
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by goeagles »

https://www.coindesk.com/the-problem-with-nocoiners/
A nocoiner, according to Urban Dictionary, is someone who has no bitcoin. But not everyone who has no bitcoin is necessarily a nocoiner.

Rather, what makes a nocoiner a nocoiner is not simply the absence of cryptocurrency from his investment portfolio, but his sanctimonious attitude about it.

Urban Dictionary's definition, which was posted in December - about the time the word entered wide usage in the bitcoin community - goes on to describe nocoiners as:

"....people who missed their opportunity to buy Bitcoin at a low price ... and who [are] now bitter at having missed out. The nocoiner takes out his or her bitterness on Bitcoin Hodlers, by constantly claiming that Bitcoin will crash, is a scam, is a bubble, or other types of easily refuted FUD."

In other words, a nocoiner is full of what philosophers call ressentiment, defined by La Wik as "a reassignment of the pain that accompanies a sense of one's own inferiority/failure onto an external scapegoat."

The Twitter user known as @crackbagged picked up on this psychological insight in a Medium post in June of last year, warning fellow bitcoiners not to gloat when the price reaches $1 million:

"The people you told about Bitcoin may turn on you and assault you. You might be accused of witchcraft and thrown down a well, or worse. The mind of a nocoiner (a person who has no Bitcoin) is a dangerous place."

Marco Santori, a lawyer who's represented bitcoin startups since the early days and now the president and chief legal officer of wallet provider Blockchain, recently tweeted his distaste for the word "nocoiner," writing that "it has a bitter us-vs-them flavor to it" and "smacks of partisan tribalism."

But nocoiners engage in tribal signalling at least as much as bitcoiners. The nocoiner isn't just skeptical or even bearish about bitcoin. He feigns epistemic certainty that it will fail.

A nocoiner doesn't simply express doubt about the use cases for cryptocurrency - he declares, unequivocally, that there are no use cases at all, in the face of evidence to the contrary. (A subset of nocoiners will assert that the only uses are criminal, implicitly committing the logical fallacy of appeal to the law.)

The nocoiner mocks the bitcoiner's evangelical fervor, but he is every bit as religious in his convictions - and nowhere near as endearing.

The first use of "nocoiner" on Twitter is believed to have been in February 2017, though the term's apparently been used in 4chan forums for several years. But nocoiners have arguably been around since long before Satoshi's white paper. As long as humans have walked the Earth, perhaps.

In the late 19th century, Nietzsche compared the nocoiners of the day to tarantulas: "In all their lamentations soundeth vengeance ... and being judge seemeth to them bliss."

Mea culpa
Cards on the table: I myself was a proto-nocoiner in the late 1990s, a good 10 years before bitcoin's Genesis block.

Working at a daily banking newspaper (a phrase that will be indecipherable to our grandchildren), I sneered at the dot-com boom and regularly gawked at F**ked Company, a website that printed unvetted rumors of layoffs and bankruptcies at the era's highflying startups (what an edgy name, I thought then).

Incredulous about market valuations for companies with no profits or even revenues, I rolled my eyes and looked forward to the day when the the internet bubble would burst. Once this nonsense is over, I thought, we can concentrate on writing about serious companies. Like Countrywide, ha ha.

In my defense, a lot of those tech companies I scoffed at were indeed frivolous, and most went belly-up or got acquired. But the internet still transformed the economy (though the financial services industry less so) and the subsequent mortgage boom and bust were far more destructive, all things considered.

Even Fast Company is still around, while the tawdry gossip site that spoofed the magazine's name is long forgotten. Its rapier-like subtlety lives on at the r/buttcoin subreddit.

To be clear: The lesson from that era was not that we should revere entrepreneurs or accept all technologists' claims unchallenged. Rather, keep an open mind, think beyond the quarterly metrics Wall Street obsesses over, question your assumptions about how the world will always work - and don't confuse a beautiful horse (the world wide web, bitcoin) with the flies buzzing around its rear end (Pets.com, Mt. Gox).

In other words, you don't have to hold or even like bitcoin. Just don't be a nocoiner.
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by bimboman »

The Book of Mormon ...
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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

bimboman wrote:The Book of Mormon ...
Things are looking quite bullish again on the 4 hour.
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paddyor
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by paddyor »

goeagles wrote:....
To be clear: The lesson from that era was not that we should revere entrepreneurs or accept all technologists' claims unchallenged. Rather, keep an open mind, think beyond the quarterly metrics Wall Street obsesses over, question your assumptions about how the world will always work - and don't confuse a beautiful horse (the world wide web, bitcoin) with the flies buzzing around its rear end (Pets.com, Mt. Gox).

.....
Thats some grade A shite right there. You don't have to buy bitcoin to do that.
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paddyor
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by paddyor »

Image

:lol:
goeagles
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by goeagles »

paddyor wrote:
goeagles wrote:....
To be clear: The lesson from that era was not that we should revere entrepreneurs or accept all technologists' claims unchallenged. Rather, keep an open mind, think beyond the quarterly metrics Wall Street obsesses over, question your assumptions about how the world will always work - and don't confuse a beautiful horse (the world wide web, bitcoin) with the flies buzzing around its rear end (Pets.com, Mt. Gox).

.....
Thats some grade A shite right there. You don't have to buy bitcoin to do that.
Literally the next sentence:
In other words, you don't have to hold or even like bitcoin. Just don't be a nocoiner.
:lol: :lol:
Bowens
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Bowens »

paddyor wrote:Image

:lol:
"Evangelical fervor" is one of the few things that fanfic posted earlier got right.
goeagles
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by goeagles »

A blockchain pretty clearly could be used for better gun registry record keeping. But keep on with your "Bitcoin is a scam and going to zero" crap.
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Rumham »

goeagles wrote:A blockchain pretty clearly could be used for better gun registry record keeping. But keep on with your "Bitcoin is a scam and going to zero" crap.
Gun registry records is really the problem. Yeah.
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paddyor
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by paddyor »

goeagles wrote:
paddyor wrote:
goeagles wrote:....
To be clear: The lesson from that era was not that we should revere entrepreneurs or accept all technologists' claims unchallenged. Rather, keep an open mind, think beyond the quarterly metrics Wall Street obsesses over, question your assumptions about how the world will always work - and don't confuse a beautiful horse (the world wide web, bitcoin) with the flies buzzing around its rear end (Pets.com, Mt. Gox).

.....
Thats some grade A shite right there. You don't have to buy bitcoin to do that.
Literally the next sentence:
In other words, you don't have to hold or even like bitcoin. Just don't be a nocoiner.
:lol: :lol:
Yeah I can read. You gotta be super clever and virtuous to own the monorail.
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Sefton
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Sefton »

One of the podcasts I listen to is Click from the BBC World Service and It feels like every other feature has somebody eulogising how blockchains are going to fundamentally change their industry, it does remind me of the dot com 80’s with solid core underlying technology but with overblown expectations but then I’m an old fart now so there’s a good chance I’m talking shit.
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Plato'sCave
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Plato'sCave »

Sefton wrote:One of the podcasts I listen to is Click from the BBC World Service and It feels like every other feature has somebody eulogising how blockchains are going to fundamentally change their industry, it does remind me of the dot com 80’s with solid core underlying technology but with overblown expectations but then I’m an old fart now so there’s a good chance I’m talking shit.
It’s just a code encryption chain of data buckets that protection-buffers itself against quick creation and doesn’t require third party verification because it’s method of creation mitigates side-branch creation by verification of the timestamped single path from the genesis block. It’s a clever conduit that could carry any info.
goeagles
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by goeagles »

Rumham wrote:
goeagles wrote:A blockchain pretty clearly could be used for better gun registry record keeping. But keep on with your "Bitcoin is a scam and going to zero" crap.
Gun registry records is really the problem. Yeah.
It may not be the main problem, but it's one of the problems and blockchain is a realistic, good solution for that aspect and would absolutely help. Here are a couple looks at what that might look like:

https://peerj.com/preprints/3407.pdf
https://medium.com/@marcbhargava/a-bloc ... 7c1953055e

Oh, and a look at how dysfunctional the current registration system is: https://www.gq.com/story/inside-federal ... -many-guns
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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

Plato'sCave wrote:
Sefton wrote:One of the podcasts I listen to is Click from the BBC World Service and It feels like every other feature has somebody eulogising how blockchains are going to fundamentally change their industry, it does remind me of the dot com 80’s with solid core underlying technology but with overblown expectations but then I’m an old fart now so there’s a good chance I’m talking shit.
It’s just a code encryption chain of data buckets that protection-buffers itself against quick creation and doesn’t require third party verification because it’s method of creation mitigates side-branch creation by verification of the timestamped single path from the genesis block. It’s a clever conduit that could carry any info.
Excellent description. :lol:
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Plato'sCave
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Plato'sCave »

sorCrer wrote:
Plato'sCave wrote:
Sefton wrote:One of the podcasts I listen to is Click from the BBC World Service and It feels like every other feature has somebody eulogising how blockchains are going to fundamentally change their industry, it does remind me of the dot com 80’s with solid core underlying technology but with overblown expectations but then I’m an old fart now so there’s a good chance I’m talking shit.
It’s just a code encryption chain of data buckets that protection-buffers itself against quick creation and doesn’t require third party verification because it’s method of creation mitigates side-branch creation by verification of the timestamped single path from the genesis block. It’s a clever conduit that could carry any info.
Excellent description. :lol:
Thanks, I’m a software engineer, who does data mining and shit like that.
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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

Plato'sCave wrote:
sorCrer wrote:
Plato'sCave wrote:
Sefton wrote:One of the podcasts I listen to is Click from the BBC World Service and It feels like every other feature has somebody eulogising how blockchains are going to fundamentally change their industry, it does remind me of the dot com 80’s with solid core underlying technology but with overblown expectations but then I’m an old fart now so there’s a good chance I’m talking shit.
It’s just a code encryption chain of data buckets that protection-buffers itself against quick creation and doesn’t require third party verification because it’s method of creation mitigates side-branch creation by verification of the timestamped single path from the genesis block. It’s a clever conduit that could carry any info.
Excellent description. :lol:
Thanks, I’m a software engineer, who does data mining and shit like that.
I'm a software engineer that does full stack. Developing an Android mobile application in React Native using Realm as the local data store talking to a .Net Core 2 WebAPI with MSSQL data store and a React browser based management tool.
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Plato'sCave
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by Plato'sCave »

sorCrer wrote:
Plato'sCave wrote:
sorCrer wrote:
Plato'sCave wrote:
Sefton wrote:One of the podcasts I listen to is Click from the BBC World Service and It feels like every other feature has somebody eulogising how blockchains are going to fundamentally change their industry, it does remind me of the dot com 80’s with solid core underlying technology but with overblown expectations but then I’m an old fart now so there’s a good chance I’m talking shit.
It’s just a code encryption chain of data buckets that protection-buffers itself against quick creation and doesn’t require third party verification because it’s method of creation mitigates side-branch creation by verification of the timestamped single path from the genesis block. It’s a clever conduit that could carry any info.
Excellent description. :lol:
Thanks, I’m a software engineer, who does data mining and shit like that.
I'm a software engineer that does full stack. Developing an Android mobile application in React Native using Realm as the local data store talking to a .Net Core 2 WebAPI with MSSQL data store and a React browser based management tool.
Cool. I do mainly integration, reporting, cube analytics and mining, stats and science, commonly in the Microsoft stack SSIS, SSAS and SSRS. But also do some python in anaconda, and then NumPy upwards, whatever package I need, it’s just like complicated Lego. I’m in defence platforms. But this shit works everywhere, Data is data, math is math. We all want to know what, when, where, to give us our whys, hows, when wills etc etc. Just finding the coal amongst the filth.
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sorCrer
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Re: €100 of Bitcoin in 2010 = €70m today

Post by sorCrer »

You'll love these...

http://www.dancingbots.com
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