Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevance.

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Zakar
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Zakar »

To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
backrow
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by backrow »

Zakar wrote:To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Or even just a memo
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4071
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by 4071 »

Sandstorm wrote:
4071 wrote:
Sandstorm wrote:
deadduck wrote: Hanging up a phone

Rewind a movie

Two obsolete verbs with no common alternative
I still rewind Sky or Netflix to go back a bit.
No you don't. Not when you think about the action described by the verb. Nothing is being wound, because it's not recorded onto a tape.
"Hey Love, rewind that scene I want to see it again"
"No, you hang up."

"I can't. There is no physical possibility to 'hang up' my cellphone to end this call. I can disconnect, if that would help. But you are incorrectly using a verb to describe an action that is no longer possible, due to the change in associated technology."

"..."

"..."

*click*
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Azlan Roar »

Zakar wrote: Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Globus invented onion paper, shortly after finishing work on the typewriter.
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Kiwias
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Kiwias »

Zakar wrote:To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Why?

And Yes, to the question in parentheses.
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Womack
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Womack »

Zakar wrote:
Sounds like a broken record
Talking of records, 'album' is a good example of how these lost meanings can persist even when the original context is long gone. A record album was originally literally a book of 78s, so throughout its heyday up to the present day, the music album was known by an obsolete term.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Gwenno »

People still talk about lights burning all night, and burning the midnight oil. Driving used to refer to animals. Midwives used to deliver mothers. Creutzfeld-Jacob disease used to be Jacob-Creutzfeld disease. Doctors used to treat Cretins, Spastics and Mongols, now it's congenital hypothyroidism, cerebral palsy, and Down' syndrome.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Jay Cee Gee »

Womack wrote:
Zakar wrote:
Sounds like a broken record
Talking of records, 'album' is a good example of how these lost meanings can persist even wen the originil context is long gone. A record album was originally literally a book of 78's, so threwout its heyday up to the present day, the music album was known by an obsoleet term.
Thinking about it, the term "DJ" in respect of the ones on the radio isn't really accurate anymore as they don't used records or even CD's. I suppose they may be 'Disk Jockeys' instead these days, unless they are using a SSD....

Fixed for Womack.....
Last edited by Jay Cee Gee on Wed Jul 11, 2018 11:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by JM2K6 »

Jay Cee Gee wrote:
JM2K6 wrote: I mean when you call someone it makes a sound (that the person calling hears) that everyone refers to as ringing. I'll accept it doesn't sound like a bell ringing but it's the digitised equivalent.
.
Yeah, it makes a sound but the reason we call that 'ringing' is cause of an obsolete technology that has no modern relevance. That's the whole point of this thread!
It's a digital version of a ringing noise :)
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Sandstorm »

4071 wrote: *click*
More like a "nnnnggggggg" tone :)
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Jay Cee Gee »

JM2K6 wrote:
Jay Cee Gee wrote:
JM2K6 wrote: I mean when you call someone it makes a sound (that the person calling hears) that everyone refers to as ringing. I'll accept it doesn't sound like a bell ringing but it's the digitised equivalent.
.
Yeah, it makes a sound but the reason we call that 'ringing' is cause of an obsolete technology that has no modern relevance. That's the whole point of this thread!
It's a digital version of a ringing noise :)
You're a digital version of a ringing noise.
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JM2K6
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by JM2K6 »

Jay Cee Gee wrote:
JM2K6 wrote:
Jay Cee Gee wrote:
JM2K6 wrote: I mean when you call someone it makes a sound (that the person calling hears) that everyone refers to as ringing. I'll accept it doesn't sound like a bell ringing but it's the digitised equivalent.
.
Yeah, it makes a sound but the reason we call that 'ringing' is cause of an obsolete technology that has no modern relevance. That's the whole point of this thread!
It's a digital version of a ringing noise :)
You're a digital version of a ringing noise.
:lol:






:x
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Womack
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Womack »

Jay Cee Gee wrote:
Womack wrote:
Zakar wrote:
Sounds like a broken record
Talking of records, 'album' is a good example of how these lost meanings can persist even when the original context is long gone. A record album was originally literally a book of 78s, so throughout its heyday up to the present day, the music album was known by an obsolete term.
Thinking about it, the term "DJ" in respect of the ones on the radio isn't really accurate anymore as they don't used records or even CD's. I suppose they may be 'Disk Jockeys' instead these days, unless they are using a SSD....
Agreed, fast becoming obsolete but not going anywhere. But more importantly, can you please edit the errant apostrophe in 'its' (that my phone decided was necessary) in my post that you quoted?

Many thanks :)
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Auckman »

Ali's Choice wrote:When Auckland Rugby is strong New Zealand Rugby is strong.
wibble wibble develop your own players then :o
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Jay Cee Gee »

Womack wrote:
Jay Cee Gee wrote:
Womack wrote:
Zakar wrote:
Sounds like a broken record
Talking of records, 'album' is a good example of how these lost meanings can persist even when the original context is long gone. A record album was originally literally a book of 78s, so throughout its heyday up to the present day, the music album was known by an obsolete term.
Thinking about it, the term "DJ" in respect of the ones on the radio isn't really accurate anymore as they don't used records or even CD's. I suppose they may be 'Disk Jockeys' instead these days, unless they are using a SSD....
Agreed, fast becoming obsolete but not going anywhere. But more importantly, can you please edit the errant apostrophe in 'its' (that my phone decided was necessary) in my post that you quoted?

Many thanks :)
Have done so....
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Womack
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Womack »

:lol:

Cheers
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by happyhooker »

Womack wrote::lol:

Cheer's
Ftfy
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by tabascoboy »

Kiwias wrote:
Zakar wrote:To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Why?

And Yes, to the question in parentheses.
Me too, back in the day with my glorious pre-WP 1950s typewriter :blush:
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Sandstorm »

tabascoboy wrote:
Kiwias wrote:
Zakar wrote:To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Why?

And Yes, to the question in parentheses.
Me too, back in the day with my glorious pre-WP 1950s typewriter :blush:
Used to do quotes with pen, notebook and carbon paper back in the 90s. :(

The Chinese-run mobile phone repair shop in town still uses one for receipts.
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Zakar
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Zakar »

Kiwias wrote:
Zakar wrote:To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Why?

And Yes, to the question in parentheses.
The majority of people in the workforce will not know what carbon copying is unless it has come up as a piece of trivia. So it wouldn't be immediately obvious why you would 'cc' someone in an email.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by julian »

sim_in_mel wrote:'Balls Out'
I really thought you said that when you were trying to conquer a lady.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Mog The Almighty »

Sandstorm wrote:
deadduck wrote:
Rewind a movie

Two obsolete verbs with no common alternative
I still rewind Sky or Netflix to go back a bit.
Many people still call any movie a "video"...
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Cartman »

Was surprised to learn the other day that bipolar disorder was previously known as manic depression
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Gwenno »

Cartman wrote:Was surprised to learn the other day that bipolar disorder was previously known as manic depression
Still is. The problem was that a lot of laymen thought that manic just meant severe, and didn't link it with the word mania, or if they did, because a maniac was somebody VERY mad, manic depression meant very depressed. Trouble is now that anyone that has more than 2 moods in the same hour think that are bipolar, but they're not.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Kiwias »

Zakar wrote:
Kiwias wrote:
Zakar wrote:To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Why?

And Yes, to the question in parentheses.
The majority of people in the workforce will not know what carbon copying is unless it has come up as a piece of trivia. So it wouldn't be immediately obvious why you would 'cc' someone in an email.
:blush: :blush:
I actually just right now realised that CC stands for Carbon Copied.
:blush: :blush:
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by tabascoboy »

"put through the wringer"

I suppose "put through the tumble dryer" just doesn't work.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by CrazyIslander »

What about carbon paper?
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Gwenno »

Kiwias wrote:
Zakar wrote:
Kiwias wrote:
Zakar wrote:To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Why?

And Yes, to the question in parentheses.
The majority of people in the workforce will not know what carbon copying is unless it has come up as a piece of trivia. So it wouldn't be immediately obvious why you would 'cc' someone in an email.
:blush: :blush:
I actually just right now realised that CC stands for Carbon Copied.
:blush: :blush:
And me!! :blush:
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Zakar
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Zakar »

Kiwias wrote:
Zakar wrote:
Kiwias wrote:
Zakar wrote:To hem and haw.
Sounds like a broken record
Cc in emails (is anyone here old enough to have carbon copied a memo?)
Why?

And Yes, to the question in parentheses.
The majority of people in the workforce will not know what carbon copying is unless it has come up as a piece of trivia. So it wouldn't be immediately obvious why you would 'cc' someone in an email.
:blush: :blush:
I actually just right now realised that CC stands for Carbon Copied.
:blush: :blush:
:lol: :lol:

There you have it. If someone who as actually carbon copied something didn't know what it meant, what chance to the post millenials have :lol:
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Nolanator »

I've known about the meaning of "cc" since I knew how to send an email, but that's just because I was told by a parent or something. I've never actually used carbon paper to make a copy (unless those duplicate invoice books count).
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by guy smiley »

Nolanator wrote:I've known about the meaning of "cc" since I knew how to send an email, but that's just because I was told by a parent or something. I've never actually used carbon paper to make a copy (unless those duplicate invoice books count).
They do... it's almost the same process. Originally, carbon paper came in a sheaf of individual sheets that you'd slide between pages in an invoice book or similar, then they did away with the separate sheet and treated one of the pages to render the imprint permanently.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Nolanator »

guy smiley wrote:
Nolanator wrote:I've known about the meaning of "cc" since I knew how to send an email, but that's just because I was told by a parent or something. I've never actually used carbon paper to make a copy (unless those duplicate invoice books count).
They do... it's almost the same process. Originally, carbon paper came in a sheaf of individual sheets that you'd slide between pages in an invoice book or similar, then they did away with the separate sheet and treated one of the pages to render the imprint permanently.
:thumbup:
I've used duplicate books, but never heard and read the term "carbon copy". I guess the term fell out of conversational use as the user didn't have to worry about setting up the carbon paper and making the copy; with duplicate books it just happens.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by sim_in_mel »

Womack wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
sim_in_mel wrote:'Balls Out'

Reference to removing the balance balls in an engine distributor, to allow the engine to rev faster........
:o

I did not know that :thumbup: and I did my time back when points and manual timing were a thing.
I'm often dubious about these apparently logical/literal explanations for words or phrases - like the classic example of 'posh' with its various explanations, or 'pom'. In all cases, it just seems much more likely to me that some verbally inventive individual spontaneously came up with a word or phrase that perfectly captured the essence of the thing it was describing and so caught on.

In the case of 'balls out', I suppose I will allow that the original use may have been as SiM describes but even in an age where engineering knowledge was more widespread, I'd bet dollars to o-rings it very soon lost its original meaning amongst almost anyone using it in a general sense to mean maximum effort/speed.
Well I was wrong.... Funny how stories get about, but the original saying comes from:

balls out
This refers to the governor on a steam engine. Two heavy balls are attached to the engine so that as engine speed increases, the centrifigal force of the flywheel causes the balls to rise. As the balls top out, they govern (limit) the engine, thereby controlling maximum engine speed. "Balls out," then, refers to running the engine at maximum speed.

But I am sure there was something similar in the distributor....

Hence 'balls out' meaning going as fast as you can, or hard study etc.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Nolanator »

sim_in_mel wrote:
Womack wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
sim_in_mel wrote:'Balls Out'

Reference to removing the balance balls in an engine distributor, to allow the engine to rev faster........
:o

I did not know that :thumbup: and I did my time back when points and manual timing were a thing.
I'm often dubious about these apparently logical/literal explanations for words or phrases - like the classic example of 'posh' with its various explanations, or 'pom'. In all cases, it just seems much more likely to me that some verbally inventive individual spontaneously came up with a word or phrase that perfectly captured the essence of the thing it was describing and so caught on.

In the case of 'balls out', I suppose I will allow that the original use may have been as SiM describes but even in an age where engineering knowledge was more widespread, I'd bet dollars to o-rings it very soon lost its original meaning amongst almost anyone using it in a general sense to mean maximum effort/speed.
Well I was wrong.... Funny how stories get about, but the original saying comes from:

balls out
This refers to the governor on a steam engine. Two heavy balls are attached to the engine so that as engine speed increases, the centrifigal force of the flywheel causes the balls to rise. As the balls top out, they govern (limit) the engine, thereby controlling maximum engine speed. "Balls out," then, refers to running the engine at maximum speed.

But I am sure there was something similar in the distributor....

Hence 'balls out' meaning going as fast as you can, or hard study etc.
Terry Pratchett parodied this in Small Gods. See the entry for page 186 here.
Ancient Greeks knew of the power of steam, but it wasn't until Watt's engine that a mechanical governor solved the tendency of the steam engines to explode when pressure built up too much.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Spyglass »

sim_in_mel wrote:
Womack wrote:
guy smiley wrote:
sim_in_mel wrote:'Balls Out'

Reference to removing the balance balls in an engine distributor, to allow the engine to rev faster........
:o

I did not know that :thumbup: and I did my time back when points and manual timing were a thing.
I'm often dubious about these apparently logical/literal explanations for words or phrases - like the classic example of 'posh' with its various explanations, or 'pom'. In all cases, it just seems much more likely to me that some verbally inventive individual spontaneously came up with a word or phrase that perfectly captured the essence of the thing it was describing and so caught on.

In the case of 'balls out', I suppose I will allow that the original use may have been as SiM describes but even in an age where engineering knowledge was more widespread, I'd bet dollars to o-rings it very soon lost its original meaning amongst almost anyone using it in a general sense to mean maximum effort/speed.
Well I was wrong.... Funny how stories get about, but the original saying comes from:

balls out
This refers to the governor on a steam engine. Two heavy balls are attached to the engine so that as engine speed increases, the centrifigal force of the flywheel causes the balls to rise. As the balls top out, they govern (limit) the engine, thereby controlling maximum engine speed. "Balls out," then, refers to running the engine at maximum speed.

But I am sure there was something similar in the distributor....

Hence 'balls out' meaning going as fast as you can, or hard study etc.
You are correct regarding the bob weights on a centrifugal governor with a slight refinement that the balls (bob weights) move outwards due to centrifugal forces and operate a linkage connected to a fuel/steam admission valve.

The weights you are referring to in an old style mechanical distributor control the advance of the ignition spark relative to engine speed to maintain correct ignition timing.
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Zakar
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Zakar »

Is the phrase 'balls out' related to the sinilar phrase 'balls to the wall' ?
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Nolanator »

Brass monkeys (and variations) in reference to cold weather is another oddity that has long outlived it's original meaning. Although, it's not a phrase I'd expect to hear used by most people under the age of 40.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by TB63 »

Nolanator wrote:Brass monkeys (and variations) in reference to cold weather is another oddity that has long outlived it's original meaning. Although, it's not a phrase I'd expect to hear used by most people under the age of 40.
Old Naval references are everywhere, like Hanging on to the bitter end..
The bitter end is where the anchor chain attached to the ship, lose that whilst moored, you're on the rocks..
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Nolanator »

TB63 wrote:
Nolanator wrote:Brass monkeys (and variations) in reference to cold weather is another oddity that has long outlived it's original meaning. Although, it's not a phrase I'd expect to hear used by most people under the age of 40.
Old Naval references are everywhere, like Hanging on to the bitter end..
The bitter end is where the anchor chain attached to the ship, lose that whilst moored, you're on the rocks..
:thumbup:
Hadn't heard that one.
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Re: Sayings or phrases that no longer have a modern relevanc

Post by Sandstorm »

Zakar wrote:Is the phrase 'balls out' related to the sinilar phrase 'balls to the wall' ?
Balls to the Wall comes from those circus stunt motorbike riders.

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