Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

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BlackMac
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by BlackMac »

Scrummie wrote:Looking forward to see how Bardet goes this year. Will the TT be his downfall?
I follow Bardet on Strava and he has been doing a trememdous amount of TT work.
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DOB
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by DOB »

Xupi wrote:
Joost wrote: Still, if he manages it, possible that he could win all 3 GC’s in a calendar year (sure no-one’s ever managed that) :shock:
Not only has it never been done, I don't think it's ever been attempted.

I just cannot imagine for a second that Froome would ride the Vuelta this year.
I think only Pantani has won the Giro/Tour double since the Vuelta moved to the Autumn. So only he, Merckx in 73, and Battaglin in 81, have ever won the first 2 grand tours of the year. None of them then went on to ride the 3rd (Merckx said he didn’t want to put his teammates through the pain of doing that all over again).

So no. Several riders have completed all 3 Tours in a year. Nobody has ever attempted to win a 3rd GT in the same year.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Xupi »

Scrummie wrote:There are those that say Froome might struggle to win the Tour due to his riding the Giro. What’s the difference between riding the Tour then the Vuelta and riding the Giro then the Tour? Is it timings or perceived toughness of the Giro or the Vuelta?
Winning 2 GC in a row is always, always, extremely tough. The only way to achieve this - besides being an all-time great - is to have a very easy ride on one of those GC's, which has happened in the past on the Giro on some years.

But this year, the Giro was exceptionally brutal with top riders like Aru or Pinot (or even S Yates) collapsing physically in an impressive manner - the former two being still in recovery mode after falling ill.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by DOB »

Scrummie wrote:There are those that say Froome might struggle to win the Tour due to his riding the Giro. What’s the difference between riding the Tour then the Vuelta and riding the Giro then the Tour? Is it timings or perceived toughness of the Giro or the Vuelta?
The Tour is the big one that most of the main contenders have targeted. The Vuelta for the last few years has been a bit of a consolation prize for guys who TdF didn’t quit go to plan, or who thought they’d get less competition there.

Anyone who’s made a serious attempt at a Giro Tour double in recent years has come up short. Contador won the Vuelta in 2014 (comfortably beating Froome in the end), the Giro in 2015, but was just never seriously in contention in the 2015 Tour.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Xupi »

Scrummie wrote: Anyone think Froome will put in another killer solo stage if the competition is close?
I have a very bad feeling for this year's Tour. Never had the resentment against Froome been as high as now within the ranks of French amateur packs, with whom I ride on a regular basis. Everyone knows the Giro has been an inferno. If on top of all this, he manages to continue to dominate the Tour I predict a massive, massive uproar.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Xupi »

Scrummie wrote: So are we saying the Tour / Vuelta is ‘easier’ then the Giro / Tour?

Last year Froome had a ‘light’ build up to the Tour and rode to fitness and still held that fitness at the Vuelta. This year he rode into fitness on the final week of the Giro so I guess the question is can he hold that fitness for the three weeks of the Tour? In that case he’ll need a good time gap after the TTT and cling on for dear life in the mountains and the gain or recoup in the TT? The team are going to earn their crust on this one.
Theoratically, the Tour is the toughest to win simply because there is usually more competition. And everything is bigger: (much) more media attention, money, pressure, tension, etc... so this would lead to a more difficult Giro-Tour double than Tour-Vuleta.

Now this being said, there have been some extremely tough and contested Vueltas in recent years, and some relatively mild and easy Giros as of late. But not 2018, the Giro was brutal, weather conditions were extreme and competition very fierce.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by BlackMac »

Scrummie wrote:
Xupi wrote:
Scrummie wrote: Anyone think Froome will put in another killer solo stage if the competition is close?
I have a very bad feeling for this year's Tour. Never had the resentment against Froome been as high as now within the ranks of French amateur packs, with whom I ride on a regular basis. Everyone knows the Giro has been an inferno. If on top of all this, he manages to continue to dominate the Tour I predict a massive, massive uproar.
Simple genuine question. Why?
Because he isn't French, is the main reason.
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Xupi
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Xupi »

Scrummie wrote: Simple genuine question. Why?
Why? because he was found with a high level of salbutamol during last year's Vuelta and until... today, the sentence had not been served. So people have had time to make up their mind. And as I said on top of that, the Giro was absolutely brutal - I mean very serious riders like Pinot and Aru have recently been quoted saying their body had not yet recovered from it - and during the Giro, Froome first collapsed and then spectacularly resurrected in a Landis-like stage (or a Coppi-like stage, if you prefer) where he destroyed the field leaving them all 80km from the finish line in a mammoth mountain stage. Many top riders have publicly said he should have not ridden during that temporary period (Dumoulin, Bardet), the Tour organisers themselves, desperate not to get a verdict from UCI, had just decided to ban him for fear of trouble... and now this.

It's all lined-up for a perfect storm, especially if Froome does not collapse and dominates.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Xupi »

Scrummie wrote: That I can understand anything else is sour grapes. If that then leads to interference with Froome during the race that would be disgraceful.
I do not think you understand what this sport and their fans have gone through during the Armstrong years.

What we all needed was a swift verdict and very clear medical explanations as to what the hell happened that day in Spain. Instead we were all left waiting for a year and still don't know f*ck all.

And in all this I do realize the extremely embarrassing position Froome was/is in. Ride or not ride? not riding would have given the impression he was guilty, but continuing to ride before being cleared was very touchy as well...
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Xupi »

Then let's talk about that brutal stage 17, 65km only with Peyresourdes + Azet (climbed it 3 weeks a go, a tough bummer) + Pla d'Adet.

Short and destructive this one. Unusual format. They'll have to adapt the delay calculations otherwise 3/4 of the pack would be eliminated...
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Xupi »

Scrummie wrote: As mentioned last year I’ve only ever driven up Peyresourdes and it’s criminally steep in places.
Azet is tougher (but shorter), and Pla d'Adet is even tougher (and long).
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by DOB »

Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by LandOTurk »

Xupi wrote:Then let's talk about that brutal stage 17, 65km only with Peyresourdes + Azet (climbed it 3 weeks a go, a tough bummer) + Pla d'Adet.

Short and destructive this one. Unusual format. They'll have to adapt the delay calculations otherwise 3/4 of the pack would be eliminated...
Love your posts by the way!
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by LandOTurk »

DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
And yours.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by DOB »

Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
How difficult would those climbs be for a Sunday club rider? I can do Ditchling Beacon, Leith Hill and Box Hill fairly easily with my Granny gear. Do you think I could cope doing a climb in stages with good breaks? Would love to give one of the mountain stages a go but would be afraid it would kill me after half an hour. Which would be the ‘easiest’ mountain stage to tackle?
I’ve never rode in the UK, so would have no concept of the specific comparison. I’ll just say that the Tourmalet is multiple times longer, and steeper for longer, than anything I ever encountered growing up in Dublin.

Any paved road climb is doable if you have a low enough gear and are patient enough. If you want to do multiple climbs in one day, I suggest a very very low gear and a lot of patience, or work a lot on your fitness.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Joost »

DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
Me too, we did it a few days before the tour went through, so all the campervans were out and people had drawn on the road etc. Some of them gameley even came out to cheer us on (there were 20 of us in team kit); the closest I’ll ever get to being a TdF cyclist!
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Bullettyme »

DOB wrote:
Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
How difficult would those climbs be for a Sunday club rider? I can do Ditchling Beacon, Leith Hill and Box Hill fairly easily with my Granny gear. Do you think I could cope doing a climb in stages with good breaks? Would love to give one of the mountain stages a go but would be afraid it would kill me after half an hour. Which would be the ‘easiest’ mountain stage to tackle?
I’ve never rode in the UK, so would have no concept of the specific comparison. I’ll just say that the Tourmalet is multiple times longer, and steeper for longer, than anything I ever encountered growing up in Dublin.

Any paved road climb is doable if you have a low enough gear and are patient enough. If you want to do multiple climbs in one day, I suggest a very very low gear and a lot of patience, or work a lot on your fitness.
We an a mate were talking about heading over next year to tackle one of the climbs. Patience sounds better than fitness
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Seez »

Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
How difficult would those climbs be for a Sunday club rider? I can do Ditchling Beacon, Leith Hill and Box Hill fairly easily with my Granny gear. Do you think I could cope doing a climb in stages with good breaks? Would love to give one of the mountain stages a go but would be afraid it would kill me after half an hour. Which would be the ‘easiest’ mountain stage to tackle?
Annecy is a great place to cut your teeth. Three different 1200m climbs up to Semnoz, two routes to the Cat 1 Forclaz du Montmin (restaurant at the top with an amazing view of the lake), loads more cols to the south off the excellent cycle path to Albertville (including the Arpettaz, single track road with no traffic and twice as many hairpins as the Alpe). The Grand Colombier, Colombiere, Cormet de Roselend (stunning), Madeleine and more are a little bit further away. Great place for a family holiday too, can get a Col or two in and be back in time for breakfast.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Joost »

Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:
Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
How difficult would those climbs be for a Sunday club rider? I can do Ditchling Beacon, Leith Hill and Box Hill fairly easily with my Granny gear. Do you think I could cope doing a climb in stages with good breaks? Would love to give one of the mountain stages a go but would be afraid it would kill me after half an hour. Which would be the ‘easiest’ mountain stage to tackle?
I’ve never rode in the UK, so would have no concept of the specific comparison. I’ll just say that the Tourmalet is multiple times longer, and steeper for longer, than anything I ever encountered growing up in Dublin.

Any paved road climb is doable if you have a low enough gear and are patient enough. If you want to do multiple climbs in one day, I suggest a very very low gear and a lot of patience, or work a lot on your fitness.
Multiple climbs in one day :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: like the sense of humour.

I guess the only way to find out is to go and do it. So which one first?
It’s quite easy to break down the big climbs, as there are signposts every km with the distance to the top and the gradient for the upcoming km. If you go in-season, you’ll also come across a lot of people doing the same thing and there’s some good camaraderie on the way up. I personally found some of the descents terrifying and more of a concern than the climbs! (partly because I was knackered from the climbs and partly because my hands were so cold I couldn’t feel them on the breaks!)

Completely doable for a regular leisure cyclist though and a great experience! :thumbup:
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by LandOTurk »

V I N D I C A T E D!!

Chris Froome expects 'confrontation' at Tour de France despite end of anti-doping case

https://www.bbc.com/sport/cycling/44690324

The four-time Tour winner, 33, was under investigation after more than the allowed level of legal asthma drug salbutamol was found in his urine.

Cycling's world governing body, the UCI, closed proceedings on Monday.

"We've raced under trying circumstances at the Tour for the last six years," Team Sky leader Froome told BBC Sport.

"There is always some kind of confrontation out on the road but it's always a minority and it's just something you have to deal with."

Froome said he had urine thrown at him during the 2015 Tour, and he was booed by fans when passing through rival Romain Bardet's home region last year.

A spectator carrying a giant inhaler ran alongside the Briton during the remarkable stage-19 victory that set up his Giro d'Italia win in May.

Asked what he would say if someone did the same at this year's Tour, Froome replied: "Go jump."

Tour organiser ASO had said Froome taking part could "damage" the race, but now says the UCI's decision, reached after working closely with the World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada), means there is no reason to prevent his participation when the race starts on Saturday.

Last month, five-time champion Bernard Hinault urged riders to strike in protest against Froome riding the Tour. Team Sky called the Frenchman's comments "irresponsible and ill-informed".

He added the process had been "very challenging" because news of his adverse test was leaked in December when athletes usually respond to such cases in private.

"Information that wasn't correct was being circulated and I wasn't able to put my side of events across, so it's been a trying past nine months," he said.

"I take my leadership position within the sport seriously and I wouldn't want to tarnish it so this is a huge victory to have this behind me.

"I can go into the next month of racing without any question marks over my head."

Froome is looking to join Eddy Merckx, Miguel Indurain, Jacques Anquetil and Hinault as a record five-time Tour winner.

He is also seeking a fourth Grand Tour win in a row - following successes at the Tour and Vuelta in 2017, and this year's Giro - which would equal the record set by Merckx in 1972-73.

"This is the biggest challenge I've faced to date and I can't wait to get stuck into the racing side of things again," he said.

Froome's adverse result followed a test on 7 September, 2017 during his Vuelta win, which initially showed double the 1,000-nanogram per millilitre threshold of salbutamol was in his system.

When corrected to account for dehydration, using an adjustment calculation Wada made effective from 1 March for ongoing cases, Team Sky said this level came down to 19% over the 'decision limit' of 1,200 ng/ml, which accounts for any measurement error.

Froome said he had "always known" he had not broken any rules because he "never took more than the maximum permissible amount" of 1600 micrograms over 24 hours, or 800 mcg over 12 hours - roughly equating to 16 or eight puffs of an inhaler.

Wada said the Briton increased his dose prior to the test - as Team Sky claim his doctor advised him to - yet Froome said he still "didn't actually take anywhere close to the maximum amount".

Wada regulations allow athletes to take part in a pharmacokinetic study - a controlled test of how a drug works its way through the body - to help try to show how they exceeded the permitted level of a drug without taking more than the allowed dose.

Yet Froome was not required to take this step, with Wada stating it would not have been possible to "adequately recreate the unique circumstances" of the original test.

"The authorities looked at all the data they had already - I'm being tested almost every single day I'm racing - and the experts came to the decision that my results from the Vuelta were consistent with other variations of the results given to that point," said Froome.


Great news. We can all move on now.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by clydecloggie »

Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:
Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
How difficult would those climbs be for a Sunday club rider? I can do Ditchling Beacon, Leith Hill and Box Hill fairly easily with my Granny gear. Do you think I could cope doing a climb in stages with good breaks? Would love to give one of the mountain stages a go but would be afraid it would kill me after half an hour. Which would be the ‘easiest’ mountain stage to tackle?
I’ve never rode in the UK, so would have no concept of the specific comparison. I’ll just say that the Tourmalet is multiple times longer, and steeper for longer, than anything I ever encountered growing up in Dublin.

Any paved road climb is doable if you have a low enough gear and are patient enough. If you want to do multiple climbs in one day, I suggest a very very low gear and a lot of patience, or work a lot on your fitness.
Multiple climbs in one day :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: like the sense of humour.

I guess the only way to find out is to go and do it. So which one first?
If you really have never done a big mountain before, I suggest you start in the Vosges mountains to the northwest of the Alps, in France. The advantages are that it's a small mountain range with summits up to 1500m, so you won't have the effects of thin air while still tackling major climbs with >1000m elevation between start and summit. The Grand Ballon can be tackled from different sides and is a really nice climb. The Platzerwasel is a bitch of a thing, but if you can ride up that one you're ready for the Alps. And then there's the Petit Ballon and Ballon d'Alsace, all nice. I personally haven't done the Plance de Belle Fille which is supposedly the worst of the lot with really steep gradients in the last stretch.

I absolutely love the Dolomites (the Valparola is one of the nicest mountains I've ever ridden up and down on a bike), but they have their cols at 2,200m so it's proper suffering in the last few k's.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Seez »

clydecloggie wrote:
Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:
Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
How difficult would those climbs be for a Sunday club rider? I can do Ditchling Beacon, Leith Hill and Box Hill fairly easily with my Granny gear. Do you think I could cope doing a climb in stages with good breaks? Would love to give one of the mountain stages a go but would be afraid it would kill me after half an hour. Which would be the ‘easiest’ mountain stage to tackle?
I’ve never rode in the UK, so would have no concept of the specific comparison. I’ll just say that the Tourmalet is multiple times longer, and steeper for longer, than anything I ever encountered growing up in Dublin.

Any paved road climb is doable if you have a low enough gear and are patient enough. If you want to do multiple climbs in one day, I suggest a very very low gear and a lot of patience, or work a lot on your fitness.
Multiple climbs in one day :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: like the sense of humour.

I guess the only way to find out is to go and do it. So which one first?
If you really have never done a big mountain before, I suggest you start in the Vosges mountains to the northwest of the Alps, in France. The advantages are that it's a small mountain range with summits up to 1500m, so you won't have the effects of thin air while still tackling major climbs with >1000m elevation between start and summit. The Grand Ballon can be tackled from different sides and is a really nice climb. The Platzerwasel is a bitch of a thing, but if you can ride up that one you're ready for the Alps. And then there's the Petit Ballon and Ballon d'Alsace, all nice. I personally haven't done the Plance de Belle Fille which is supposedly the worst of the lot with really steep gradients in the last stretch.

I absolutely love the Dolomites (the Valparola is one of the nicest mountains I've ever ridden up and down on a bike), but they have their cols at 2,200m so it's proper suffering in the last few k's.
The Vosges is beautiful and very quiet. There's a nice circuit from Le Thillot including the Belles Filles, Ballon de Servance and the Col des Chevrères which is short but very steep. The Belles Filles was dead in August when I did it, no cars or other bikes in 12km up and down :-)
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Joost
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Joost »

Always good to see the Col du Tourmalet in the race - love the story of how it got included: a friend of the organiser was keen on including it and went to scout the route, got lost, went off the road into the snow, then a stream, then nearly died from hypothermia before being found and rescued. He telegramed back the next day: "Crossed Tourmalet stop. Very good road stop. Perfectly feasible" :lol:
Biffer29
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Biffer29 »

Nice team announcement video from Dimension Data

http://africasteam.com/2018/06/29/2018- ... ouncement/
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Spyglass »

Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
How difficult would those climbs be for a Sunday club rider? I can do Ditchling Beacon, Leith Hill and Box Hill fairly easily with my Granny gear. Do you think I could cope doing a climb in stages with good breaks? Would love to give one of the mountain stages a go but would be afraid it would kill me after half an hour. Which would be the ‘easiest’ mountain stage to tackle?
The key is to ride to your ability, not trying to stay with others that have better W/kg than you do. If you have a power meter you should know the power you can sustain for the duration of the climb, stick to you target power and you should be OK. If your climb is at altitude, like some of the ones in Colorado, then you have to take that into account and derate your target power accordingly. Do core work as part of your training, it will alleviate the back pain associated with long climbs.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by johnstrac »

Spyglass wrote:
Scrummie wrote:
DOB wrote:Ive rode up the other side of Peyresourde and it’s tough but not a bastard. I believe the side from Luchon is a category higher, though. The road in general there is wide smooth tarmac, whereas the final climb of the day apparently has unlaced sections, which should be a much tougher test.

I’ve actually done the main climbs of the final mountain day, (Tourmalet and Aubisque via Borderes and Soulor). My 2 hardest days on a bike, and they’re doing it all in one, at the end of 3 week’s racing. It’ll be brutal.
How difficult would those climbs be for a Sunday club rider? I can do Ditchling Beacon, Leith Hill and Box Hill fairly easily with my Granny gear. Do you think I could cope doing a climb in stages with good breaks? Would love to give one of the mountain stages a go but would be afraid it would kill me after half an hour. Which would be the ‘easiest’ mountain stage to tackle?
The key is to ride to your ability, not trying to stay with others that have better W/kg than you do. If you have a power meter you should know the power you can sustain for the duration of the climb, stick to you target power and you should be OK. If your climb is at altitude, like some of the ones in Colorado, then you have to take that into account and derate your target power accordingly. Do core work as part of your training, it will alleviate the back pain associated with long climbs.
Patience is the key, a low gear and determination will get you up the climbs. Don't fall for the attractive girl taking pictures 100 m from the top of the Tourmalet !
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by BlackMac »

Anyone saying that they cannot get excited about the tour because of the Froome decision is a moron.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by lexpat »

Absolutely, because now it's going to be very exciting with a lot of suspense. :lol:
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by BlackMac »

lexpat wrote:Absolutely, because now it's going to be very exciting with a lot of suspense. :lol:
Why shouldn't it be. Froome has hardly run away with his most recent Grand Tours and watching the GC favorites negotiate the first week will be fascinating. Sad to see the continentals rolling over.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Bullettyme »

BlackMac wrote:Anyone saying that they cannot get excited about the tour because of the Froome decision is a moron.
Some epic preciousness from the Brits this last week.

Anyway, big Sky team for Le Tour. Some season for the wunderkind Bernal.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by lexpat »

BlackMac wrote:
lexpat wrote:Absolutely, because now it's going to be very exciting with a lot of suspense. :lol:
Why shouldn't it be. Froome has hardly run away with his most recent Grand Tours and watching the GC favorites negotiate the first week will be fascinating. Sad to see the continentals rolling over.
With these 2 posts you are starting to sound like the others " team England douche bags"

Rolling over, what r u talking about? How many times sky won the TDF in the last 6 years? ... yes 5, and Nibali won in 2014 because Froome DNF ( broken wrist I think) . Don't forget the last Giro and vuelta.
Teamsky can afford the top pros as their budget is about 3 times what most teams have, not a criticism just the fact.
The main excitement might not be the race itself, btw I did like Froome, now a bit less.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Puma »

I think I say this every year... don't really know much about ciclying, but Le Tour is an amazing event. Love the way the french TV manages to mix the touristic aspects with a very understandable commentary for a novice like me.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by blindcider »

Puma wrote:I think I say this every year... don't really know much about ciclying, but Le Tour is an amazing event. Love the way the french TV manages to mix the touristic aspects with a very understandable commentary for a novice like me.
Who do you get on commentary?

In the UK we have a choice between Ned Boulton with David Millar (ITV) and Carlton Kirby with Sean Kelly (Eurosport). No brainer really, Kirby just rants on oblivious to the action half the time and Kelly just sounds miserable the entire time.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by guy smiley »

blindcider wrote:
Puma wrote:I think I say this every year... don't really know much about ciclying, but Le Tour is an amazing event. Love the way the french TV manages to mix the touristic aspects with a very understandable commentary for a novice like me.
Who do you get on commentary?

In the UK we have a choice between Ned Boulton with David Millar (ITV) and Carlton Kirby with Sean Kelly (Eurosport). No brainer really, Kirby just rants on oblivious to the action half the time and Kelly just sounds miserable the entire time.
:lol: :lol:
I've been watching a fair bit of Eurosport coverage this season, a new treat for me... I think they're on that, yeah? It's funny for being so poor.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by blindcider »

guy smiley wrote:
blindcider wrote:
Puma wrote:I think I say this every year... don't really know much about ciclying, but Le Tour is an amazing event. Love the way the french TV manages to mix the touristic aspects with a very understandable commentary for a novice like me.
Who do you get on commentary?

In the UK we have a choice between Ned Boulton with David Millar (ITV) and Carlton Kirby with Sean Kelly (Eurosport). No brainer really, Kirby just rants on oblivious to the action half the time and Kelly just sounds miserable the entire time.
:lol: :lol:
I've been watching a fair bit of Eurosport coverage this season, a new treat for me... I think they're on that, yeah? It's funny for being so poor.
Matt Stevens (GCN) and Rob Hatch are pretty good value on Eurosport, problem is whenever I switch on it seems to be Kirby
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by iarmhiman »

I used to love David Duffield and Sean Kelly commentating together.

One commentated purely on the race and wasn't in the mode for humour, the other was always talking about specialities of wine, cheese, cabbages and chateaus and was all about the colour
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Bullettyme »

Matt Stevens is really good value, his enthusiasm is infectious. Sadly gone from GCN now to focus on commentary. I don't mind Kelly either, usually has pretty decent insights, he's not a speaker though.
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by DOB »

Kelly now is leagues removed from the commentator he used to be. He would nod to answer some of Duffield’s questions.

I have never got the Kirby hate. Hatch is probably the better, and Matt Stephens is great too, but Kirby is as enthusiastic as the rest, which is all you want. I think correcting Kirby’s errors of identification gives Kelly plenty to say, so it ends up having a beneficial effect. “This looks like a QuickStep rider having a go, could it be Alaphilippe..?” “Eh, no. Jungels.” (Half a foot taller and wearing the Luxembourg champion’s jersey)
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by Beaver_Shark »

blindcider wrote:
Puma wrote:I think I say this every year... don't really know much about ciclying, but Le Tour is an amazing event. Love the way the french TV manages to mix the touristic aspects with a very understandable commentary for a novice like me.
Who do you get on commentary?

In the UK we have a choice between Ned Boulton with David Millar (ITV) and Carlton Kirby with Sean Kelly (Eurosport). No brainer really, Kirby just rants on oblivious to the action half the time and Kelly just sounds miserable the entire time.
I don't think there's anyone that does a bunch sprint better than Kirby. If I could I would have him commentate the last 10KM of every flat stage. :lol:

Here in SA we got Sherwen and Liggett for as long as I can remember. Then last year they were replaced by Matt Keenan and Robbie McEwen. I thought they were pretty good.

I just hope we don't get the droning monotones of Anthony McCrossan. x( x(
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Re: Le Tour 2018: Official Thread

Post by DOB »

I can’t think of anything more boring than a 220km+ sprint stage being commented on by McCrossan.
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