Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

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UncleFB
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by UncleFB »

Sensible Stephen wrote:Meanwhile, a couple of cnuts spreading fakenews.

https://twitter.com/DonaldJTrumpJr/stat ... 9697845249

https://twitter.com/seanhannity/status/ ... 9937743874
Wow, just wow.
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Ali's Choice
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Ali's Choice »

Having worked in Ingham and Ayr over the past few years, I can attest that Cane fires are very cool. They really are unlike anything else.

Sadly they are also still potentially very unsafe. Earlier in the year a former colleague of mine lost her husband to a Cane fire. He was a very experienced, 3rd generation Cane farmer but the wind changed direction very quickly and he was extremely unlucky.
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Fat Old Git
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Fat Old Git »

Slim 293 wrote:
Sensible Stephen wrote:Meanwhile, a couple of cnuts spreading fakenews.

https://twitter.com/DonaldJTrumpJr/stat ... 9697845249

https://twitter.com/seanhannity/status/ ... 9937743874
Oh God, I read some of the comments...

:uhoh:
I WOULDN'T BE SURPRISED IF THEY WERE TRAINED ANTIFA ARSONIST WHO OBAMA TRAINS TO DO IT IN CALIFORNIA & HIS ANTIFA ARSONIST R ALSO ALL AROUND THE WORLD AS IN AUSTRALIA. I'VE SEEN THEM WITH BIG BLOW TORCHES ON VIDEOS SETTING FIELDS ON FIRE NEAR HOMES.THEY NEED TO ARREST ONE AT TOP!
I was just thinking the same thing. Even after someone actually clarified where the 180 figure came from.
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Thomas
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Thomas »

It doesn't matter what the facts are. Facts are useless.

You have the RFS Commissioner (guy in charge of the New South Wales Rural Fire Service) coming out saying hazard reduction isn't the solution and that there is no Green-led conspiracy but that doesn't stop the right wing commentators running with articles and tweets etc about how hazard reduction stops bushfires and how the Greens blocked them. And their base just laps it up yum yum and regurgitates it verbatim on social media. Round and round we go.
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Sensible Stephen
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Sensible Stephen »

Thomas wrote:It doesn't matter what the facts are. Facts are useless.

You have the RFS Commissioner (guy in charge of the New South Wales Rural Fire Service) coming out saying hazard reduction isn't the solution and that there is no Green-led conspiracy but that doesn't stop the right wing commentators running with articles and tweets etc about how hazard reduction stops bushfires and how the Greens blocked them. And their base just laps it up yum yum and regurgitates it verbatim on social media. Round and round we go.
I really worry about where the world is going. The internet and huge sections of the media are just large echo chambers, and only getting worse.
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Thomas
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Thomas »

Sensible Stephen wrote:
Thomas wrote:It doesn't matter what the facts are. Facts are useless.

You have the RFS Commissioner (guy in charge of the New South Wales Rural Fire Service) coming out saying hazard reduction isn't the solution and that there is no Green-led conspiracy but that doesn't stop the right wing commentators running with articles and tweets etc about how hazard reduction stops bushfires and how the Greens blocked them. And their base just laps it up yum yum and regurgitates it verbatim on social media. Round and round we go.
I really worry about where the world is going. The internet and huge sections of the media are just large echo chambers, and only getting worse.
100%

Time for a plague.
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Fat Old Git
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Fat Old Git »

Thomas wrote:
Sensible Stephen wrote:
Thomas wrote:It doesn't matter what the facts are. Facts are useless.

You have the RFS Commissioner (guy in charge of the New South Wales Rural Fire Service) coming out saying hazard reduction isn't the solution and that there is no Green-led conspiracy but that doesn't stop the right wing commentators running with articles and tweets etc about how hazard reduction stops bushfires and how the Greens blocked them. And their base just laps it up yum yum and regurgitates it verbatim on social media. Round and round we go.
I really worry about where the world is going. The internet and huge sections of the media are just large echo chambers, and only getting worse.
100%

Time for a plague.
Perhaps a Computer virus.
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6.Jones
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by 6.Jones »

Mog The Almighty wrote:Nuclear and solar seem to be the obvious solutions but I guess theres more short term $$$ in coal. At least for the fat fůcks in that industry who have so much power over the government.
Nuclear just doesn't work. It would've if we started 20 years ago, but now there's no economic case. Solar, wind, pumped hydro, batteries. Welcome to the future, now.
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6.Jones
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by 6.Jones »

Sensible Stephen wrote:
6.Jones wrote:
Mog The Almighty wrote:That's all lovely. I donated too although not quite that much. Meanwhile the Australian government is giving Adani & their new mega-coal mine 4.4 billion dollars in subsidies coming from the pockets of Australian tax payers. More than double what they've allocated to the entire nation for bush-fire relief.

What a joke.
It is a joke. We should consider showing some leadership and shutting down our coal industry except for metallurgical coal. It's a big one time hit, that will pay off when we need it most, in a generation from now. It'll also encourage other countries to reduce their emissions, instead of us actively encouraging them to buy coal. So we might actually achieve a leveraged effect.

There's a simple way to do it. Simply tax carbon at its real price, taking into account its environmental cost. Currently those costs are borne by future Australians [and everyone else's children]. This is called the social cost of carbon, and there's some dispute about how to calculate it, but it'd price our carbon exports out of the market.

You might argue this is unfair, but what's fair about future humans subsidising one form of energy production? We'd need to take care of the workers, but shareholders can take their lumps.
Agree 100%. If we had a carbon tax, the market would get our emissions right down pretty quickly.

I would have a few tax exemptions though, industries were there is no viable alternative at the moment, such as air travel.
Absolutely. It can be engineered so there's no extra cost to consumers or business unless there are alternatives. That provides a price signal to develop the alternatives.
grievous
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by grievous »

massive_field_goal wrote:
grievous wrote:
Thomas wrote:
Slim 293 wrote:$70M does sound impressive until you learn he’s donating most of it to... himself.
Yep.

Image
10m is 10m. Free money is fake news of course there is always a catch just like the government commitment of billions. When that finally makes it to where it’s needed it won’t be anywhere near that as it gets pecked at along the way.
Public auto-donations are true to Twiggy "tax write-off" Forrest's form. Same deal with the other $450m or whatever it was.
Well here's the list so far, meanwhile fires ramping up again...bad...we will need more A listers
Major bushfire donors

Donor/s Amount
Andrew Forrest's Minderoo Foundation $70m
Paul Ramsay Foundation $30m
Crown/The Packers $5m
NAB $5m
Coles $4m
AFL $2.5m
BHP $2m
Westpac $1.5m
Woolworths $1.5m
Australian NBA stars $1m+
Commonwealth Bank $1m
ANZ $1m
Rio Tinto $1m
Orica $1m
Pratt Foundation $1m
John and Pauline Gandel $1m
Elton John $1m
Chris Hemsworth $1m
Kylie Jenner $1m
Hains family via Portland House Foundation $1m
The Perich Group $1m
Auction for Shane Warne's baggy green cap (purchased by the Commonwealth Bank) $1m
Metallica $750k
Lewis Hamilton $730k approx
Kylie and Dannii Minogue $500k
Justin Hemmes $500k
Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban $500k
Pink $500k
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Sandstorm
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Sandstorm »

Sensible Stephen wrote:
Slim 293 wrote:
Sensible Stephen wrote:Meanwhile, a couple of cnuts spreading fakenews.

https://twitter.com/DonaldJTrumpJr/stat ... 9697845249

https://twitter.com/seanhannity/status/ ... 9937743874
Oh God, I read some of the comments...

:uhoh:
I WOULDN'T BE SURPRISED IF THEY WERE TRAINED ANTIFA ARSONIST WHO OBAMA TRAINS TO DO IT IN CALIFORNIA & HIS ANTIFA ARSONIST R ALSO ALL AROUND THE WORLD AS IN AUSTRALIA. I'VE SEEN THEM WITH BIG BLOW TORCHES ON VIDEOS SETTING FIELDS ON FIRE NEAR HOMES.THEY NEED TO ARREST ONE AT TOP!
Its either that, Greta and Leo, or Muslims. All lighting fires because they hate us.
Jesus guys, can't you smell the troll from 50km? I know these fires are terrible and it's an emotional time in Australia but seriously.... :blush:
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Ali's Choice
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Ali's Choice »

Really good article by George Megalogenis in Fairfax today. He paints the picture of a Prime Minister with no policy agenda whatsoever who is unwilling or unable to lead the nation in its hour of need.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/morriso ... 53q6j.html
Morrison, the political animal who missed the political opportunity to lead

By George Megalogenis
JANUARY 11, 2020

The Prime Minister's actions during the bushfire crisis jar with what we’ve come to expect from our politicians in moments of national peril and collective grief.

In the euphoric week after last May’s election "miracle", one of the more experienced members of Scott Morrison’s government likened the result to Paul Keating’s victory for the true believers in 1993. “It reminded some of us of Fightback,” he said. An unpopular government had been returned against expectations because voters feared the opposition’s radical alternative.

The senior Liberal shared his insights with colleagues to deliver a quiet warning. Don’t confuse an electoral reprieve for a mandate to govern as you please. Keating had alienated voters immediately after his win with a horror budget and then a policy lurch to the left, which prepared the ground for a landslide defeat in 1996. John Howard, the beneficiary of Keating’s hubris, is likely to have reinforced the message for Morrison. Remain humble and don’t take re-election for granted.

The fascinating part of these internal discussions was the expectation that the Prime Minister would use his authority to bring the government back to the middle ground. One policy area stood out – the environment. There was a strong view that the Coalition could not risk another campaign without a credible climate change policy. In fact, more Liberal seats might have fallen in Sydney and Melbourne in 2019 if Labor had not left itself so open to a scare campaign on its taxation and spending programs. Many Coalition MPs believe otherwise: that the government’s success at the ballot box last year meant a majority of Australians had rejected the global-warming hoax for all time.

But Morrison was assumed to be in the former camp, a realist not an ideologue, who understood the need to reset the government’s approach before the next election. That assessment seems too generous now.

As Morrison is buffeted by rolling waves of local and international criticism over his handling of the bushfire crisis, he should be kicking himself for not connecting the post-election advice for moderation from his own side with the open letter sent to him by former emergency chiefs a month beforehand, in April. That letter expressed alarm at the lack of action on climate change at the national level, and pleaded for an end to the cycle of funding cuts for fire services.

“In the last year we’ve seen unseasonal fires in Tasmania, Victoria, NSW, Queensland and Western Australia, floods and twin cyclones in parts of northern Australia, longer bushfire danger periods and fires burning in rainforests,” the statement, signed by 23 representatives from each state and territory, said. “Rising greenhouse gas pollution from the burning of coal, oil and gas is worsening extreme weather and putting people in danger.”

For a politician schooled in the Abbott era of making Labor responsible for every single asylum seeker death at sea, it is surprising that Morrison would not take out some insurance ahead of this summer’s bushfire season by committing extra resources, to be tapped in the event of a catastrophe.

This remains the most bewildering aspect of the crisis. Morrison is the political animal who kept missing the political opportunity to rise above politics and lead. The trip to Hawaii, the self-pitying apology tour of media outlets when he was forced to cut it short, the blame-shifting to the states and the awkward, passive-aggressive exchanges with victims of devastated towns appeared to be the shrugs of a man who thought this should be someone else’s problem. It jars with what we’ve come to expect from our politicians in moments of national peril and collective grief.


Morrison has a ferocious work ethic and a Kevin Rudd-like propensity to micro-manage. But he felt no immediate compulsion to intervene while the country burnt because he didn’t see the early start, and epic scale of the fires, or the smoke choking Sydney and Canberra as a cause for his concern. Even if it was, what could he do? The responsibility for fighting fires belonged to the states. That was his argument before he went to Hawaii in mid-December. If they asked for help, he’d provide it; a sly formula that suggested the states were the complacent party, not the Commonwealth. On his return, he offered a buck-passing slogan for the ages: “I don’t hold a hose, mate.” He seemed genuinely perplexed and a little pissed off that people were asking him to do more.

As he absorbs the lessons of the past few weeks, the Prime Minister should reacquaint himself with the leadership examples of John Howard and Paul Keating.

Gun laws and native title had been state matters. They were left in the too-hard basket during the economic reform era of the 1980s, in part because the vested interests opposed to reform could swing elections at both the state and federal level. State Labor governments in Victoria and NSW had tried to toughen gun laws in response to a series of massacres but pulled back when farmers and recreation shooters marched on their parliaments.

Bob Hawke, meanwhile, had promised land rights for Indigenous Australians but withdrew his offer after Western Australian Labor premier Brian Burke threatened to campaign against the federal government. Hawke told me that was one of his greatest regrets of his public life. He should have called Burke’s bluff.

The window for national action did not close with those setbacks. The question was whether leaders and their parties were prepared to step up again when circumstances changed.

For Keating, the 1992 High Court judgment in the Mabo case presented both an opportunity and an existential threat to his leadership. Unemployment was heading towards 11 per cent, and Labor was expected to lose the next election. But Keating was determined to act and, in December that year, just four months out from the election, he delivered his Redfern Speech. He was thinking ahead in the unlikely event that his government was returned. If he lost, the speech would be a rallying call to future generations. If he won, it was the mandate for turning the Mabo judgment into Commonwealth legislation.

For Howard, the Port Arthur massacre in 1996 presented the opportunity to act on a lifelong belief. Many on his side were surprised that he felt this way. They shouldn’t have been because a year beforehand, as opposition leader, he used a headland speech on the role of government to declare that “every effort should be made to limit the carrying of guns in Australia”.

No one paid attention then. But like the Redfern Speech, it demonstrated a deep engagement with an issue before the window for reform was re-opened by the next massacre. It meant that Howard spoke with a Keating-like clarity of conviction when he called for uniform gun laws.

A common thread between these two examples was the ability of Howard and Keating to cross the normal language barriers of politics to reveal their true idealistic selves. This was a critical element in inspiring colleagues to continue the fight when vested interests pushed back, or the party base had second thoughts.

For Keating, Gareth Evans, the government leader in the Senate, and Bill Kelty, the secretary of the ACTU, were invaluable lieutenants. Evans steered the legislation through a fractious Senate, while Kelty kept recalcitrant unions in line.

For Howard, National Party leader Tim Fischer and his deputy John Anderson, played the equivalent role in keeping regional Australia on side.

The present generation of politicians underestimates the degree of difficulty of those reforms. I’ve spoken to a number who are simultaneously in awe of the achievement and inclined to play it down because in today’s media environment they can’t imagine land being given to Indigenous Australians or guns being taken off white Australians.

Mabo, in particular, faced a perfect storm of opposition. The Coalition refused to negotiate, forcing Labor to deal with a Senate that had just dismantled the budget. State Labor and Coalition governments were running scare campaigns, warning without evidence that native title could apply in suburban backyards, and talkback radio seemed to be giving voice to every racist in the country. And yet both sides are grateful that Keating prevailed.

The reform era didn’t end because the internet made people angry. It ended because the governments of Rudd, Gillard, Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison lacked the belief to mount and sustain an argument.

Morrison has only known a federal Parliament where success was measured in legislation blocked or repealed. He has only known a polarised media. He was able to navigate both dystopias to claim the prime ministership before the public really knew him. He won the election by turning it into a referendum on his opponent, Bill Shorten.

He entered the bushfire crisis with less baggage than he appreciated. The public was willing to receive him as their saviour, a role every leader I’ve covered - with the possible exception of Julia Gillard - assumed had been assigned to them at birth. Morrison certainly doesn’t lack confidence and his energetic campaign persona suggests he enjoys the company of his fellow Australians.

But he wasted the best part of a month resisting the call. When he finally accepted his burden, his public language remained painfully inadequate. He lacked the clarity of conviction that came so easily to Howard, Keating and Hawke in previous crises because he hadn’t given the issue enough thought beforehand to recognise a tipping point. He had to be hounded into doing his job, and humiliated again until he found his voice.

Last Sunday’s announcement of a national bushfire recovery agency with initial funding of $2 billion, backed up by the deployment of the military, is the first tangible sign that the Prime Minister is engaged. Tellingly, he is now prepared to leave the budget in deficit to fund the relief effort.

In a parallel universe, Morrison delivered that statement a month earlier, acknowledging that climate change had elevated the risk that bushfires posed to lives and property. He could have said he had his fingers crossed that the fires then under way could be contained, but the best advice was that the weather would not be on our side. At that point, he could have taken a short, well-earned family holiday in Australia, remaining close enough to dash back to work on the days of greatest fire danger.

Howard made a revealing intervention on Morrison’s behalf last Sunday. He said the Prime Minister didn’t get enough credit for his efforts since returning from Hawaii. “I don’t think he’s interested in the next opinion poll, if you want my opinion,” Howard told reporter Chris Barrett. “I think what he wants to do now is make certain all of the responses are the right ones. In a federation like Australia, working closely with the states is the most important requirement a federal government has.”

The edge in that final observation was not lost on Liberals. Morrison has been sniping at the NSW Coalition government of Gladys Berijiklian and Howard wanted it to stop.

The damage to Morrison’s standing has been compounded by the global attention. It usually doesn’t matter what the rest of the world thinks because we are too small to bother with. But the fires have triggered something in the international media not seen since September 11, 2001. The apocalyptic images of a mountain of flames pushing an entire township onto the beach, the orange skies over capitals, the military being called to evacuate people, and the charred remains of Australian wildlife are on high rotation. Only this time it isn’t the same clip being repeated of planes smashing into the Twin Towers. Each day brings a fresh nightmare streamed live into a world already anxious about climate change.

Morrison didn’t just miss his moment to lead Australians, his prevarications and obfuscations created a new narrative of a spoilt rich country led by a man who didn’t care if the planet burnt. This is no doubt unfair, but Morrison would have noticed that the global news cycle can elevate a prime minister just as easily as it can humiliate them. New Zealand's Jacinda Ardern sits at one end of the spectrum for her handling of the Christchurch massacre, while Morrison risks being plonked at the other.

Australia has not been on the receiving end of a global pile on like this before. The last time the international community saw us as a delinquent was in the 1970s when we were being advised to deregulate our economy. But that debate was restricted to OECD reports and gentle sledges between officials at international forums. And we were not the only country suffering stagflation.

Morrison could be forgiven for thinking he is being unfairly blamed for the sins of his predecessors. Australia was playing climate change policy spoiler before his arrival in Parliament in 2007. The blame starts with Howard’s refusal to sign the Kyoto Protocol. Yet no global leader or journalist with a global platform today would remember this. Howard is only known to them by his response to the Port Arthur massacre in 1996. He was that rare breed of conservative leader who convinced his own supporters to give up their guns.

Morrison would not have appreciated the intervention this week of former foreign affairs minister Julie Bishop, who called on the government to become an international role model of climate change action. “If a country like Australia fails to show leadership, we can hardly blame other nations for not likewise showing leadership in this area,” she said on Monday.

In the past, the big Australian reforms were framed to impress global opinion. The Hawke-Keating government always had one eye on the international money markets when they were floating the dollar or slashing government spending and tariffs. Keating wanted Mabo to help build a bridge to Asia.

If Morrison is to make something of the bushfire crisis, he has to convince the rest of the world that Australia is serious about climate change.
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Wallah
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Wallah »

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fishfoodie
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by fishfoodie »

grievous wrote:
massive_field_goal wrote:
grievous wrote:
Thomas wrote:
Slim 293 wrote:$70M does sound impressive until you learn he’s donating most of it to... himself.
Yep.

Image
10m is 10m. Free money is fake news of course there is always a catch just like the government commitment of billions. When that finally makes it to where it’s needed it won’t be anywhere near that as it gets pecked at along the way.
Public auto-donations are true to Twiggy "tax write-off" Forrest's form. Same deal with the other $450m or whatever it was.
Well here's the list so far, meanwhile fires ramping up again...bad...we will need more A listers
Major bushfire donors

Donor/s Amount
Andrew Forrest's Minderoo Foundation $70m
Paul Ramsay Foundation $30m
Crown/The Packers $5m
NAB $5m
Coles $4m
AFL $2.5m
BHP $2m
Westpac $1.5m
Woolworths $1.5m
Australian NBA stars $1m+
Commonwealth Bank $1m
ANZ $1m
Rio Tinto $1m
Orica $1m
Pratt Foundation $1m
John and Pauline Gandel $1m
Elton John $1m
Chris Hemsworth $1m
Kylie Jenner $1m
Hains family via Portland House Foundation $1m
The Perich Group $1m
Auction for Shane Warne's baggy green cap (purchased by the Commonwealth Bank) $1m
Metallica $750k
Lewis Hamilton $730k approx
Kylie and Dannii Minogue $500k
Justin Hemmes $500k
Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban $500k
Pink $500k

I don't see the Murdock cunts on that list ?
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Ali's Choice
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Ali's Choice »

Was reading today that Twiggy Forrest's $70 million donation is not as generous as it appears. It will be used to fund his new climate 'think tank' organisation which will research and advocate for fossil fuels and traditional sources of energy.

Edit: I apologise, I see this has already been addressed a few posts up.
grievous
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by grievous »

I don't see the Murdock cunts on that list ?
and you wont...what you will see is from them is something more horrific than any images of fire destruction, its truely appalling and hope I never have to see anything like this again...

https://www.smh.com.au/culture/celebrit ... 53ptb.html









x( x( x( x( x( x( x( x(
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by MungoMan »

grievous wrote:
I don't see the Murdock cunts on that list ?
and you wont...what you will see is from them is something more horrific than any images of fire destruction, its truely appalling and hope I never have to see anything like this again...

https://www.smh.com.au/culture/celebrit ... 53ptb.html







x( x( x( x( x( x( x( x(
Sweet baby jesus that is farken grotesque
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CrazyIslander
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by CrazyIslander »

:lol:
Harden up!!!
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Harden up!!! »

Thomas wrote:
Sensible Stephen wrote:
Thomas wrote:It doesn't matter what the facts are. Facts are useless.

You have the RFS Commissioner (guy in charge of the New South Wales Rural Fire Service) coming out saying hazard reduction isn't the solution and that there is no Green-led conspiracy but that doesn't stop the right wing commentators running with articles and tweets etc about how hazard reduction stops bushfires and how the Greens blocked them. And their base just laps it up yum yum and regurgitates it verbatim on social media. Round and round we go.
I really worry about where the world is going. The internet and huge sections of the media are just large echo chambers, and only getting worse.
100%

Time for a plague.
The anti vaxers are working on that to help you.

Really feel bad for you all, my aunt lives in western sydney, could see all the smoke when we called her, was in wellington recently and I could smell the smoke, it set off my asthma, its just terrible, been a really hard few months for NZ's neighbors, samoa with the measles and australia with these terrible fires. makes me wonder when we are going to get our *turn* makes me worried, man i feel old haha.
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Kahu
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Kahu »

Our turn? Have you not been paying attention to events in NZ of the past ten years?
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6.Jones
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by 6.Jones »

MungoMan wrote:
grievous wrote:
I don't see the Murdock cunts on that list ?
and you wont...what you will see is from them is something more horrific than any images of fire destruction, its truely appalling and hope I never have to see anything like this again...

https://www.smh.com.au/culture/celebrit ... 53ptb.html







x( x( x( x( x( x( x( x(
Sweet baby jesus that is farken grotesque
Well, if she wasn't standing in the water it wouldn't've got her.
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6.Jones
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by 6.Jones »

Ali's Choice wrote:Morrison, the political animal
scomouse [noun scomous; verb scomous] (Australian]
noun, plural scomice [scomahys]
1. any of numerous small new world rodents of the family Morrison, especially of the genus Scotty.
2. smug, parasitic cnut of a thing
3. lives in a hole of its own making
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Ali's Choice
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Ali's Choice »

6.Jones wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:Morrison, the political animal
scomouse [noun scomous; verb scomous] (Australian]
noun, plural scomice [scomahys]
1. any of numerous small new world rodents of the family Morrison, especially of the genus Scotty.
2. smug, parasitic cnut of a thing
3. lives in a hole of its own making
He's as sly as a sewer house rat though.

Today in an interview with David Speers he stated that the Coalition "could" look at reducing carbon emissions into the future. I think this will be his stock answer to any Climate Change question right up until the next election. He's realised that arguing that Climate Change is not caused by human activity, or that his govt is already doing enough, is not working for him. So now he is simply going to bat away in criticism by saying that they may do more in the future. What a great way to kick this problem down the road for a few more years.
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6.Jones
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by 6.Jones »

Ali's Choice wrote:
6.Jones wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:Morrison, the political animal
scomouse [noun scomous; verb scomous] (Australian]
noun, plural scomice [scomahys]
1. any of numerous small new world rodents of the family Morrison, especially of the genus Scotty.
2. smug, parasitic cnut of a thing
3. lives in a hole of its own making
He's as sly as a sewer house rat though.

Today in an interview with David Speers he stated that the Coalition "could" look at reducing carbon emissions into the future. I think this will be his stock answer to any Climate Change question right up until the next election. He's realised that arguing that Climate Change is not caused by human activity, or that his govt is already doing enough, is not working for him. So now he is simply going to bat away in criticism by saying that they may do more in the future. What a great way to kick this problem down the road for a few more years.
It won't work. There was a groundswell with the school strikes. All those soccer moms marching struck a nerve. Now it's the fires. He'll be playing catch-up if he takes that line. The winner is the one who gets in front of it.
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EverReady
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by EverReady »

Just looking at this article on the BBC regarding the fires Kangaroo island https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-51102658

I was there in late 2007 early 2008 about 2 weeks after the fires then and they were very bad. I have a photo of that road in the article and it is identical. I also remember the whole of the left hand side of the island burned though looking at the overhead there it looks bigger this time as I would have said a quarter of it burned that time. Question I have is how did it burn again as I remember the talk at the time was making it preventable. Also did it recover the last time sufficiently? I remember I stayed in a lighthouse place and Kangaroos had been fücking themselves off the cliff
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jdogscoop
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by jdogscoop »

Fuk I laffed at the Gr8 kiwis mowing signs in there lawns about Taxinda tho.

Fuk off Comrad Jacinda to Russia or somefink.

Orsome.
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Sandstorm
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Sandstorm »

EverReady wrote:Question I have is how did it burn again as I remember the talk at the time was making it preventable. Also did it recover the last time sufficiently?
Blame Big Coal
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EverReady
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by EverReady »

Sandstorm wrote:
EverReady wrote:Question I have is how did it burn again as I remember the talk at the time was making it preventable. Also did it recover the last time sufficiently?
Blame Big Coal
This bird?

Image
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6.Jones
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by 6.Jones »

EverReady wrote:Just looking at this article on the BBC regarding the fires Kangaroo island https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-51102658

I was there in late 2007 early 2008 about 2 weeks after the fires then and they were very bad. I have a photo of that road in the article and it is identical. I also remember the whole of the left hand side of the island burned though looking at the overhead there it looks bigger this time as I would have said a quarter of it burned that time. Question I have is how did it burn again as I remember the talk at the time was making it preventable. Also did it recover the last time sufficiently? I remember I stayed in a lighthouse place and Kangaroos had been fücking themselves off the cliff
Ten years is a really short time for recovery. The ideal gap for regeneration is 50-100 years, which is the norm for bushfires. These fires likely passed through the same forests but were 2x larger.
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usermame
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by usermame »

6.Jones wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:Morrison, the political animal
Image
scomouse [noun scomous; verb scomous] (Australian]
noun, plural scomice [scomahys]
1. any of numerous small new world rodents of the family Morrison, especially of the genus Scotty.
2. smug, parasitic cnut of a thing
3. lives in a hole of its own making
Winner.
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Cullen
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Cullen »

Unfortunately another casualty* of this dreadful situation.

The original Yellow Wiggle has collapsed with a heart attack at their over-18s charity concert.

While Greg was being treated back stage, presumably on a de-fib and being rushed to hospital, the remaining members returned to the stage for an encore performance of Hot Potato.

*Greg is expected to make a full recovery

https://i.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/cel ... ef-concert
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Ted.
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Ted. »

Sandstorm wrote:
Sensible Stephen wrote:
Slim 293 wrote:
Sensible Stephen wrote:Meanwhile, a couple of cnuts spreading fakenews.

https://twitter.com/DonaldJTrumpJr/stat ... 9697845249

https://twitter.com/seanhannity/status/ ... 9937743874
Oh God, I read some of the comments...

:uhoh:
I WOULDN'T BE SURPRISED IF THEY WERE TRAINED ANTIFA ARSONIST WHO OBAMA TRAINS TO DO IT IN CALIFORNIA & HIS ANTIFA ARSONIST R ALSO ALL AROUND THE WORLD AS IN AUSTRALIA. I'VE SEEN THEM WITH BIG BLOW TORCHES ON VIDEOS SETTING FIELDS ON FIRE NEAR HOMES.THEY NEED TO ARREST ONE AT TOP!
Its either that, Greta and Leo, or Muslims. All lighting fires because they hate us.
Jesus guys, can't you smell the troll from 50km? I know these fires are terrible and it's an emotional time in Australia but seriously.... :blush:
I think you need to clarify exactly who is trolling in this instance, Junior, Hannity or the CAPS screamer?
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guy smiley
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by guy smiley »

Image
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Ted.
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Ted. »

guy smiley wrote:Image
What a huge undertaking. :(
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guy smiley
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by guy smiley »

The cost of this firestorm will be felt for decades, Ted :(

There are reports now of the heavy rain across NSW washing mud and ash into the rivers in huge quantities resulting in massive fish kill.

The imbeciles running the country are still trying to braveface their way out of this... the ecological nightmare has only just begun. :(

As an aside... my flight out of Adelaide on Wednesday was delayed due to severe weather in Melbourne. I ended up getting in about 10.30pm or so. The scene through the plane window was surreal... what I thought was drizzle was smoke. Visibility was down to about 300m at ground level. You could only just make out the terminal building from the runway. I was allocated a hotel room and had to find a cab... after 10 minutes outside my eyes were watering and my breathing felt laboured. The stink is indescribable... damp char, maybe. The sky across Aus is often dusty, especially further north over the desert regions... now, it's just a filthy brown smudge at altitude.

this is, as I've said a few times, apocalyptic. The rain across the lower East has relieved some pressure but fires are still burning. Add the flooding and run off damage to the disaster. It's f**king awful.
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fishfoodie
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by fishfoodie »

usermame wrote:
6.Jones wrote:
Ali's Choice wrote:Morrison, the political animal
Image
scomouse [noun scomous; verb scomous] (Australian]
noun, plural scomice [scomahys]
1. any of numerous small new world rodents of the family Morrison, especially of the genus Scotty.
2. smug, parasitic cnut of a thing
3. lives in a hole of its own making
Winner.
Way too cute I'm afraid.

Maybe like this,

Image

or possibly feasting on a charred koala :((
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guy smiley
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by guy smiley »

Watch the Libs turn this into another gravy train for their mates...

https://theaimn.com/asking-peter-dutton ... C1eNCpT55g
A couple of days ago I received this message from a Facebook friend:

“Hi John, Part of the bloated Dutton budget is spent on this group [AIDR]. Young Peter has been strangely silent of late so may be an appropriate time to highlight his expertise.”

A Google search and it tells me that:

The Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience (AIDR) develops, maintains and shares knowledge and learning to support a disaster resilient Australia.

So why haven’t we heard about this institute before or during the course of this ongoing disaster? What is the reason for its existence, and why does it come under the umbrella of Peter Dutton’s department?

What is their total funding and what is it spent on? With a bit of checking I find out that it is funded by the by the Attorneys General’s Department. “Now that’s a bit strange,” I think to myself.

One of a few web pages in their name describes their function:

“The Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience (AIDR) develops, maintains and shares knowledge and learning to support a disaster resilient Australia. Building on extensive knowledge and experience in Australia and internationally, we work with government, communities, NGOs, not-for-profits, research organisations, education partners and the private sector to enhance disaster resilience through innovative thinking, professional development and knowledge sharing.

AIDR is supported by its partners: the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs, AFAC, the Australian Red Cross and the Bushfire & Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre.”

I asked myself; if the government has a department already functioning for the purpose of disaster resilience why is there this sudden reactive flurry for the need of more information?

The site has a link that includes an Annual Report but it doesn’t list any financials.

It also links to one of its partners The Department of Home Affairs.

“The Department of Home Affairs is a central policy agency, providing coordinated strategy and policy leadership for Australia’s national and transport security, federal law enforcement, criminal justice, cyber security, border, immigration, multicultural affairs, emergency management, and trade-related functions.”

Turning our attention back to Peter Dutton, is he hiding a secret? Perish the thought and bite your tongue. Interesting too that Twiggy’s $70M is actually $10M, plus $10M to his private foundation and $50M to duplicate the stated raison d’etre of the AIDR

What was strange, however, was that in this article by Sarah McPhee Twiggy uses the word “resilience” twice.

“We know that this is a matter of national resilience,” Mr Forrest told reporters in Perth today.

“This goes to a holistic assessment of where the nation is at and what we need to do to improve resilience.”

There is also this sentence:

“In addition, he will provide $10 million through the couple’s Minderoo Foundation to build a “volunteer army” to deploy to regions devastated by bushfires and another $10 million for communities in collaboration with the Australian Red Cross, the Salvation Army and other agencies on the ground.”

Note that the same agencies are mentioned on multiple occasions.

AIDR is funded by the Commonwealth Attorney General’s Department through Emergency Management Australia, managed by AFAC and supported by the Australian Red Cross and Bushfire & Natural Hazards CRC. (From the 2016-2017 AIDR Annual Report).

Why does this word “resilience” keep popping up?

Yet another google search takes me to another AIDR page sub-headed “Australian Disaster Resilience Knowledge Hub.”

There are a number of web pages all dealing with the work of the AIDR and I’m wondering why this is necessary.

The only place I can find money mentioned is on page that mentions the doubling of funding by the Turnbull government. They get an extra $1million.

The Knowledge Hub page tells us that:

“Australian Disaster Resilience Knowledge Hub. The Knowledge Hub is a national, open-source platform that supports and informs policy, planning, decision-making and contemporary good practice in disaster resilience”

“This goes to a holistic assessment of where the nation is at and what we need to do to improve resilience.”

Then when I read Kaye Lee’s piece for The AIMN in which she talks about Twiggy Foresters conditional $70 million donation and the formation of a volunteer group I notice that the AIDR are forming a volunteer group in WA. Is this the same thing, I ask myself?

“The Volunteer Leadership Program (VLP) equips emergency sector volunteers with the skills and confidence to grow as leaders. The VLP experience is immersive and collaborative, bringing together volunteers from different organisations and agencies to build knowledge and share experiences with each other. The program explores practical leadership frameworks through interactive learning, and participants gain both self-awareness and an enhanced ability to understand and contribute to their organisations.“

Now it must be connected, I say to myself, but why the secrecy? Why are the AIDR never mentioned but the Prime Minister uses the word resilience in every interview? As he did with David Speers.

Another thing I find rather odd is that the site never mentions any names. Surely the NIDR has a chairperson, a committee or some form of management.

But for some reason it appears to be a faceless organisation. And why is their no mention of the current crisis on their web site?

There are so many questions that require answers but I have reached a dead end.

Yet I remain convinced that there is something shonky about all of this.

Could it be that the government will award an amount of money, matched by Twiggy’s donation to this obscure voluntary organisation?

Shades of the Barrier Reef Foundation. Anyway, I have gone as far as I can go with it …

Then as I’m about to close I find this on the John Menadue’s Pearls and Irritations. Again the word “resilience” pops up.

The article is dated 13 January and written by Abul Rizvi.

Where have Dutton and Pezzullo been hiding?

The culpability of Dutton and Pezzullo for the bushfire crisis.

“Peter Dutton is the senior minister responsible for the Home Affairs portfolio that includes Emergency Management Australia (EMA). EMA is a division of the Department of Home Affairs whose Secretary is Mike Pezzullo. EMA says its role is to “build a disaster resilient Australia that prevents, prepares, responds and recovers from disasters and emergencies”. Thus in their empire building, Dutton and Pezzullo took on responsibility for preventing and preparing Australia for these bushfires. So why the eerie silence from both of them?”

Now we have two identities working on this resilience. EMA and AIDR, and both under the control of Peter Dutton.

Yet another Google search reveals a volunteer group known as the Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Forum, and guess what? A representative from Home Affairs attends their meetings and the Commonwealth Department of Home Affairs provides secretariat support to the AEMVF.

This all goes beyond any coincidence, but I cannot put my finger on it.
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by MungoMan »

guy smiley wrote:Watch the Libs turn this into another gravy train for their mates...

https://theaimn.com/asking-peter-dutton ... C1eNCpT55g
A couple of days ago I received this message from a Facebook friend:

“Hi John, Part of the bloated Dutton budget is spent on this group [AIDR]. Young Peter has been strangely silent of late so may be an appropriate time to highlight his expertise.”

A Google search and it tells me that:

The Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience (AIDR) develops, maintains and shares knowledge and learning to support a disaster resilient Australia.

So why haven’t we heard about this institute before or during the course of this ongoing disaster? What is the reason for its existence, and why does it come under the umbrella of Peter Dutton’s department?

What is their total funding and what is it spent on? With a bit of checking I find out that it is funded by the by the Attorneys General’s Department. “Now that’s a bit strange,” I think to myself.

One of a few web pages in their name describes their function:

“The Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience (AIDR) develops, maintains and shares knowledge and learning to support a disaster resilient Australia. Building on extensive knowledge and experience in Australia and internationally, we work with government, communities, NGOs, not-for-profits, research organisations, education partners and the private sector to enhance disaster resilience through innovative thinking, professional development and knowledge sharing.

AIDR is supported by its partners: the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs, AFAC, the Australian Red Cross and the Bushfire & Natural Hazards Cooperative Research Centre.”

I asked myself; if the government has a department already functioning for the purpose of disaster resilience why is there this sudden reactive flurry for the need of more information?

The site has a link that includes an Annual Report but it doesn’t list any financials.

It also links to one of its partners The Department of Home Affairs.

“The Department of Home Affairs is a central policy agency, providing coordinated strategy and policy leadership for Australia’s national and transport security, federal law enforcement, criminal justice, cyber security, border, immigration, multicultural affairs, emergency management, and trade-related functions.”

Turning our attention back to Peter Dutton, is he hiding a secret? Perish the thought and bite your tongue. Interesting too that Twiggy’s $70M is actually $10M, plus $10M to his private foundation and $50M to duplicate the stated raison d’etre of the AIDR

What was strange, however, was that in this article by Sarah McPhee Twiggy uses the word “resilience” twice.

“We know that this is a matter of national resilience,” Mr Forrest told reporters in Perth today.

“This goes to a holistic assessment of where the nation is at and what we need to do to improve resilience.”

There is also this sentence:

“In addition, he will provide $10 million through the couple’s Minderoo Foundation to build a “volunteer army” to deploy to regions devastated by bushfires and another $10 million for communities in collaboration with the Australian Red Cross, the Salvation Army and other agencies on the ground.”

Note that the same agencies are mentioned on multiple occasions.

AIDR is funded by the Commonwealth Attorney General’s Department through Emergency Management Australia, managed by AFAC and supported by the Australian Red Cross and Bushfire & Natural Hazards CRC. (From the 2016-2017 AIDR Annual Report).

Why does this word “resilience” keep popping up?

Yet another google search takes me to another AIDR page sub-headed “Australian Disaster Resilience Knowledge Hub.”

There are a number of web pages all dealing with the work of the AIDR and I’m wondering why this is necessary.

The only place I can find money mentioned is on page that mentions the doubling of funding by the Turnbull government. They get an extra $1million.

The Knowledge Hub page tells us that:

“Australian Disaster Resilience Knowledge Hub. The Knowledge Hub is a national, open-source platform that supports and informs policy, planning, decision-making and contemporary good practice in disaster resilience”

“This goes to a holistic assessment of where the nation is at and what we need to do to improve resilience.”

Then when I read Kaye Lee’s piece for The AIMN in which she talks about Twiggy Foresters conditional $70 million donation and the formation of a volunteer group I notice that the AIDR are forming a volunteer group in WA. Is this the same thing, I ask myself?

“The Volunteer Leadership Program (VLP) equips emergency sector volunteers with the skills and confidence to grow as leaders. The VLP experience is immersive and collaborative, bringing together volunteers from different organisations and agencies to build knowledge and share experiences with each other. The program explores practical leadership frameworks through interactive learning, and participants gain both self-awareness and an enhanced ability to understand and contribute to their organisations.“

Now it must be connected, I say to myself, but why the secrecy? Why are the AIDR never mentioned but the Prime Minister uses the word resilience in every interview? As he did with David Speers.

Another thing I find rather odd is that the site never mentions any names. Surely the NIDR has a chairperson, a committee or some form of management.

But for some reason it appears to be a faceless organisation. And why is their no mention of the current crisis on their web site?

There are so many questions that require answers but I have reached a dead end.

Yet I remain convinced that there is something shonky about all of this.

Could it be that the government will award an amount of money, matched by Twiggy’s donation to this obscure voluntary organisation?

Shades of the Barrier Reef Foundation. Anyway, I have gone as far as I can go with it …

Then as I’m about to close I find this on the John Menadue’s Pearls and Irritations. Again the word “resilience” pops up.

The article is dated 13 January and written by Abul Rizvi.

Where have Dutton and Pezzullo been hiding?

The culpability of Dutton and Pezzullo for the bushfire crisis.

“Peter Dutton is the senior minister responsible for the Home Affairs portfolio that includes Emergency Management Australia (EMA). EMA is a division of the Department of Home Affairs whose Secretary is Mike Pezzullo. EMA says its role is to “build a disaster resilient Australia that prevents, prepares, responds and recovers from disasters and emergencies”. Thus in their empire building, Dutton and Pezzullo took on responsibility for preventing and preparing Australia for these bushfires. So why the eerie silence from both of them?”

Now we have two identities working on this resilience. EMA and AIDR, and both under the control of Peter Dutton.

Yet another Google search reveals a volunteer group known as the Australian Emergency Management Volunteer Forum, and guess what? A representative from Home Affairs attends their meetings and the Commonwealth Department of Home Affairs provides secretariat support to the AEMVF.

This all goes beyond any coincidence, but I cannot put my finger on it.
I note the three directors listed in AIDR’s most recently-published annual report (2017-2018, which is a bit poor) are all Vics* plus the organisation itself is headquartered in Vic.

AIDR appears to be funded by Emergency Management Australia, a division of Home Affairs, altho’ this is not detailed in the financial performance / financial statements section of DOH’s 2019-2019 annual report.


* I checked via LinkedIn
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Slim 293
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by Slim 293 »

guy smiley wrote:The cost of this firestorm will be felt for decades, Ted :(

There are reports now of the heavy rain across NSW washing mud and ash into the rivers in huge quantities resulting in massive fish kill.

The imbeciles running the country are still trying to braveface their way out of this... the ecological nightmare has only just begun. :(

As an aside... my flight out of Adelaide on Wednesday was delayed due to severe weather in Melbourne. I ended up getting in about 10.30pm or so. The scene through the plane window was surreal... what I thought was drizzle was smoke. Visibility was down to about 300m at ground level. You could only just make out the terminal building from the runway. I was allocated a hotel room and had to find a cab... after 10 minutes outside my eyes were watering and my breathing felt laboured. The stink is indescribable... damp char, maybe. The sky across Aus is often dusty, especially further north over the desert regions... now, it's just a filthy brown smudge at altitude.

this is, as I've said a few times, apocalyptic. The rain across the lower East has relieved some pressure but fires are still burning. Add the flooding and run off damage to the disaster. It's f**king awful.

My early 4am wake up times this week were made worse by the coughing fits that prevented me from getting a decent sleep... despite my best efforts to insulate my place from the smoke, and to generally stay inside.

Never experienced that before...
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6.Jones
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Re: Welcome to Hell ... eastern Australia

Post by 6.Jones »

This is pretty sad news. Reports today that 80% of the Blue Mountains eucalyptus forest may have been burnt. I've spent a decent amount of my life in those mountains.
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