Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

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Sandstorm
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Sandstorm »

Clive wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Clive wrote:Lots of asian folk are fat and are diabetic, most of the people in Wales died because of this ,not because they're poor or have shit jobs in the NHS its because they are prone to Covid and low levels of Vitamin D don't help.
If people want and try and make this yet another racist issue they are utter twats with ones head up ones arse.
I must admit my doctor told me as I am black and living in the UK I would certainly have low Vitamin D levels (my bloods came back confirming what she said). She gave me a script for a high dose to bring my levels up and I've been taking a maintenance dose ever since. It does significantly reduce susceptibility to acute respiratory tract infections.

However I do believe the most obvious correlation between general health and life expectancy is disposable household income.
Vitamin D comes from sunshine, white people absorb it better than dark skinned, you also can get it from oily fish cheese and mushrooms (normal kind) so the winter time is when the dosage should be higher, helps with fatigue also.
I take one a day, double up in the winter.
Didn’t know you were Black, Clive.
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Gavin Duffy
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Gavin Duffy »

Where can I find this oily fish cheese? Is it polish?
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Sandstorm
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Sandstorm »

Gavin Duffy wrote:Where can I find this oily fish cheese? Is it polish?
Might be German.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Anonymous 1 »

Clive wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Clive wrote:Lots of asian folk are fat and are diabetic, most of the people in Wales died because of this ,not because they're poor or have shit jobs in the NHS its because they are prone to Covid and low levels of Vitamin D don't help.
If people want and try and make this yet another racist issue they are utter twats with ones head up ones arse.
I must admit my doctor told me as I am black and living in the UK I would certainly have low Vitamin D levels (my bloods came back confirming what she said). She gave me a script for a high dose to bring my levels up and I've been taking a maintenance dose ever since. It does significantly reduce susceptibility to acute respiratory tract infections.

However I do believe the most obvious correlation between general health and life expectancy is disposable household income.
Vitamin D comes from sunshine, white people absorb it better than dark skinned, you also can get it from oily fish cheese and mushrooms (normal kind) so the winter time is when the dosage should be higher, helps with fatigue also.
I take one a day, double up in the winter.
Thank you for that lesson
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Anonymous 1 »

bimboman wrote:
However I do believe the most obvious correlation between general health and life expectancy is disposable household income.
Maybe, that wouldn’t explain the disparity in Doctors deaths though.
Maybe diabetes and being pre diabetic. Would have been nice to have autopsy evidence.
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Clive
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Clive »

Sandstorm wrote:
Clive wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Clive wrote:Lots of asian folk are fat and are diabetic, most of the people in Wales died because of this ,not because they're poor or have shit jobs in the NHS its because they are prone to Covid and low levels of Vitamin D don't help.
If people want and try and make this yet another racist issue they are utter twats with ones head up ones arse.
I must admit my doctor told me as I am black and living in the UK I would certainly have low Vitamin D levels (my bloods came back confirming what she said). She gave me a script for a high dose to bring my levels up and I've been taking a maintenance dose ever since. It does significantly reduce susceptibility to acute respiratory tract infections.

However I do believe the most obvious correlation between general health and life expectancy is disposable household income.
Vitamin D comes from sunshine, white people absorb it better than dark skinned, you also can get it from oily fish cheese and mushrooms (normal kind) so the winter time is when the dosage should be higher, helps with fatigue also.
I take one a day, double up in the winter.
Didn’t know you were Black, Clive.
Would it matter.
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Anonymous 1
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Anonymous 1 »

Clive wrote:
Sandstorm wrote:
Clive wrote:
Anonymous. wrote:
Clive wrote:Lots of asian folk are fat and are diabetic, most of the people in Wales died because of this ,not because they're poor or have shit jobs in the NHS its because they are prone to Covid and low levels of Vitamin D don't help.
If people want and try and make this yet another racist issue they are utter twats with ones head up ones arse.
I must admit my doctor told me as I am black and living in the UK I would certainly have low Vitamin D levels (my bloods came back confirming what she said). She gave me a script for a high dose to bring my levels up and I've been taking a maintenance dose ever since. It does significantly reduce susceptibility to acute respiratory tract infections.

However I do believe the most obvious correlation between general health and life expectancy is disposable household income.
Vitamin D comes from sunshine, white people absorb it better than dark skinned, you also can get it from oily fish cheese and mushrooms (normal kind) so the winter time is when the dosage should be higher, helps with fatigue also.
I take one a day, double up in the winter.
Didn’t know you were Black, Clive.
Would it matter.
Sandstorm
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fishfoodie
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by fishfoodie »

Gavin Duffy wrote:Where can I find this oily fish cheese? Is it polish?
I think that might have been what was in the plastic package I found at the back of the salad tray in my fridge today.

It was mostly white, but had blue streaks, & some interesting orange furry blobs on it.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by frillage »

fishfoodie wrote:
Gavin Duffy wrote:Where can I find this oily fish cheese? Is it polish?
I think that might have been what was in the plastic package I found at the back of the salad tray in my fridge today.

It was mostly white, but had blue streaks, & some interesting orange furry blobs on it.

Worth a shot it might be a cure.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by fishfoodie »

The Beeb wrote: Man charged over urinating at PC Keith Palmer memorial

A man has been charged after a man was photographed apparently urinating at the Westminster memorial dedicated to PC Keith Palmer.

The incident is believed to have taken place on Saturday afternoon.

Andrew Banks, aged 28, of Stansted, Essex has been charged with outraging public decency, the Metropolitan Police said.

He will appear in custody at Westminster Magistrates' Court on Monday.
Good !

The shitstain should be made lick the pavement for miles around, as community service.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Rinkals »

Clive wrote:
Bokkom wrote:
Clive wrote:
Bokkom wrote:
Up to 80 per cent of people who test positive for coronavirus don't show any symptoms, a new study of the pandemic in England suggests.
Ok, here's a question for the medical/science bordies.
What does it mean to "test positive"?
Obviously the virus is lingering somewhere in your system, but it isn't going anywhere, or what?
A few days ago I posted a link to a British medical chap claiming between 50 and 80% of humans are just not "in the game". Meaning the virus has no effect on them.
Can a pathogen resides in your body for a while, being totally impotent and then eventually just fvck off?
It can stay in your body for a long time, tests on people were showing they still had the virus several weeks on, but the test were incorrect because dead virus cells still float happily around your body until they flush out.
So they are "dead"?
Meaning, although they are there, they have no effect?
Yes 100% correct. They carried out tests in Korea and couldn't understand why people who had covid were showing signs months on, the virus was showing its presence, but it was dead and no effect what so ever.
This runs counter to my understanding which is that the virus is never alive to begin with.

As in; it's not a living entity.

Is my understanding wrong?
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Bokkom »

This runs counter to my understanding which is that the virus is never alive to begin with.

As in; it's not a living entity.

Is my understanding wrong?
I don't think there are enough expert boredies to discuss the "live" state of a virus.
Suffice to say, if it loses is protective lipid layer, the remaining DNA/RNA component, for all intents and purposes, is "dead" - ie. it cannot successfully infect a potential host.
*doff science cap
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Rinkals »

Bokkom wrote:
This runs counter to my understanding which is that the virus is never alive to begin with.

As in; it's not a living entity.

Is my understanding wrong?
I don't think there are enough expert boredies to discuss the "live" state of a virus.
Suffice to say, if it loses is protective lipid layer, the remaining DNA/RNA component, for all intents and purposes, is "dead" - ie. it cannot successfully infect a potential host.
*doff science cap
On the contrary, not all bordies are thick as pigshit.
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Bokkom
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Bokkom »

Rinkals wrote:
Bokkom wrote:
This runs counter to my understanding which is that the virus is never alive to begin with.

As in; it's not a living entity.

Is my understanding wrong?
I don't think there are enough expert boredies to discuss the "live" state of a virus.
Suffice to say, if it loses is protective lipid layer, the remaining DNA/RNA component, for all intents and purposes, is "dead" - ie. it cannot successfully infect a potential host.
*doff science cap
On the contrary, not all bordies are thick as pigshit.
As per usual, a wrong assumption from you, but to be expected.
I will leave it to scientists and experts to debate the "live" status of a virus.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Raggs »

Rinkals wrote:This runs counter to my understanding which is that the virus is never alive to begin with.

As in; it's not a living entity.

Is my understanding wrong?
Pedantically, potentially correct.

Inactive, rather than "dead" then. Basically fragments of the virus, rather than a whole active one.

Not really worth the argument of whether or not they're alive in this case though is it? It's blatantly obvious what the main point was.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Rinkals »

Bokkom wrote:
Rinkals wrote:
Bokkom wrote:
This runs counter to my understanding which is that the virus is never alive to begin with.

As in; it's not a living entity.

Is my understanding wrong?
I don't think there are enough expert boredies to discuss the "live" state of a virus.
Suffice to say, if it loses is protective lipid layer, the remaining DNA/RNA component, for all intents and purposes, is "dead" - ie. it cannot successfully infect a potential host.
*doff science cap
On the contrary, not all bordies are thick as pigshit.
As per usual, a wrong assumption from you, but to be expected.
I will leave it to scientists and experts to debate the "live" status of a virus.
What wrong assumption?

We do have a number of virologists on the bored and we have medical experts, too.

Obviously I'm not talking about the Bimbot, but to specifically say that we don't have experts on here is to belittle the qualified people that we do have.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by bimboman »

We do have a number of virologists on the bored and we have medical experts, too.
A number of virologists :lol
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Rinkals »

bimboman wrote:
We do have a number of virologists on the bored and we have medical experts, too.
A number of virologists :lol
None that measures up to your qualifications, though, obviously.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by eldanielfire »

Anonymous. wrote:
Clive wrote:
Glaston wrote:Can anyone explain this PHE report that says racism/discrimination is partially to blame for high death rates amongst BAME people with Covid 19 in the UK?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/ ... ths-report

I would have thought actual physiological reasons would have played the bigger part.

I can understand that some might be of lower income/ have poorer living conditions/worse health care in the locations they live (mostly the cities) and that this gave them a worse outcome from catching the virus.

Do BAME deaths in other European countries tie in with this?

Found this odd.
"For BAME communities, lack of trust of NHS services resulted in reluctance to seek care."
Especially when so many BAME people work in the NHS and their high infection/death rate well documented.
Its lack of vitamin D with brown and black peoples the problem.
Case closed
Given all the science, it's highly likely to be part of the cause.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by eldanielfire »

bimboman wrote:
We do have a number of virologists on the bored and we have medical experts, too.
A number of virologists :lol
They would be the experts and know and understand the most on this disease.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by eldanielfire »

BlackMac wrote:Am I the only one finding the figures from Russia and India as ever so slightly questionable.
I do wonder. It seems too low, on the other hand Russia is an isolationist state, not very well connected with the world due to sanctions, economics and culture. Even it's major population in the european side is spread over a wide area. Also Eastern european countries don't appear so badly affected so far. It fits the criteria to not be a major COVID-19 case study.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Bokkom »

Rinkals wrote:
Bokkom wrote:
Rinkals wrote:
Bokkom wrote:
This runs counter to my understanding which is that the virus is never alive to begin with.

As in; it's not a living entity.

Is my understanding wrong?
I don't think there are enough expert boredies to discuss the "live" state of a virus.
Suffice to say, if it loses is protective lipid layer, the remaining DNA/RNA component, for all intents and purposes, is "dead" - ie. it cannot successfully infect a potential host.
*doff science cap
On the contrary, not all bordies are thick as pigshit.
As per usual, a wrong assumption from you, but to be expected.
I will leave it to scientists and experts to debate the "live" status of a virus.
What wrong assumption?

We do have a number of virologists on the bored and we have medical experts, too.

Obviously I'm not talking about the Bimbot, but to specifically say that we don't have experts on here is to belittle the qualified people that we do have.
Following your logic, the boredies who are neither virologists nor medical experts are "thick as pigshit"?
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by eldanielfire »

Anonymous. wrote:
Glaston wrote:Can anyone explain this PHE report that says racism/discrimination is partially to blame for high death rates amongst BAME people with Covid 19 in the UK?
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/ ... ths-report

I would have thought actual physiological reasons would have played the bigger part.

I can understand that some might be of lower income/ have poorer living conditions/worse health care in the locations they live (mostly the cities) and that this gave them a worse outcome from catching the virus.

Do BAME deaths in other European countries tie in with this?

Found this odd.
"For BAME communities, lack of trust of NHS services resulted in reluctance to seek care."
Especially when so many BAME people work in the NHS and their high infection/death rate well documented.
I'd be interested in how they came to that conclusion. I have never hard that before
Same here.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by paddyor »

Uk trial for HCQ shutdown for overdosing the patients with the wrong drug.
:blush:

https://twitter.com/__ice9/status/12722 ... 19840?s=20
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Blackrock Bullet »

https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... SApp_Other

From the Guardian of all places
The past three months have proved it: the costs of lockdown are too high


The past three months have been a global experiment to test whether modern economies built on social interaction are compatible with methods for tackling a pandemic that haven’t moved on much since the Black Death.

The results are now in. Lockdowns are toxic for a world in which people travel to work on buses or commuter trains, spend eight hours with their colleagues at the office, spend their lunch hour doing a bit of shopping, and head off in the evening to the pub, the theatre or the football.

Britain imposed severe restrictions towards the end of March. By the end of April, according to initial estimates by the Office for National Statistics, the economy had shrunk by 25%. If anything, that will prove to be optimistic because of the difficulty in getting data from companies forced to close.

Little by little, restrictions are being lifted but life is not going to return to normal while face masks are obligatory on public transport, diners have to stay two metres, or even a metre apart in restaurants and customers are discouraged to browse in shops.

Recovery will be even slower in the event of a second wave of infections, something the history of past pandemics suggests is probable. Covid-19 looks to be the sort of virus that sticks around. The number of new cases has been on a downward trend for weeks as a result of the severest curbs on the UK population ever imposed in peacetime and the arrival of warmer weather, but what happens in the autumn when restrictions have been further eased and the temperature starts to drop? If the trend is reversed, does the government lock down the economy a second time?

The answer is almost certainly not, even though the possibility spooked financial markets last week. Share prices crashed in the early stages of the crisis because investors grasped that measures taken to control the pandemic would result in much weaker corporate profits. Markets subsequently rallied fast because the tentative easing of lockdown restrictions raised hopes of a V-shaped recession. They then had second thoughts after an increase in new Covid-19 cases in a number of US states, mainly in the south. The city of Houston in Texas is mulling the possibility of again ordering people to stay in their homes. A partial shutdown has been imposed in Beijing after the city reported its first cases of Covid-19 in almost two months.

This is likely to be the template for the months ahead: a targeted, localised approach rather than a blanket ban on activity. Political leaders are going to be wary of reimposing full lockdowns, and they are right to be.

For a start, it has become clear that there is no such thing as “the science” when it comes to Covid-19. Immunologists have different views about infection rates and possible mortality outcomes in the same way that monetarists and Keynesians differ over economics.

Ministers felt they had no option but to adopt a safety-first approach when the crisis broke in March because there was a genuine risk that an uncontrolled pandemic would overwhelm the NHS. Every person who had contracted the virus was infecting three others.

Three months later things look different. The NHS coped and the extra capacity installed through the Nightingale hospitals was not needed. The R number – the reproduction rate at which the virus spreads – has come down from three to one or just below.

Evidence of the harmful side-effects of the lockdown have also emerged. The number of suicides is up. Domestic violence has increased. Mental health is suffering. Unemployment figures out this week will illustrate the human cost of a 20.4% drop in national output in just one month. The jobless total is heading for 3 million this summer despite the fact that the government is currently paying a third of the workforce.

As the Institute for Fiscal Studies pointed out last week, the crisis has deepened Britain’s class, ethnic, gender and generational divides. Young people are the least likely demographic group to be infected with Covid-19 but they are being particularly hard hit by the lockdown. The cost of school closures for all children, but especially those from poorer households, will be high. The 18-24 age group are most likely to end up unemployed because many of them work in hospitality, retailing and leisure.

The likelihood that Covid-19 will resurface a second and perhaps a third or fourth time makes the case for a measured approach to future lockdowns even stronger. All the evidence is that six months without going to school is more than twice as damaging as three months. The same applies to youth unemployment. The longer the spell out of work the deeper the scars.

Getting young people to abide by a second lockdown would be problematic. They want to work, to meet their mates, go on demonstrations and have some fun. They know they are low risk and will do their own cost-benefit analysis. Many will simply not comply, deciding instead that Covid-19 is a risk they are prepared to accept.

This is not a bad philosophy because until a vaccine is found there is a choice. Either countries such as Britain use effective track and trace systems to deal with local hotspots and let the rest of the country operate as near to normal as possible, or they shut everything down again. If they haven’t already done so, governments will conclude that the economic, social, health and educational costs of full lockdowns are too high and that somehow we have to learn to live with Covid-19.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by bimboman »

eldanielfire wrote:
bimboman wrote:
We do have a number of virologists on the bored and we have medical experts, too.
A number of virologists :lol
They would be the experts and know and understand the most on this disease.

Indeed, and PR has one of them. I spose 1 is a number.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by CM11 »

Well, I'm convinced. Such a good argument.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by DOB »

Bokkom wrote:
This runs counter to my understanding which is that the virus is never alive to begin with.

As in; it's not a living entity.

Is my understanding wrong?
I don't think there are enough expert boredies to discuss the "live" state of a virus.
Suffice to say, if it loses is protective lipid layer, the remaining DNA/RNA component, for all intents and purposes, is "dead" - ie. it cannot successfully infect a potential host.
*doff science cap
If a human gets taken out of their subcutaneous lipid layer, they'd be pretty dead too, or at the very least be in the process of dying a very painful death.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Rinkals »

bimboman wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
bimboman wrote:
We do have a number of virologists on the bored and we have medical experts, too.
A number of virologists :lol
They would be the experts and know and understand the most on this disease.

Indeed, and PR has one of them. I spose 1 is a number.
You, I presume?
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by bimboman »

Rinkals wrote:
bimboman wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
bimboman wrote:
We do have a number of virologists on the bored and we have medical experts, too.
A number of virologists :lol
They would be the experts and know and understand the most on this disease.

Indeed, and PR has one of them. I spose 1 is a number.
You, I presume?

No the actual virologist.... I’m sure you can name the others.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by eldanielfire »

Blackrock Bullet wrote:https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... SApp_Other

From the Guardian of all places
Actually Larry Elliot I often find is nearly always at odds with the rest of the Guardian about economics. He comes over as some one who is almost a Briexteer or certainly does think it has economic opportunities.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Nolanator »

For a start, it has become clear that there is no such thing as “the science” when it comes to Covid-19. Immunologists have different views about infection rates and possible mortality
Someone fundamentally misunderstands what "science" is, especially where new things are concerned.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Sandstorm »

bimboman wrote:
No the actual virologist....
DrSnow?
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Anonymous 1 »

Blackrock Bullet wrote:https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... SApp_Other

From the Guardian of all places
The past three months have proved it: the costs of lockdown are too high


We should have taken the 500,000 deaths instead
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by BlackMac »

Anonymous. wrote:
bimboman wrote:
However I do believe the most obvious correlation between general health and life expectancy is disposable household income.
Maybe, that wouldn’t explain the disparity in Doctors deaths though.
Maybe diabetes and being pre diabetic. Would have been nice to have autopsy evidence.
The one obvious thing I noticed was a lot of the Asian doctors who died were well past their retirement date. You would question why they were still working in the first place and why they were allowed to work when their age clearly made them more vulnerable
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by BlackMac »

eldanielfire wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Am I the only one finding the figures from Russia and India as ever so slightly questionable.
I do wonder. It seems too low, on the other hand Russia is an isolationist state, not very well connected with the world due to sanctions, economics and culture. Even it's major population in the european side is spread over a wide area. Also Eastern european countries don't appear so badly affected so far. It fits the criteria to not be a major COVID-19 case study.
It's the deaths in proportion to cases that are questionable. More than twice the cases we have but less than 20% of the deaths.
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by Nolanator »

BlackMac wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Am I the only one finding the figures from Russia and India as ever so slightly questionable.
I do wonder. It seems too low, on the other hand Russia is an isolationist state, not very well connected with the world due to sanctions, economics and culture. Even it's major population in the european side is spread over a wide area. Also Eastern european countries don't appear so badly affected so far. It fits the criteria to not be a major COVID-19 case study.
It's the deaths in proportion to cases that are questionable. More than twice the cases we have but less than 20% of the deaths.
Have to look at excess deaths once this has all passed and stats have been compiled to see how it looks. I wouldn't be surprised to see lots of deaths supposedly due to pneumonia or other respiratory ailments.
Last edited by Nolanator on Mon Jun 15, 2020 10:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
piquant
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by piquant »

BlackMac wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Am I the only one finding the figures from Russia and India as ever so slightly questionable.
I do wonder. It seems too low, on the other hand Russia is an isolationist state, not very well connected with the world due to sanctions, economics and culture. Even it's major population in the european side is spread over a wide area. Also Eastern european countries don't appear so badly affected so far. It fits the criteria to not be a major COVID-19 case study.
It's the deaths in proportion to cases that are questionable. More than twice the cases we have but less than 20% of the deaths.
Looking at that description of Russia I'm wondering if Russia isn't the country I think it is. Because another way of looking at Russia is it suffers terrible problems in communications between health agencies, government and the populace, it has a huge number of diabetics, their big population centres are also densely populated and it's very well connected to the world even with sanctions, also once you have community spread whether you're connected seems less relevant.
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fishfoodie
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by fishfoodie »

piquant wrote:
BlackMac wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Am I the only one finding the figures from Russia and India as ever so slightly questionable.
I do wonder. It seems too low, on the other hand Russia is an isolationist state, not very well connected with the world due to sanctions, economics and culture. Even it's major population in the european side is spread over a wide area. Also Eastern european countries don't appear so badly affected so far. It fits the criteria to not be a major COVID-19 case study.
It's the deaths in proportion to cases that are questionable. More than twice the cases we have but less than 20% of the deaths.
Looking at that description of Russia I'm wondering if Russia isn't the country I think it is. Because another way of looking at Russia is it suffers terrible problems in communications between health agencies, government and the populace, it has a huge number of diabetics, their big population centres are also densely populated and it's very well connected to the world even with sanctions, also once you have community spread whether you're connected seems less relevant.
And don't forget the shocking state of their Health Service.
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eldanielfire
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Re: Coronavirus Thread. Virus v humans

Post by eldanielfire »

BlackMac wrote:
eldanielfire wrote:
BlackMac wrote:Am I the only one finding the figures from Russia and India as ever so slightly questionable.
I do wonder. It seems too low, on the other hand Russia is an isolationist state, not very well connected with the world due to sanctions, economics and culture. Even it's major population in the european side is spread over a wide area. Also Eastern european countries don't appear so badly affected so far. It fits the criteria to not be a major COVID-19 case study.
It's the deaths in proportion to cases that are questionable. More than twice the cases we have but less than 20% of the deaths.
Other factor is COVID-19 affects and kills mostly old men. Russia is notorious for having a massive death rate among men due to alcoholism, lower than most countries and like a 15-20 year gap with the women. So their most vulnerable group to deaths from COVID-19, is already massively gone.

I do find the figure suspicious, my points are mostly just informed speculation base don the unique conditions in Russia.
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