Irish unity....?

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my 2 cents
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by my 2 cents »

Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Only when my c unting phone f ucks about

A new one you must buy
No way. I'm being frugal in advance of the recession. Have another couple of years left in this dated old Motorola
iarmhiman
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by iarmhiman »

A half
my 2 cents
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by my 2 cents »

camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Ignorance:

For the Irish who returned home, their fate was compounded by the political situation. These men were shunned, ostracised from Irish society and in many cases murdered by the IRA, but that is only part of the story.

Source: Irish Times
FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
iarmhiman
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by iarmhiman »

my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Ignorance:

For the Irish who returned home, their fate was compounded by the political situation. These men were shunned, ostracised from Irish society and in many cases murdered by the IRA, but that is only part of the story.

Source: Irish Times
FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
WW2 we were neutral. Shouldnt have been getting involved
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HighKingLeinster
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by HighKingLeinster »

Pffft ww1 or ww2 makes no matter, they're all filthy shoneen traitors

Hanging was too good for them
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lorcanoworms
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by lorcanoworms »

Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Only when my c unting phone f ucks about

A new one you must buy
Weak in the head young 2 cents is.
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nardol
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by nardol »

I care not for WW1 or WW2 - its WW3 im getting ready for
my 2 cents
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by my 2 cents »

iarmhiman wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Ignorance:

For the Irish who returned home, their fate was compounded by the political situation. These men were shunned, ostracised from Irish society and in many cases murdered by the IRA, but that is only part of the story.

Source: Irish Times
FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
WW2 we were neutral. Shouldnt have been getting involved
Sickening
my 2 cents
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by my 2 cents »

lorcanoworms wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Only when my c unting phone f ucks about

A new one you must buy
Weak in the head young 2 cents is.
Remember.the mantra:

Irish Nationalism is good
British Nationalism is bad
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camroc1
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by camroc1 »

my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Ignorance:

For the Irish who returned home, their fate was compounded by the political situation. These men were shunned, ostracised from Irish society and in many cases murdered by the IRA, but that is only part of the story.

Source: Irish Times
FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
The post WW2 sentiment was aimed more at the UK in general than at ex British servicemen in particular, and was a result of the nasty propaganda war carried out against "Eire", for not obliging the UK by participating, by the UK both during and in the aftermath of the war.
That said, the only official sanction against ex British servicemen was against those who had deserted the Irish army to join the British Army. It also has to be remembered that more people from the 26 counties volunteered for service in the BA during WW2, and won more decorations, than did from NI, leading to Betjemans famous jibe of travelling to Belfast and observing " thousands of loyal Ulstermen, loyally staying at home".
Last edited by camroc1 on Fri Jan 03, 2020 5:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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nardol
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by nardol »

my 2 cents wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Only when my c unting phone f ucks about

A new one you must buy
Weak in the head young 2 cents is.
Remember.the mantra:

Irish Nationalism is good
British Nationalism is bad

In the context of imperialism and Ireland's lack there of and Britain's abundance there in ... yes
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lorcanoworms
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by lorcanoworms »

my 2 cents wrote:
iarmhiman wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Ignorance:

For the Irish who returned home, their fate was compounded by the political situation. These men were shunned, ostracised from Irish society and in many cases murdered by the IRA, but that is only part of the story.

Source: Irish Times
FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
WW2 we were neutral. Shouldnt have been getting involved
Sickening
America was neutral, was that sickening.
America only declared war against Japan after Pearl harbour.
iarmhiman
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by iarmhiman »

my 2 cents wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Only when my c unting phone f ucks about

A new one you must buy
Weak in the head young 2 cents is.
Remember.the mantra:

Irish Nationalism is good
British Nationalism is bad
British Nationalism is essentially English nationalism. The DUP really cozied up to it last three years
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camroc1
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by camroc1 »

lorcanoworms wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
iarmhiman wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote: FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
WW2 we were neutral. Shouldnt have been getting involved
Sickening
America was neutral, was that sickening.
America only declared war against Japan after Pearl harbour.
Actually Germany declared war on the US, not the other way around. Leading to one of the great "What ifs........".
my 2 cents
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by my 2 cents »

camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Ignorance:

For the Irish who returned home, their fate was compounded by the political situation. These men were shunned, ostracised from Irish society and in many cases murdered by the IRA, but that is only part of the story.

Source: Irish Times
FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
The post WW2 sentiment was aimed more at the UK in general than at ex British servicemen in particular, and was a result of the nasty propaganda war carried out against "Eire", for not obliging the UK by participating, by the UK both during and in the aftermath of the war.
That said, the only official sanction against ex British servicemen was against those who had deserted the Irish army to join the British Army. It also has to be remembered that more people from the 26 counties volunteered for service in the BA during WW2, and won more decorations, than did from NI, leading to Betjemans famous jibe of travelling to Belfast and observing " thousands of loyal Ulstermen, loyally staying at home".
Ah, I see. So, not treated badly by Irish and anyway Ulstermen are cowards.

Any argument depends on how much you want to twist the facts to suit your prejudices. It's fun.

"Let there be a war memorial. That is one thing, but a war memorial in Merrion Square, a public park, presumably with the railings gone and leading up to the entrance of Government Buildings, is another thing." The minister of justice, Kevin O'Higgins, was adamant that any memorial for those that had died in the war, including his own brother, would be out of sight and therefore out of mind.
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by boringperson12 »

camroc1 wrote: Actually Germany declared war on the US, not the other way around. Leading to one of the great "What ifs........".
The only what if is it would have taken the Soviets longer to get to Berlin.
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camroc1
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by camroc1 »

my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Ignorance:

For the Irish who returned home, their fate was compounded by the political situation. These men were shunned, ostracised from Irish society and in many cases murdered by the IRA, but that is only part of the story.

Source: Irish Times
FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
The post WW2 sentiment was aimed more at the UK in general than at ex British servicemen in particular, and was a result of the nasty propaganda war carried out against "Eire", for not obliging the UK by participating, by the UK both during and in the aftermath of the war.
That said, the only official sanction against ex British servicemen was against those who had deserted the Irish army to join the British Army. It also has to be remembered that more people from the 26 counties volunteered for service in the BA during WW2, and won more decorations, than did from NI, leading to Betjemans famous jibe of travelling to Belfast and observing " thousands of loyal Ulstermen, loyally staying at home".
Ah, I see. So, not treated badly by Irish and anyway Ulstermen are cowards.

Any argument depends on how much you want to twist the facts to suit your prejudices. It's fun.

"Let there be a war memorial. That is one thing, but a war memorial in Merrion Square, a public park, presumably with the railings gone and leading up to the entrance of Government Buildings, is another thing." The minister of justice, Kevin O'Higgins, was adamant that any memorial for those that had died in the war, including his own brother, would be out of sight and therefore out of mind.
Very, very difficult to hide the 60 Acres of the Irish National War Memorial my friend.
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lorcanoworms
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by lorcanoworms »

Betjeman was just quoting a nationalist Denis Ireland no?
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earl the beaver
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by earl the beaver »

lorcanoworms wrote:Betjeman was just quoting a nationalist Denis Ireland no?
I can only find two references to Betjeman's "quote", cammy here and a thread called "troubles propoganda music" on another forum.
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Liathroidigloine
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Liathroidigloine »

earl the beaver wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:Betjeman was just quoting a nationalist Denis Ireland no?
I can only find two references to Betjeman's "quote", cammy here and a thread called "troubles propoganda music" on another forum.
Kipling (not the cakes) would be more to your taste.
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camroc1
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by camroc1 »

lorcanoworms wrote:Betjeman was just quoting a nationalist Denis Ireland no?
Could be. Had read it was Betjeman though.

Remember, that unlike in GB, there was no conscription in NI during WW2.
EDIT
A quick google tells me it was Denis Ireland in 1947, but that seems rather late to me. Could have been Ireland quoting Betjeman ?

How's QUB as a source, Earl, funny how it didn't show in your google search.

https://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/irishhistor ... orldWarII/
Last edited by camroc1 on Fri Jan 03, 2020 5:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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lorcanoworms
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by lorcanoworms »

my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
camroc1 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Ignorance:

For the Irish who returned home, their fate was compounded by the political situation. These men were shunned, ostracised from Irish society and in many cases murdered by the IRA, but that is only part of the story.

Source: Irish Times
FFS as Mullet has pointed out, there were ex BA all over the country, related to every family. In fact, many joined the IRA in the War of Independence. And in fact many young and idle (in the sense of not having work) continued to join the BA after independence, and suffered no shame or discrimination when home.

The IT transferring post WW2 sentiment, to post WW1.
It's so hard to keep up. So, okay the Irish WWI veterans WEREN'T treated badly at all post war. The Irish Times has it all mixed up and is transferring a post WWII sentiment.

Right, so.
The post WW2 sentiment was aimed more at the UK in general than at ex British servicemen in particular, and was a result of the nasty propaganda war carried out against "Eire", for not obliging the UK by participating, by the UK both during and in the aftermath of the war.
That said, the only official sanction against ex British servicemen was against those who had deserted the Irish army to join the British Army. It also has to be remembered that more people from the 26 counties volunteered for service in the BA during WW2, and won more decorations, than did from NI, leading to Betjemans famous jibe of travelling to Belfast and observing " thousands of loyal Ulstermen, loyally staying at home".
Ah, I see. So, not treated badly by Irish and anyway Ulstermen are cowards.

Any argument depends on how much you want to twist the facts to suit your prejudices. It's fun.

"Let there be a war memorial. That is one thing, but a war memorial in Merrion Square, a public park, presumably with the railings gone and leading up to the entrance of Government Buildings, is another thing." The minister of justice, Kevin O'Higgins, was adamant that any memorial for those that had died in the war, including his own brother, would be out of sight and therefore out of mind.
Preference was given soldiers returning from WW2 by Guinness, Williams and Woods, the tobacco factories, Jacobs, Cahills the printers etc.
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Anonymous 1
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Anonymous 1 »

Bloody deserters
Five thousand Irish soldiers who swapped uniforms to fight for the British against Hitler went on to suffer years of persecution.

One of them, 92-year-old Phil Farrington, took part in the D-Day landings and helped liberate the German death camp at Bergen-Belsen - but he wears his medals in secret.

Even to this day, he has nightmares that he will be arrested by the authorities and imprisoned for his wartime service.

"They would come and get me, yes they would," he said in a frail voice at his home in the docks area of Dublin.

And his 25-year-old grandson, Patrick, confirmed: "I see the fear in him even today, even after 65 years."

Mr Farrington's fears are not groundless.

He was one of about 5,000 Irish soldiers who deserted their own neutral army to join the war against fascism and who were brutally punished on their return home as a result.
They were formally dismissed from the Irish army, stripped of all pay and pension rights, and prevented from finding work by being banned for seven years from any employment paid for by state or government funds.

A special "list" was drawn up containing their names and addresses, and circulated to every government department, town hall and railway station - anywhere the men might look for a job.

It was referred to in the Irish parliament - the Dail - at the time as a "starvation order", and for many of their families the phrase became painfully close to the truth
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16287211
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lorcanoworms
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by lorcanoworms »

boringperson12 wrote:
camroc1 wrote: Actually Germany declared war on the US, not the other way around. Leading to one of the great "What ifs........".
The only what if is it would have taken the Soviets longer to get to Berlin.
They definitely needed the Yank trucks.
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camroc1
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by camroc1 »

Tell me Anon, how does that differ from what I've written, and what was the punishment for deserting the British Army at the time ?
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Liathroidigloine
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Liathroidigloine »

Anonymous. wrote:Bloody deserters
Five thousand Irish soldiers who swapped uniforms to fight for the British against Hitler went on to suffer years of persecution.

One of them, 92-year-old Phil Farrington, took part in the D-Day landings and helped liberate the German death camp at Bergen-Belsen - but he wears his medals in secret.

Even to this day, he has nightmares that he will be arrested by the authorities and imprisoned for his wartime service.

"They would come and get me, yes they would," he said in a frail voice at his home in the docks area of Dublin.

And his 25-year-old grandson, Patrick, confirmed: "I see the fear in him even today, even after 65 years."

Mr Farrington's fears are not groundless.

He was one of about 5,000 Irish soldiers who deserted their own neutral army to join the war against fascism and who were brutally punished on their return home as a result.
They were formally dismissed from the Irish army, stripped of all pay and pension rights, and prevented from finding work by being banned for seven years from any employment paid for by state or government funds.

A special "list" was drawn up containing their names and addresses, and circulated to every government department, town hall and railway station - anywhere the men might look for a job.

It was referred to in the Irish parliament - the Dail - at the time as a "starvation order", and for many of their families the phrase became painfully close to the truth
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16287211
Deserters punished, well I never.
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Liathroidigloine
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Liathroidigloine »

EverReady wrote:
Liathroidigloine wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:Bloody deserters
Five thousand Irish soldiers who swapped uniforms to fight for the British against Hitler went on to suffer years of persecution.

One of them, 92-year-old Phil Farrington, took part in the D-Day landings and helped liberate the German death camp at Bergen-Belsen - but he wears his medals in secret.

Even to this day, he has nightmares that he will be arrested by the authorities and imprisoned for his wartime service.

"They would come and get me, yes they would," he said in a frail voice at his home in the docks area of Dublin.

And his 25-year-old grandson, Patrick, confirmed: "I see the fear in him even today, even after 65 years."

Mr Farrington's fears are not groundless.

He was one of about 5,000 Irish soldiers who deserted their own neutral army to join the war against fascism and who were brutally punished on their return home as a result.
They were formally dismissed from the Irish army, stripped of all pay and pension rights, and prevented from finding work by being banned for seven years from any employment paid for by state or government funds.

A special "list" was drawn up containing their names and addresses, and circulated to every government department, town hall and railway station - anywhere the men might look for a job.

It was referred to in the Irish parliament - the Dail - at the time as a "starvation order", and for many of their families the phrase became painfully close to the truth
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16287211
Deserters punished, well I never.
A delusional 92 year old waiting for the man to come and get him. It gets worse
A quote from that ever reliable BBC.
Mullet 2

Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Mullet 2 »

my 2 cents wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Only when my c unting phone f ucks about

A new one you must buy
Weak in the head young 2 cents is.
Remember.the mantra:

Irish Nationalism is good
British Nationalism is bad
When Irish Nationalists enslave 1/4 of the planet we can talk
Adetroy
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Adetroy »

I have always rather enjoyed the fact that the one Victoria cross won by somebody from Northern Ireland in WWII was the “wrong religion” so there was no desire to commemorate him until the 21st century. Says all you need to know about NI between 1920 and 1997.
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earl the beaver
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by earl the beaver »

Adetroy wrote:I have always rather enjoyed the fact that the one Victoria cross won by somebody from Northern Ireland in WWII was the “wrong religion” so there was no desire to commemorate him until the 21st century. Says all you need to know about NI between 1920 and 1997.
That's not true though is it?

The people of Belfast raised £3k for a fund for him (roughly £130k now) and he became somewhat a celebrity.

He was not awarded the Freedom of the City of Belfast, which is shameful for either classism (he was working class) or sectarianism (he was Catholic) there are various reports.
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earl the beaver
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by earl the beaver »

camroc1 wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:Betjeman was just quoting a nationalist Denis Ireland no?
Could be. Had read it was Betjeman though.

Remember, that unlike in GB, there was no conscription in NI during WW2.
EDIT
A quick google tells me it was Denis Ireland in 1947, but that seems rather late to me. Could have been Ireland quoting Betjeman ?

How's QUB as a source, Earl, funny how it didn't show in your google search.

https://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/irishhistor ... orldWarII/
A source that confirms it wasn't Betjeman?
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Winnie
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Winnie »

earl the beaver wrote:
Adetroy wrote:I have always rather enjoyed the fact that the one Victoria cross won by somebody from Northern Ireland in WWII was the “wrong religion” so there was no desire to commemorate him until the 21st century. Says all you need to know about NI between 1920 and 1997.
That's not true though is it?

The people of Belfast raised £3k for a fund for him (roughly £130k now) and he became somewhat a celebrity.

He was not awarded the Freedom of the City of Belfast, which is shameful for either classism (he was working class) or sectarianism (he was Catholic) there are various reports.
:lol: :lol:
Our southern friends just take history and make shit up to spin things
my 2 cents
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by my 2 cents »

iarmhiman wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Only when my c unting phone f ucks about

A new one you must buy
Weak in the head young 2 cents is.
Remember.the mantra:

Irish Nationalism is good
British Nationalism is bad
British Nationalism is essentially English nationalism. The DUP really cozied up to it last three years
Here's another false equivalence: Irish Nationalism is the same as IRA nationalism
Mullet 2

Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Mullet 2 »

Except it was that he was a Catholic.

And the people of Belfast? What people of Belfast?
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Winnie
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Winnie »

Mullet 2 wrote:Except it was that he was a Catholic.

And the people of Belfast? What people of Belfast?
Not only is mullet an expert on places he doesn’t live he is an expert on places he didn’t live nor was he even alive
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Uncle Fester
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Uncle Fester »

Winnie wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
HighKingLeinster wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:Fight for the freedom of "gallant " little Belgium .
A great line from an old song sums it up nicely: " The British Lion will pose the world over as champion of freedom while Eireann lies mangled and crushed 'neath her claw"
The loyal men of Ulster loyally staying at home.
Ever tried reading a book?
He's referring to ww2.
Here's a book for you to peruse.
my 2 cents
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Re: Irish unity....?

Post by my 2 cents »

Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:Only when my c unting phone f ucks about

A new one you must buy
Weak in the head young 2 cents is.
Remember.the mantra:

Irish Nationalism is good
British Nationalism is bad
When Irish Nationalists enslave 1/4 of the planet we can talk
Different times eh? What do you think of Italian nationalism? Better or worse than British? Spanish? Russian? German? Does a small unsuccessful country give you more of a right to support your country? Lichtenstein okay?

Or can we all have a more sensible discussion that there are shameful periods in all countries, but that doesn't mean we don't support the positive aspects of them?

No nuance. Ireland good. Brits bad.

Simpleton
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HighKingLeinster
Posts: 22443
Joined: Wed Jul 31, 2013 10:58 am

Re: Irish unity....?

Post by HighKingLeinster »

my 2 cents wrote:
Different times eh? What do you think of Italian nationalism? Better or worse than British? Spanish? Russian? German? Does a small unsuccessful country give you more of a right to support your country? Lichtenstein okay?

Or can we all have a more sensible discussion that there are shameful periods in all countries, but that doesn't mean we don't support the positive aspects of them?

No nuance. Ireland good. Brits bad.

Simpleton
Norn Irons shameful period: from foundation to present day and counting. That's gotta be some sort of record
iarmhiman
Posts: 44224
Joined: Tue Jan 31, 2012 11:05 am
Location: Dublin

Re: Irish unity....?

Post by iarmhiman »

my 2 cents wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:
my 2 cents wrote:
lorcanoworms wrote:
Mullet 2 wrote:

A new one you must buy
Weak in the head young 2 cents is.
Remember.the mantra:

Irish Nationalism is good
British Nationalism is bad
When Irish Nationalists enslave 1/4 of the planet we can talk
Different times eh? What do you think of Italian nationalism? Better or worse than British? Spanish? Russian? German? Does a small unsuccessful country give you more of a right to support your country? Lichtenstein okay?

Or can we all have a more sensible discussion that there are shameful periods in all countries, but that doesn't mean we don't support the positive aspects of them?

No nuance. Ireland good. Brits bad.

Simpleton
Thought he explained it well. Brit success comes from plundering places like India and eastern Africa. T
Mullet 2

Re: Irish unity....?

Post by Mullet 2 »

Nordies very wound up again

No wonder they're poorer than us. Too much time permanently outraged and not enough working.
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